2014 Seminars


9th Apr 2014 - 10:00 am

Venue: Room 214/5, H69 - Economics and Business Building

Speaker: Robert Johnston,

Title: Naturalistic Decision Making as a Challenge to Business Analytics


7th May 2014 - 10:00 am

Venue: Room 214/215, H69 - Economics and Business Building

Speaker: Olivera Marjanovic,

Title: Improving Knowledge-Intensive Business Processes Advanced Analytics through Human-Centered Sharing of Analytical Insights


4th Jun 2014 - 10:00 am

Venue: Room 214/215, H69 - Economics and Business Building

Speaker: Kai Riemer, Discipline of Business Information Systems, University of Sydney Business School

Title: Holism: The Key to Clarifying and Applying Sociomateriality


30th Jul 2014 - 10:00 am

Venue: New Law School Annexe SR 344

Speaker: Ken Peffers, University of Nevada Las Vegas

Title: Re-preparing a design science research (DSR) paper for publication in 2014: the case of the paper formerly known as "Population targeted arrangement methodology for requirements engineering"

Abstract: How we re-develop a DSR to meet the expectations for a tier 1 journal in 2014. This paper develops population targeted arrangement methodology (PTAM) for crafting requirements discovery, analysis and negotiation activities to specific user populations. We argue that current requirements development methodologies do not focus on the adaption of RE efforts to particular user populations. PTAM is based on experience in five cases in which the authors targeted specific populations of customers and other users to engage in activities to define functional and feature level requirements for new customer oriented systems. We used four reference theories: personal construct, diffusion of innovation, social actor, and information theories, to enable PTAM’s design. The paper contributes to literature by presenting a methodology that can be useful in the arrangement of population and project specific methods for RE activities in the development of products, software, systems, or service development for targeted user populations.

Bio:Ken Peffers (Phd, Purdue 1991) is Professor of MIS, Lee School of Business, University of Nevada Las Vegas. His research has followed three broad themes: evaluating value and strategy in IT investments, research methodology and practice, and designed requirements engineering methodology, the subject of much of his recent work. He was the founding editor-in-chief of the Journal of Information Technology Theory & Application, now a publication of the AIS. A theme of his research addressed requirements elicitation problems with hard-to-reach subjects. This led to a study of design science research methodology and to the development of new RE methods. Prof. Peffers's 2007-8 paper in JMIS, "A Design Science Research Methodology for Information Systems Research", has been cited more than any other paper in information systems published since its print date (March 2008).


6th Aug 2014 - 09:00 am

Venue: Peter Nichol Russell Learning Studio 316

Speaker: Ken Peffers, University of Nevada Las Vegas

Title: Workshop on Design Science Research

Seating is limited. Make sure to RSVP by Friday 1 August, 2014
E business.infosystems@sydney.edu.au

Workshop details

Design science research (DSR) in information systems, as we refer to it today, has been with us for nearly forty years although it was not defined in its current conceptual form until much more recently. Papers in recent decades have introduced and provided guidance for producing and publishing DSR outcomes. The objective of this workshop is to emphasize and enable us to accomplish more in terms of the original raison d'être for DSR; its applicability to real world problems such as the building of new kinds of machines to solve new problems or the application of systems to new purposes for organizations.

It is difficult to publish DSR results in the best journals. Researchers have offered explanations, such as the comparative immaturity of DSR, the low emphasis on practical relevance in highly regarded journals, the expectation for scientific theoretical contributions, and the uncertainty for DSR outcomes. Recent guidance may help. Can we consider alternate contribution objectives, like those in other parts of the academy, such as architecture, engineering, or art, that don't require theoretical contributions? How about collaborating with our neighbors in the business school?

One half day workshop

Predecessors and early exemplars for DSR.
Recent literature and the current state of the art.
Planning the DSR research project. What can we do about the riskiness for DSR efforts?
Applicability in DSR outcomes. Recent guidance and new paradigms?
Short project proposals and discussion.

Bio: Ken Peffers (Phd, Purdue 1991) is Professor of MIS, Lee School of Business, University of Nevada Las Vegas. His research has followed three broad themes: evaluating value and strategy in IT investments, research methodology and practice, and designed requirements engineering methodology, the subject of much of his recent work. He was the founding editor-in-chief of the Journal of Information Technology Theory & Application, now a publication of the AIS. A theme of his research addressed requirements elicitation problems with hard-to-reach subjects. This led to a study of design science research methodology and to the development of new RE methods. Prof. Peffers's 2007-8 paper in JMIS, "A Design Science Research Methodology for Information Systems Research", has been cited more than any other paper in information systems published since its print date (March 2008).


10th Sep 2014 - 10:00 am

Venue: New Law School Annexe SR 342

Speaker: Linda Levine,

Title: System of System Failure Patterns from Catastrophic Events

Abstract: When catastrophes occur, what key dynamics take place? How do these dynamics affect  our technical infrastructure - and how can we understand these patterns of  failure in order to better build and operate future technologies and system of  systems? This research analyzes multiple catastrophes, viewed through  designated lenses, with consideration of how systems of systems fail, as well  as the implications for future systems of systems. In this investigation we  studied three cases - Hurricane Katrina, 9/11 and the "Black Saturday" Victorian  Bushfires  - representing threats from natural forces and terrorism. The lens  used is the Generic Error Modeling System (GEMS). The GEMS framework helps us  to understand the types of errors that occur in operational situations and  distinguishes among skill, rule, and knowledge based modes. I'll report on key  findings in three areas: (1) the problematic role that technology plays -  given  its fragility and its dominance (2) a coordination and centralization effect,  and (3) the failure to consider failure

Bio: Linda Levine is an Researcher  Consultant specializing in systems thinking for adaptive organizations and a  Senior Principal Research Fellow affiliated with the Discipline of Business  Information Systems at The University of Sydney.  Previously, from 1991-  2012, she was a senior member of the technical staff at Carnegie Mellon  University's Software Engineering Institute. Her research focuses in four  cluster areas: (a) socio-technical systems and system of systems  interoperability; (b) reasoning, archetypes and patterns of failure; (c) agile  development and organizations; and (d) diffusion of innovations and knowledge  integration. She holds a PhD from Carnegie Mellon University. She is a member  of the IEEE Computer Society, Association for Information Systems, National  Communication Association, and co-founder and past Chair of IFIP Working Group  8.6 on Diffusion, Transfer and Implementation of information  technology.


5th Nov 2014 - 10:00 am

Venue: Merewether Building Seminar Room 1

Speaker: Catherine Hardy,

Title: Business analytics and continuous assurance: theoretical matters, practice issues and future directions


19th Nov 2014 - 10:00 am

Venue: Institute Lecture Room 3

Speaker: Dr. Barney Tan, Discipline of Business Information Systems, Business School, University of Sydney

Title: The social implications of e-commerce: stories of collectivisation and community empowerment from agricultural villages in rural China

RSVP: Friday 14 November, 2014
E business.infosystems@sydney.edu.au

Abstract: Since the commercialization of the Internet in the mid 1990s, research on e-commerce has been one of the most vibrant areas in the discipline of Information Systems. Yet, much of the emphasis of the existing body of work is on the strategic and business impact of e-commerce while far less research attention has been paid to its social implications. Based on a number of case studies of agricultural villages in rural China, this seminar will present findings that shed light on how traditionally disadvantaged groups can capitalize on the opportunities offered by e-commerce to realize important social benefits such as improving the standard of living, community empowerment, and stemming the “brain drain” associated with rural-urban migration. More specifically, the collectivisation strategies that enable the digitally excluded to participate and thrive in e-commerce will be discussed, as well as the theoretical and practical implications of those strategies.

Bio: Dr Barney Tan is a Senior Lecturer from the Discipline of Business Information Systems at The University of Sydney Business School. He received his PhD in Information Systems from the National University of Singapore in 2012. His research interests include strategic information systems, enterprise systems implementation, electronic commerce, Chinese IT management and qualitative research methods. Dr. Tan’s research has been published or accepted in Information Systems Research, Journal of Association of Information Systems; IEEE Transaction on Engineering Management; Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology; Information and Organization, Information and Management and European Management Journal.


26th Nov 2014 - 10:00 am

Venue: New Law School Annexe SR 342

Speaker: Prof. Mike Chiasson, University of British Columbia

Title: On being relevant to the future

Abstract: Numerous debates about the relevance of management and information systems research are recast by examining how research practices affect the future.  In this talk, three research practices -- prediction, explanation and transformation – are considered within the typical tripartite view of IS research: positivism (capturing a past in order to predict the future); interpretivism (understand the past to appreciate the large varieties of the future but through relatively stable social processes); and one approach to critical theory (critiquing the present in order to produce a shift or disjuncture to produce a future).  Within fissures within this tripartite division, other practices for IS research to inform the future, are considered.

Bio: Mike W. Chiasson is currently a Professor and director of the Faculty of Management, at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus.  He is also an Advanced Institute for Management Research (AIM) Innovation Fellow, and a Visiting Professor at Lancaster University’s Management School.  His research examines how social context affects and is affected by information systems (IS) development and implementation, with an increasing focus on negotiation and legitimacy during the mobilization of things and people.  Most of his empirical work has employed some combination observation, action research, field experiments, and organisational-social critique. Mike Chiasson can be reached at mike.chiasson@ubc.ca