Dr Nick Eckstein

BA (Hons) PhD Monash
Cassamarca Senior Lecturer in Italian History

A18 - Brennan MacCallum Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9351 2155
Fax +61 2 9351 3918

Website Phonebook Entry

Biographical details

Nick previously lectured in history at Monash University and the University of Melbourne. In 1998-1999 he was the Deborah Loeb Brice Fellow in the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies at Villa I Tatti, Florence. He was Robert Lehmann Visiting Professor at Villa I Tatti in 2003, and again in 2006.

He has been awarded a number of research grants, including an ARC Small Grant (1999); an ARC Large Grant (2001-2003); and two ARC Discovery Grants (2005-06; 2008-2010). Nick is the recipient of two Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Teaching Initiatives Award (2001, 2003) and a Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Teaching Excellence Award (2004)

Research interests

  • Social and cultural history of Late-Medieval, Renaissance and Early-Modern Italy, especially Florence.
  • Neighbourhood and social interaction
  • popular religion and lay devotion
  • daily life
  • urban culture
  • the social context of art.

Teaching and supervision

  • HSTY1034 Early-Modern Europe
  • HSTY2612 High Renaissance
  • HSTY2645 Invisible Cities: Imagining Urban Italy
  • HSTY2647 Renaissance Italy
  • HSTY2660 Violence in Italy
  • HSTY4011 Violence in History

Supervision

Nick is currently supervising two full-time PhD candidates, whose projects cover:

  • the performance of urban life and culture in Renaissance Florence (Kate Colleran)
  • Sacrifice in Renaissance Florence (Kate Blake)

Current projects

The Anatomy And Physiology Of Renaissance Florence: The Dynamics Of Social Change In The Fifteenth Century

This project subjects the greatest source of social, economic and urban data on Renaissance Florence – the tax censuses called the Catasto – to serial analysis over the momentous period of the city’s fifteenth-century development. The study incorporates the dynamic of change and also integrates quantitative with ethnographic analysis. This combination aims to produce a history that exposes the structural evolution of central Florence in the sweeping terms of a major statistical analysis, but which also narrates subtle cultural developments and nuances in an ethnographic key.

Associations

PhD and master's project opportunities

Selected grants

2008

  • The Anatomy and Physiology of Renaissance Florence: the Dynamics of Social Change in the Fifteenth Century; Eckstein N; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).

2005

  • Beyond the neighbourhood: the urban histories of sociability and community in renaissance florence, 1400-1500; Eckstein N; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).

2004

  • Art, religion and civic identity in Renaissance Florence: a new interpretation of the Brancacci Chapel; Eckstein N; DVC Research/Research and Development Scheme: Research and Development (R&D).

2001

  • The religious confraternities of high renaissance Florence; Eckstein N; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Large Research Grants (LRG).

Selected publications

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Books

  • Eckstein, N. (1995). The District of the Green Dragon: Neighbourhood Life and Social Change in Renaissance Florence. Florence: L. S. Olschki.

Edited Books

  • Eckstein, N., Terpstra, N. (2009). Sociability and its discontents: civil society, social capital, and their alternatives in late Medieval and early modern Europe. Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers.
  • Eckstein, N. (2007). The Brancacci Chapel: Form, Function and Setting. Acts of an International Conference (Florence, Villa I Tatti, 6 June 2003). Florence: L. S. Olschki.

Book Chapters

  • Eckstein, N. (2009). Pittori, amici e vicini: The Formal and Informal Bonds of Community amongst Florentine Artists. In Terpstra, Nicholas; Eckstein, Nicholas (Eds.), Sociability and its discontents: civil society, social capital, and their alternatives in late Medieval and early modern Europe, (pp. 109-128). Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers.
  • Terpstra, N., Eckstein, N. (2009). Sociability and its Discontents. In Terpstra, Nicholas; Eckstein, Nicholas (Eds.), Sociability and its discontents: civil society, social capital, and their alternatives in late Medieval and early modern Europe, (pp. 1-20). Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers.
  • Eckstein, N. (2007). The Brancacci Chapel: New Questions, Hypotheses and Interpretations. In Nicholas A. Eckstein (Eds.), The Brancacci Chapel: Form, Function and Setting. Acts of an International Conference (Florence, Villa I Tatti, 6 June 2003), (pp. 1-13). Florence: L. S. Olschki.
  • Eckstein, N. (2007). The Brancacci, the Chapel, and the Mythic History of San Frediano. In Nicholas A. Eckstein (Eds.), The Brancacci Chapel: Form, Function and Setting. Acts of an International Conference (Florence, Villa I Tatti, 6 June 2003), (pp. 15-36). Florence: L. S. Olschki.
  • Eckstein, N. (2006). Neighborhood as Microcosm. In Roger J Crum & John T Paoletti (Eds.), Renaissance Florence: A Social History, (pp. 219-239). New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Eckstein, N. (2005). "The Religious Confraternities of High Renaissance Florence: Crisis or Continuity? In Zika, C and Kent, B (Eds.), Rituals, Images and Words: the Varieties of Cultural Expression in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe, (pp. 9-32). Leiden, Netherlands: Brepols Publishers.
  • Eckstein, N. (2003). "Con buona affetione": Confraternities, charity and the poor in early Cinquecento Florence",Eckstein. In Safley (Eds.), The Reformation of Charity: The secular and the religious in early modern poor relief, (pp. 47-62). Boston: Brill.

Journals

  • Eckstein, N. (2011). Three Recent Studies of Italian Society and Religion. Journal of Religious History, 35(4), 614-625. [More Information]
  • Eckstein, N. (2006). Addressing Wealth in Renaissance Florence: Some New Soundings from the Catasto of 1427. Journal of Urban History, 32(5), 711-728.
  • Eckstein, N. (2005). The Widows' Might. Women's Identity and Devotion in the Brancacci Chapel. Oxford Art Journal, 28(1), 99-118. [More Information]
  • Eckstein, N. (2004). Words and Deeds, Stasis and Change: New Directions in Florentine Devotion Around 1500. Journal of Religious History, 28(1), 1-18.

2011

  • Eckstein, N. (2011). Three Recent Studies of Italian Society and Religion. Journal of Religious History, 35(4), 614-625. [More Information]

2009

  • Eckstein, N. (2009). Pittori, amici e vicini: The Formal and Informal Bonds of Community amongst Florentine Artists. In Terpstra, Nicholas; Eckstein, Nicholas (Eds.), Sociability and its discontents: civil society, social capital, and their alternatives in late Medieval and early modern Europe, (pp. 109-128). Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers.
  • Terpstra, N., Eckstein, N. (2009). Sociability and its Discontents. In Terpstra, Nicholas; Eckstein, Nicholas (Eds.), Sociability and its discontents: civil society, social capital, and their alternatives in late Medieval and early modern Europe, (pp. 1-20). Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers.
  • Eckstein, N., Terpstra, N. (2009). Sociability and its discontents: civil society, social capital, and their alternatives in late Medieval and early modern Europe. Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers.

2007

  • Eckstein, N. (2007). The Brancacci Chapel: Form, Function and Setting. Acts of an International Conference (Florence, Villa I Tatti, 6 June 2003). Florence: L. S. Olschki.
  • Eckstein, N. (2007). The Brancacci Chapel: New Questions, Hypotheses and Interpretations. In Nicholas A. Eckstein (Eds.), The Brancacci Chapel: Form, Function and Setting. Acts of an International Conference (Florence, Villa I Tatti, 6 June 2003), (pp. 1-13). Florence: L. S. Olschki.
  • Eckstein, N. (2007). The Brancacci, the Chapel, and the Mythic History of San Frediano. In Nicholas A. Eckstein (Eds.), The Brancacci Chapel: Form, Function and Setting. Acts of an International Conference (Florence, Villa I Tatti, 6 June 2003), (pp. 15-36). Florence: L. S. Olschki.

2006

  • Eckstein, N. (2006). Addressing Wealth in Renaissance Florence: Some New Soundings from the Catasto of 1427. Journal of Urban History, 32(5), 711-728.
  • Eckstein, N. (2006). Neighborhood as Microcosm. In Roger J Crum & John T Paoletti (Eds.), Renaissance Florence: A Social History, (pp. 219-239). New York: Cambridge University Press.

2005

  • Eckstein, N. (2005). "The Religious Confraternities of High Renaissance Florence: Crisis or Continuity? In Zika, C and Kent, B (Eds.), Rituals, Images and Words: the Varieties of Cultural Expression in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe, (pp. 9-32). Leiden, Netherlands: Brepols Publishers.
  • Eckstein, N. (2005). The Widows' Might. Women's Identity and Devotion in the Brancacci Chapel. Oxford Art Journal, 28(1), 99-118. [More Information]

2004

  • Eckstein, N. (2004). Words and Deeds, Stasis and Change: New Directions in Florentine Devotion Around 1500. Journal of Religious History, 28(1), 1-18.

2003

  • Eckstein, N. (2003). "Con buona affetione": Confraternities, charity and the poor in early Cinquecento Florence",Eckstein. In Safley (Eds.), The Reformation of Charity: The secular and the religious in early modern poor relief, (pp. 47-62). Boston: Brill.

1995

  • Eckstein, N. (1995). The District of the Green Dragon: Neighbourhood Life and Social Change in Renaissance Florence. Florence: L. S. Olschki.

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