Prizes and Scholarships

University of Sydney university medal

The University of Sydney's Department of Government and International relations is very proud of the work of our students. Every year, the department offers a number of medals and named prizes to top performers at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels, in the fields of both public administration and international politics. Below, you will find a comprehensive list of prizes and scholarships offered in the department as well as historical information for each.

For information on scholarships offered by the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Sydney, please visit the SSPS site.

Medals and Prizes

POSTGRADUATE COURSEWORK

Christopher Hood Prize for Postgraduate Coursework

Awarded to the postgraduate student who has the best results in a calendar year in the study of public policy, administration and affairs.

History of Prize: Professor Christopher Hood taught in the Department of Government and International Relations for some years in the 1990s before moving first to the London School of Economics and then to All Souls College at Oxford University. He remains a prolific and influential researcher.

 

 

Hedley Bull Prize for Postgraduate Coursework

Awarded to the postgraduate coursework student with the best results in international politics in a calendar year provided the work is of sufficient merit.

History of Prize: Professor Hedley Bull (1932-1985) was born in Burwood, NSW. He obtained a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Sydney, graduating in 1952. He completed honours courses in both philosophy and history in four calendar years. The most important influence on his thinking was John Anderson, Challis professor of philosophy: his iconoclasm, tough realism, devotion to teaching, and love of grappling with statements of a contrary position in their strongest form, all left a mark on him. Bull later wrote, "My greatest intellectual debt is to John Anderson ... the impact of his mind and example have been the deepest factors in shaping the outlook of many of us whom he taught' (The Anarchical Society: A Study of Order in World Politics, 1977). He taught at the London School of Economics, then Oxford University. (This account is drawn from the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography by Adam Roberts.)

 

AFGW-NSW Education Trust Trish Proctor Memorial Prize for the Most Proficient Woman Student - Postgraduate Coursework

Awarded to the most proficient woman student doing postgraduate coursework study in public policy, administration and affairs in government.

History of Prize: A brilliant student, Tish Proctor was educated at Newcastle's Girls' Grammar School and graduated from the University of Sydney with Honours in Government. She worked in banking for a time and then as a journalist for the Australian Financial Review, mothering three children. Later she tutored in Adult Education through the University of Sydney. She became active in the Australian Federation of University Women, where she was a creative and energetic leader, serving as the New South Wales president. She dealt with adversity when her husband died unexpectedly and then she was diagnosed with cancer. She bore these trials with dignity and good humour until her premature death. Inspired by her example and to keep her memory alive, members of the Australian Federation of University Women established a bequest fund to in her honour in Government at the University of Sydney.

 

 

RN Spann Scholarship

Awarded to a postgraduate student who achieves outstanding results in a calendar year.

History of Prize: Professor Richard (Dick) Neville Spann (1916-1981), who was to become a leading student of publica administration in Australia, arrived from the University of Manchester in 1954 to succeed Percy Partridge as Professor of Government and Public Administration at the University of Sydney. He held this position until his death in 1981. In the field of public administration, Spann's major contributions were made as editor of Public Administration from 1955 to 1975 (later the Australian Journal of Public Administration). From the Oxford Companion to Australian Politics by Murray Goot, 2007.

 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSEWORK

Henry S. Albinksi Prize

Awarded annually for the best undergraduate essay or thesis on Australian foreign or defence policy or Australia-USA relations

History of Prize: Henry S. Albinski headed the Australian Studies Centre at the University of Pennsylvania in the United States for many years and then joined the Department of Government and the University of Sydney in the late 1990s. His works include: Assessing Corporate Political Risk: A Guide for the International Businessman (1986) and Australia's Evolving American Relationship: Interests, Processes, and Prospects for Australian Influence (1994). He was a man who was very popular with colleagues and students for his courtesy, wit, and good will; qualities that he continued to exhibit to the end of his days.

 

 

Emeritus Professor FA Bland Prize for Government III

Awarded annually to the best student completing a major in Government, provided that the work is of sufficient merit. The prize is named for Professor Francis Armand Bland who long served the Department of Government at the University of Sydney. Indeed, he had much to do with creating the department.

History of Prize: Emeritus Professor Francis Armand Bland, public servant, professor, and politician, was born 24 August in MacDonaldtown, Sydney. He did arts and law at the University of Sydney. From 1915, Bland lectured part time on public administration. Bland became lecturer in public administration in 1930 and professor in 1938. He laid the foundations of the Department of Government. Bland believed that universities should aim to provide well-educated candidates rather than technically trained officials.

 

 
Hedley Bull Prize in International Politics

Awarded to the senior student with the best results in international politics in a calendar year, provided the work is of sufficient merit.

History of Prize: Professor Hedley Bull (1932-1985) was born in Burwood, NSW. He obtained a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Sydney, graduating in 1952. He completed honours courses in both philosophy and history in four calendar years. The most important influence on his thinking was John Anderson, Challis professor of philosophy: his iconoclasm, tough realism, devotion to teaching, and love of grappling with statements of a contrary position in their strongest form, all left a mark on him. Bull later wrote, "My greatest intellectual debt is to John Anderson ... the impact of his mind and example have been the deepest factors in shaping the outlook of many of us whom he taught' (The Anarchical Society: A Study of Order in World Politics, 1977). He taught at the London School of Economics, then Oxford University. (This account is drawn from the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography by Adam Roberts.)

 

 

G.S. Caird Award in Third Year Government

Awarded to the best student in Government at the third year level, if work is of sufficient merit, who is proceeding to Government Honours.

History of Prize: George Sutherland Caird (1829-1901), merchant, was born on 5 October 1829 in Greenock, Scotland. He was educated at Greenock Grammar School and the University of Edinburgh. On his arrival in Australia in 1856, he founded the mercantile firm of Caird, Peterson & Co. Caird himself was interested interested and active in fostering higher learning; in 1886 he donated 1000 to the University of Sydney for a scholarship in chemistry, and futher benefactions were made in 1918 by his younger daughter and under her will in 1923. (Derived from G.P. Walsh, 'Carid, George Sutherland (1829-1901)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 3, Melbourne University Press, 1969)

 

 

Public Service Association of New South Wales John S. D'Arcy Memorial Prizes (4)

The four D'Arcy prizes recognise outstanding achievement by second and third year students in Government in Pass and in Honours.

History of Prize: John Synott D'Arcy was born in 1867 and died at 51 years of age at the residence of his sister, Dr Constance D'Arcy, Park Road, Paddington. He was for a number of years secretary of the Navigation Department of New South Wales, and well-known in shipping and commercial circles. He was also the president of what is now the Community and Public Sector Union in 1907 and again in 1915-1916. John D'Arcy joined the Public Instruction Department as a Junior Clerk in 1881, and was appointed Secretary of the Navigation Department in 1910, making him the permanent head of the Department. He was one of the founders of the University Club, known today as the University and Schools Club on Philip Street in the city, and was chairman of the board for more than ten years. He had a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Sydney and always listed it as a matter of pride. His premature death led his family, friends and admirers to create the suite of D'Arcy Prizes in Government.

 

 

Mayer Prize in Political Theory

Awarded to a who student who completes a piece of work with a major theoretical element to an exceptional standard.

History of Prize: Emeritus Professor Henry Mayer (1919-1991), arrived in Australia in 1940 on the Dunera - a fact he never sought to exploit. He became a leading figure in the study of Australian politics and media, a public intellectual, a gadfly and enfant terrible of academia. He stood out as an undergraduate after the war at the University of Melbourne and joined the Deparment of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney in 1950. He was appointed Professor of Political Theory in 1970 and an Emeritus Professor in 1985. Thereafter he served as Visiting Professor of Sociology at the University of New South Wales and Visiting Professor in Mass Communication at Macquarie University.

 

 

 


MEDALS

University Medal

A faculty may recommend the award of a University Medal to a student qualified for the award of an undergraduate honours degree (or some master’s degrees), whose academic performance is judged to be outstanding.