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Industry and community projects

Projects and partners

The following projects are 3000 level units. If you’re studying in a Bachelor of Advanced Studies, see information on our 4000 level projects.

Places in each project are limited so we encourage you to register early to avoid missing out. If you can’t see a project when you go to register, it has already reached capacity.

If you have any questions about the projects, you can email pvceducation.enquiries@sydney.edu.au

February intensives

February intensives take place over 4 weeks from the 28 January to the 21 February and are based in Sydney or Melbourne.

Find out how to enrol in an ICPU.

Deloitte – Workplace disruption: how do you want to work?

Globalisation, changes in communication and rapid environmental, technological and social change has disrupted the nature of the workplace and the traditional 'office'. The 'office' does not have to be a physical place where people come to meet and work, but only a place where people can access information, communicate with colleagues and share ideas. However, meeting with people face-to-face and building relationships is an important part of creating and maintaining organisational culture. The term 'virtual office' may sound like a far off, futuristic possibility, however; the truth is that today, more than 50% of Deloitte staff are working from 'somewhere else'. In this project, you will work in interdisciplinary groups to understand the diverse workforce and their unique requirements to create solutions for what Deloitte should strategically be doing to best position themselves to prepare for workplace disruption and the future of 'the office'.

28 – 31 January: on campus
3 – 14 February: at Deloitte offices on George Street
17 – 21 February: a combination of self-directed and on campus learning to be advised by the project supervisor

KPMG, Australian Society of Lifestyle Medicine, GS1 & other consortia partners - Food for thought: rethinking food systems for better health and sustainability

Food is central to family, cultural and community identity. It is essential to sustain life and food-related activities provide income and livelihoods for billions of people. With the continuing rise in global food production and manufacturing to meet increasing demand, there is a pressing need to rethink food systems. In this project, student teams representing unique mixes of disciplines will explore questions such as, how can we influence mass consumer food behaviours? What will be the role of growers, manufacturers, retailers and regulators in the future? Which technologies and innovations (e.g. smart foods, alternative proteins, and personalised nutrition) will be required to transform the food industry? What role can the health and allied professionals play? Through research into these areas, students will provide solutions on how we can rethink food for better health and sustainability. Students will be exposed to the Australian food industry through visits to farms, food processors, manufacturers and markets.

This project will be run in conjunction with Padova University (Italy) and the class will be made up of half University of Sydney students and half Padova University students.

28 January – 14 February: on campus with visits to Australian food industry businesses, farms, food processors, manufacturers and markets.
17 – 21 February: a combination of self-directed and on campus learning to be advised by the project supervisor.

Schroders Sydney – Environmental challenges in the investment sector

Climate change is emerging as an important but complex new variable in decision-making around investment portfolio design and management. Taking into account the environmental impacts of investing, demands for transparency in evaluation of climate risk and the imperative to achieve maximum investment returns creates challenging, and often competing, obligations for investment managers. With $805.9 billion of assets managed globally, a key challenge for Schroders is identifying sustainable strategies, particularly for long-term investors. We need to develop a multi-dimensional understanding of how environmental issues are influencing the investment management sector in order to determine the best advice to clients. Interdisciplinary insights will help us map the ethical, political, economic, legal, social and technological factors that animate a new climate-conscious investment landscape.

For intensive projects, students are expected to attend class Monday to Friday for the full day (exact timing to be determined by your project supervisor).

28 – 31 January: on campus
3 – 14 February: at Schroders offices on Pitt Street
17 – 21 February: a combination of self-directed and on campus learning to be advised by the project supervisor

University of Sydney & Industry Experts – Creating student centred spaces

In Australia and globally, higher education is undergoing a period of radical transformation in terms of the diversification of student cohorts and, as with other sectors of the Australian economy, digital disruption. Paradoxically, mounting calls to move our teaching and learning online come at a time when an increasing number of young Australians and university students are reporting feelings of social isolation and exclusion. University of Sydney students are asking for more fit-for-purpose physical spaces that encourage social activity and collaboration. In this project, you will explore the role of place and belonging in higher education from multiple perspectives in order to reimagine the social fabric of higher education and propose innovative approaches for the redevelopment of university campuses.

For intensive projects, students are expected to attend class Monday to Friday for the full day (exact timing to be determined by your project supervisor).

28 January – 14 February: on campus
17 – 21 February: a combination of self-directed and on campus learning to be advised by the project supervisor

Unfortunately, due to low numbers we have had to cancel Melbourne projects for 2020. If you have any questions, contact Imogen.barwick@sydney.edu.au 

 

July Intensives

July intensives take place over 4 weeks from the 29 June to the 24 July and are based in Sydney or overseas.

Find out how to enrol in an ICPU.

TAD Sydney (Westmead) – Using Assistive Technology to Change Lives

You are young, fit and in the prime of your life. One day at sports practice, you are doing a drill you have done a thousand times before. This time though, you slip and fall. This is what happened to Mark, a rugby league player seven years ago. In an instant, Mark’s life was changed forever; he was paralysed from the neck down. TAD changes the lives of people just like Mark living with a disability by providing personalised technology, equipment and services. TAD has over 100 volunteers who dedicate their time, skills and energy to produce life-changing solutions. New technologies such as microcontrollers, 3D printing and the internet are rapidly transforming solutions for people living with disabilities. TAD is working towards being a provider of innovative technology-based solutions; however, the majority of their volunteer workforce are inexperienced in this area. In this project, you will explore what new and emerging technologies will have the greatest impact on people living with a disability and explore how the changing nature of the volunteering industry can help to produce these solutions.

For intensive projects students are expected to attend class Monday to Friday for the full day (exact timing to be determined by your project supervisor).

This project will be based at the Westmead campus.

29 June – 17 July: based at Westmead campus with visits to TAD offices in Northmead
20 – 24 July – a combination of self-directed and on campus learning to be advised by the project supervisor

WPP Sydney – The Customer Journey

The holy grail for marketing is understanding the customer journey. Put simply it is to understand how people progress along the road from brand choice to brand selection to brand purchase, especially in an online environment. Is this journey (for the most part) linear, or does it vary wildly based on attitudes to money, or mood of the customer at the time of purchase or on other variables such as sustainability concerns or community values? Are these variables different across generations, for example, do the ‘baby-boomers’ behave differently to the ‘millennials’? Can we observe different behaviours in the context of different sectors such as banking, travel, education and retail? In this project, interdisciplinary teams are asked to dig into the complexity of consumer behaviours beyond traditional understandings of ‘rationality’. For example, you might explore the role of emotions, aesthetics or disruptive technologies has on consumer decision-making. Teams are also asked to build innovative and interdisciplinary strategies for how we might positively intervene in the customer journey.

For intensive projects, students are expected to attend class Monday to Friday for the full day (exact timing to be determined by your project supervisor).

29 June – 3 July: on campus
6 – 17 July: based at WPP offices in Millers Point
20 – 24 July: a combination of self-directed and on campus learning to be advised by the project supervisor

July global intensives will take place in China, India, Italy, Singapore the US and the UK. Information on these intensives, the application process and deadlines will be available here in March 2020.

Semester-long projects

Semester-long projects take place over 13 weeks during semester and are usually based at the University of Sydney.

Find out how to enrol in an ICPU.

Accenture – Demand for higher education

Australians will spend 33% more time on education and training across their lifetime by 2030, creating significant potential for Australian universities. This coupled with rising demand driven by population growth and overseas students will put significant pressure on a system already under stress. How will the HE sector respond to this demand? In addition, what will the effect be on our workforce over the years and decades to come? In this project, students will work in interdisciplinary groups to examine the trends influencing the scale and scope of service delivery by the HE sector, and deliver recommendations on how the sector will need to transform to respond to this scale and scope.

9am – 12pm, Monday

Allianz – Mental health and well-being at work

Employee mental health and well-being is imperative for Allianz. As the next generation enters the workforce, a key enterprise-wide focus is on the various factors that affect employee mental health and their well-being at work. Traditionally, mental health focused on individuals and their immediate social, family and environmental sphere of influence. However, the ways in which young people connect, communicate and engage with the world around them has undergone rapid change. Furthermore, current and future generations of young people face increasing socio‐economic, political and environmental uncertainty on a global level. Students in this project will work in interdisciplinary teams to explore a wide range of influences on the next generation’s mental health at work and work to develop a future enterprise-wide strategy for Allianz that will administer a positive impact on the mental health and well-being of the next generation entering the workplace.

9am – 12pm, Wednesday

ANZ Bank – Digital identities

With the rise of online banking, social media, e-commerce and peer-to-peer services, a verified digital identity is a crucial ingredient for any digital platform. Your digital identify allows you to prove who you are when interacting online with businesses, including when making online payments. Banking is one of the areas where the ability to verify one’s identity in a secure manner is a prerequisite to access basic services. In this project, students will work in interdisciplinary groups to provide ANZ with new opportunities for digital identity services including ways to reduce fraud, improve the convenience and security of online interactions and enhance privacy and data security. Students can research the ethical, social, technological and legal aspects of digital identities including ways in which biometrics, geolocation and block chain can be used to enhance the authentication process.

3 – 6pm, Friday

Bauer Media Group - The future of media

From the first printing press to 5G, the media landscape has changed at an accelerating pace. Bauer Media is Australia’s leading multi-platform publisher, with a portfolio of magazines, digital and live experiences. What is the future of content creation, and what role will humans have vs AI? How do we cover important issues like domestic violence and climate change while ensuring business viability in the short and long term? What are the implications of technological developments like 5G for media companies? What print media might young people want to consume in the future? In this project, students will explore a range of technical, social, economic and editorial solutions to provide recommendations for what Bauer Media should be doing to prepare for the future of media.

12 – 3pm, Monday

City of Sydney – The war on waste

Australian’s generate nearly 67 million tonnes of waste every year. While some of that waste is recovered, much of the plastic, paper, glass, food, and other materials end up in landfill. Worst still is the large amount of waste that ends up on our land and ocean environments. This problem is seen most acutely in our cities where business and retail activities are concentrated. What can be done to reduce the amount of waste produced here in Sydney? How can we improve our recycling efforts? What opportunities are there to shift activities in the city away from the traditional use and dispose approach, and move towards a circular economy approach? Our partner for this project is the City of Sydney who works with some of Sydney’s biggest buildings and businesses to improve their sustainability and reduce waste production. In this project, you will work in a group with other students to develop innovative solutions to real life waste problems, ultimately pitching them to the City of Sydney.

12 – 3pm, Wednesday

DXC Technology – The digital university of the future

Higher education is facing disruptive trends and market forces which will create significant change on what, how and where we learn. Online learning, access to cheaper education, globalisation, industry engagement, increased student expectation for their campus experience, and bespoke courses are just some of the drivers for change. Organisations who are able to move quickly and embrace digital transformation to evolve their business model will become the new Industry leaders. In this project, students will research higher education industry trends and market forces and provide insights into potential opportunities available through transformation of university business models and digital transformation. Students can explore a broad range of categories such as curriculum, learning experience, student success, employability, the physical campus and the digital campus of the future.

3 – 6pm, Wednesday

Ernst & Young – Emergence of the smart consumer

EY’s research suggests that changes in how consumers eat, work, play, stay healthy, shop, live, move and use technology all give shape to an emerging ‘smart consumer’. This fast-changing consumer landscape presents a range of complex questions. For example: Do Millennials ‘play’ differently to Gen X?  What are the implications of increasing demands for personalisation on conventional manufacturing systems and supply chain logistics? Are traditional ‘shop-fronts’ still relevant or do we need new approaches to the built-business-environment? What are the ethical limits for delivering to ‘smart consumers’? And, how do geo-political tensions, international trade conditions and wider demographic shifts impact the development of new business strategies? In this project, interdisciplinary teams are asked to identify opportunities and risks for Australian F&B (Food and Beverage) businesses building their brand in the Asia Pacific region. You will have the opportunity to immerse yourself in emerging consumer realities and will draw on multiple disciplines to design and visualise future-focussed solutions.  

9am – 12pm, Thursday

KYUP Project – Future of domestic violence prevention

Family and Domestic Violence is a serious issue that does not discriminate against ethnicity, socio-economic status or geography. Australia has a long and shameful history of domestic violence, ABS Personal Safety Survey reports 40% of women have experienced violence since the age of 15 and family and domestic violence is still the leading cause of preventable death for females aged 15 to 44. If the past is showing us that the intergenerational cycle of violence is strong, what does the future hold?  In this project, you will explore what the future holds for domestic violence prevention in Australia and the different ways in which the Australian government, communities, businesses and individuals can help break the cycle of domestic violence.

9am – 12pm, Tuesday

MS Research Living well with MS

People living with multiple sclerosis (MS) can control and potentially minimise the impact of MS on their lives, which can provide a sense of empowerment and hope. Research shows that there are a number of risk factors that influence the onset of MS, including smoking, UV light exposure, and weight, and that these can be modified through lifestyle changes. However, the role that modifiable lifestyle factors may play in reducing disease activity and disability progression in MS is not well understood. In this project, students are asked to develop an evidence-based, customised, self-management program that integrates key healthy behaviours relevant to the progression of MS that is adaptable to account for individual abilities and symptoms. A key outcome of the program is to support uptake of and adherence to healthy lifestyle behaviours in people with MS.

3 – 6pm, Wednesday

NSW Treasury Corporation (TCorp) – Reimagining social housing

Demand for social housing is on the rise. An increasingly unaffordable rental market, responses to homelessness and fewer social housing vacancies has driven growth in the social housing waiting list, which has now reached 60,000 households. In 2016, the NSW Government launched a 10-year strategy to transform the social housing system called Future Directions for Social Housing in NSW. What is the best way to achieve the government’s vision for social housing transformation? Social housing is a complex problem that sits at the intersection of numerous factors and stakeholder interests. A unique opportunity exists to optimise the rollout of Future Directions through interdisciplinary research to develop innovative, sustainable, ethical, financially viable and client-focused social housing models. Students could explore the social housing planning and consultation process, design fit for purpose social housing infrastructure or research solutions that ensure a healthy and social environment for tenants. 

12 – 3pm, Friday

PTW Architects - Is the world big enough for our growing population?

Inaction on climate change poses significant threats to how we live. It is responsible for the increasing frequency and intensity of natural disasters and is expected to cause unprecedented poverty, famine and mass migration. Our built environment - our homes, our schools, our places of work - and the villages, towns and cities of which they are a part of are contributing to this climate crisis. PTW Architects have joined a worldwide effort to mitigate climate change through sustainable design. In this project, you will examine the role of architecture in developing the cities of the future. You may choose to identify local, regional or global environmental challenges and their impact on European and Asian cities, examine trends in sustainable design, propose a just transition plan, examine the technological advancements that will bring us closer to harmonious solutions or consider the legal and regulatory barriers that prevent more radical change to our built environments.

3 – 6pm, Tuesday

PwC – The Future of Healthcare

The Australian health system is underpinned by a commitment to universal care. Significant services are provided by the private sector that play a large role in improving the wellbeing of the community through the provision of direct medical care (e.g. private hospitals), allied health care in the community (e.g. physio, podiatry, dietitians, etc.), pharmaceuticals and therapeutic devices and other related industries (such as pathology and laboratory services). Public and private sectors are concerned with the efficient use of resources and need to consider the nature of investments to ensure optimal return on economic investment, balanced with excellent health outcomes from health care expenditure whilst addressing issues pertaining to universal access and affordability. This project will seek to generate perspectives on what you consider to be the main issues impacting the health of Australians over the next 2-5 years and seek your views on where the private sector should invest to address the health concerns of the community as part of Australia’s mixed public-private health system.

9am – 12pm, Tuesday

Qantas – Minimising Customer Disruption

In aviation disruption to the flight schedule is normal, global unpredictable events require a real time and decisive approach to minimise the customer impact during the day of operations. Recovering customers to ensure they reach their final destination as soon as possible is an optimisation problem where prioritisation accounting for a variety of competing factors is required to determine the optimal result. In this project, you will design principles, rationale and methodology to solve customer disruptions. You will be considering ethical, customer experience, commercial and operational factors in tandem with potential technical approaches to present a possible solution.

9am – 12pm, Friday

Subaru Automotive – How will we buy cars in 2030?

Today, everything is available at our fingertips. We can get entertainment, fashion, and food without leaving the couch. Why then, would we continue to visit a ‘car dealership’ on the fringe of town every 4 - 5 years to make one of the most expensive purchases in our lives? The automotive industry has remained relatively unchanged since the early 1900’s. However, industry transformation is now underway and accelerating. In this era of change, it is important to reconsider all assumptions and recreate the industry in ways that truly serve the consumer. In this project, students will explore the impact of technology, user experience, environmental design, shopper behaviour, ecommerce and importance of brand as a signifier of self. Student groups are asked the question “How can the buying needs of the future family consumer be best served when it comes to buying their new car while bringing the essence of the Subaru brand to life to help navigate this period of change?”

9am – 12pm, Wednesday

Telstra – The Future of Working Remotely

Working from home offers many benefits and with rapidly changing technology, it is now even easier for employees to work remotely from virtually anywhere in the world.  Greater employee flexibility comes with its own limitations and difficulties. For example, there have been reports that people who regularly work from home experience professional and social isolation, with a lack of collaboration between colleagues. How do we know if working from home is really working? How can employers measure the productivity of their staff? How can employers improve collaboration between colleagues working in multiple different locations? In this project, students will explore technological, social and environmental factors and offer solutions as to how Telstra can best support their employees to create a productive, collaborative, efficient and effective workforce, no matter where they are working.

12 – 3pm, Tuesday

Westmead Redevelopment, NSW Health and WSLHD - Cultural Competence around Health

Historically, the Australian health care system has failed to provide safe and high quality health care for Aboriginal people. Western Sydney Local Health district recognises the right for Aboriginal people to feel culturally welcome, safe and connected when accessing and receiving care. The Westmead Redevelopment Project provides an opportunity to build the cultural competency of Westmead Precinct staff, ensuring our staff have capability to consider the cultural needs, deliver appropriate, safe and quality health care for Aboriginal people leading to improved health outcomes and better experiences of care. One-off training is seen as a starting point but cultural safety is a process that requires ongoing learning. This project aims to develop a cultural competency approach that could be implemented in the orientation plan and sustained throughout the organisation.

2 – 5pm, Monday

This project will be based at the Westmead campus.

Westpac – The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Banking

The booming growth of machine learning and artificial intelligence is both exciting and intimidating. In shifting conventional computing paradigms, can innovations led by AI provide new and lucrative opportunities for businesses across all sectors? A number of clear potential applications for AI already exist for the banking sector: customer service interactions, providing financial advice, mitigating risk and decision-making. In this project, you will work in mixed disciplinary groups to explore solutions that takes advantage of artificial intelligence on banking.

9am – 12pm, Friday

Accenture – Prevention is the best medicine

1 in 2 Australians have a chronic disease, chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease cancer and diabetes are the leading cause of illness, disability and death in Australia. Almost one third could be prevented by removing exposure risk factors such as smoking, high body mass, alcohol use, physical inactivity and high blood pressure. Despite the need, only 1.5% of Australia total health expenditure is spent on prevention. With current and emerging health technologies, we are looking to understand if there are sufficient ways to encourage a healthy lifestyle and ultimately have the potential to educate, prevent and improve healthcare. In this project, you will explore how we as a country make the big shift in health spending to focus on prevention and how do we activate and enable consumers to change their behaviours so they live longer, healthier lives?  

Adobe – Closing the digital skills gap

As we enter an era of integrated digital and physical technologies across all areas of business, production, mobility, and communications, we have already seen whole industries and economies shift rapidly. Currently, with such a lag between education and disruptive technological change within industry, there is a risk that organisations are not ready to harness the full potential of this change. How can technologies be incorporated into education so that the skills shortfall is mitigated, meaning organisations don’t just look to survive, but capture enormous growth instead? In this project, you will investigate the future of education and look to formulate creative and innovative ways that businesses, schools, universities, and governments can tackle industry skills shortages. You are required to provide tangible suggestions and solutions that address the future of education so that human talent aligns with technological advancement.

AGL – Creating a renewable energy future

Climate change is one of the biggest challenges our planet faces. What needs to change to get to zero greenhouse gas emissions? Currently two-thirds of Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions come from our electricity and transport sectors. So how do we ensure our energy systems meet the needs of society whilst not being reliant on fossil fuels? What energy projects may be possible in the future, that were once thought science fiction? Will current electricity and transport infrastructure meet our future needs? What planning needs to happen to ensure industries and communities reliant on existing energy supply chains are not left behind? Working in groups with students from different faculties and backgrounds, you will design your own project to help make a renewable energy future a reality.

ANZ Bank – Digital identities

With the rise of online banking, social media, e-commerce and peer-to-peer services, a verified digital identity is a crucial ingredient for any digital platform. Your digital identity allows you to prove who you are when interacting online with businesses, including when making online payments. Banking is one of the areas where the ability to verify one’s identity in a secure manner is a prerequisite to access basic services. In this project, students will work in interdisciplinary groups to provide ANZ with new opportunities for digital identity services including ways to reduce fraud, improve the convenience and security of online interactions and enhance privacy and data security. Students can research the ethical, social, technological and legal aspects of digital identities including ways in which biometrics, geolocation and block chain can be used to enhance the authentication process.

Cochlear – Improving access to healthcare using digital technologies

As the market leader in implantable hearing solutions, Cochlear is constantly looking for new ways to evolve the hearing care delivery model and make it easier for people with hearing loss to access our technology and get the best possible outcome once they receive an implantable hearing solution. Connected Care is a long-term initiative at Cochlear that aims to use software, mobile apps and other digital health tools to transform the care delivery model for cochlear implants and bone anchored hearing aids. In this project, students will explore the likely future trends of telemedicine and the impact of digital technology on the future access and delivery of healthcare. Cochlear is interested in working with groups of interdisciplinary student groups to explore the future of Connected Care and the potential implications for the Cochlear product and services pipeline.

Herbert Smith Freehills – Disrupting the professional services model

The rise of new technologies has brought and will continue to bring exciting change and benefits. In the context of law, current and emerging technology includes automation, robotics and artificial Intelligence. It is foreseeable that these technologies will influence the current services offered, future workforce roles and requirements in the legal workforce. Herbert Smith Freehills currently have a number of projects being undertaken globally that touch on aspects of ‘disruptions’, but feel that having a new group ‘step back’ and look at the implications more holistically and with an outsiders perspective will be very beneficial. In this project, you will work in interdisciplinary groups to find solutions and provide recommendations for what HSF should strategically be doing to position itself best to compete in the current and future technology driven environment? This project is open to students from all disciplines.

Matilda Centre – Technology and mental health: black Mirror, green Light or white Noise?

The rise of the ‘tech age’, in particular social media, has been one of the most significant technological shifts for young people globally. Adolescents grow up seeing their world, both private and public, through the digital eyes of their peers. At the same time, social media provides an opportunity for teens to stay socially connected, building and sharing a common experience of the world around them. In this project, students will explore to what extent technology is influencing young people’s experience of their private emotional world, the decisions they make around socialisation and the way in which they connect with each other and with the broader world around them. Drawing on a range of perspectives including psychology, education, technology, design, business and health, students will provide solutions as to how social media and digital technologies can be leveraged for good.

NSW Department of Planning, Industries and Environment – Saving koalas

Koalas are perhaps the most recognisable and loved of Australia’s wildlife. They are also emblematic of the impact that humans have had on Australia’s environment in the last two centuries. Koalas sit alongside another 450 species currently vulnerable or threatened with extinction.  Habitat loss from agriculture and mining, urbanisation, disease, invasive species, drought and climate change are all influencing the survival of the koala. To protect koalas natural resource managers are increasingly drawing on broad range of scientific, social, cultural, legal and economic expertise. In this unit, you will work with students from different disciplines on projects that create recommendations to save NSW’s Koala population. You will see researchers working to understand the impacts of disease and drought on koalas (and meet some koalas) and hear from government managers and other stakeholders who hold the fate of koalas in their hands. The skills you learn will be valuable not just for work in conservation but any area of complex public policy involving diverse communities and stakeholders.

QBE – Can we predict the next massive health issue?

More information coming soon

Randstad – Workforce of the future

AI has the potential to deliver tremendous benefits as well as new challenges for the recruitment sector. Today, investment in, development and use of AI has skyrocketed and enabled automation of many steps in the recruitment process. At the same time, concerns about AI-powered solutions and their implications for privacy, job security, control and trust have grown. Will we allow our social media profiles, our psychometric tests, and behavioural predictions to reduce us to a series of data points and run them through a potentially biased system? What are the ethical questions on using a machine to match people into a job? Will we accept machines computing the match? What happens to the role of the recruiter? In what part of the process is the human touch still key? Your team will research and present solutions on what the application of AI/ML will look like in the recruitment process.

United Nations - Elizabeth Broderick & Co - Reproductive health in areas of crisis

More information coming soon

Water NSW – Drought, health and wellbeing in regional Australia

More information coming soon

Westmead Redevelopment, NSW Health and WSLHD – The art of feedback across the medical professions

There is a long-standing worldwide culture of doctors not feeling comfortable providing negative feedback to other doctors. This means that the deficiencies in their clinical knowledge may not be documented in feedback forms, and they slip under the radar because their supervisor did not feel comfortable providing feedback, nor was feedback passed on to the next supervisor for their next rotation. In this project, students will explore way for clinicians to feel more comfortable providing constructive feedback to junior doctors, and how we can ensure junior doctor training records are accessible to the medical education training teams in WSLHD so there are historical records of supervisor reports to guide future supervision of junior doctors.

This project will be based at the Westmead campus

Westpac - The impact of artificial intelligence on banking

The booming growth of machine learning and artificial intelligence is both exciting and intimidating. In shifting conventional computing paradigms, can innovations led by AI provide new and lucrative opportunities for businesses across all sectors? A number of clear potential applications for AI already exist for the banking sector: customer service interactions, providing financial advice, mitigating risk and decision-making. In this project, you will work in mixed disciplinary groups to explore solutions that takes advantage of artificial intelligence on banking.

Semester 1 and 2 2020 project timetable

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