Dr Frances M Clarke

BA (Hons) La Trobe PhD JohnsH
Senior Lecturer

A18 - Brennan MacCallum Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9351 2880
Fax +61 2 9351 3918

Website Phonebook Entry

Biographical details

I was awarded my PhD by Johns Hopkins University in 2002. I then worked as a researcher at the American Historical Association in Washington DC for a year, before taking up a lectureship in the History Department at Sydney University. Since that time, I have taught units covering a range of topics in American history, from the colonial era through to the turn of the twentieth-century. My teaching was recognized in 2005 with a Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Teaching Award. In 2011, my monograph War Stories: Suffering and Sacrifice in the Civil War Northjointly won the AHA’s Biennial Hancock Prize for the best first book in any field of history. My current research concerns the relationship between youth and militarism over the course of American history.

Research interests

  • Nineteenth-century US history
  • Civil War and Reconstruction
  • War, Trauma, and Memory
  • The political, cultural, and social history of warfare
  • Gender and race relations in America
  • History of childhood
  • Cultural history

Teaching and supervision

Teaching:

Junior Units:

HSTY1023: Emerging Giant, The Making of America

Senior Units:

HSTY2656: A House Divided, The American Civil War

HSTY2629: Sex and Scandal

HSTY2657: American Cultural History

HSTY2628: Boom! The History of War

Honours Units

HSTY4011: Victorian Culture

HSTY3093: Race & Gender in America I

HSTY3094: Race & Gender in America II

HSTY4011: American Utopias

Postgraduate Seminars

Experiences and Memories of War

Supervisions:

Topics in nineteenth-century US history; the American Civil War and Reconstruction; war and memorialisation; gender and race relations in American history.

I am currently supervising MA and PhD studentswho work on a range of topics, including undercover investigative journalism in the US; divorce court reporting in Australia and the UK before WWII; the rise of evangelicalism in Australia; and US-China bilateral relations in the 1970s and 80s.

Current projects

In 2011, I began collaborating with Rebecca Jo Plant (University of California, San Diego) on a jointly-authored article, “‘The Crowning Insult’: Federal Racism and the Gold Star Mother Pilgrimages of the Early 1930s,” which has been accepted for publication by the Journal of American History.

The following year, we started research for a much larger study, which will examine the use of child soldiers and debates over youth and militarism in the U.S. from the Revolution to the current day. Exploring the way changing attitudes toward America as a military nation have intersected with evolving understandings of childhood and youth, this project will map discussions taking place in multiple realms—in legislatures, courts, families, and the military, as well as among individuals. It will also provide the first comprehensive study of the hundreds of thousands of minors who served in the American military from the Revolution to the Cold War era, as well as analysing discussions around contemporary issues like the expansion of military-model public schools.

Awards and honours

Joint winner of the Australian Historical Association’s biennial Hancock Prize for best work of history by a first time author for War Stories: Suffering and Sacrifice in the Civil War North.

Awarded a Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Teaching Excellence Award, 2005

Selected grants

2015

  • Child Soldiers: Militarism and American Youth; Clarke F, Plant R; American Council of Learned Societies (USA)/ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship.

2014

  • Debating militarism & the use of child soldiers in America; Clarke F; DVC Research/Bridging Support Grant.

2012

  • Child Soldiers: The Militarization of American Youth; Clarke F; Newberry Library/Newberry Library Short Term Collaborative Fellowship.
  • Child Soldiers: The Militarization of American Youth; Clarke F; Andrew W Mellon Foundation (USA)/Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship.
  • Child Soldiers: The Militarization of American Youth; Clarke F; Barra Foundation/Barra Foundation International Fellowship.
  • Child Soldiers: The Militarization of American Youth; Clarke F; American Antiquarian Society/Lapides Fellowship.

2009

  • Lincoln and the Gendered Implications of Free labor Ideology; Clarke F; University of Sydney/Research Support.

2008

  • Citizenship in Civil War America; Clarke F; United States Studies Centre/United States Studies Centre Fellowship.

2004

  • The shape and meaning of voluntarism in the civil war north; Clarke F; DVC Research/Research and Development Scheme: Newly Appointed Staff (NAS).

Selected publications

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Books

  • Clarke, F. (2011). War Stories: Suffering and Sacrifice in the Civil War North. Chicago, US: The University of Chicago Press.

Edited Books

  • McDonnell, M., Corbould, C., Clarke, F., Brundage, W. (2013). Remembering the Revolution: Memory, History and Nation Making from Independence to the Civil War. Amherst and Boston: University of Massachusetts Press.

Book Chapters

  • Clarke, F. (2013). Old-Fashioned Tea Parties: Revolutionary Memory in Civil War Sanitary Fairs. In Michael A. McDonnell, Clare Corbould, Frances M. Clarke, W. Fitzhugh Brundage (Eds.), Remembering the Revolution: Memory, History, and Nation Making from Independence to the Civil War, (pp. 294-312). Amherst and Boston: University of Massachusetts Press.
  • McDonnell, M., Corbould, C., Clarke, F., Brundage, W. (2013). The Revolution in American Life from 1776 to the Civil War. In Michael A. McDonnell, Clare Corbould, Frances M. Clarke, W. Fitzhugh Brundage (Eds.), Remembering the Revolution: Memory, History, and Nation Making from Independence to the Civil War, (pp. 1-15). Amherst and Boston: University of Massachusetts Press.
  • Clarke, F. (2002). 'Honorable Scars': Northern Amputees and the Meaning of Civil War Injuries. In Paul A. Cimbala and Randall M. Miller (Eds.), Union Soldiers and the Northern Home Front: Wartime Experiences and Postwar Adjustments, (pp. 361-393). New York: Fordham University Press.

Journals

  • Clarke, F. (2011). Forgetting the Women: Debates over Female Patriotism in the Aftermath of America's Civil War. Journal of Women's History, 23(2), 64-86.
  • Clarke, F. (2007). So Lonesome I Could Die: Nostalgia and Debates Over Emotional Control in the Civil War North. Journal Of Social History, 41(2), 253-282.
  • Clarke, F. (2006). 'Let All Nations See': Civil War Nationalism and the Memorialization of Wartime Voluntarism. Civil War History, 52(1), 66-93.

2013

  • Clarke, F. (2013). Old-Fashioned Tea Parties: Revolutionary Memory in Civil War Sanitary Fairs. In Michael A. McDonnell, Clare Corbould, Frances M. Clarke, W. Fitzhugh Brundage (Eds.), Remembering the Revolution: Memory, History, and Nation Making from Independence to the Civil War, (pp. 294-312). Amherst and Boston: University of Massachusetts Press.
  • McDonnell, M., Corbould, C., Clarke, F., Brundage, W. (2013). Remembering the Revolution: Memory, History and Nation Making from Independence to the Civil War. Amherst and Boston: University of Massachusetts Press.
  • McDonnell, M., Corbould, C., Clarke, F., Brundage, W. (2013). The Revolution in American Life from 1776 to the Civil War. In Michael A. McDonnell, Clare Corbould, Frances M. Clarke, W. Fitzhugh Brundage (Eds.), Remembering the Revolution: Memory, History, and Nation Making from Independence to the Civil War, (pp. 1-15). Amherst and Boston: University of Massachusetts Press.

2011

  • Clarke, F. (2011). Forgetting the Women: Debates over Female Patriotism in the Aftermath of America's Civil War. Journal of Women's History, 23(2), 64-86.
  • Clarke, F. (2011). War Stories: Suffering and Sacrifice in the Civil War North. Chicago, US: The University of Chicago Press.

2007

  • Clarke, F. (2007). So Lonesome I Could Die: Nostalgia and Debates Over Emotional Control in the Civil War North. Journal Of Social History, 41(2), 253-282.

2006

  • Clarke, F. (2006). 'Let All Nations See': Civil War Nationalism and the Memorialization of Wartime Voluntarism. Civil War History, 52(1), 66-93.

2002

  • Clarke, F. (2002). 'Honorable Scars': Northern Amputees and the Meaning of Civil War Injuries. In Paul A. Cimbala and Randall M. Miller (Eds.), Union Soldiers and the Northern Home Front: Wartime Experiences and Postwar Adjustments, (pp. 361-393). New York: Fordham University Press.

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