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Research

The place of Business Information Systems (BIS) as a specific discipline within the University of Sydney Business School reflects the strategic influence of business information systems in shaping the framework, structures, processes and opportunities of contemporary business and the commitment of the University of Sydney Business School to being a significant centre of research and teaching in the field. The first appointments were made to BIS in 2002 and, due to high levels of student demand the group now has 12 full-time academic positions.

BIS is interdisciplinary in character; it is information, and the technology that delivers it, that underpins critical activities and decision making by individuals, groups, organisations and society in general. It is our approach to develop research collaborations with other disciplines in the Business School, as well as elsewhere in the University, wherever it is possible and appropriate to do so.

The overall imperative of the BIS discipline is business innovation through the application of information technology to business processes. Our research and teaching is centred on the analysis and understanding of the entirety of an organisation's strategies, information management, decision-making and business processes. From this foundation it seeks to be an agent of subsequent innovation and strategic business leadership through the application of information technologies. Within this context, the Business Information Systems discipline has a strong research agenda with a commitment to practice-based, industry-relevant inquiry, with particular strengths in:

  • Digital identity creation and management;
  • IS strategy development;
  • Enterprise systems implementation and management;
  • IS enabled governance, risk and compliance (GRC);
  • Sustainability;
  • Security policy development and deployment;
  • Business process improvement;
  • Consumer information and e-Commerce marketplaces;
  • Information and knowledge management;
  • Business Intelligence (Business Analytics);
  • Social media for personal and enterprise applications; and
  • Collaborative technologies and distributed group work.

Staff in the discipline have been successful with the award of large research grants from the Australian Research Council, including:

  • ARC Discovery - Developing and Managing Sustainable Technology-Enabled Innovation Capabilities: An Information Systems Approach (S. Elliot);
  • ARC Discovery - Potential applications of emerging disruptive technologies in the Financial Services sector (S. Elliot);
  • ARC Linkage - Supply chain management and E-procurement (S. Williams and S. Elliot);
  • ARC Linkage - New Frontiers: Assessing the Impact of Electronic Business on Australia's Wholesale Financial Markets (S. Elliot and S. Williams).

Other significant grants include:

  • Go8 Germany Joint Research Co-operation Scheme - Social Media for Knowledge Sharing in Global Organisations (K. Riemer).