Dr Kirsten Barnes

Biographical details

Dr Kirsten Barnes is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Sydney, working with Associate Professor Ben Colagiuri. Her research investigates the role of expectancy and learning on the experience of pain and nausea, with focus on electrocutaneous and contact heat pain, as well as models of nausea elicited via Virtual Reality and Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation.

Kirsten holds a B.Sc. (University of Bristol), M.A. (University of London) and a Ph.D. (University of Cambridge) in Psychology. During this period, she amassed 10 years of research experience across multiple grants held at the University of Cambridge. Kirsten is a Co-Investigator on two research grants awarded by the John Templeton Foundation investigating the role of hallucination-proneness, anomalous belief and anxiety on the representation of agency.

Research interests

  • Placebo and Nocebo Effects
  • Virtual Reality Models of Nausea
  • Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation
  • Electrocutaneous and Contact Heat Pain (CHEPS)
  • Pain Modulation
  • Psychophysiology
  • Stress and Anxiety

Teaching and supervision

Kirsten has previous teaching and supervision experience in the following areas:

Honours Supervision: University of Sydney

Co-supervision responsibility of Honours students investigating the role of information framing in VR-induced nausea and attention and rumination in nocebo hyperalgesia.

University of Cambridge, Natural Sciences Tripos, Part II: Biological and Biomedical Sciences [Brain Mechanisms of Psychopathology: Psychosis]

Supervision of Undergraduate students completing Professor Paul Fletcher’s lecture series on Brain Mechanisms and Psychopathology.

University of Cambridge, Natural Sciences Tripos, Part II: Psychology [Part II Projects]

Supervision of students completing the final year empirical project investigating psychophysiological response (EDA and fEMG) and hallucination-proneness.

University of Cambridge, Politics, Psychology, and Sociology Tripos: Undergraduate Final Year Project Supervision

Supervision of final year undergraduate dissertations.

University of Cambridge, Politics, Psychology, and Sociology Tripos, Part IIA: Int1 Research Project

Supervision of second-year Undergraduate empirical research projects.

University of Cambridge, Politics, Psychology, and Sociology Tripos, Part IIA: Methods Paper

Supervision of Undergraduates completing methods assignments.

University of Cambridge, Natural Sciences Tripos, Part II: Statistics Computer Lab Demonstrator

Statistical demonstrations for Natural Sciences Undergraduate students.

University of Cambridge, Politics, Psychology, and Sociology Tripos, Part IIA: Statistics Assignment

Supervision of Undergraduates completing their chosen statistical analyses.

University of Cambridge, Teaching Assistant: SPSS and Statistics Computer Lab Demonstrator

Statistical demonstrations and supervision for second year Politics, Psychology & Sociology (PPS) Undergraduate students.

Awards and honours

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Barnes, K., Faasse, K., Geers, A., Helfer, S., Sharpe, L., Colloca, L., Colagiuri, B. (2019). Can Positive Framing Reduce Nocebo Side Effects? Current Evidence and Recommendation for Future Research. Frontiers in Pharmacology, 10, 167. [More Information]
  • Tang, B., Geers, A., Barnes, K., Colagiuri, B. (2019). Instrumental Control Enhances Placebo Analgesia. The Journal of Pain. [More Information]

2019

  • Barnes, K., Faasse, K., Geers, A., Helfer, S., Sharpe, L., Colloca, L., Colagiuri, B. (2019). Can Positive Framing Reduce Nocebo Side Effects? Current Evidence and Recommendation for Future Research. Frontiers in Pharmacology, 10, 167. [More Information]
  • Tang, B., Geers, A., Barnes, K., Colagiuri, B. (2019). Instrumental Control Enhances Placebo Analgesia. The Journal of Pain. [More Information]

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