Authored Books

Recent publications from the staff of the Department of Government and International Relations. Books are organised into the department's five major research areas: international relations, public policy, political theory, comparative politics, and Australian politics.

Australian Politics

Australian Politics in a Digital Age

Peter Chen - ANU Press Library - February 2013

Information and communications technologies are increasingly important in the Australian political landscape. From the adoption of new forms of electoral campaigning to the use of networking technology to organise social movements, media technology has the potential to radically change the way politics is conducted and experienced in this country. The first comprehensive volume on the impact of digital media on Australian politics, this book examines the way these technologies shape political communication, alter key public and private institutions, and serve as the new arena in which discursive and expressive political life is performed.

Keeping the Executive Honest: the modern Legislative Council committee system

David Clune - Legislative Council of NSW 2013

Keeping the Executive Honest is the first instalment of the Legislative Council’s Oral History Project. It focuses on the development of committees in the Council. The monograph draws on interviews with five former Members who were integral to the establishment of the committee system: Max Willis, Elisabeth Kirkby, Lloyd Lange, John Hannaford and Ron Dyer.

Almost Like Home: Living in Bradfield Park

Michael Hogan - Ku-ring-gai Historical Society Inc – 2012

The planned garden suburb of Bradfield has disappeared and is now part of Lindfield. This book is about the area between Fiddens Wharf Road and Lady Game Drive, the site of Bradfield Park and it’s many uses. This is the story of the many thousands of men, women and children who lived in an ex-RAAF camp at Bradfield Park in post-war Sydney.



Comparative Politics

Class in Contemporary China

David Goodman - Wiley - October 2014

More than three decades of economic growth have led to significant social change in the People’s Republic of China. This timely book examines the emerging structures of class and social stratification: how they are interpreted and managed by the Chinese Communist Party, and how they are understood and lived by people themselves.

Why Electoral Integrity Matters

Pippa Norris - Cambridge University Press - June 2014

This book is the first in a planned trilogy by Pippa Norris on challenges of electoral integrity to be published by Cambridge University Press. Unfortunately too often elections around the globe are deeply flawed or even fail. Why does this matter? It is widely suspected that such contests will undermine confidence in elected authorities, damage voting turnout, trigger protests, exacerbate conflict, and occasionally lead to regime change. Well-run elections, by themselves, are insufficient for successful transitions to democracy. But flawed, or even failed, contests are thought to wreck fragile progress. Is there good evidence for these claims? Under what circumstances do failed elections undermine legitimacy? With a global perspective, using new sources of data for mass and elite evidence, this book provides fresh insights into these major issues.

America Inc.?

Linda Weiss - Cornell University Press - March 2014

For more than half a century, the United States has led the world in developing major technologies that drive the modern economy and underpin its prosperity. In America, Inc., Linda Weiss attributes the U.S. capacity for transformative innovation to the strength of its national security state, a complex of agencies, programs, and hybrid arrangements that has developed around the institution of permanent defense preparedness and the pursuit of technological supremacy.

The Politics of Party Policy

Anika Gauja - Palgrave Macmillan - March 2013

Anika Gauja examines the complexities and tensions in the relationship between party members and parliamentarians through an in-depth analysis of the structures and processes that shape the development of party policy, and the respective role of members and parliamentarians in the formulation of policy and its transferral to the legislative arena. Providing a timely contribution to the current scholarly and public debate on the future of political parties, the book presents significant new evidence on the challenges facing both established and emerging political parties in encouraging citizen participation in policy development and counters some of the overly simplistic judgments that are often made about participation and disengagement by revealing the complexity of the relationships that are involved in modern party systems.

Symbolism and Regime Change in Russia

Graeme Gill - Cambridge University Press - January 2013

During the Soviet period, political symbolism developed into a coherent narrative that underpinned Soviet political development. Following the collapse of the Soviet regime and its widespread rejection by the Russian people, a new form of narrative was needed, one which both explained the state of existing society and gave a sense of its direction. By examining the imagery contained in presidential addresses, the political system, the public sphere and the urban development of Moscow, Graeme Gill shows how no single coherent symbolic programme has emerged to replace that of the Soviet period. Laying particular emphasis on the Soviet legacy, and especially on the figure of Stalin, Symbolism and Regime Change in Russia explains why it has been so difficult to generate a new set of symbols which could constitute a coherent narrative for the new Russia.

Female Soldiers in Sierra Leone: Sex, Security and Post-Conflict Development

Megan MacKenzie - New York University Press - August 2012

The eleven-year civil war in Sierra Leone from 1991 to 2002 was incomprehensibly brutal€”it is estimated that half of all female refugees were raped and many thousands were killed. While the publicity surrounding sexual violence helped to create a general picture of women and girls as victims of the conflict, there has been little effort to understand female soldiers’ involvement in, and experience of, the conflict. Female Soldiers in Sierra Leone draws on interviews with 75 former female soldiers and over 20 local experts, providing a rare perspective on both the civil war and post-conflict development efforts in the country. Megan MacKenzie argues that post-conflict reconstruction is a highly gendered process, demonstrating that a clear recognition and understanding of the roles and experiences of female soldiers are central to both understanding the conflict and to crafting effective policy for the future.

Making Democratic Governance Work: How Regimes shape Prosperity, Welfare and Peace

Pippa Norris - Cambridge University Press - August 2012

This book focuses on three core questions. Is democratic governance good for economic prosperity? Has this type of regime accelerated progress toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals, social welfare, and human development? Does it generate a peace-dividend and reduce conflict at home? Despite the importance of understanding these questions and the vast research literature generated, remarkably little consensus has emerged about any of these issues. Within the international community, democracy and governance are widely advocated as intrinsically desirable and important goals. Nevertheless, alternative schools of thought continue to dispute their consequences – and thus the most effective strategy for achieving a range of critical developmental objectives. Some believe that human development is largely determined by structural conditions in each society, such as geographic location, natural resources, and the reservoir of human capital, so that regimes have minimal impact. Others advocate promoting democracy to insure that leaders are responsive to social needs and accountable to citizens for achieving better schools, clinics, and wages. Yet others counter that governance capacity is essential for delivering basic public services, and state-building is essential in post-conflict reconstruction prior to holding elections. This book advances the argument that both liberal democracy and state capacity need to be strengthened in parallel to ensure effective development, within the constraints posed by structural conditions.

Strong Society, Smart State: The Rise of Public Opinion in Chinas Japan Policy

James Reilly - Columbia University - 2012

The rise and influence of public opinion on Chinese foreign policy reveals a remarkable evolution in authoritarian responses to social turmoil. James Reilly shows how Chinese leaders have responded to popular demands for political participation with a sophisticated strategy of tolerance, responsiveness, persuasion, and repression–a successful approach that helps explain how and why the Communist Party continues to rule China.

Yemen and the Politics of Permanent Crisis

Sarah Phillips - The Adelphi Series - July 2011

The Middle East is in the midst of considerable and unpredictable changes, but deeply patrimonial political systems do not change overnight – and neither do the international and regional structures that have helped them to endure for so long. The informal rules that guide Yemeni society and its dysfunctional political settlement look set to endure, in spite of unprecedented protests. Entangled in a narrative of acute crisis and possible state failure, the country still relies on foreign assistance to prop up its ailing economy. Fearing the threat from al-Qaeda on Yemeni soil as well as the crisis of the Houthi insurgency and the southern secessionist movement, regional and Western powers have continued to bankroll the regime without taking significant steps to address the underlying causes of instability and threat. Drawing on research carried out on the ground in Yemen, this Adelphi examines the shadowy structures that govern political life and sustain a network of social elites predisposed against any far-reaching systemic reform. It looks behind the scenes at the regime’s opaque internal politics, at its entrenched patronage system and at the ‘rules of the game’ that will shape the behaviour of the post-Saleh rulers, to offer insights for how the West may better engage within that game.

Democratic Deficit: Critical Citizens Revisited

Pippa Norris - Cambridge University Press - February 2011

Many fear that democracies are suffering from a legitimacy crisis. This book focuses on 'democratic deficits', reflecting how far the perceived democratic performance of any state diverges from public expectations. Pippa Norris examines the symptoms by comparing system support in more than fifty societies worldwide, challenging the pervasive claim that most established democracies have experienced a steadily rising tide of political disaffection during the third-wave era. The book diagnoses the reasons behind the democratic deficit, including demand (rising public aspirations for democracy), information (negative news about government) and supply (the performance and structure of democratic regimes). Finally, Norris examines the consequences for active citizenship, for governance and, ultimately, for democratization. This book provides fresh insights into major issues at the heart of comparative politics, public opinion, political culture, political behavior, democratic governance, political psychology, political communications, public policymaking, comparative sociology, cross-national survey analysis and the dynamics of the democratization process.

Tiger Girls: Women and Enterprises in the Peoples Republic of China

Minglu Chen - Routledge - 2011

The existing scholarship on women in China suggests that gender inequality still exists against the background of the country’s reform and opening in recent years. However, the situation of women in enterprise ownership and leadership seems to indicate that despite such notions of disadvantage amongst women, some of them are playing a more active and significant role in China’s economic development. Based on a series of interviews with female enterprise owners, wives of enterprise owners and women managers conducted in diverse locations in three difference provinces of China, Tiger Girls examines the deeper realities of women entrepreneurs in China, and by extension the role of leading women in the workforce.

Symbols and Legitimacy in Soviet Politics

Graeme Gill - Cambridge University Press - 2011

Symbols and Legitimacy in Soviet Politics analyses the way in which Soviet symbolism and ritual changed from the regime's birth in 1917 to its fall in 1991. Graeme Gill focuses on the symbolism in party policy and leaders' speeches, artwork and political posters, and urban redevelopment, and on ritual in the political system. He shows how this symbolism and ritual were worked into a dominant metanarrative which underpinned Soviet political development. Gill also shows how, in each of these spheres, the images changed both over the life of the regime and during particular stages: the Leninist era metanarrative differed from that of the Stalin period, which differed from that of the Khrushchev and Brezhnev periods, which was, in turn, changed significantly under Gorbachev. In charting this development, the book lays bare the dynamics of the Soviet regime and a major reason for its fall.

No Mans Land: Globalization, Territory, and Clandestine Groups in Southeast Asia

Justin Hastings - Cornell University Press - October 2010

The increased ability of clandestine groups to operate with little regard for borders or geography is often taken to be one of the dark consequences of a brave new globalized world. Yet even for terrorists and smugglers, the world is not flat; states exert formidable control over the technologies of globalization, and difficult terrain poses many of the same problems today as it has throughout human history.

In No Man's Land, Justin V. Hastings examines the complex relationship that illicit groups have with modern technology€”and how and when geography still matters. Based on often difficult fieldwork in Southeast Asia, Hastings traces the logistics networks, command and control structures, and training programs of three distinct clandestine organizations: the terrorist group Jemaah Islamiyah, the insurgent Free Aceh Movement, and organized criminals in the form of smugglers and maritime pirates. Hastings also compares the experiences of these groups to others outside Southeast Asia, including al-Qaeda, the Tamil Tigers, and the Somali pirates.



International Relations

American Biodefense: How Dangerous Ideas about Biological Weapons Shape National Security

Frank Smith - Cornell University - July 2014

Biological weapons have threatened U.S. national security since at least World War II. Historically, however, the U.S. military has neglected research, development, acquisition, and doctrine for biodefense. Following September 11 and the anthrax letters of 2001, the United States started spending billions of dollars per year on medical countermeasures and biological detection systems. But most of this funding now comes from the Department of Health and Human Services rather than the Department of Defense. Why has the U.S. military neglected biodefense and allowed civilian organizations to take the lead in defending the country against biological attacks? In American Biodefense, Frank L. Smith III addresses this puzzling and largely untold story about science, technology, and national security.

The Transformation of Global Health Governance

Adam Kamradt-Scott - Palgrave Macmillan - April 2014

The authors examine how health governance is being transformed amid globalization, characterized by the emergence of new actors and institutions, and the interplay of competing ideas about global health. They explore how this has affected the governance of specific health issues, such as HIV/AIDS, pandemic influenza, tobacco control and access to medicines, and how it relates to global governance more broadly. Adopting a multi-layer perspective on global health governance, the authors suggest how global health governance might move forward more effectively.

A Low-Visibility Force Multiplier: Assessing China's Cruise Missile Ambitions

Jingdong Yuan - National Defense University Press (NDU Press) - April 2014

Border Conflicts in a German African Colony: Jacob Morengo and the untold tragedy of Edward Presgrave

Peter Curson - Arena Books - 2012

The story of a young Australian adventurer, Edward Presgrave, who enlisted in an irregular unit in the Boer War and stayed on in the Northern part of the Cape Colony to fight alongside Jakob Morengo and the Nama peoples in their epic guerrilla war against the Germans in German Southwest Africa, or present day Namibia. It records the adventure, sacrifice, deception and betrayal touching on major themes dominating the history of Southern Africa in the early years of the 20th century.

The book vividly describes the Herero and Nama rebellions against the Germans in the years 1903-1907, and the shattering aftermath of concentration, death and work camps and the German policy of genocide. It also details the full cost of the war in human terms to both the Herero and Nama peoples as well as to the German occupiers.



Political Theory

Democracy and Media Decadence

John Keane - Cambridge University Press - October 2013

We live in a revolutionary age of communicative abundance in which many media innovations - from satellite broadcasting to smart glasses and electronic books - spawn great fascination mixed with excitement. In the field of politics, hopeful talk of digital democracy, cybercitizens and e-government has been flourishing. This book admits the many thrilling ways that communicative abundance is fundamentally altering the contours of our lives and of our politics, often for the better.

Climate-Challenged Society

John S. Dryzek, Richard B. Norgaard, and David Schlosberg - Oxford University Press - October 2013

This book is an original, accessible, and thought-provoking introduction to the severe and broad-ranging challenges that climate change presents and how societies can respond. It synthesizes and deploys cutting-edge scholarship on the range of social, economic, political, and philosophical issues surrounding climate change. The treatment is introductory, but the book is written "with attitude", for nobody has yet charted in coherent, integrative, and effective fashion a way to move societies beyond their current paralysis as they face the challenges of climate change.

Anti-Capitalism A Beginner's Guide

Simon Tormey - One World Publications - June 2013

The financial crisis, bank bailouts, and the dash to austerity have breathed new life into protest movements across the globe, and brought anti-capitalist ideas to the mainstream. But what does it mean to be anti-capitalist? And where is anti-capitalism going €” if anywhere?

Human Rights as a Way of Life: On Bergsons Political Philosophy

Alexandre Lefebvre - Stanford University Press - 2013

The work of Henri Bergson, the foremost French philosopher of the early twentieth century, is not usually explored for its political dimensions. Indeed, Bergson is best known for his writings on time, evolution, and creativity. This book concentrates instead on his political philosophy€”and especially on his late masterpiece, The Two Sources of Morality and Religion€”from which Alexandre Lefebvre develops an original approach to human rights.

We tend to think of human rights as the urgent international project of protecting all people everywhere from harm. Bergson shows us that human rights can also serve as a medium of personal transformation and self-care. For Bergson, the main purpose of human rights is to initiate all human beings into love. Forging connections between human rights scholarship and philosophy as self-care, Lefebvre uses human rights to channel the whole of Bergson's philosophy.



Public Policy