Master of Architecture

Unit of Study descriptions

Master of Architecture Core units of study

Candidates are required to complete the following core units of study:
MARC4001 Urban Architecture Research Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lee Stickells and Dr Peter Armstrong Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact (technical consultants and demonstrations as required), plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum student commitment averaging 18 hours per week. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: This studio cannot be taken in the same semester as MARC4002 or MARC4003. Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
The studio examines the role and agency of architecture in the urban context - interrogating the internal and external parameters that act on the design process at incremental urban scales and intensities and engaging with the societal, financial, legislative and managerial frameworks that shape urban development, The studio will prompt students to develop critical positions in regard to urban issues and to extend and explore those positions through the architectural design process.
MARC4001 Urban Architecture Research Studio, MARC4002 Sustainable Architecture Research Studio and MARC4003 Digital Architecture Research Studio are all available in both semesters 1 and 2. Students may enrol or pre-enrol freely, but some will be asked to swap to create equal groups. After three semesters each student will have done each of the studios. The studios examine the relationships between architecture and urbanism; architecture and sustainability; and architecture and digital design. Each is based around one or more design projects which address a specialised area of study, supported by lectures and seminars which introduce the relevant theory, knowledge and design precedents. Studios require the investigation of key technical issues and systems, and their innovative integration in the design, with the preparation of appropriate contract documents. On the successful completion of these units, students will have demonstrated: an ability to formulate, interpret and communicate appropriate concepts derived from the study of brief and site; an ability to extend those starting points into a working design proposal; an ability to develop the design proposal in response to critique, and produce a building design which demonstrably embodies understanding of the principles associated with the specialised study area; an ability to communicate the design ideas effectively through appropriate graphic and three-dimensional means using architectural conventions; and an ability to cohesively design and execute a comprehensive presentation of the project. These units are core to the Master of Architecture.
MARC4002 Sustainable Architecture Research Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Glen Hill/Daniel Ryan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact (technical consultants and demonstrations as required), plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 18 hours per week. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: This studio cannot be taken in the same semester with MARC4001 or MARC4003. Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
MARC4002 Studio B Sustainable Architecture will focus on the theories, technologies and techniques that promote the creation of a sustainable built environment. The studio projects will directly explore the interdependent issues of environmental, social and economic sustainability. The studio will prompt students to develop critical positions in regard to sustainability and to extend and explore those positions through the architectural design process. MARC4001 Urban Architecture Research Studio, MARC4002 Sustainable Architecture Research Studio and MARC4003 Digital Architecture Research Studio are all available in both semesters 1 and 2. Students may enrol or pre-enrol freely, but some will be asked to swap to create equal groups. After three semesters each student will have done each of the studios. The studios examine the relationships between architecture and urbanism; architecture and sustainability; and architecture and digital design. Each is based around one or more design projects which address a specialised area of study, supported by lectures and seminars which introduce the relevant theory, knowledge and design precedents. Studios require the investigation of key technical issues and systems, and their innovative integration in the design, with the preparation of appropriate contract documents.On the successful completion of these units, students will have demonstrated: an ability to formulate, interpret and communicate appropriate concepts derived from the study of brief and site; an ability to extend those starting points into a working design proposal; an ability to develop the design proposal in response to critique, and produce a building design which demonstrably embodies understanding of the principles associated with the specialised study area; an ability to communicate the design ideas effectively through appropriate graphic and three-dimensional means using architectural conventions; and an ability to cohesively design and execute a comprehensive presentation of the project. These units are core to the Master of Architecture.
MARC4003 Digital Architecture Research Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dagmar Reinhardt Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact (technical consultants and demonstrations as required), plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 18 hours per week. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: This studio cannot be taken in the same semester with MARC4001 or MARC4002. Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
MARC4003 Studio C Digital Architecture explores theories, media and techniques that involve digital mediation to create engaging architectural designs that stimulate all human senses in their relationship with the built environment. The studio addresses various issues of digital media, digital design techniques, design theories, computational concepts and other factors influencing the development of architectural production using digital tools. The studio prompts critical reflections on design conventions and creates novel design positions. MARC4001 Urban Architecture Research Studio, MARC4002 Sustainable Architecture Research Studio and MARC4003 Digital Architecture Research Studio are all available in both semesters 1 and 2. Students may enrol or pre-enrol freely, but some will be asked to swap to create equal groups. After three semesters each student will have done each of the studios. The studios examine the relationships between architecture and urbanism; architecture and sustainability; and architecture and digital design. Each is based around one or more design projects which address a specialised area of study, supported by lectures and seminars which introduce the relevant theory, knowledge and design precedents. Studios require the investigation of key technical issues and systems, and their innovative integration in the design, with the preparation of appropriate contract documents. On the successful completion of these units, students will have demonstrated: an ability to formulate, interpret and communicate appropriate concepts derived from the study of brief and site; an ability to extend those starting points into a working design proposal; an ability to develop the design proposal in response to critique, and produce a building design which demonstrably embodies understanding of the principles associated with the specialised study area; an ability to communicate the design ideas effectively through appropriate graphic and three-dimensional means using architectural conventions; and an ability to cohesively design and execute a comprehensive presentation of the project. These units are core to the Master of Architecture.
MARC5001 Graduation Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Semester 1: Dr François Blanciak; Semester 2: Prof Michael Tawa Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact (technical consultants and demonstrations as required), plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 24 hours per week. Prerequisites: MARC4001 and MARC4002 and MARC4003 Prohibitions: ARCH5201, MARF5201 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
This is the culminating studio of the Master of Architecture degree and provides students with the opportunity to develop a complex architectural project that builds upon knowledge gained from the preceding digital, sustainable or urban architecture studios.The project will be supported by a comprehensive research report demonstrating independent exploration of relevant theories and issues raised during the design. This unit is core to the Master of Architecture.
MARC4101 Advanced Technologies 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Armstrong Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: MARC4001 or MARC4002 or MARC4003 Prohibitions: ARCH4202 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The unit introduces students to concepts, issues and techniques relating to the design of some advanced structural, construction and services systems, and the integration of these systems within the design decision making process. This unit has a modular structure and aims to give students the tools to initiate and develop their design intentions in relation to structural, construction and services technologies. The knowledge will move from an understanding of the nature and impact of materiality on the architectural design process through to the implementation of this knowledge in the practice of a professional architect through design, consultation and building processes. The unit aims to examine the foundation and structural systems of large scale public buildings, the construction of the elements of the external fabric and the impact on the design process of the anthropomorphic, environmental and engineering requirements of the internal spaces. The unit stresses the primacy of detailing, skills in the development of individual design processes, and the understanding of design principles of construction materials in relation to structural and environmental concerns. It also aims to develop an understanding of the impact of the BCA and relevant Australian Standards on the building interior and exterior. Knowledge required for the selection of strategies, systems, and integration of the systems for a variety of design situations, is assessed through case study assignments and an examination. This unit is core to the Master of Architecture. Contact hours: 6 hours per week (lecture and tutorial); student effort expected for an average student to achieve a pass level result: class preparation: 3 hours per week; assessment preparation: 30 hours per semester.
MARC5101 Advanced Technologies 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Fiorito Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: MARC4001 or MARC4002 or MARC4003 Prohibitions: ARCH4203 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The unit introduces students to concepts, issues and techniques relating to the design of more advanced and complex structural, foundation and services systems for buildings. The unit has a modular structure and explores in depth the integration of these systems within the design decision making process. It aims to give students the ability to realize their design intentions initially in the studio projects of the degree; to understand the nature and impact of materiality on the architectural design process; and then in subsequent practice, to provide the basis for the development of technical and design skills required of a professional architect. This unit reviews the recent developments and emerging trends in the design of more advanced structural systems for buildings, including those inspired by nature and generated through computational processes, and explores the nature of both the building fabric and, the environmental and management systems which enable the building to function optimally in a complex and dynamic urban environment. Students are expected to develop the ability to research alternative structural, environmental and construction systems that satisfy the aesthetic requirements of their design and to evaluate them based on clearly articulated decision criteria. Knowledge required for the selection of strategies, systems, and the integration of the systems, for a variety of design situations, is assessed through a computer modelling assignment, a case study assignment and a written examination.
MARC4102 Modern Architectural Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prohibitions: ARCH6104, ARCH9048, ARCH9049 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The objective of the Modern Architectural Theory unit is to equip students with a critical understanding of key Western architectural theories from the Enlightenment to the present. Emphasis is placed on the specific historical situations and cultural and philosophical contexts in which those theories arose, and ultimately how they were represented within the domain of architectural embodiment. It is organized predominantly as a chronological survey which clearly identifies particular trains of thought in their continuity and transformation throughout history. Students will become generally conversant in the principles of central theories, and will understand their terms and references. Through readings, lectures, and tutorial sessions, students will acquire the literacy required to perceive and articulate contemporary theoretical standpoints, and will refine their research and writing skills through independent research into a particular aspect of recent architectural theory and history related to their concurrent studio design project. Close attention will be paid to the exchange between practice and theory and the relevance of the discussed theories to the formation of current circumstances, and to the place of architecture within contemporary culture as a whole.
MARC4201 Modern Architectural History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prohibitions: ARCH4102 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit presents foundational knowledge concerning modern movements in global architecture and urbanism, from the early-20th century to the present. It explores the relationships between developments in architectural practice and broader dynamics of 20th century history. Organised as a chronological survey focused on case studies of individual buildings, the course uses architectural exemplars to explore the social, political, technological, economic, and aesthetic guises of modernity. In addition to developing student analytical skills, the unit seeks to introduce students to formal and conceptual approaches to architectural modernity, provide a critical overview of the architectural profession and its historical context over the last century, and impart knowledge of the major periods and developments of modern movements in architecture and their relationship to the multiple guises of modernity in which they were embedded.
Through readings and lectures, students will acquire the architectural literacy required to perceive the contemporary built environment as an artefact of modernity's varied legacies. In addition, students will be expected to refine their research and writing skills through their individual investigations of a particular aspect of modern architecture.
MARC5102 Contract Documentation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Armstrong Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: One of MARC4001, MARC4002, MARC4003, MARC5001 or MARC5201 Prohibitions: ARCH4103 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The unit aims to provide knowledge of basic contract law and building contracts; as well as information about, and skills in, the production of working drawings, specifications and opinions of probable construction costs, as commonly prepared by an architect. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will have demonstrated: a competent ability in the production of working drawings, specifications and cost control for the building designed during the semester studio; an ability to communicate this documentation to clients, statutory authorities, consultants, tenderers, contractors and sub-contractors etc. such that they are able to understand what is required to be built; an understanding of the significance of contract documents in contracts, the relationship between contract documents and relevant law, and the provision of a context for understanding the full examination of commonly used building contracts in the Management in Architecture unit of study; an ability in the making of working drawings and specifications, the coordination of these documents into contact documents; an understanding of the role of consultants with specific reference to cost control, and the management of the process. This unit is core to the Master of Architecture. Contact hours: 3 hours per week. Class preparation and assessment preparation: 39 hours per semester.

Elective units of study

Candidates must complete 18 credit points from the units of study listed below. With permission of the unit of study coordinator, students may also undertake units of study listed in Table G, the Faculty's table of Graduate Units of Study.
ARCH9001 Urban Design Studio A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Rod Simpson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial 3 hrs/wk Assumed knowledge: ARCH9100 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
These studios are the heart of the urban design program. Values, knowledge and skills acquired in other units and from previous experience are supplemented and enhanced, and applied creatively to both the investigation and development phases of design projects at an urban scale. These may be concerned with the generation of strategies, frameworks, concepts, master plans, public space improvements, or other urban design purposes. They are chosen carefully to expose students to a range of contexts (central city, suburban, institutional campuses, etc) and contemporary issues concerning urban form, activity, transport and the implementation of projects.
Students are expected to extend their presentation methods by developing illustrative, writing and verbal skills appropriate to urban design. It is usual for the backgrounds of those enrolled in the studios to span at least architecture, planning and landscape architecture, with inter-disciplinary group work an essential part. Visionary and innovative approaches are encouraged.
Students will be expected to demonstrate appropriate (professional-level) problem recognition, investigative, analytical, interpretative, design and presentation skills and abilities on projects of an urban scale. Assessment may also embrace abilities to prepare and interpret project briefs, program proposals and work in groups.
The central aim of this unit is to develop abilities and skills (investigation, analysis and interpretation, design development and presentation) which will enable students to carry out urban design projects such as the preparation of strategies, frameworks, concepts and master plans in a professional and visionary manner.
ARCH9039 General Elective 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Dean (Education) Session: Int April,Int August,Int July,Int June,Int March,Int May,Int November,Int October,Int Sept,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Adminstration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor, with your request to enrol.
This elective allows an individual to pursue an agreed topic with a member of academic staff, or for a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.
For individual study arrangements this is an opportunity to develop independent study skills. The unit is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on a topic related to the supervisor's expertise. The student will meet with the supervisor regularly to discuss progress.
For group study arrangements the unit of study is available to engage in a topic that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic.
Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and/or tutorial exercises.
ARCH9040 General Elective 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Dean (Education) Session: Int April,Int August,Int July,Int June,Int March,Int May,Int November,Int October,Int Sept,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Adminstration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor, with your request to enrol.
This elective allows an individual to pursue an agreed topic with a member of academic staff, or for a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.
For individual study arrangements this is an opportunity to develop independent study skills. The unit is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on a topic related to the supervisor's expertise. The student will meet with the supervisor regularly to discuss progress.
For group study arrangements the unit of study is available to engage in a topic that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic.
Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and/or tutorial exercises.
ARCH9058 General Elective 7

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Dean (Education) Session: Int April,Int August,Int February,Int January,Int July,Int June,Int March,Int May,Int November,Int October,Int Sept,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Adminstration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor, with your request to enrol.
This elective allows an individual to pursue an agreed topic with a member of academic staff, or for a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment. For individual study arrangements this is an opportunity to develop independent study skills. The unit is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on a topic related to the supervisor's expertise. The student will meet with the supervisor regularly to discuss progress. For group study arrangements the unit of study is available to engage in a topic that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and/or tutorial exercises.
ARCH9059 General Elective 8

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Dean (Education) Session: Int April,Int August,Int January,Int July,Int June,Int March,Int May,Int November,Int October,Int Sept,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Adminstration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor, with your request to enrol.
This elective allows an individual to pursue an agreed topic with a member of academic staff, or for a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment. For individual study arrangements this is an opportunity to develop independent study skills. The unit is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on a topic related to the supervisor's expertise. The student will meet with the supervisor regularly to discuss progress. For group study arrangements the unit of study is available to engage in a topic that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and/or tutorial exercises.
ARCH9085 General Elective 9

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Dean (Education) Session: Int April,Int August,Int July,Int June,Int March,Int May,Int November,Int October,Int Sept,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Adminstration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor, with your request to enrol.
This elective allows an individual to pursue an agreed topic with a member of academic staff, or for a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.
For individual study arrangements this is an opportunity to develop independent study skills. The unit is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on a topic related to the supervisor's expertise. The student will meet with the supervisor regularly to discuss progress.
For group study arrangements the unit of study is available to engage in a topic that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic.
Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and/or tutorial exercises.
ARCH9086 General Elective 10

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Dean (Education) Session: Int April,Int August,Int July,Int June,Int March,Int May,Int November,Int October,Int Sept,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Adminstration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor, with your request to enrol.
This elective allows an individual to pursue an agreed topic with a member of academic staff, or for a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.
For individual study arrangements this is an opportunity to develop independent study skills. The unit is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on a topic related to the supervisor's expertise. The student will meet with the supervisor regularly to discuss progress.
For group study arrangements the unit of study is available to engage in a topic that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic.
Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and/or tutorial exercises.
ARCH9087 General Elective 11

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Dean (Education) Session: Int April,Int August,Int July,Int June,Int March,Int May,Int November,Int October,Int Sept,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Adminstration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor, with your request to enrol.
This elective allows an individual to pursue an agreed topic with a member of academic staff, or for a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.
For individual study arrangements this is an opportunity to develop independent study skills. The unit is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on a topic related to the supervisor's expertise. The student will meet with the supervisor regularly to discuss progress.
For group study arrangements the unit of study is available to engage in a topic that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic.
Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and/or tutorial exercises.
ARCH9088 General Elective 12

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Dean (Education) Session: Int April,Int August,Int July,Int June,Int March,Int May,Int November,Int October,Int Sept,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Adminstration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor, with your request to enrol.
This elective allows an individual to pursue an agreed topic with a member of academic staff, or for a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.
For individual study arrangements this is an opportunity to develop independent study skills. The unit is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on a topic related to the supervisor's expertise. The student will meet with the supervisor regularly to discuss progress.
For group study arrangements the unit of study is available to engage in a topic that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic.
Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and/or tutorial exercises.
ARCH9061 East Asian Arch and Urbanism (Classical)

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Armstrong Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3hrs per week Prohibitions: DESA2203, ARCH6202 Practical field work: Investigations, field work. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: This unit is offered in odd numbered years only.
The unit provides an introduction to the urban and architectural traditions of East Asia in the pre-industrial era. Beginning with the classical Chinese concept of cosmos, state and society, the unit examines the development of these concepts and their architectural expression in time and in the context of the cultures of China, Korea and Japan. The development of cities and the full range of building types are traced, with cultural interaction and patterns of influence shown in terms of both architecture and its social context.
On successful completion of the unit of study, students will be able to give a clear picture of the philosophical and cultural foundations of urbanism and architecture in the dominant cultures of East Asia; to elucidate the origins and development of urban form from Chinese models in the context of the development of Japanese, Korean & Vietnamese cultural traditions; to provide an understanding of the design and construction principles of the principal building types of the region within the broad context of the Chinese cultural base of architecture and applied arts; to examine and contrast the national characteristics of the major periods of architectural development in each country; and to understand the ongoing influence of building traditions in contemporary culture.
ARCH9063 Urban Morphology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Rod Simpson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial 1 hr/wk (weeks 1-9); tutorial 2 hrs/wk (weeks 10-13) Prohibitions: ARCH9021 Assumed knowledge: Some prior study of architectural, urban or planning history. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The unit outlines the nature of urban morphology, and its rise as an area of study, and explores the evolution of city forms with an emphasis upon urban structure and typology. Most designed components of our cities conform in their general characteristics to identifiable types; they reflect the functions of cities, cultural values and the technological, economic and social circumstances of their times. These have been laid down over particular landforms and previous built forms and landscapes to result in usually complex, and often distinct, local characteristics.
The ability to recognize, investigate and respond to these forms and relationships lies at the heart of good urban design. The development of an historical knowledge, and of sensibilities and skills in the recording and interpretation of urban pattern and form for design purposes is the unit's primary aim. It will develop abilities to make more informed 'readings' of the urban landscape, and judgments about structure and form in contemporary urban design: retention, modification, replacement, etc. On completion, a student will be better able to: recognize structures and patterns, and key building and spatial typologies that contribute to overall city morphology; record and describe these, investigate and explain their origins, and discuss informatively their place in urban change and contemporary design.
It complements the Urban Design - Ideas and Methods unit (ARCH9062) which emphasises the theories and models underpinning the forms that are covered in this unit. It is a core unit that supports the Urban Design Studios in the Urban Design programs and an informative elective for students enrolled in or intending to enrol in the Urban Architecture Research Studio.
ARCH9074 History and Theory of Conservation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/wk Prohibitions: ARCH9003 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The purpose of this unit is to help student is the intent to develop an appropriate level of knowledge in the development of the ideas and practices of conservation over an historical perspective from Classical times to the present in the Western and Non-Western context. Particular emphasis will be placed on the theoretical ideas and practices of Sir George Gilbert Scott, John Ruskin, the Arts and Crafts Movement, SPAB in England and Eugène Voillet-le-Duc in France. The principal aims of the unit are to develop an understanding of the history and theoretical basis of the development if the idea and practice of conservation from Classical times to the present. Additional to this another main aim is to develop an understanding of the historical development of Western traditions of architectural and garden design, as well as to develop a sound intellectual basis for the understanding of the theory and practice of current conservation practice in Australia and beyond. By the end of the unit the student will successfully demonstrate an understanding of the history of the development the idea of conservation through time and in Western and non-Western traditions; an understanding of the development of Western traditions of architecture and garden design; and skills in the applying this knowledge in the assessment of cultural significance in the Australian and international context. Student workload effort expected: class preparation three hours per week; assessment preparation 40 hours per semester.
ARCH9075 New Design in Old Settings

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2hrs/wk, site visits and seminars. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will cover one of the most fundamental aspects of heritage conservation. Designing infill and additions to historic buildings and precincts are the common practice of architecture throughout time in all cultures. From a multi-disciplinary background this course will aim to develop skills in the assessment of the cultural significance of existing buildings, the impact of new works to the heritage significance of historic buildings in existing contexts, visual and spatial literacy in the design of new fabric in old settings. The course will provide a wide range of examples, including wide international perspective. The aims of the unit are to develop an understanding of the history of designing and building new buildings in old settings; to develop an understanding of the major theoretical and practical issues of designing new buildings in old settings; to develop an ability to critically assess the appropriateness of the design of the new in the context of the accordingly accepted current conservation practice in Australia. By the end of the course the student will be able to produce, at a professional level a Heritage Impact Statement as defined by the NSW Heritage Branch.
DESA9008 Object Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Prohibitions: AWSS2020 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In this unit students develop and inter-relate manufacturing and artisan skills with research, analysis and design development. It aims to develop a critical awareness of the nature of all objects, which surround us, exploring cultural, contextual and symbolic aspects of object design as well as functional and aesthetic qualities. The unit aims to increase appreciation of the materiality of objects focusing on timber as an example and introduces students to the wonderful diversity of timber species, environmental and ethical issues associated with their selection, and also emerging alternative materials. Through a series of exercises and production of their major project, students develop knowledge of construction techniques and skills in using wood/plastics tools and machinery and in so doing, build an awareness of industrial and craft practices and how they impact on the design process and outcome. Students will be expected to produce a research process journal and report on how a particular artist/s or art movement has informed or influenced their final project/s.
DESA9009 Public Art

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/wk and 2 x 3 hr field trips Prohibitions: AWSS2001 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This practical unit will provide students with the opportunity to explore changing notions and legislative framework for public art. The course addresses the shift of focus from the making of objects in space to more self-reflexive modes of art making that use public space itself as a medium. Students will be introduced to early experimental works from the 1960s to more recent movements of DIY urbanism, public interventions and relational aesthetics. During the course students will study public artworks, through field trips and/or guest lectures and workshops with local and international artists, and work in public spaces to create their own works.
DESA9011 Photography 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: AWSS2023 or DESA9003 Prohibitions: AWSS2024 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In this unit of study, students will have the opportunity to develop creative photographic projects from initial ideas to production of artwork, producing two major photographic series that function successfully at both an aesthetic and a conceptual level. They will have the opportunity to research and experiment with a variety of different ideas and take an experimental approach to photography, trying different techniques and considering which will best serve the intentions of the artwork. Students will be expected to produce a research process journal and report on how a particular artist/s or art movement has informed or influenced their final project/s.
DESA9012 Screen Printing on Paper

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Prohibitions: AWSS2026 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This studio-based unit will introduce students to various methods and techniques in screen printing. Students will be provided with the opportunity to create an edition or experimental series of screen-prints. In conjunction with the studio work, students will develop a strong awareness and appreciation of screen-printing in both historical and contemporary contexts. Techniques covered include: photo, wax emulsion stencils, preparation of photo-positives, ink technology, registration and print set-up for multi-coloured screen-prints. Through studio practice, set exercises, illustrated talks, gallery visits and library research students will develop an understanding of their creative process and ability to interpret ideas through the medium of screen-printing.
DESA9013 Sculpture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Prohibitions: AWSS2027 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In this elective will use a variety of sculptural techniques to creatively engage with notions of the architectural uncanny. Students will work with a broad range of materials - emphasis is placed on developing students' awareness of the elementary aspects of three-dimensional forms in space. Students will be required to design, plan and complete two main sculptural works, utilizing mediums and techniques explored throughout the semester. In addition to this, students will need to independently research historical precedents and contemporary practice and discuss their ideas and development of their work in class.
DESA9014 Ceramics (Handbuilding)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Prohibitions: AWSS2010 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This practical unit aims to give students the understanding to create ceramic and porcelain constructions that will be fired and glazed. Students will investigate different fabrication techniques such as slip casting, ceramic rapid prototyping and laser cut porcelain. All works will be glazed and fired. The ceramics program utilises the digital fabrication lab within the faculty to investigate the use of digital fabrication techniques in ceramic production. There will be an investigation of ceramics in relation to architecture at both historical and contemporary levels. Set projects will enable students to discover their own means of expression and design of objects and sculptural forms.
DESA9015 Site Specific Art

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBA Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This practical unit aims to give students a broad understanding of site-specific art including its historical development and relationship to other visual art forms and architecture. Students gain experience in ways of selecting and analysing sites for the purposes of incorporation into artwork. Students begin to develop an individual art practice through using a wide range of materials to make temporary site-specific artworks and also begin to develop ways of analysing and evaluating site-specific artworks through directed group discussions.
DESC9014 Building Construction Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Michael Muir Session: Semester 1 Classes: 5 day intensive (9am - 5pm) Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit covers three related areas of investigation: basic building construction practices, advanced building construction practices & sustainable construction. It begins by introducing a number of recurrent themes in construction in Australia at the present time including the idea of building culture, the various modes of delivery and variety of classifications of buildings and building elements, rational construction & construction detailing from first principles. There follows a review of construction techniques of domestic scaled buildings using, where appropriate, examples of well documented and/or accessible exemplars. The second part of the unit reviews current approaches to building technologies employed in more complex public and commercial scaled buildings, particularly with regard to processes of structural system selection, façade systems design and construction and material performance. The fundamentals of heat transfer and effects of external conditions on indoor comfort, aspects of the BCA and integration of services into the building fabric relevant to building services engineers will also be reviewed. Again, accessible exemplars will be covered. Finally the unit will review current issues related to key attributes of buildings which make them sustainable, particularly with regard to material selection, appropriate detailing for energy and resources conservation and building reuse and recycling.
DESC9015 Building Energy Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard Hyde Session: Semester 1a Classes: 5 day intensive (9am-5pm) Mode of delivery: Block Mode
The aim of the unit is to acquaint students with the range of analytical and design tools available for low energy building design; to provide the opportunity for students to become proficient at using some of these tools. Among the techniques and tools explored are: climate data analysis; graphical and model techniques for solar studies; steady state and dynamic heat flow analysis; simplified methods for sizing passive solar elements; computer models of thermal performance; modelling ventilation; estimating energy consumption. Emphasis is given to tools which assist the design of the building fabric rather than building systems. At the end of the unit it is expected that students will: be aware of the importance of quantitative analysis in the design of low energy buildings; have an understanding of the theoretical basis of a range of analytical techniques; be familiar with the range of techniques available for building energy analysis; be able to apply many of these to design analysis; be familiar with the range of thermal analysis computer software available; and be able to use a software package to analyse the thermal performance of a typical small scale building. All of the assignments are designed to provide students with hands-on experience of each of the analysis tools.
DESC9047 Strategic Facility Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard de Dear Session: Semester 1 Classes: 5 day intensive (9am-5pm) Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit is an introduction to forward planning of facilities and its impact on their management, since adjustments and alterations to facilities occur much slower than corporate decisions can be made. It is a management discipline, and as such relies on the central topics of business finance, information systems, and of course management per se. The teaching proceeds from an examination of the purpose of organisations and how the facility assists (or hinders) it achieving its goals. Explaining this understanding is the subject of the first Coursework assignment. In this first half of the unit we will examine the purpose of 'organisations' and their 'facilities'. This includes examination of facilities and how their performance is measured. We shall consider the procedures necessary to obtain this information, and how to identify those areas that have 'elasticity' and are therefore amenable to management initiatives. In the second half of the unit we will consider the potential improvement of the performance in terms of the user organisation's mission. In this regard, occupational health and safety issues are germane. The second coursework assignment will require attendees to consider the means to measure the performance of facilities in order to relate them to corporate purpose.
DESC9048 Operational Facility Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard de Dear Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5 day intensive (9am-5pm) Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Operational Facilities Management is a service industry concerned with the day-to-day operations required to run an organisation's facilities. Primarily facility operation has to satisfy the user organisation's statutory responsibilities. Beyond that, whilst some major costs (such as Rates, Land Taxes, Insurance premiums etc.) are fixed, other costs are amenable to management. Operational Management necessarily requires those charged with the task to evaluate where their effort is spent and where the significant resourcing costs lie, thus allowing them to prioritise and match their effort to the effect.
This unit will involve considerations of subcontracting and examine 'best practice' guidelines for both hard and soft service provision.
DESC9074 Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard de Dear Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5 day intensive (9am-5pm) Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Project Management is specific form of establishing, programming, and coordinating an activity having a specific start point and end point. This body of knowledge - as for example in the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK) - needs to be understood in general terms. Initially project managers must identify and define the services that are needed, (scope) and that their employers are willing to endorse. The activities requiring to be carried out need to be sorted and sequenced; the materials, labour and plant required need to be estimated and procured. Projects involve the management of information, and communications. This unit will develop the student's ability to ascertain and document the scope of a project, schedule a programme, and understand the difficulties in directing it. This unit approaches the profession of Project Management as a cooperative undertaking rather than adversarial: It promotes the adoption of soft-skills rather than that of forceful command and supervision.
DESC9111 Energy Management in Buildings

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Alan Obrart/Prof Richard de Dear Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5 day intensive (9am-5pm) Mode of delivery: Block Mode
The objectives of this unit are to give students an understanding of energy consumption issues in buildings through both design and operation and to give students an awareness of energy auditing and current energy conservation techniques.
This unit is primarily concerned with the management and control of electrical power delivered via the grid. We start with the commercial electricity sales environment; the rental of transmission lines, the rental of the utility company's infrastructure, the non-fossil fuel obligation, and tariff structures. We will concentrate on the processes and the considerations involved in undertaking an energy audit, which will also be the focus of Assignment 1. The options for demand management, including outsourcing will be examined. Passive energy design, which 'locks in' future energy usage will be presented. Active energy systems and their fundamentals: lighting, air conditioning, hot water, ventilation, vertical transportation, and machinery, will be reviewed. Finally methods of assessing energy performance including computer simulation will be covered.
DESC9138 Architectural and Audio Acoustics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Densil Cabrera Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3 hrs/wk Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit introduces the fundamental concepts and issues of audio and architectural acoustics. Unit content: basic acoustical concepts, quantities and units; principles of sound propagation; sound absorption and room acoustics; physiological and psychological acoustics; noise measurement and specification; and principles and specification of sound insulation. By completing this unit students will be able to understand acoustical terminology, and perform calculations applicable to sound in the environment, in buildings, and in audio contexts. They will have the ability to critically assess claims of acoustical performance. This unit will provide the theoretical foundation of advanced units in audio and acoustics.
DESC9169 Daylight in Buildings

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Fiorito Session: Semester 1 Classes: Five day intensive. Prohibitions: DESC9106 Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Daylight can be used in buildings to reduce the energy spent on electric lighting and create aesthetically appealing interiors. Design decisions that affect the success of daylighting in a building span every phase of the design process, from site selection to the application of interior finishes. This unit discusses the role of daylight in indoor illuminated environments. Calculations to predict the quantity and distribution of daylight in spaces and predict the effects of shading devices are covered. Students learn about the local and global variables that influence daylight availability, recognize the challenges and opportunities with daylight in interior spaces, and the appropriate use of daylighting technologies. The integration of daylight with electric light is emphasized.
DESC9192 Energy Code Compliance in Buildings

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Fiorito Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5 day intensive (9am-5pm) Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate architecture or engineering degree Mode of delivery: Block Mode
The aim of this 5 day intensive is to provide the students with the knowledge to prepare a BCA Section J - JV3 modeling exercise suitable for presentation to a principal certifying authority thus demonstrating building compliance.
Students will explore the BCA procedure and sections dealing with alternative solutions, deemed-to-satisfy prescription, verification methods, specifications, and also utilize the GREENSTAR and NABERS Energy computer programmes.
IDEA9106 Design Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 1 Classes: Seminar 3 hrs/wk Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study aims to introduce students to design thinking and how it can be productively applied to different design situations, in both traditional design contexts and to the broader issues faced in contemporary society. Students will acquire the following learning outcomes:
1. An appreciation of the role of design thinking and strategy in traditional and cross-disciplinary contexts
2. Theoretical and practical understanding and application of design theories, methodologies and methods, with a particular emphasis on human-centred design
3. Demonstration of ideation and concept development to innovate solutions to complex problems
4. Awareness of design processes and cognition in collaborative, inter-disciplinary teams
5. Demonstration of persuasive oral/visual communication techniques
MARC6102 3D Computer Design Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dagmar Reinhardt Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and computer laboratory contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Enrolment numbers limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful, please seek permission from the Student Administration Centre (SAC).
This unit of study consolidates students' knowledge of advanced concepts in digital modelling and visualization media available for architectural design. The unit develops conceptual understanding and practical application of these techniques, using commercial modelling and rendering packages. It will help students: generate sophisticated 3D modelling through pre-packaged techniques and scripting processes, assign colour and texture information, generate complex photorealistic images and develop transferable conceptual skills that apply across different 3D packages and for different contexts such as modeling, animation, games assets, and photorealistic rendering. At the conclusion of this unit students should be conversant with 3D modeling and photo-rendering terminology and have the ability to produce sophisticated digital models and photorealistic images. Class preparation: 3 hours/week, assessment preparation 8 hours/semester.
MARC6202 Architecture Workshop A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Glen Hill Session: Int March,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Classes: 40 hours intensive mode Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
Through design projects offered by visiting national and international design practitioners and Faculty staff, this unit of study will provide students with the opportunity to explore a wide range of design issues and ideas in an intensive design studio environment. At the successful completion of this unit of study students will have: extended their ability to develop creative responses to a design brief or situation; extended their understanding of the theoretical, historical, cultural, environmental or technical framework of design; applied these understandings and demonstrated good architectural judgement; and communicated these ideas and understandings effectively through presentation means including drawings, models and CAD, which are assessed in a jury context. This unit is Pass/Fail. Contact hours: 40 hours intensive. Assessment and preparation: 38 hours.
MARC6203 Architecture Workshop B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Glen Hill Session: Int March,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Classes: 40 hours intensive mode. Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
Through design projects offered by visiting national and international design practitioners and Faculty staff, this unit of study will provide students with the opportunity to explore a wide range of design issues and ideas in an intensive design studio environment. At the successful completion of this unit of study students will have: extended their ability to develop creative responses to a design brief or situation; extended their understanding of the theoretical, historical, cultural, environmental or technical framework of design; applied these understandings and demonstrated good architectural judgement; and communicated these ideas and understandings effectively through presentation means including drawings, models and CAD, which are assessed in a jury context. This unit is Pass/Fail. Contact hours: 40 hours intensive. Assessment and preparation: 38 hours.
MARC6204 Graduate Exhibition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Michael Tawa Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; Studio 5 hrs/wk Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study enables students to engage in a collaborative project to research, design and produce a high-profile public exhibition and accompanying yearbook of 2012 graduating work from the BDESARC and MARC programs. The project will exercise and extend design skills and knowledge required to produce a plausible concept for the exhibition and yearbook and to implement the necessary logistical, technical and practical means to realize it. The project integrates multiple activities which exercise different skill sets including research and precedent studies of exhibition, curation and potential venues; developing a critical, plausible and achievable concept for the event; fundraising; budgeting and financial management; marketing and communication; exhibition design; graphic design; construction and installation of the exhibition; production of the yearbook; consultation and engagement with staff and students and event management and implementation. Students will extend their research, design and implementation skills through a real project with a concrete outcome to real-time deadlines and resource limitations.