Units of study - definitions

Junior units of study

Units of study with numeric codes between 1000 and 1999 are first year or junior units of study. These units of study are usually completed in a student's first year and contain introductory material for the particular subject area. For example, CLAW1001 Foundations of Business Law, introduces the student to introductory principles of Business Law.

Senior units of study

Those units of study with numeric codes between 2000 and 2999 are second year/senior units, and those with numeric codes between 3000 and 3999 are third year/senior units, and so forth. Senior units of study are more advanced units and usually requiring the completion of the general introductory junior units of study (1000 level). Senior units of study tend to focus on a more specialised area within the particular subject area.

Please Note. In the Business School and Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences units of study with 2000 and 3000 level numeric codes are considered "senior units of study" in regards to their degree rules and the requirements for major offered by them. However, the Faculty of Science defines units of study with 2000 level numeric codes as "intermediate" units of study and 3000 level units as "senior" in regards to their degree and major requirements.

Students enrolled in a pass degree can only enrol in 1000, 2000 and 3000 level units of study. Course rules indicate which units of study must be completed in order to fulfil degree requirements. Students should refer to the specific information on their degree for further information.

The following table shows an illustrative example of an undergraduate degree progression

                                                                                                                                               
YEARSESSIONUNITS OF STUDYCREDIT POINTS

Year 1

Semester 1

junior 1000-level

junior 1000-level

junior 1000-level

junior 1000-level

24

Year 1

Semester 2

junior 1000-level

junior 1000-level

junior 1000-level

junior 1000-level

24

Year 2

Semester 1

senior 2000-level

senior 2000-level

senior 2000-level

senior 2000-level

24

Year 2

Semester 2

senior 2000-level

senior 2000-level

senior 2000-level

senior 2000-level

24

Year 3

Semester 1

senior 2000 or 3000-level

senior 2000 or 3000-level

senior 2000 or 3000-level

senior 2000 or 3000-level

24

Year 3

Semester 2

senior 2000 or 3000-level

senior 2000 or 3000-level

senior 2000 or 3000-level

senior 2000 or 3000-level

24

Please Note: This is an example only. For details of how students should enrol in units of study in particular programs, please refer to the individual undergraduate degrees.

               

Honours year units of study

Units of study with numeric codes between 4000 and 4999 are designated honours units of study. These units of study are completed by students enrolled in the Honours Year only. These units tend to cover highly specialised content in the particular subject area, including a thesis, as indicated by the alpha code. Honours units are not available to students under the pass degree. For details of the Honours Year, please refer to the information under the individual courses or the Undergraduate honours page.

Credit points

Credit points refers to the value of the contribution each unit of study provides to meeting the total course requirements. For example,for the Bachelor of Commerce students must successfully complete 144 credit points in total to be awarded with the degree. In terms of units of study, this would mean that students would need to successfully complete 24 x 6 credit point units of study in order to be awarded the Bachelor of Commerce.

Each unit of study has a credit point value assigned to it. The majority of units of study on offer by the faculty are worth 6 credit points. Junior mathematics units of study are worth 3 credit points and require the completion of two units to be equivalent to a 6 credit point unit. Some senior units of study are also worth 12 credit points and are equivalent in workload and assessment to two 6 credit point units of study.

Prerequisite units of study

Prerequisites are necessary requirements that need to be completed successfully before students can enrol in another particular unit of study that has the prerequisite.

Examples of prerequisites include the following:

  • a particular unit or units of study which is required to be completed successfully before the student can attempt another unit of study e.g. ACCT1006 Accounting and Financial Management is a prerequisite for ACCT2012 Management Accounting A
  • a number of units of study from a particular subject area which must be completed before students can attempt a unit/units of study e.g. All GOVT 2000 level units of study have the prerequisite of two GOVT 1000 level units of study
  • a particular grade average in particular units of study which must be obtained in order to enrol in higher level unit/units of study e.g. ECOS3901 Advanced Microeconomics requires students to have completed ECOS2901 Intermediate Microeconomics Honours, ECOS2902 Intermediate Macroeconomics Honours and ECOS2903 Mathematical Economics A with a Credit average or better over the three units combined
  • the completion of a certain number of credit points before students can enrol in certain units of study at a higher level e.g. to enrol in IBUS2101 International Business Strategy, students must complete 36 junior credit points.

Corequisite units of study

A corequisite refers to a unit of study which must be taken in the same semester  as a particular unit of study (unless already completed).

For example, BUSS1900 Managing Business Communications A is a corequisite of BUSS1001 Understanding Business.

Assumed knowledge for units of study

For some units of study, a student is assumed to have passed a relevant unit of study or a particular subject in their HSC. Although students are usually advised against taking a unit of study which they do not have the assumed knowledge for, they are not prevented from enrolling in the unit of study.

For example, students enrolling in INFS3030 Information Protection and Assurance, would find it beneficial for their study in the unit to have already completed the unit of study INF1000 Digital Business Innovation or equivalent.

Unit of study prohibitions

Prohibitions or prohibited combinations of units refers to when two or more units of study contain a significant overlap of content. Enrolment by students in any one such unit of study prohibits their enrolment in any other unit of study identified as a prohibited unit.

For example, Students who began their degree prior to 2006 and completed the unit of study FINC2001 Corporate Finance I would not be able to enrol in the unit of study FINC2011 Corporate Finance I as it is a prohibited unit of study (because both units cover similar material).

Core units of study (for the degree)

Core units of study are the units of study which are compulsory and must be completed for the award of the particular degree. Core units of study are specified under the course structures for the Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Commerce (Liberal Studies).

For example, BUSS1001 Understanding Business and BUSS1002 The Business Environment are core units for the Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Commerce (Liberal Studies).

Compulsory units of study (for majors)

Compulsory units of study are units of study which must be completed as requirements for a particular degree or area of specialisation (major).

For example, for a major in Marketing MKTG2112 Consumer Behaviour is compulsory and students must complete this unit to be awarded the major.

Elective units of study

Elective units of study are units which students choose from a range of options determined by the degree in which they are studying. Elective units of study can be chosen as individual options or as part of majors.

Each major will require students to choose "electives" from that particular subject area. For example, FINC3013 Mergers and Acquisitions is an elective for a major in the Finance subject area.

Students can also choose general electives for their degree that don't count towards a specific major. For example a student completing a Bachelor of Commerce with a major in Accounting may choose to complete an elective unit of interest from the International Business subject area without intending to complete any additional units from that area.

For details of the units of study available for this current year, students should refer to Undergraduate units of study.

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