Current Postgraduate Research

Sharon Aris
Sharon Aris

sari7271@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Sharon Aris has a BA (Hons) and a MA in Policy and Applied Social Research from Macquarie University. The subject of her Masters thesis was how youth rights were presented in NSW parliamentary legislation.

In a career that has included community work and advocacy, policy development and an extended period working as a journalist and television producer she has returned continually to the themes of social issues, shared values and the ideas and practice of community development.

As well as continuing to write, she currently teaches in Sociology at the University of Sydney and Community Services at the Sydney Institute of Technology.

Her research interests include education, intimate and family relations, class and governance structures.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Dr Karl Maton; Dr Craig Campbell
Commenced 2009
Full or part time Part-time
Thesis topic ‘What knowledge? Which knowers? How parents choose a high school for their children’
Abstract

Broadly situated in the sociology of education, the purpose of this study is to examine how parents in Sydney choose a high school for their children. Thus this thesis engages with how families, particularly middle-class families, plan for the next generation and what they consider necessary for their success in the world. Therefore most broadly this study examines how families characterise the individual in the world, the necessary attributes for success and the systems they favour for transmitting such attributes.

The research design and theorising will utilise the tools developed by Pierre Bourdieu, particularly field, capital and habitus; the coding orientations developed by Basil Bernstein; and Legitimation Code Theory (LCT) to provide a language of description and a series of structuring principles to theorise school choice and the key relations contained within this field: those between families and schools and schools and families; relations within families; and the relationship between each of the former to a family’s SES, ethnicity and gender. The field work follows a broadly ethnographic design, with data being collected using a range of qualitative instruments.

Publications As a journalist for many years specialising in social issues Sharon has contributed articles to Good Weekend, The Australian Women’s Weekly, Sunday Life, The Bulletin, Marie Claire, Men’s Health, Australian Good Taste, The Australian Educator and The Independent Monthly. She has written three books: Being Married (2005: Allen and Unwin), It’s My Party and I’ll Knit If I Want To (2002, Allen and Unwin) and Top Jobs (1999, Duffy and Snellgrove).

Mom Bishwakarma
Mom Bishwakarma

mom.bishwakarma@sydney.edu.au
Biography

Mom is a PhD candidate in University of Sydney, Department of Sociology and Social Policy, Australia research focusing on federalism, Identity Politics and Representation of Dalits in Nepal. He has more than 10 years of working experiences in development sectors-UN agencies (UNDP, UNMIN and UNICEF) and NGOs in Nepal specializing project on peace and constitution building, research & study, project management and organizational development. He tend to more focus on research and study on social policy, exclusion and inclusion, minority rights, federal governance, discrimination and would preview to contribute on the development projects around the globe. He has significantly contributed to ameliorate the socio-economic conditions of marginalized community through leadership development, awareness building and advocacy. He is interested in academic research and study as well as development project.

Degree PhD
Supervisors A/Prof. Danielle Celermajer
Commenced March 2013
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic State Restructuring and Federalism in Nepal: Identity Politics and Dalit Representation
Abstract

This research aims to understand the underlying causes and nature of injustices, institutional barriers in consideration of state restructuring and federalism process to draw the specific institutional reforms measures that would bring greater social justice for Dalit in Nepal. This study employs the essential framework of social justice theory posed by social and political theories reifying interrelationship between two dimensions of justice, recognition and redistribution as well as Identity and minority group rights perspectives. The existing literatures relevant to Dalit mostly contextualize the problems and possible solution. However, there is not yet major focus on how the institutional barriers and biases have impacted in the formulation of new reform majors and implementation of existing provisions. This research, thus, will draw its conclusion based on nature and causes of problems and socio-political discourse on state reformation in Nepal. The in-depth interview with current/ex-members of parliament, social and political leaders including community leaders will contribute to explore the phenomenological experiences of Dalits in relation to policy formulation and its effective implementation. Beside that the discourse analysis will further help to build up substantive analysis of the research.

Publications

Referred Articles

  • Bishwakarma, M. (upcoming 2014). Contentious Identity Politics in Federalism Discourse: Challenges for Constitution Building in Nepal. Federal Governance, 10:(pages to be determined).
  • Bishwakarma, M. (2012). Dalit Rights Perspectives in course in Nepal. Participation, 13:80-87.
  • Bishwakarma, M. (2011). Comparative Study of Dalit Education in Nepal. Social Science Research Network online.
  • Bishwakarma, M. (2006). Dalit Development Assistance: Opportunities and Challenges. Jana Utthan National. Kathmandu: JUP Nepal.

Joint Research Book

  • T.Sunar, B. Lamgade, M. Bishwakarma (2007). Situation Analysis of Caste Based Discrimination Cases in Nepal, Kathmandu: LANCAW Nepal.

Non-referred Articles in National Daily Newspaper

  • Bishwakarma, M. (2014). Rational of Harmony Day in Nepal. Nepalipatra, p. 10.Sydney.
  • Bishwakarma, M. (2014). Proportional Representation System and Dalit. Annapurna Post Daily, p. 05.Kathmandu.
  • Bishwakarma, M. (2013). Ethnic Federalism: Illusion and facts. Annapurna Post Daily, p. 05.Kathmandu.
  • Bishwakarma, M.(2013). Caste Discrimination in Diaspora. Kantipur Daily, p. 07.Kathmandu.
  • Bishwakarma, M. (2013). Conflict and Consensus. The Kathmandu Post, p. 07. Kathmandu.
  • Bishwakarma, M. (2011).Dalit in Federalism Discourse. Telegraph Weekly, p.20.Kathmandu.
  • Bishwakarma, M. (2003).Nepali Society and Practices of Discrimination. National Daily Rajdhani, p.10. Kathmandu

Margaret Boulos
Margaret Boulos

mboulos@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

I have been involved in a number of projects undertaken in the spirit of community engagement and the development of public policy including my thesis which was part of a larger ARC-funded project which produced a unique Australian dataset, the results of which formed the only empirically-derived submission to the Legislative Review Committee in 2011.

I am interested in pursuing research about rituals surrounding the circulation of human tissue to examine materiality, circulation and the self. I am equally interested in exploring the community-building capacity of Australian institutions such as the Country Women’s Association.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Catherine Waldby; Ian Kerridge
Commenced 2008
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic "‘Good eggs’: women, altruism and the conduct of research into Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in Australia"
Abstract

My thesis discusses the factors that have thus far inhibited the altruistic-donation of oöcytes for this ground-breaking research. I argue contrary to the supposed reliance of anonymised collective endeavour, that much tissue provision to scientific research is done within contexts of a specified benefit or beneficiary (in both positive and negative ways). I claim that the model of the disinterested citizen does not adequately capture the motivations and relationships between individuals and institutions existing in a ‘scientific’ society.

Publications
  • Boulos, M., Kerridge, I. and Waldby, C. (forthcoming) ‘Reciprocity in Australian reproductive oöcyte provision’, in Nash, M. (ed.) Reframing Reproduction: sociological perspectives on gender, sexuality and reproduction in late modernity, Palgrave Macmillan
  • Boulos, M. (forthcoming) Review of The global biopolitics of the IUD: how science constructs contraceptive users and women’s bodies, by C. Takeshita for Feminist Theory.
  • Waldby, C., Kerridge, I., Boulos, M., and K. Carroll (forthcoming) ‘“I just wouldn’t do it for nothing”: Fertility patients, clinicians and young women’s ideas about payment for research eggs’ for Social Science and Medicine

  • Boulos, M. (2010) ‘On the periphery: egg donation for reproduction and the nuclear family’, Conference Proceedings for The Australian Sociology Association December 6-9th 2010.

Estelle Carpi
Estelle Carpi

Estella.carpi@sydney.edu.au
Biography

Estella worked at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Regional Office based in Cairo (2008) for the Trade and Human Development Monitor Project, meant to enhance small and medium enterprises in the Arab world. She also worked as a Junior Consultant for the International Development Research Center (IDRC) based in Cairo (2009-2010) for a project aimed at strengthening and supporting social protection systems in Egypt, Lebanon, Yemen, Morocco and Algeria. Estella has studied Arabic for 5 years at the University of Milan (2002-2007) and at the University of Damascus (2005 and 2007). She has been a PhD Fellow at the American University of Beirut, while conducting her fieldwork (September 2011-February 2012) at the Social and Behavioral Studies Center (AUB).

Degree PhD
Supervisors Michael Humphrey; Laura Beth Bugg
Commenced August 2010
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic ‘Local Responsiveness to Humanitarian Intervention in Lebanon. Beirut’s Southern Suburbs and a little village of ‘Akkar: a comparative study.’
Abstract

Estella is currently exploring how the experience of humanitarianism has been experienced from within in the everyday life of people living in Beirut’s Southern Suburbs, stricken by Israeli attacks in the summer 2006; she is also comparing it to the local perception of humanitarian assistance in a northern village of ‘Akkar, North Lebanon, current destination of thousands of Syrian refugees.

Publications

Magdalena Arias Cubas
Magdalena Arias Cubas

mari4283@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Originally from Mexico, Magdalena holds a Bachelor degree in Economics & Social Sciences with first class Honours in Political Economy. In addition to her studies, she has worked as a tutor for the Department of Political Economy and as a research assistant for the project ‘Social Transformation and International Migration in the 21st Century’. Recently, she was awarded a 2013 Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Postgraduate Teaching Fellowship with the Department of Political Economy. Her research interests include political economy, migration, labour, indigenous and development studies.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Stephen Castles; Tim Anderson
Commenced 2011
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic Transforming Rural Mexico – Indigenous Migration to the United States
Abstract

This project explores the link between social transformation and international migration in rural Mexico since the 1980s to develop a human-centred understanding of the relationship between migration and development. It focuses on analysing the impact of these interconnected processes on the well-being of Mexico’s Indigenous population, in particular that of Indigenous migrants and their relatives, in communities of both origin and destination. The central case study concerns Mixteco migrants from the state of Oaxaca (Mexico) to the state of California (USA).

Publications
  • Arias Cubas, M. (2012) ‘Recent Developments in Mexico’s Diaspora Policy’ in Oh, J. (Ed.) Special Issue II: Diaspora as Focus Area of National Migration Policy, IOM Migration Research and Training Centre: Goyang-si, p. 239-262.
  • Castles, S., Arias Cubas, M. Kim C. & Ozkul, D. (2012) ‘Irregular Migration: Causes, Patterns and Strategies’ in Omelaniuk, I. (Ed.) Reflections on Migration and Development, Springer: New York, p. 117-151
  • Arias Cubas, M. (2012) ‘Migration and “Well-Being” - the Experience of Mixteco Migrants in the United States’, Presented at The Second International Sociological Association Forum of Sociology: Social Justice and Democratization, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1-4 August.
  • Williamson, R., Ozkul, D., Koleth, E., Kim, C., Castles, S., & Arias Cubas, M. (2012) ‘Operationalising the Study of Social Transformation and International Migration in the 21st Century’, Presented at The Second International Sociological Association Forum of Sociology: Social Justice and Democratization, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1-4 August.
  • Arias Cubas, M. (2011) 'Thinking Beyond Remittances: Exploring and Contesting the Relationship between Migration and Development', in Proceedings for the 10th Australian Society of Heterodox Economists Conference, Australian Society of Heterodox Economist: Sydney.
  • Arias Cubas, M., Castles, S., Kim, C., Koleth, E., Ozkul, D. & Williamson, R. (2011) ‘Understanding Contemporary Social Transformation: Scaling up Polanyi’s Great Transformation’, in Proceedings for the Annual Conference of The Australian Sociological Association 2011: Local Lives / Global Networks, The Australian Sociological Association: Newcastle.
  • Arias Cubas, M., Castles, S., Kim, C., Koleth, E., Ozkul, D. & Williamson, R. (2011) ‘Migration and Social Transformation: Methodological Dilemmas’, Presented at Knowledge/Culture/Social Change International Conference, University of Western Sydney, 7-9 November.
  • Castles, S., Arias Cubas, M., Kim, C., Koleth, E., Ozkul, D. & Williamson, R. (2011) ‘Karl Polanyi’s Great Transformation as a Framework for Understanding Neo-Liberal Globalisation’, Working Paper 1, Social Transformation and International Migration Project, University of Sydney.

Anna-Kristin David
Anna-Kristin David

adav2830@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Originally from Germany, Anna lived and studied in London for many years before moving to Australia. Anna has degrees in politics and history, education and psychology and is a trained psychotherapist. Anna’s work experience and interests to-date have centered on education and personal and professional development. This includes extensive, international experience as an organization development consultant with a special interest in change management and leadership development. More recently Anna has been teaching as a ‘sessional academic’ in the area of management and organization studies at the University of Sydney and abroad.. She is currently employed as a lecturer on a fixed term contract at the University of Sydney Business School in the Discipline of Work & Organisational Studies.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Dr Karl Maton
Commenced 2013
Full or part time Part-time
Thesis topic The Recontextualization of Kurt Lewin’s Work by Organization Development (OD)
Abstract

Broadly situated in the sociology and history of (management) knowledge, this study aims to explore the theoretical foundations of organization development, a sub-field of management and organization studies and a consulting approach and practice. The research focusses on studying the processes of selection and recontextualization of the work of the social psychologist Kurt Lewin (1890-1947) who is regarded as the father of Organization Development. Thus, the study aims to analyse Kurt Lewin’s work and the organizing principles of his theories as well as the processes of its transformation and the effects of this on his work and OD. The study proposes that Kurt Lewin's relation to OD is an example of broader significance regarding the development of management knowledge and how it draws on and utilizes various disciplines and concepts while looking towards ensuring professional applicability and relevance.

While there has been a social-constructionist interest in how management knowledge is constructed since the late 1970s, this critique has been mainly concerned with an externalist, sociological explanation of knowledge that reduces knowledge to power relations, or even collapses power and knowledge. Studies of knowledge themselves are now often seen to be conservative and essentialist, for example, intellectual histories of decontextualized ideas. However, by applying Legitimation Code Theory (LCT) as a conceptual framework, the proposed study aims to go beyond the above conceptual limitations and make knowledge an object of study itself and understand its shaping function by analysing its structure and organizing principles as part of a relational field approach.

Publications

Laura Davy
Laura Davy

ldav5252@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Laura completed a Masters in Political Theory at the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2012, where her dissertation focused on how people with disability are marginalised in mainstream political philosophy. She also holds a Bachelor of Arts in Communication with First Class Honours in Social, Political and Historical Studies from the University of Technology, Sydney. Her Honours thesis explored the need for human rights discourses to be combined with concepts of social interdependence and responsibility to be effectually empowering for people with intellectual disability.

Laura is a part-time Research Associate at the City Futures Research Centre, University of New South Wales. During her Masters degree she worked as a Research Assistant at the Complexity Research Centre, LSE. She has also taught in the undergraduate Communications programme at UTS, and worked in the disability advocacy sector. Her research interests include human rights theory and practice, critical disability studies and disability rights, and feminist moral and political philosophy.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Danielle Celermajer; Dinesh Wadiwel
Commenced 2013
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic The Independent Citizen? Intellectual disability and representations of the disabled subject in Australian political discourse
Abstract

This research examines how people with disability, particularly intellectual disability, are positioned in the political language and aims of government and the disability movement. It confronts some key tensions between disability activism, government rhetoric and the lived experience of people with intellectual disability and their families and carers around independent autonomy as a political goal for the individual. The project aims to construct a political philosophy that places the social inclusion of people with intellectual disability at its centre, and explore the implications of this for traditional conceptions of political representation and participation.

Publications
  • Mitleton-Kelly, Eve, & Davy, Laura. (2013). The Concept of 'Co-evolution' and its Application in the Social Sciences. In E. Mitleton-Kelly (Ed.), Co-evolution of Intelligent Socio-technical Systems: Modelling and Applications in Large Scale Emergency and Transport Domains. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Walls, Rachel, Millikan, Lyndal, Bridge, Catherine, & Davy, Laura. (2013). Home Modifications in Aboriginal Housing. Occasional Paper. Sydney: Home Modification Information Clearinghouse, University of New South Wales.
  • Judd, Bruce, Liu, Edgar, Easthope, Hazel, Davy, Laura, & Bridge, Catherine. (upcoming 2013). Downsizing amongst older Australians. AHURI Final Report (Report no. to be assigned). Melbourne: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute.
  • Judd, Bruce, Adams, Toni, Bridge, Catherine, Davy, Laura, & Liu, Edgar. (2012). Downsizing amongst older Australians. AHURI Positioning Paper No. 150. Melbourne: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute.
  • Bridge, Catherine, Davy, Laura, Flatau, Paul, Judd, Bruce, Morris, Alan, & Phibbs, Peter. (2011). Age specific housing and care for low to moderate income older people. AHURI Final Report No. 174. Melbourne: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute.
  • Davy, Laura, Bridge, Catherine, Judd, Bruce, Flatau, Paul, Morris, Alan, & Phibbs, Peter. (2010). Age specific housing for low to moderate income older people. AHURI Positioning Paper No. 134. Melbourne: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute.

Tristan Enright
Tristan Enright

tristan.enright@sydney.edu.au
Biography

Tristan was awarded a Bachelor of Arts (Honours Class 1 and University Medal) in Sociology in 2009 by The University of Sydney. He began his PhD in 2010, having been awarded an Australian Postgraduate Award and University Merit Scholarship. His PhD thesis reflects his broader research interests in political, economic, cultural and historical sociology, and his narrower interests in the sociology of knowledge, education, and Australian social policy. Since 2010, Tristan has also been an active member of the Department of Sociology and Social Policy’s teaching staff, with experience as an academic tutor, lecturer, and the coordinator of units of study taught in the Sydney Summer and Winter School. Since mid-2013, he has been engaged as a research associate on the international, ARC-funded Global Arenas of Knowledge project being led by Professor Raewyn Connell and Associate Professor Fran Collyer.

Degree Doctor of Philosophy
Supervisors Dr Melinda Cooper
Commenced 2010 (currently on leave)
Full or part time Part-time
Thesis topic Competition, Knowledge and The ‘Marketised’ University
Abstract

For decades now the international and Australian systems of higher education have been under the powerful sway of the market, with higher education being conceived as the engine room of national (and private) wealth generation and competitive advantage vis-à-vis the production of ‘human capital’ and ‘intellectual property’. Broadly speaking, this turn of affairs has been understood as the result of the rise of neoliberalism, a nebulous system of thought extolling the virtues of a competitive, market-conforming social order as the last great line of defence for the protection of individual (economic) freedoms. While this may well be the case, my research takes this now taken for granted position as its point of departure insofar as I seek to interrogate the socio-historical process by which the ostensibly neoliberal idea of knowledge as a tradeable, monetised commodity – rather than the products of its application – became entrenched in the political, if not popular, imagination. Towards this end, the research takes the ‘marketisation’ of the (Australian) university as an empirical case to be studied instrumentally in the service of advancing an analytical framework capable of systematically accounting for the ideas, actors, and institutions relevant to this process, at the same time as foregrounding the significance of both historicity and the passage of time that any such process entails.

Publications

Mark Gawne
Mark Gawne

mgaw1933@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Mark has a varied, itinerant work history, but since 2008 has taught in Sociology and Political Economy. He did his undergraduate with class 1 honours at the University of Wollongong, and was awarded a scholarship for PhD research at USYD. He has a long-standing interest in Marxist political theory and critique, influenced by the school of Operaismo and class compositionist analysis, or autonomist Marxism.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Melinda Cooper; Craig Browne
Commenced 2008
Full or part time Part-time
Thesis topic Intimate arrangements of work and class in precarious times: composition, value and affect
Abstract

This thesis develops a critical engagement with post-workerist theories of contemporary, namely ‘immaterial’ and ‘affective’, theories of labour. In doing so, it creates a framework through which to understand and analyse contemporary arrangements of class, work and reproduction, or the shifting relations of what is often called post-Fordism, and contributes to contemporary theorisations of labour and work. One of the salient debates concerning a contemporary critique of labour is that which has drawn connections between affect, work and capital. This thesis engages this debate through drawing together the insights of compositionist analysis, or autonomist Marxism, with those of the Marxian value-form theorists, whilst addressing the limitations of each of these respective schools of thought. However, within this thread as well as weaved with it, the analysis throughout also develops a critical reading of affect theory and feminist and queer critiques of political economy. This broader theoretical context allows for a more substantial analysis of the intimate arrangements of the relations of re/-production.

Publications
  • ‘The modulation and ordering of affect: from emotion recognition technologies to the critique of class composition’, Fibreculture, 21: 2012

Nao Kasai
Nao Kasai

nkas3997@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Nao Kasai completed her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Social Engineering at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and was awarded a scholarship to study at the University of Sydney. Before coming to Sydney, she was engaged in a sponsored research project concerning homeless support systems in advanced countries including Australia, UK and US. Her research interests include civic/nonprofit activities, community development, social inequalities and urbanism.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Gyu-Jin Hwang; Greg Martin
Commenced July 2011
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic The Promotion Policy of Civil Society and Its Local Effects and Consequences: Citizen Activities in Addressing Homelessness in Japan
Abstract

The study takes a close look at civil society activities to tackle homelessness in Japan and examines roles of civil society in addressing social exclusion. Japan has a distinctive pattern of civil society comprising many small organisations and the case may highlight communitarian functions of civil society. The study draws on in-depth interviews with government agencies and voluntary organisations working with homeless people. Answers to the following questions will be sought: What is the implication of emerging presence of civil society in solving social exclusion? And how can we understand the Japan’s case considering its distinct nature of civil society?

Publications
  • Kasai, N., & Dohi, M. (2011). A Study on Rough Sleeping Policies and the Actual Support Systems for Rough Sleepers in London [in Japanese]. Journal of the City Planning Institute of Japan, 46(3), 1021-1026.
  • Kasai, N., Sugita, S., & Dohi, M. (2010). A Study on the Actual Conditions of Support for Homeless Persons in Australia [in Japanese]. Journal of the City Planning Institute of Japan, 45(3), 757-762.

Chulhyo Kim

ckim1306@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Prior to coming to Sydney, Chulhyo worked with International Organization for Migration for developing research and training projects on labour and marriage migrations. He also worked for MINBYUN-Lawyers for a Democratic Society as refugee legal service coordinator; and Amnesty International as campaign coordinator. Chulhyo received an MA in the Theory and Practice of Human Rights from the University of Essex and a BA in Sociology from Seoul National University. He currently works as a research assistant for the Social Transformation and International Migration research project. He has worked as a sessional teacher in sociology at the University of Sydney and in NGO studies at Sungkonghoe University, South Korea.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Stephen Castles; Kiran Grewal
Commenced July 2010
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic Social Transformation and International Migration in South Korea: A Human Rights Movement Perspective
Abstract

This project first seeks to analyse the links between neo-liberal structural changes in South Korean society and the increased incoming temporary migration. South Korean government introduced the temporary labour migration schemes in the context of the redundancy, the precarisation and casualisation of work, the bankruptcy of small and medium sized industries after 1997 Asian Financial Crisis. The social consequence of the commodification of labour was the destruction of human rights standards at work, public or private spaces. The governments’ responses were highly motivated by ethno-centric, patriarchical and paternalistic approaches. The project also reviews on the countermovement aspect. While the overwhelming trend of civil society groups is the shift to service-provision with benevolent and paternalistic approaches in line with government direction, there are also increasing groups of xenophobic responses. In the mean time, the project’s particular focus is a small group of activists who seek the organisation and empowerment of the temporary migrant workers using the language of rights. Though this process, South Korean social movement rediscovers a possibility to extend its definition of human rights beyond the national boundary.

Publications

Sohoon Lee
Sohoon Lee

sohoon.lee@sydney.edu.au
Biography

Sohoon’s areas of interest are migrant women in Asia and the dynamics between labour and women’s rights, migration laws and illegality, social movement and atypical forms of resistance. She has undertaken consultancy with the UN Women, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES), and other NGOs to write on topics of migrant domestic workers, intersectionality and discrimination and labour rights protections in South Korea.

Prior to her PhD studies, she worked at Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA) in areas of ASEAN human rights mechanisms, indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia, and documentation of human rights violation. She completed her Hon. B.A. with high distinction in Asia-Pacific Studies at the University of Toronto and Master of Human Rights and Democratisation (Asia-Pacific) at the University of Sydney. During her previous studies, she has undertaken research on multicultural (damunhwa) policies and ‘new’ nationalism in South Korea, return migrants and bottom-up development in Indonesia, and NGO-Trade Union relationship in migrant movement in South Korea.

Degree PhD
Supervisors A/Prof. Nicola Piper; Dr. Deirdre Howard-Wagner
Commenced July 2012
Full or part time Full-time
Thesis topic Against Discourse of Legitimacy: Resistance of “Illegal” Migrant Women in South Korea (working title)
Abstract

This research examines the interactive process between (il)legality, rights consciousness and collective subjectivity over the course of migrant women’s resistance against the state-led legal discourse on membership in South Korea. By conceptualising membership as a relational process with multiple dimensions such as gender, ethnicity and class, I examine the process in which legality and membership are negotiated and migrant women come to establish their subjectivity. This research seeks to encapsulate dynamics of resistance, which forms as a response to contradictory migration laws that on one hand limit migrants’ stay to temporary/circular but on the other encourage women to carry on subsumed reproductive role of South Korean society. This research postulates that intersecting identity of migrant women as migrants and women, along with further “axes of subordination”, creates a unique form of resistance inside and/or outside of the archetypes not only of migrant movement but of general social movement. My ethnography specifically focuses on enclaves of migrant communities in sectors that are ‘traditionally’ regarded as women’s work, such as textile industry, care work, entertainment work and farm work in three sites in Seoul and surrounding Gyeonggi Province.

Publications Commissioned Report/ Policy Paper

Referred Journal

  • Lee, Sohoon (2012) “Those Who Can Become “Foreign Koreans”: Globalisation, Transnational Marriages, and Shifting Nationalist Discourses in South Korea. Theory in Action 5:3

Book Chapters

  • Lee, Sohoon (forthcoming) “Asian Democracy and the Problem of Membership: Rules of Exception and “Legitimate” Discrimination against Migrants in South Korea” in Arvanitakis, James; Boydell, Spike; Mathews, Ingrid (eds) Citizen in the 21st Century.
    Ebook. Inter-disciplinary.net [draft title: accepted for publication]

Joint Report

  • Azhar, Haris; Ginbar, Yuval; Lee, Sohoon; Sigiro, Atnike; Yap, Swee Seng (2010) Hiding Behind Its Limits:Performance Report on ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR). Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development: Bangkok

Non-referred Articles

  • Lee, Sohoon (2010) “A Reality of Becoming Citizens: An Experience of Birth Registration ofthe Indigenous Peoples” Asian Human Rights Defenders V.6(2) Dec. 2010. FORUMASIA. Bangkok, Thailand

Nu Nguyet Anh Nguyen
Nu Nguyet Anh Nguyen

nngu5002@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

During her undergraduate course, she was awarded scholarship to study in Deajeon University, South Korea (2004) and awarded scholarship from Sumitomo Corporation, Japan (2004).

In graduate level, Ms. Nguyen was granted Toshiba Scholarship (2007) and completed Master of Sociology from Ho Chi Minh National University (2010). Besides, she also obtained Scholarship of Academic Exchange Fellowship Program 2009 from ASEAN University Network for her research on Vietnamese women married to Korean men, conducted in South Korea.

In 2012, she achieved Australia Scholarship for Development, for her Master of Philosophy and PhD of Sociology.

Degree MPhil
Supervisors Associate Professor Nicola Piper
Commenced March 2012
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic Vietnam – South Korea Transnational Migration: Determinants and Cross-cultural Experiences
Abstract

The research is a study of the determinants of migration to South Korea of Vietnamese labourers and their cross-cultural experiences. It aims to explore the decisive factors of mobility as well as the social and cultural impact of cross-cultural experiences for Vietnamese temporary migrant workers. Those two objectives are carried out at three different stages of the migration process: pre-departure, actual migration and return migration.

Publications
  • Nguyen Nu Nguyet Anh. Current Issues of Marriage Migration in Vietnam in the 2010 ARENA International Workshop From Individual to Community: On Reinterpreting Citizenship and Asian Marriage Migration. 4-5 June 2010 in Pusan, Korea. P.27-31.
  • Nguyen Nu Nguyet Anh. 2011. Life of Vietnamese Brides in Korea in The Update on ASEAN and Korean Studies: 2010. ASEAN Universities Network. P. 242-294

Derya Nizam
Derya Nizam

dniz1191@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Derya holds the University of Sydney International Research Scholarship. She has awarded for Ronald Wimberley Best Graduate Student Paper by the USA Rural Sociological Society in 2012. Derya has a BA (Honours) and M.A. degree in Sociology from Bogazici University, Istanbul. She participated as a researcher in two important research projects on “Globalization and Agriculture” and “Agrarian Change under Globalization” funded by the Scientific and Technological Research Foundation of Turkey (TUBITAK). She conducted various fieldworks and interviews with more than 500 farmers and other rural actors throughout Turkey. Her research experience focused on the effects of market reform legislations implemented in the Turkish agricultural sector beginning in the 2000s. She is further interested in agro-business appropriation and substitution strategies, anti-essentialist eco-feminism, localism and the agro-exceptionalist methodologies in rural sociology.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Salvatore Babones; Elisabeth Valiente-Riedl (assoc. supervisor)
Commenced 2011 March
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic How ‘geographical indicators’ (GIs), as a localist strategy to challenge conventional agricultural practice due to their explicit reference to place or territory, can strengthen the position of local growers in global markets
Abstract

An understanding of geographical indicators (GIs) protection has been increasingly confronted with new challenges not only in harmonizing a global policy of GI but also in meeting demands relating to more environmental, cultural and socially equitable agriculture all around the world. This thesis identifies a policy goal of GI to capture more added value derived from local sources by creating resource and policy rents in economic, cultural and environmental terms. For this aim, the thesis presents a case study of Aegean Olive Oils GIs in Turkey using a disarticulation approach based on global commodity chain analysis. The thesis argues that GI can be a means of sustaining the viability of small farming and rural livelihoods only if resource and policy rents are disarticulated from the agro-business strategies of appropriation and substitution.

Publications
  • 2012. “Localization of Resource and Policy Rents: Geographical Indicators of ‘Aegean Cotton’ and ‘Aegean Olive Oils’”. (Ronald Wimberley Graduate Paper Award by the Rural Sociological Society
  • 2011. “Cografi Isaretler ve Kuresel Piyasalarda Yerellesen Tarim Urunleri” [Geographical Indications and Localized Agricultural Products in Global Markets], Praksis, 25:87-116.
  • 2009. Protection of Geographical Indication: A Study of “Aegean Cotton Mark”, Istanbul: MA. Thesis, Bogaziçi University: Sociology.
  • 2008. with Islamoglu, Huri, E. Guloksuz, A.Y. Kaya, U. Karakoc, D. Nizam, A. Cavdar ve G. Yazici. TUBITAK Proje Raporu: Turkiye’de Tarımda Donusum ve Kuresel Piyasalarla Butunlesme Surecleri: [The Project Report of Transformation and Integration with Global Markets in Turkish Agriculture] (Proje No.106K137). http://uvt.ulakbim.gov.tr/uvt/index.php?cwid=3&vtadi=TPRJ&ts=1358248685&
  • 2006. “Devrimin Dikisleri: Laclau and Mouffe” [The “Sutures” of the Revolution: Laclau and Mouffe] ,Birikim, 208:156-163.

Olga Oleinikova
Olga Oleinikova

oole8615@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Olga holds Bachelor and Master degrees with first class Honours in Sociology from KNU (Kiev National Taras Shevchenko University, Ukraine). In 2012 Olga joined the Department of Sociology and Social Policy with the University of Sydney International Research Scholarship. She specializes in social research with a particular interest in international migration, post-socialist social transformations, social change, post-Soviet migration to Australia, life-course and gender. She has experience in quantitative and qualitative research on labour migration in EU (Italy and Poland) and marginalization processes in contemporary Ukrainian society. Her professional experience includes work in social and market research companies. Before coming to Sydney, she worked as a research manager assistant in quantitative and qualitative Ad Hoc research divisions at Taylor Nelson Sofres Ukraine (TNS).

Degree PhD
Supervisors Catriona Elder; Deirdre Howard-Wagner
Commenced March 2012
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic “Life-Course Strategies and International Migration: Post-Independence Ukrainian Migrants in Australia”
Abstract

This research project focuses on post-independence Ukrainian migration to Australia and is centred on Ukrainian migrants’ life-course strategies in Australia with respect to their employment, education or marriage. The focus is on the rationale behind the ‘waves’ of migrants who came to Australia in three periods (since 1990s, since 2000 and 2010). Particularly, research analyses the link between social transformations in post-Soviet Ukraine and international migration of Ukrainians to Australia since the 1990s, by focusing on the impact of socio-economic and political restructuring on the migrants’ life strategies.

This research investigates how individual pathways are changed and adapt under social transformations and which strategies individuals chose to follow to accommodate to changing social conditions, focusing on peculiarities of forming life strategies with the help of international migration. In order to trace the institutional impact and influence on the process of individual’s life-course strategy formation on micro-level of analysis, social transformations in Ukraine will be analysed within 3 dimensions – economic, political and social milieus in combination with the analysis of Australia’s immigration policy according migrants from post-Soviet countries since 1990s.

This project aims to provide insights into the following areas: (1) daily life and the socio-cultural problems Ukrainian migrants face in recipient societies, particularly barriers in realizing migrants’ pathways in terms of social inclusion, cultural differentiation, and shifts of national and cultural identities; (2) official migration policies of Ukraine and Australia; and (3) the socio-economic contradictions within Ukrainian society as a migration push factor. This research takes an original approach in that it brings the life-course strategy within migration methodology and deploys it in sociological context rather than its original psychological focus.

Publications
  • Oleinikova O. (2012) “Social Responsibility of the Ukrainian Nation State and Labour Migration: Contemporary Challenges”, The Australian Sociological Association Conference Proceedings, University of Queensland, 26 – 29 November, 2012
  • Oleinikova ,O., Kyzmenko, T. (2011) “Crime as a Display of Marginalization in Contemporary Ukrainian Society”, Collection of scientific papers “Gileya: scientific herald”. – K.: VIR UAS, 46 edition, pp. 626-632 [In Ukrainian]
  • Oleinikova, O. (2011) “Ukrainian Labor Migration: Role of Social Capital” Sociology-Social Work – Regulating Social Problems, Conference Proceedings, pp.189-193 [In Ukrainian]
  • Oleinikova, O. (2011) “Main Patterns of Current Ukrainian Emigration Wave” Sociology-Social Work – Regulating Social Problems, Conference for students and young researchers, Conference Proceedings, pp.93-95 [In Ukrainian]

Derya Ozkul
Derya Ozkul

sozk2606@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

I studied my BA degree in Political Science and International Relations at the University of Bogazici in Turkey and my MSc degree in Comparative Politics at the London School of Economics. Since then I have been involved in various projects on migration-related issues. I contributed to the research conducted at OHCHR, Committee on Migrant Workers and at ILO, MIGRANT Department in Geneva. I also worked as a researcher at the Migration Research Centre at Koc University (MiReKoc) in various EU-funded projects. Currently my doctoral thesis is part of the project called ‘Social Transformation and international Migration in the 21st Century, directed by Prof Stephen Castles. During my candidature I held guest researcher fellowships from the Social Science Research Centre in Berlin (WZB) and the University of Bielefeld in Germany.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Stephen Castles; Christine Inglis
Commenced 2010
Full or part time Full-time
Thesis topic The Alevi Diaspora: A Comparative Study of Germany and Australia
Abstract

My thesis explores transnational Alevi networks. The motivating questions are 1) In which mechanisms do the migratory processes change the manner in which Alevism is experienced in private, as well as practiced and presented in public? 2) To what extent do the newly emerging forms of Alevism contribute to the political-institutional struggles in Turkey? Although transnational research has revealed extensive empirical findings, it still lacks developed comparative studies exploring the impact of state policies and of distance to the homeland. Departing from these questions, my thesis displays a comparative study of Germany and Australia, the two countries of destination with very different traditions and institutional frameworks. I investigate how distinct migratory processes have provided conditions for Alevis’ transnational struggles.

Publications
  • Ozkul, Derya (Forthcoming) ‘Australia’ in Gildas Simon (ed) Geo-historical Dictionary of International Migrations, Paris: Armand Colin.
  • Castles, Stephen and Ozkul, Derya (Forthcoming). ‘Circular migration: triple win, or a new label for temporary migration?’ in Graziano Battistella (ed) Theoretical Perspectives on Asian Migration, New York: Springer Publishing.
  • Ozkul, Derya. 2014. ‘Emotive connections: insider research with Turkish/Kurdish Alevi migrants in Germany’ in Lejla Voloder and Liudmila Kirpitchenko (eds) Insider Research on Migration and Mobility, London: Ashgate.
  • Castles, Stephen; Vasta, Ellie and Ozkul, Derya. 2014. ‘Australia: a Classical Immigration Country in Transition’ in J. Hollifield, P. Martin and P. Orrenius (eds) Controlling Immigration: A Global Perspective, 3rd Edition, Stanford CA: Stanford University Press.
  • Ozkul, Derya. 2013. ‘International Migration and Local Policies’ in Marcela Balbo, Ahmet Icduygu and Julio Peres Serrano (eds) Countries of Migrants, Cities of Migrants: Italy, Spain, Turkey, Istanbul: The Isis Press.
  • Castles, Stephen; Arias, Magdalena; Kim, Chulhyo and Ozkul, Derya. 2012. ‘Irregular migration: causes, patterns and strategies’ in Irena Omelaniuk (ed) Reflections on Migration and Development, GFMD Puerto Vallarta and Beyond Series: Global Migration Issues, Vol. 1, New York: Springer Publishing., pp. 117-151.
  • Ozkul, Derya. 2012. ‘Managing the Diaspora: the Turkish Case’ in Jung-Eun OH (ed.), Diaspora as Focus Area of National Migration Policy, Seoul: IOM MRTC Special Issues in Migration Series No. 2., pp. 115-140.
  • Ozkul, Derya. 2012. ‘Ulus-ötesi Göç: Kuramsal Bir Değerlendirme [Transnational Migration: A Theoretical Evaluation] in Asli Sirin and Gulfer Ihlamur-Oner (eds) ‘Uluslararası Göçü Yeniden Düşünmek: Yeni Yaklaşım ve Yönelimler’ [Re-thinking International Migration: New Approaches], Istanbul: Iletisim Yayinlari., pp. 483-501.
  • Ozkul, Derya. 2012. ‘Transnational Migration Research’, Sociopedia.isa. [The International Sociological Association’s dictionary].
  • Ozkul, Derya. 2012. Göç Araştırmalarında Yeni Yönelimler: Ulus-Ötecilik Araştırmaları [Transnationalism: New Paradigms in Migration Research], Die Gaste, 20 January-February.
  • Castles, Stephen; Vasta, Ellie and Ozkul, Derya. 2012. ‘The internal dynamics of migration processes and their consequences for Australian government migration policies’, Sydney: University of Sydney.
  • Ozkul, Derya. 2012. The Politics of European Citizenship: Deepening Contradictions in Social Rights & Migration Policy, Peo Hansen and Sandy Brian Hager (Berghahn Books, 2010), Journal of European Social Policy, 22 (3), 332-333.
  • Castles, Stephen; Arias Cubas, Malena; Kim, Chulhyo; Koleth, Elsa; Ozkul, Derya; Williamson, Rebecca. 2011. ‘Karl Polanyi and Understanding Social Transformation’, Social Transformation and International Migration in the 21st Century Working Paper No 1, Sydney: University of Sydney.
  • Ozkul, Derya. 2011. ‘Circular Migration Schemes: Renewed Interests in Destination Countries’, CARIM Best Participant Essays Series AS 2011/61, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, San Domenico di Fiesole (FI): European University Institute.
  • Ozkul, Derya. 2011. Beyond a Border: The Causes and Consequences of Contemporary Immigration, Thomas Faist and Peter Kivisto (SAGE/Pine Forge Press, 2010), Journal of Sociology, 47 (2), 222-223.

Ly Phan
Ly Phan

lpha5621@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Ly Phan has a Bachelors Degree in Sociology from the Vietnam National University and a Masters degree in Sociology from the University of Washington. In 2012, she commenced her PhD program at the University of Sydney with an Endeavour scholarship. Before coming to Sydney, Ly worked as a researcher at the Institute of Sociology in Vietnam. Her research interests include demography, population and development issues, gender, migration and urbanization. She is also interested in applying quantitative methods to sociological analysis.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Salvatore Babones; Gyu-Jin Hwang
Commenced Semester 1, 2012
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic Women’s Empowerment and Fertility in Southeast Asia
Abstract

The relationship between women’s empowerment and their fertility has been a major theme in studies of gender and development. The improved status of women is considered to increase their educational attainment and economic opportunities, and higher decision-making power. Fertility decline is hypothesized as the result of such progress in women’s empowerment. There have been many different suggestions on how women’s empowerment initiates changes in fertility levels. However, the ways that women’s empowerment affect fertility has not been clearly identified. In my thesis, I will suggest a causal framework of how women’s empowerment leads to fertility changes. I will use indicators of women’s empowerment from country-level data of 5 Southeast Asian countries to fit a regression model of fertility.

Publications
  • 2013: Conceptualizing and Measuring Women’s Empowerment, under review for International Review of Sociological Perspectives.
  • 2012: Migration and Fertility in Vietnam, under review for Population Review.
  • 2009: Gender and Sexual Opinions, chapter in book: Rural Families in Transitional Vietnam, edited by Trinh Duy Luan, Helle Rystrom and Wil Burhoon.
  • 2006: Some Remarks on Migration in a Mountainous Commune in Vietnam, co-author, Vietnam Sociological Review.

Bobby Quinn
Bobby Quinn

rqui3924@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Bobby Quinn completed a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) at the University of Western Australia in 2006.

Degree PhD
Supervisors A/P Catriona Elder; D Greg Martin
Commenced Semester 2 2010
Full or part time Part-time
Thesis topic The Post-Divorce Child: The Role of the Child as Figural Body
Abstract

The objective of this research is to examine the figuration of the post-divorce child and identify its significance in making wider cultural claims. I propose that the dominant way the child appears in representations of divorce is as ‘victim’ and that this figuration is used to construct divorce as a threat to society. By looking at several sites through which the post-divorce child is figured, such as Australian Family Law, I ask how this figuration is utilised in the social construction of divorce.

Publications

Jessica Richards
Jessica Richards

jric9567@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Jessica’s research interests broadly focus on the sociology of sport, with a particular emphasis on sport fandom and spatial geography. After graduating from the University of Sydney with a B.A (Hons), she was awarded an Australian Post-Graduate Award to pursue further study in the field of sport sociology. Following work experience at a research agency, Jessica is now working full-time on her PhD, and is currently living between England and Australia. In Australia, she tutors in the Sociology and Social Policy department at the University of Sydney. In England, Jessica works as a Honorary PhD Student in the Management School at the University of Liverpool.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Fiona Gill; David Bray
Commenced March 2012
Full or part time Full-time
Thesis topic Oh The Places You’ll Go: A Cross Comparative Study of Sport Fandom in Australia and England.
Abstract

This project examines the motivations and behaviour of sport fans of four sporting teams in England and Australia. It explores how fan identification takes its form; and the role of the sport stadium and local community in the creation of a sport teams narrative. It seeks to understand how sport fans identify with themselves and others inside sporting locations; and how sporting spaces can both encourage and restrict certain types of spectator behaviour. Data for this study is currently being generated in Australia and England, through the ethnographic methods of participant observation, in-depth interviews and visual mapping.

Publications
  • Which Player Do You Fancy Then?’ Locating the Female Ethnographer in the Field of The Sociology of Sport (forthcoming), Soccer and Society.
  • ‘Geographies of Gender’ (2014), Guest lecture for Sport, Crime and Society, February, Liverpool John Moores University, England
  • ‘Finessing Fandom’: How Female Fans Map Their Match Day Experience (2014), The British Society of Sports History Gender, Sport and Leisure Symposium, January, DeMontfort University, England.
  • ‘Ethnographic Methods in Sport Fan Research’: Critical insights into Covert and Overt Research Methodology [with Dr. Geoff Pearson, University of Liverpool] (2013), Research Seminar Series, November, University of Edge Hill, England.
  • ‘Oh the Places You’ll Go:’ A Comparative Study of Sports Spectatorship in England and Australia’ (2013), in Football and Communities Across Codes (pp. 71-83) Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press
  • ‘Which Player Do You Fancy Then?’ The Female Ethnographer in Football (2013), paper presented at the Football 150 Conference, 2-4 September, National Football Museum Manchester, England
  • ‘It’s The Journey Not The Destination That Counts’: Meaning and the Match Day Routine of Sport Fans in Australia and England (2013), paper presented at the 8th Annual Liverpool Symposium on Current Developments in Ethnographic Research in the Social and Management Sciences, 28th – 30th August 2013, VU University Amsterdam, Netherlands.
  • ‘Oh The Places You’ll Go’: A Comparative Study of Sport Spectatorship in England and Australia (2013) paper presented at 1st Football and Communities Across Codes Conference, Monday 4th February -Wednesday 6th February, Sydney, Australia
  • ‘Value in Variety’: Conceptualising Football Fans (2012) paper presented at the Research Seminar Series, 28 November, University of Bedfordshire, England.
  • ‘Sporting Places, Sporting Spaces’ (2012) paper presented at the Ethnography Knowledge Platform, 15 November, University of Liverpool, England.
  • Hamilton, R. & Richards, J. (2010) Odds and Evens: Two Studies in Historiography for Extension History, Teaching History, 44, 1, 11-15.

Mohammad Salehin
Mohammad Salehin

mohammad.salehin@sydney.edu.au
Biography

Mohammad Salehin completed his Bachelor and Masters Degree in Sociology at the University of Dhaka (Bangladesh). He joined the Department of Rural Sociology at Bangladesh Agricultural University in 2000 as a lecturer and promoted as Assistant professor in 2004. He completed MPhil in Peace and Conflict Transformation (with a thesis on Rise of Islamic Militancy in Bangladesh) from the University of Tromso, Norway in 2006 under QUOTA Fellowship. Currently he is on study leave and joined the Department of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Sydney as a PhD-candidate in March 2009 under Endeavour Postgraduate Awards. He taught Introductory Sociology and Sociology of Terror at the University of Sydney. He specialized in research and teaching in Religion (Islam) and Development, Rural Poverty Studies, Development in South Asia, and Women and Gender Issues.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Stephen Castles; Laura Beth Bugg
Commenced 2009
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic Development, State and Islamic NGOs in Bangladesh
Abstract

This project investigates the relationship between religion, the state, development and the Religious NGOs (RNGOs) in general and Islamic NGOs in particular in Bangladesh. Based on the fieldwork with the three Islamic NGOs (Muslim Aid UK, Islami Bank Foundation and MACCA) carried out in Bangladesh over the period of July, 2010 to February 2011 this research has attempted to answer four specific research questions. These are: a. what are the ideological frameworks that inform Islamic NGOs and in what way do these frameworks inform the practice of Islamic NGOs in Bangladesh? b. What are the transnational links that Islamic NGOs utilise and in what ways do these transnational links shape the activities of Islamic NGOs in Bangladesh? c. In what ways do Islamic NGOs shape the local governance of rural villages in Bangladesh, particularly in relation to Islamic NGOs’ activities in disaster relief and Islamic microfinance? d. What is the role of Islamic NGOs in the changing gender ideology around the role of women in Bangladesh? This research has used qualitative interviews, FGDs, participation and observation to collect necessary data from the beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries of Islamic NGOs (include secular NGO beneficiaries), NGO officials and local key informants in three districts in Bangladesh. Humanitarian aids and shari’a-based microfinance program of Islamic NGOs that falls under the ‘model village program’ of these NGOs have particularly been investigated. A new form of ‘governmentality’—a pious or sacralised governmentality, as this research argues, is emerging in the context of hegemonic neoliberal governmentality. This new form of governmentality revelled through practice and programs of Islamic NGOs, for example through their practice of ‘entrepreneurial Homo Oeconomicus’. Therefore, Islamic NGOs has also changed the ideological structure shaping the lives of rural women, through the issues of empowerment and piety. Islamic NGOs have been successful in mobilizing women to create a ‘sense of guilt’ regarding interest charges by the microcredit program of non-Islamic NGOs, and have advocated an Islamic version of ‘women empowerment’ by enhancing Muslim women’s agency. Hence, a ‘different model of gender relations’ in contrast to the liberal model is emerging that envisages Muslim women’s piety as central to constructing ‘good women’ which informs the way they appear and behave in the public.

Publications
  • Salehin, Mohammad. Forthcoming. “Piety, gender relations and Muslim Women’s Empowerment: Case of Islamic NGOs in Bangladesh”. In Islam and Development: Exploring the Invisible Aid Economy, edited by Matthew Clarke and David Tittensor. Farnham: Ashgate.
  • Fischer, Isabel and Mohammad Salehin. 2009. “Health and poverty as Challenges for human security: Two case studies on Northern Vietnam and Bangladesh”. Pp. 563-572 in Facing Global Environmental Change – Environmental, Human, Energy, Food, Health and Water Security Concept, edited by H. G. Brauch, John Grin, Czeslaw Mesjasz, Navnita Chadha Behera, Béchir Chourou, Ursula Oswald Spring, P.H. Liotta, Patricia Kameri-Mbote. London: Springer-Verlag.
  • Salehin, Mohammad. 2013, forthcoming. “Democracy and Islam: A Tale of Democratic Struggle in a Muslim Majority State”. Sociology of Islam 1(1), Brill.
  • Salehin, Mohammad. 2011. “Religion, Gender Relations and Islamic NGOs in Rural Bangladesh”. Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Annual Conference 2011 Proceedings: Local lives/global networks, University of Newcastle, Australia.
  • Salehin, Mohammad. Under review. “Religion in development: From legitimacy to crisis of Islamic identity in development practice in Bangladesh.” The Journal of Development Studies, Taylor and Francis, Article ID: FJDS-2012-Oct-0076.
  • Salehin, Mohammad. Under review. “Religion in practice: Dynamics of the emergence of Islamic NGOs in Bangladesh”. Modern Asian Studies, Cambridge University Press, article ID: ASS-RES-2012-0198.
  • Kabir, Mohammad and Mohammad Salehin. 2006. “Religion and violence: Politico–Historical Analysis of Rise of Islamic militancy in Bangladesh”. Dhaka University Studies 64(2): 125-144.

Richard Schweizer
Richard Schweizer

richardschweizer1980@gmail.com
Biography

Graduate of the University of Sydney with Sociology with Honours Class 1 in 2002 and LLB with Honours Class 1 in 2005. Graduate of Masters in Journalism at the University of Technology in 2009. Honours thesis for Sociology involved ethnography of a refugee activist group. Masters thesis involved a discourse analysis of public discussion of indigenous issues following the announcement of the Federal Northern Territory Intervention. Academic interests include mental health and mental illness; Australian politics, policy and economics; American politics; studies of religion and contemporary cultural study.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Fran Collyer; Melinda Cooper
Commenced 2009
Full or part time Part-time
Thesis topic The effect of diagnosis in schizophrenia
Abstract

This thesis aims to explore how people diagnosed with schizophrenia rebuild their sense of self after the experience of diagnosis, treatment and hospitalisation. The thesis will also seek to explore how people maintain their post-diagnostic identities amongst family, friends, and the public. Furthermore, the thesis will explore how relationships of power with psychiatric staff and facilities, as well as broader phenomena such as the psychopharmaceutical complex and deinstitutionalisation, affect these processes.

The thesis will make use of a number of writers and theorists. In particular the thesis will make use of Michael Bury's concept of 'biographical disruption' to help understand the impact of a chronic illness like schizophrenia. The work of George Mead and Herbert Blumer in establishing Symbolic Interactionism will be used to help understand relations between the person diagnosed with schizophrenia and people both within and without the psychiatric system. The work of Erving Goffman will be used to help understand how persons diagnosed with schizophrenia maintain, or project, their post-diagnostic identity. Finally the work of Michel Foucault will be used to explore a number of relationships of power that emerge around the issue of self-formation and self-maintenance in persons diagnosed with schizophrenia. Members for the study will be drawn from the Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank.

Publications

Jeremy Simpson
Jeremy Simpson

jsim9083@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Jeremy Simpson holds a Bachelor of Social Sciences in sociology and philosophy with Honours from the University of Sydney and is currently completing a PhD in sociology by research. He teaches sociology and research methods at the University of Sydney and has assisted with a number of research projects, including research capacity building for the Ministry of Education of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the nationally comparative resilience study 'Personal Resilience, System Resilience, and Educational Opportunity’. His research interests include the sociologies of risk and resilience, the sociology of violence and conflict, the sociologies of Pierre Bourdieu and Niklas Luhmann, qualitative research methodology and the history and culture of Afghanistan and the Central Asian region. He is a member of the Widening Participation Scholars Network and The Australian Sociological Association.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Fran Collyer; Salvatore Babones
Commenced 2010
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic Risk and contemporary conflict in stabilisation operations: the case of Afghanistan
Abstract

The thesis examines institutional risk-aversion and enclavisation in Afghanistan, or international intervention practice and local responses in the context of contemporary conflict risk. The case study compares risk-management in the civil-developmental and private security sectors with military force protection and COIN/CT practice, and with the local mine-clearance sector as a divergent risk-management regime. The intention is to develop a model of risk and risk-related practice in this context, integrating elements of systems theory with the field of strategic practice model of Pierre Bourdieu. The approach of the study is qualitative, based on interview research and observation in Afghanistan in late 2011.

Publications
  • Simpson Jeremy (2012) 'The Externalisation of Risk and The Enclavisation of Intervention in Afghanistan'. Peer-reviewed refereed conference paper published in the proceedings of 2010 conference of The Australian Sociological Association (TASA).
  • Simpson, Jeremy (2012) 'Stabilisation Operations and Structural Instability in the Contemporary World-System' in The Routledge Handbook of World-Systems Analysis Christopher Chase-Dunn and Salvatore Babones (eds) University of California
  • Simpson, Jeremy (2010) 'Beyond 'peacekeeping': re-theorising the legitimacy of present practice in transnational paramilitary intervention' Peer-reviewed refereed conference paper published in the proceedings of 2010 conference of The Australian Sociological Association (TASA).

Ariel Spigelman
Ariel Spigelman

aspi2607@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Ariel was born in Sydney and moved to the UK when he was 11, where he completed high school and his undergraduate degree at University College London. In 2008 he returned to Australia to study for a Masters in Cross-cultural Communication at the University of Sydney.

Ariel has over a decade of social and market research industry experience, in particular working with the public and non-profit sectors and using quantitative survey methodology. He is a Full Member of the Australian Market and Social Research Society, as well as a Full Member of the UK Market Research Society.

Ariel currently serves as Vice President of the Management Committee of the Refugee Advice and Casework Service (RACS), a leader in non-profit representation and casework management of refugees and asylum seekers in Australia, and also served for three years as a Trustee on the board of Asylum Aid, a charity in the UK providing free legal advice, support and representation to asylum seekers.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Salvatore Babones; Stephen Castles
Commenced 2012
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic Modelling international migration intentions in 21st-Century South America
Abstract

The purpose of this study is to account for the structural and individual social, political, cultural and economic correlates of international migration intentions, and attempt to model them in a formal framework. It will do this through a statistical analysis of several waves of repeated cross-section questionnaire data taken from the ‘Latinobarómetro’, an annual household survey programme conducted across Latin America. Due to the pre-existence of a large volume of scholarship on migration in Central America (and in particular, on the Mexico-USA migration corridor, the busiest in the world), this study will focus on the countries of mainland continental South America (excluding the Guianas): Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. In addition, building on the statistical insights derived from the survey data, the study will attempt to operationalise a model of macro-level migration intentions through a computational agent-based simulation.

Publications
  • Spigelman, A. (2013). The depiction of Polish migrants in the United Kingdom by the British press after Poland’s accession to the European Union, International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, 33(1/2)

Harriet Westcott

harriet.westcott@sydney.edu.au
Biography

Harriet is a PhD student and teaches in the School of Sociology and Social Policy, at the University of Sydney. Her research interests include friendships/personal relationships, emotions, surveillance and social media. Harriet has over ten years experience as a social researcher for government and NGOs. She holds a Masters Degree in Culture and Media, and a Bachelors (Honours) of Sociology.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Catriona Elder; Rebecca Scott Bray
Commenced 2008
Full or part time
Thesis topic Friendship after migration
Abstract

Harriet’s research focuses on the friendship experience of skilled migrants to Australia. It explores friendship initiation, maintenance and rupture following migration. Theoretically Harriet is influenced by the micro-order of social life and the rules of social etiquette as presented by Goffman, and the friendship philosophies of Aristotle.

Publications
  • Imaginary Friends: Migrants’ emotional narratives about friends outside Australia, Australian Journal of Social Issues, (2012) Volume 47, Number 1.
  • Migrants’ Visits to Old Friends: An analysis of friendship maintenance work using social ritual, in Personal and Public Lives and Relationships in a Changing Social World, Editors: Sharon Wray and Rosemary Rae, Cambridge Scholars Publishing (December 2012).
  • Thea: An investigation of the friendship experiences of an Adult Transnational Child following migration to Australia, TASA 2011 Conference: Local Lives/Global Networks.
  • Putting Friends in a Box: Methodological considerations regarding the technique of mapping migrants' friendships, TASA 2010 Conference: Social Causes, Private Lives.
  • Research insights about the use of observation as a method for investigating skilled-migrants to Australia with their friends, ACSPRI Conference 2010 Proceedings.
  • ‘Sociology: Instructor’s Manual’ and Companion Website, Pearson Higher Education Australia, 2010 (Supplementary to: Van Krieken et al., 2010, ‘Sociology’).
  • ‘Instructor’s Manual’ Pearson Higher Education Australia 2010 (Contributor - Supplementary to: Henslin et al., 2010, ‘Sociology’).
  • The welcome or not so welcome back - An application of Goffman's social rituals to skilled migrants' visiting friends outside Australia, TASA 2009 Conference: The future of Sociology.
  • ‘Why Australia Needs Skilled Migrants’, Local Government Manager, January 2009.
  • ‘A Sustainability Review of the Local Environment Plan’, Local Government Manager, August 2006.

Rebecca Williamson
Rebecca Williamson

rwil2924@uni.sydney.edu.au
Biography

Rebecca received a Master of Arts in Social Anthropology and first class Honours from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. She has previously worked for three years as a research administrator and development officer at an international university in London. Prior to that, she was employed as a social researcher for the Ministry of Social Development in New Zealand. Rebecca works as a research assistant for the Social Transformation and International Migration research project at the University of Sydney, led by Professor Stephen Castles. She has worked as a sessional teacher in anthropology at the University of Sydney and Victoria University of Wellington.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Stephen Castles; Robbie Peters
Commenced March 2011
Full or part time Full time
Thesis topic Migration, Housing and Place-Making Practices in Suburban Sydney
Abstract

In Australia, migration is not only integral to the history and demography of the nation, but remains central in ongoing and emotive discourses around identity, belonging and territory. However, little attention has been paid to the ways in which migration transforms cities at an everyday, micro-social level. The research involves a place-based study of the interactions between recent migrants and the built environment in a highly diverse suburban locality in south-western Sydney, Australia. It focuses in particular on migrants’ place-making practices and their role in the transformation of local public space. The thesis examines how the everyday production of space is mediated by a range of actors and discourses across multiple scales, and the extent to which it shapes, or is shaped by, migrants’ urban citizenship claims.

Publications
  • Forthcoming, Quotidian Mobilities and Spaces of Encounter: Inhabiting multicultural public spaces in (sub)urban Sydney. In Shortell, T and Brown, E (eds) Walking in the City: Quotidian Mobility and Ethnographic Method.
  • Forthcoming, “Heterogeneities and Enriching Encounters: A summary of Discussions from the 2nd Aga Khan Award for Architecture Knowledge Construction Workshop” in M. Sadria (ed.), Homogenisation and the Disappearance of Difference: Urban Life and Architecture’s Futures. Geneva: Aga Khan Award for Architecture
  • Williamson, R (2012) Producing ‘Real’ Public Space or Constructing the Good Citizen?: Spaces of multiculture in the suburban library. The Australian Sociological Association Conference, University of Queensland, 26 – 30 September, 2012 (peer reviewed)
  • Castles, S., Arias Cubas, M., Kim, C., Koleth, E., Ozkul, D. and Williamson, R. (2013). Methodological Dilemmas in Migration and Social Transformation Research: Overcoming ‘Northern’ Epistemology and Exploring A Multi-Scalar Approach, Social Transformation and International Migration in the 21st Century Working Paper No 2., Sydney: The University of Sydney.
  • Shin, J. J., Yuk, J., Kim, C., Shin, Y., Park, D., Williamson, R. and Koleth, E. (2012) An International Comparative Study of Migration Policy: With Focus on Current Debates on Multiculturalism Policy. IOM MRTC Research Report Series, No. 2011-08. Goyang-si, Republic of Korea: IOM Migration Research and Training Centre (in Korean).
  • Castles, S., Arias Cubas, M., Kim, C., Koleth, E., Ozkul, D. and Williamson, R. 2011. Karl Polanyi’s Great Transformation as a Framework for understanding Neo-Liberal Globalisation, Social Transformation and International Migration in the 21st Century Working Paper No 1., Sydney: The University of Sydney.
  • Williamson, R. (2005) Flat Food: Food, sociability and the individual in the New Zealand Flat. New Zealand Sociology, Vol. 20(2).

Mary Winter
Mary Winter

mary_winter@bigpond.com
Biography

Prior to conducting her PhD Mary Winter was a trend analyst and conducted surveys on many social issues in Australia. She is a social researcher of approximately 20 years experience and has developed a particular interest in qualitative research and the complexity of issues that affect wider social groups in this country. Mary has a BA Hons and MA in Communication and Writing from Murdoch University and The University of Technology, Sydney. She is a full member of the Australian Market and Social Research Society.

Degree PhD
Supervisors Dr Deirdre Howard-Wagner, Dr Brigid Rooney
Commenced 2009
Full or part time Part-time
Thesis topic Fleeing Neoliberalism: Tree Changing in Tasmania
Abstract

The country movement has taken many forms throughout history as people have found ways to deal with social pressures and struggles through the ages. The latest form of the country movement in Australia is known as tree changing. As they struggle with the effects of neoliberal economic policy, some Australians in the city find themselves with intolerably large mortgages, the need for two incomes, reduced parental choices and the inability to live out the Australia dream of home ownership and ‘the good life’. Some of these people have fled to remote rural Tasmania as a way of combating social difficulties and find a better life. This thesis investigates the range of reasons these people fled, the outcomes of their decisions and the conflicts involved in adjusting to new cultures.

Publications

Over the years Mary has contributed to many popular publications including BRW, The Financial Review, The Age, The Sydney Morning Herald, The Australian and The Herald Sun. She has authored reports on Climate Change, The Digital Age and Australian Social Trends and has presented papers at conferences and given points of view in the media.