Bachelor of Design in Architecture

Table A: Units of study in the Bachelor of Design in Architecture

Bachelor of Design in Architecture - Core units of study

Candidates are required to complete all of the following core units:

Junior units of study

BDES1010 Architecture Studio 101

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: BDES1011, BDES1024 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics and HSC English Standard or equivalent Assessment: Minor Project (30%) Major Project (50%), Portfolio (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architecture Studio 101 introduces students to the skills and knowledge required to produce creative, innovative and appropriate solutions to architectural problems. It seeks to develop the architectural imagination as a dialogue between poetic thought and pragmatic material circumstance, nurturing the capacity to move back and forth between conceptual, intuitive levels of reference and the precise skills required for credible technical resolution. It expands students' vocabulary of architecture through study of relevant precedents and examination of techniques for spatial organization. Students develop a preliminary understanding of contemporary architectural theory and deploy a range of architectural representation techniques.
BDES1011 Architectural History/Theory 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ross Anderson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: BDES1010, BDES1024 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics and HSC English Standard or equivalent Assessment: Participation and Written Reviews (50%), Research Reports (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural History/Theory 1 introduces students to the discourse of architectural history and theory. It commences with a concise chronological survey of key periods of architectural history from antiquity to the mid-nineteenth century, providing an overview of the scope of the field and establishing initial points of reference. It then changes focus to investigate more closely the ways in which particular architectural themes and ideas traverse across history, coming to the fore in certain periods and receding in others. Students will interrogate these themes in small groups through intense study of a single significant building, which they will research, document and illustrate in a written report, and re-construct in a suite of finely crafted scale models. They will be introduced to fundamental principles and skills of scholarly research, including locating and evaluating sources, and constructing arguments.
BDES1012 Architectural Communications 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Simon Weir Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture, computer laboratory and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: BDES1020, BDES1023 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics and HSC English Standard or equivalent Assessment: Assignments (70%), Portfolio (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Communications 1 introduces students to fundamental modes of communication that are used to comprehend, conceive, explore, articulate and document architecture. It covers the domains of sketching, technical drawing, model making, verbal and written communication, diagramming and photography. It both familiarises students with necessary technical skills and encourages their creative deployment through practical experimentation.
BDES1020 Architecture Studio 102

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Michael Tawa Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1010 or DESA1001 Corequisites: BDES1012, BDES1023 Prohibitions: DESA1002 Assessment: Project (30%); Major Project (50%); Portfolio (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architecture Studio 102 further develops and applies the skills and knowledge gained in Architecture Studio 101 in response to increasingly concrete and complex programmatic and contextual issues. The design of a single building in a complex urban context is advanced through a series of iterations with an emphasis on practical experimentation at a range of scales and in a range of media. The work is drawn together into a final presentation comprising a finely crafted model and panels of drawings.
BDES1023 Architectural Technologies 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Daniel Ryan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: BDES1012, BDES1020 Prohibitions: DESA1102 Assessment: Assignments (60%), Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Technologies 1 introduces students to the roles that environmental considerations, structures and construction play in architecture. The fundamental concepts underpinning each of these key areas are presented and students demonstrate their developing knowledge of them via project-based assignments. These progressively complex tasks initiate students to the knowledge required to successfully analyse and synthesise construction and technical systems in basic buildings.
BDES1024 Art Workshop 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Chris Fox Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: BDES1010, BDES1011 Assessment: Studio Work (50%); Research Journal and Gallery Review (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In Art Workshop 1, first year architecture students begin to shape and communicate their ideas and experiences through various art practices. A range of studio-based modules within one semester seeks to foster technical, creative and conceptual skills with a particular emphasis on interdisciplinary process, tactility, interactions and critical thinking. A combination of specific disciplines in both contemporary art and the reworking of traditional art media, extend students' understanding of their own creative process and how art may contribute to their architectural study. A framework of lectures, gallery visits and readings asks students to consider the dynamic interchange between historical, cultural and environmental concerns and the field of contemporary art.

Senior units of study

BDES2010 Architecture Studio 201

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Perren Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1020 or DESA1002 Corequisites: BDES2012, BDES2013 Prohibitions: DESA2001 Assessment: Project 1 (25%), Project 2 (25%), Project 3 (40%), Portfolio (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architecture Studio 201 introduces principles of urban landscape, including an understanding of urban ecological and socio-cultural processes as they impact and influence understandings of place and the siting and design of buildings in built topographies. Learning objectives in the first part of the semester include development of knowledge and skills in analysis and the conceptual configuration of contexts that may involve contested ideas and competing interests. In the second part of the semester approaches to the siting, spatial composition and design through urban landscape and architectural strategies that support social sustainability, and an awareness of the inter-connectedness between context and architecture, are explored.
BDES2012 Architectural Communications 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dagmar Reinhardt Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture, computer laboratory and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1012 Corequisites: BDES2010, BDES2013 Prohibitions: DESA2001 Assessment: Assignments (70%), Portfolio (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Communications 2 particularly explores the roles that digital technology can play in contemporary architectural communication. It revisits graphic representation, modelling and verbal and written communication through the lens of computer-aided operations. This unit of study equips students with skills in digital drafting and modelling, texture mapping, lighting, rendering and digital fabrication, and encourages their creative deployment in an iterative design project for a simple specific building typology Students are asked to develop a clear understanding of their chosen typology and represent it through a range of media in order to create an archive of their own analysis of its concepts and expressions. Communications 2 is divided into both guided lab and studio sessions. The lab sessions deploy a variety of analogue techniques and move towards digital design in order to better understand the typology's experimental qualities including scale, proportion, texture and materiality.
BDES2013 Architectural Technologies 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Michael Muir Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1023 Prohibitions: DESA2111 Assessment: Assignments (60%), Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Technologies 2 explores the roles that environmental considerations, structures and construction play in moderately complex medium-scale buildings. Emphasis is placed on developing in students an active awareness of the impact that technical and constructional decisions have on architectural Architectural Technologies 2 explores the role that environmental, structural and constructional considerations play in moderately complex small-scale buildings. Attention is paid to the impact that choices of materials, detailing, structural systems and energy systems, whether passive or active, have on architectural design. Through project-based learning, students develop an active awareness of the important role that appropriate technical and constructional decisions, including architectural details, play in terms of fulfilling conceptual ambitions in tangible works of architecture. Students develop and demonstrate their developing appreciation of these issues via case study analysis, a group project, individual technical drawings and a final examination. Students develop and demonstrate their awareness of these issues via the analysis of case studies, a large project-based assignment, and a final exam.
BDES2020 Architecture Studio 202

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jennifer Ferng Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES2010 or DESA2001 Corequisites: BDES2021 Prohibitions: DESA2002 Assessment: Minor Project (30%), Major Project (50%), Portfolio (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architecture Studio 202 requires the design of a moderately complex building in an urban context. Students develop an increased awareness of the broader social, cultural and environmental consequences of architectural decisions. The design process that is fostered explores the creative tension between intuition and prescription, using accumulative techniques that are intended to elicit unexpected solutions. Participatory and collaborative work processes are promoted and students are required to sensitively and imaginatively negotiate between the internal logic of the design approach and urban strategies. They become increasingly attentive to the complexities of architectural design, from the interpretation of programmatic requirements in respect to the opportunities and limitations of particular site conditions to the spatial and tectonic implications of design decisions.
BDES2021 Architectural History/Theory 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1011 Corequisites: BDES2020 Prohibitions: DESA2111 Assessment: Attendance, discussions and weekly proformas (25%), group research presentation and building analysis (25%), final research essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural History/Theory 2 offers a critical examination of the developments of modern architecture in design, theory, spatial programming and construction technology, as well as its social and environmental effects across the world from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. It provides a broad overview of diverse approaches to modern architecture and rethinks critically how they have advanced different architectural propositions about modern ways of dwelling and building under a constellation of social and cultural conditions. By exposing students to a variety of theoretical issues, this unit of study aims to enhance students' capability to reflect on the values embedded in design, and to develop their understanding of the intertwined relationship between space, society and power.
BDES2024 Art Workshop 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Chris Fox Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1024 Corequisites: BDES2020, BDES2021 Assessment: Studio Work (60%), Research Journal and Gallery Review (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Drawing upon skills and knowledge learnt in Art Workshop 1, students will extend their ability to work with complex ideas while drawing on interdisciplinary practices. A diverse range of studios will host the productions and critical discussions of the work in conjunction with a series of lectures and independent research to be attained outside the workshops. By treating art as a field of open-ended experimentation, with direct consequences for architecture, this course encourages architecture students to undertake a self-directed and research based approach that widens their own practice through working across the multiple streams of information specific to contemporary art.
BDES3010 Architecture Studio 301

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ross Anderson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES2020, or equivalents from DESA2002, DESA2111 Corequisites: BDES3023 Prohibitions: DESA3001 Assessment: Minor Project (30%), Major Project (50%), Portfolio (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architecture Studio 301 engages in students the observational, analytical, interpretative and speculative capacities required to produce a conceptually and tectonically grounded solution to a medium-scale urban architectural problem. It seeks initially to refine skills in the development of a thematic framework for design, the analysis of broad urban contexts and specific site conditions, together with a strong awareness of historical and theoretical conditions for design. Students deploy these analyses in creative and experimental ways via the design of a medium-scale building with a complex functional program. Students are required to integrate multiple criteria - including thematic, conceptual, programmatic, contextual, tectonic and technical concerns - into a persuasive architectural design proposition.
BDES3011 Architectural History/Theory 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lee Stickells Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES2021 or DESA2111 Corequisites: BDES3010, BDES3023 Prohibitions: DAAP3001 Assessment: Opinion Editorial (10%), Lexicon Entry (10%), Quotation for an Installation (15%), Abstract and Bibliography (10%), Research Paper (50%), Tutorial Participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural History/Theory 3 surveys contemporary architectural debates through historical precedents, central texts, and present-day criticism on aesthetic design, cultural influences, mass media, and political events. Architectural discourse can be understood as a wide array of interlocking 'regimes of thought', each of which has its own multiple histories, transformations and unique effects. Students will become generally conversant in the principles of these central theories, and will understand some of their terms and references. Contemporary issues will not be taken at face value but interrogated through theoretical principles raised by the assigned readings. Paying close attention to the exchange between thought and action, students will explore the relevance of the discussed theories to the formation of current circumstances, and to the place of architecture within contemporary culture as a whole. Students take responsibility for their own learning, engaging in continuous reflection and developing skills in oral, written, and visual forms of communication to critique, create and articulate knowledge. They will be introduced to fundamental principles and skills of scholarly research, including locating and evaluating sources, and constructing arguments.
BDES3012 Architectural Communications 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dagmar Reinhardt Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture, computer laboratory and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES2012 or DESA2002 Corequisites: BDES3020 Prohibitions: DESA3001 Assessment: Assignments (70%), Portfolio (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Communications 3 both consolidates students' abilities to effectively communicate architecture using graphic and verbal means and further advances their digital knowledge through concepts of movement and simulation. Students are introduced to interoperable animation and database software used for simulation and documentation of architecture, and they further develop familiarity with advanced digital fabrication. They work in a 3D modelling environment using Rhino, Grasshopper and 3DStudio Max. This unit of study aims to instil in students sensitivity to working creatively with hybrid techniques, and introduces them to dynamic communication procedures deployed in professional architectural practice to move between the digital and the real.
BDES3020 Architecture Studio 302

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francois Blanciak Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES3010 or DESA3001 Corequisites: BDES3012 Prohibitions: DESA3002 Assessment: Minor Project (30%), Major Project (50%), Portfolio (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
As the culminating design studio for the degree, Architecture Studio 302 presents students with the opportunity to express their own theoretical positioning through the design of an important civic building, and to demonstrate the technical and representational capacities that they have developed across the course of their degree. They work with a great deal of autonomy in a collaborative working environment alongside their peers and under the guidance of their tutor to produce conceptually challenging, integrated and compelling pre-professional architectural projects.
BDES3023 Architectural Technologies 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Fiorito Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES2013 or DESA2111 Corequisites: BDES3010 and BDES3011 Prohibitions: DAAP3002 Assessment: Assignments (60%), Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Technologies 3 develops in students an advanced understanding of moderately complex building systems. It addresses the technical design of buildings in their entirety and in their details, through the three interrelated perspectives of environment, structures and construction. As in Architectural Technologies 1 and 2, primary emphasis is placed on developing an understanding that appropriate formal architectural solutions can be the outcome of technological considerations and that, reciprocally, technical solutions can not only support but inform conceptual ambitions. A major project-based assignment, a case study analysis, individual technical drawings and a final examination are used as the vehicles for students to demonstrate the knowledge that they have gained in analyzing and synthesizing the various considerations that are to be addressed in the design of a building system that appropriately responds to, and integrates, the three key technical considerations of environment, structures and construction.

Recommended electives

Students are strongly advised to undertake the following elective units of study:
AWSS1001 Architectural Sketching and Drawing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshop 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Portfolio of works (60%); process journal (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Students may incur costs for materials in some Art Workshops units.
This module aims to provide the student with the knowledge, skills and aptitude required to use a range of fundamental drawing skills and media to make a portfolio of drawings based on observation of the physical world, in particular the built world. On successful completion of this unit of study students will have demonstrated familiarity with a range of drawing media and techniques, including charcoal, graphite, conte crayon, pen, brush and ink, as well as being introduced to colour and mixed media. Students will be encouraged to develop a commitment to the practice of drawing as a discipline in its own right as well as a fundamental skill in all design areas. Each technique and approach will be presented against a background of art history and current architectural practice. Students will understand the importance of maintaining a diary as a site to record all their visual and conceptual research, and in which to draw on a daily basis as a means to develop both skills and ideas.

Master of Architecture - Prerequisite unit of study

Candidates wishing to proceed to the Master of Architecture are required to complete the following prerequisite unit. This unit may count towards the senior Faculty electives.
BDES3025 Architectural Professional Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Suzanah Potts Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: BDES3020 Assessment: Reports (20%), Assignment (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Professional Practice introduces students in the final semester of their undergraduate degree to the professional practice of architecture, focusing on design development within regulatory and practice management frameworks. Students are introduced to the fundamental principles of key regulatory requirements and critically deploy their understandings by investigating local practice case studies. They further develop a capacity to apply their knowledge in a particular context through an architectural design project that they take to Development Application level using current best practice.

Faculty electives

Candidates are required to complete a minimum of 42 credit points of elective units of study, including a minimum of 12 credit points of senior elective units of study from those listed below. Candidates who have passed 96 credit points with a Credit average may request permission to enrol in graduate units from Table G, the table of graduate units of study, or Table M, the Master of Architecture, in this handbook.

Junior units of study

AWSS1001 Architectural Sketching and Drawing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshop 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Portfolio of works (60%); process journal (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Students may incur costs for materials in some Art Workshops units.
This module aims to provide the student with the knowledge, skills and aptitude required to use a range of fundamental drawing skills and media to make a portfolio of drawings based on observation of the physical world, in particular the built world. On successful completion of this unit of study students will have demonstrated familiarity with a range of drawing media and techniques, including charcoal, graphite, conte crayon, pen, brush and ink, as well as being introduced to colour and mixed media. Students will be encouraged to develop a commitment to the practice of drawing as a discipline in its own right as well as a fundamental skill in all design areas. Each technique and approach will be presented against a background of art history and current architectural practice. Students will understand the importance of maintaining a diary as a site to record all their visual and conceptual research, and in which to draw on a daily basis as a means to develop both skills and ideas.
DECO1012 Design Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rob Saunders Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1hr/wk, tutorial 2hrs/wk Assessment: Tutorials and participation (10%); three programming assignments (90%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Enrolment limited by teaching resources. Permission required unless enrolled in the Bachelor of Design Computing or the BST. Other students may apply directly to the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Student Administration Centre (SAC) for a place.
This unit aims to teach students an understanding of the stages involved in the development of software for design; skills in the design and implementation of software for design tasks and in the development of software as design tools. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will have demonstrated: skills in using software tools to build interactive, visual design applications through individual programming assignments; knowledge of object-oriented programming concepts through individual programming assignments; implementation techniques such as editing, using libraries, and compilation and runtime environments through individual programming assignments; knowledge of the Java programming language including: classes, methods, object creation, instance and local variables, primitive and object types, simple I/O, and control flow through individual and group programming assignments; knowledge of software design and development processes including analysis of requirements, design of data-structures, functions and classes, software development lifecycles, and managing software projects. This unit is a core unit in the Bachelor of Design Computing program.
DESA1004 Designing with Surfaces and Light

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Davis Session: Semester 2,Summer Main,Winter Main Classes: Online Assessment: Assignment (40%), Assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: On-line
Note: Enrolment numbers limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful, please seek permission from the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Student Administration Centre.
Objects only become visible when light reflects off of them. This unit explores the ways in which light interacts with surfaces, objects, and the human visual system. Architectural design decisions regarding the lighting, as well as exterior and interior surfaces of a building, alter the perceptual experience of users and should be done thoughtfully.
This unit introduces students to the way humans perceive and experience the built environment. It covers some of the fundamental properties of light, mechanisms of human perception, and the ways that light interacts with surfaces. The application of these topics to design decisions is also discussed. Students demonstrate their understanding of the presented material and apply their knowledge to critically analyze their own environments.
DESP1001 Introductory Urban Design and Planning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Martin Payne Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2 hrs/wk; tutorial 6 hrs/semester Assessment: Assessment is based on a workbook, which will present background studies, a strategic analysis and a reasoned proposal in response to a planning and design problem, besides a review of literature. Literature review (40%); background studies (20%); strategic analysis (20%); proposal (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Students will develop knowledge of key planning ideas, and be able appreciate the context relevant to designing the built environment. They will be able to prepare strategic analyses of basic planning situations, and to prepare design proposals with supporting arguments. On successful completion of this unit, each student will be able to demonstrate their ability: to prepare short documents, using photos, maps, drawings and other illustrations, with annotated comments and supporting text, to present site analyses; to use basic ideas (such as: vistas, viewing and over-viewing, connectivity, legibility, enclosure, uses, activities, environs, links, built form, interest, amenity networks, nodes) in reviewing design situations and preparing simple site analyses; to apply a critical and reflective approach in understanding design situations, and in preparing informative reports. This is an elective unit, which introduces the Urban Design and Planning stream in the Bachelor of Design in Architecture. Elective in other programs. It is relevant to all architectural design students; it teaches students how to prepare planning studies and basic site plans as preparatory phases of designing buildings and places.

Senior units of study

AWSS2001 Public Art

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Zanny Begg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk plus field trips Assessment: Practical work (60%); participation, written component and oral presentation (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This practical unit will provide students with the opportunity to explore changing notions and legislative framework for public art. The course addresses the shift of focus from the making of objects in space to more self-reflexive modes of art making that use public space itself as a medium. Students will be introduced to early experimental works from the 1960s to more recent movements of DIY urbanism, public interventions and relational aesthetics. During the course students will study public artworks, through field trips and/or guest lectures and workshops with local and international artists, and work in public spaces to create their own works.
AWSS2002 Site Specific Art

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Practical work (60%); participation, written component and oral presentation (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This practical unit aims to give students a broad understanding of site-specific art including its historical development and relationship to other visual art forms and architecture. Students gain experience in ways of selecting and analysing sites for the purposes of incorporation into artwork. Students begin to develop an individual art practice through using a wide range of materials to make temporary site-specific artworks and also begin to develop ways of analysing and evaluating site-specific artworks through directed group discussions.
AWSS2010 Ceramics (Handbuilding)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Studio projects (70%); Process Journal and associated assignments (30%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This practical unit aims to give students the understanding to create ceramic and porcelain constructions that will be fired and glazed. Students will investigate different fabrication techniques such as slip-casting, ceramic rapid prototyping and laser cut porcelain. The ceramics program utilises the digital fabrication lab within the faculty to investigate the use of digital fabrication techniques in ceramic production. There will be an investigation of ceramics in relation to architecture at both historical and contemporary levels. Set projects will enable students to discover their own means of expression and design of objects and sculptural forms. Projects include slip casting, vacuum formed moulds and ceramic powder printing. Various surface finishes such as brushwork, decals and glazing will be introduced.
AWSS2013 Digital Video

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Denis Beaubois Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Projects (60%); participation, written and practical components (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This practical unit will explore the language of moving images with particular reference to the role digial media plays in the contemporary urban context. This subject assumes no prior knowledge of editing software; students will learn about conventions of filming, framing and editing; and the technical aspects of pre-production, production and post-production. The subject will cover a range of experimental cinematic movements and installation and media art. Emphasis is placed on experimentation, skills development and conceptual engagement.
AWSS2015 General Drawing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Portfolio (60%); Process Journal (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This module aims to provide the student with the knowledge and aptitude required to use a range of fundamental drawing skills and media to make a portfolio of drawings based on observation of the physical world. It aims to increase the student's level of skill in representational, interpretive and expressive areas of drawing. The focus is on the formal aspects of composition and perspective as well as mixed media and experimental approaches. Students use a wide variety of mark-making methods to render line, tonal value and texture. Students are provided with the opportunity to combine sound observational skills with imaginative and experimental techniques in order to encourage a personal vision and a commitment to the practice of drawing. Drawing is a discipline in its own right as well as a fundamental skill in all design areas. Each technique and approach will be presented against a background of art history and theory.
AWSS2020 Object Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Assumed knowledge: Completion of ATSC workshop proficiency class Assessment: Portfolio of works and presentation (60%); process journal and associated assignments (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In this unit students develop and inter-relate manufacturing and artisan skills with research, analysis and design development. It aims to develop a critical awareness of the nature of all objects which surround us, exploring cultural, contextual and symbolic aspects of object design as well as functional and aesthetic qualities. Sustainability and social issues relating to their manufacture, use and disposal are also discussed. The unit aims to increase appreciation of the materiality of objects focusing on timber as an example and introduces students to the diversity of timber species, environmental and ethical issues associated with their selection, and also emerging alternative materials. Through a series of exercises and production of their major project, students develop knowledge of construction techniques and skills in using wood/plastics tools and machinery and in so doing, build an awareness of industrial and craft practices and how they impact on the design process and outcome.
AWSS2023 Photography 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Process Journal and associated assignments (40%); final project and presentation (60%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This practical unit assumes students have little or no understanding of dark room practice. It aims to give students an understanding of how photography functions as a contemporary visual medium, including its connection to modernism and architecture. Students will gain knowledge of the principles and practise of camera operations, the production of high quality black and white negatives and prints in small studio style classes. This module covers the use of a 35mm SLR camera, image composition, use of lighting, film developing and printing photographs. Practical work includes darkroom, gallery visits, completion of set class projects, technical exercises, class discussions and the production of a portfolio. Students should have access to a 35mm SLR film camera.
AWSS2024 Photography 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: AWSS2023 or by either presenting a portfolio of b&w photographic work or by presenting a transcript indicating a minimum of a full semester unit in b&w photography Assessment: Process Journal and associated assignments (40%); final project and presentation (60%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In this unit of study, students will have the opportunity to develop creative photographic projects from initial ideas to production of artwork, producing two major photographic series that function successfully at both an aesthetic and a conceptual level. They will have the opportunity to research and experiment with a variety of different ideas and take an experimental approach to photography, trying different techniques and considering which will best serve the intentions of the artwork.
AWSS2026 Screen Printing on Paper

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Research Journal (30%); portfolio of Studio Works (70%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This elective covers a variety of traditional and experimental techniques that will enable students to design and print a series of works within both the fine and graphic art contexts. This elective will provide students with the knowledge and skills to design for and print on paper; awareness and appreciation of screen printing in historical and contemporary art contexts; a range of techniques and creative exercises that can be developed into an edition or a series of experimental printed works. Techniques covered include: photo, wax emulsion and paper stencils, ink technology, registration and print set-up for multi-coloured prints.
AWSS2027 Sculpture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Journal and associated assignments (40%); projects and presentation (60%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In this elective will use a variety of sculptural techniques to creatively engage with notions of the architectural uncanny. Students will work with a broad range of materials - emphasis is placed on developing students' awareness of the elementary aspects of three-dimensional forms in space. Students will be required to design, plan and complete two main sculptural works, utilizing mediums and techniques explored throughout the semester. In addition to this, students will need to independently research historical precedents and contemporary practice and discuss their ideas and development of their work in class.
DAAE2001 20th Century Australian Architecture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Assessment: One seminar presentation and one 3,000 word essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The unit will introduce students to a range of architectural styles and aspirations in Australia. Lectures and seminars will cover key buildings representative of their period. At the conclusion, students will be familiar with a range of styles and their characteristics. They will undertake individual self-directed research and learn how to record and present the results of this research. Students will also acquire an appreciation of the ideals and aspirations that support the architectural styles examined, and how these are related to wider social and cultural movements. On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to demonstrate: a familiarity with a range of Australian buildings and styles. Site tours will examine specific buildings, and these will be recorded in a site visit log; the ability to research, record and present a specific building in Sydney; the ability to link a specific building to other works of a similar style and period. This will be assessed in the seminar presentation and in the submitted essay.
DAAE2002 Architecture, Place and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Assessment: Graphic and Written Pressentation on Research (40%); Final Research Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit aims to investigate the relationship between architecture, place and society and to explore the meaning of cultural and social sustainability in architectural design. The unit assumes that designers will increasingly work in places where cultures are unfamiliar at home or in a global context, and that an ability to understand, and interpret, diverse cultures, and the way design occurs in diverse locations, is an important area of knowledge for designers. A key aspect of social sustainability is the practice of social responsibility, and the unit explores how this may occur, including involving people in the design process. On completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate: an ability to better understand the connections between architecture place and society, and the social, cultural, political and economic factors affecting sustainable environments; skills and knowledge in participatory processes necessary for effective communication about environmental design issues; increased critical awareness about social responsibility in relation to the practice of architecture and the design of the built environment, and an ability to exercise this awareness. This unit will provide architecture students with knowledge of the relationship between culture and architecture, as well as practical knowledge of the social aspects of design practice. It is intended that students from other disciplines will develop a critical awareness of the built environment as a form of cultural production, and the possibilities for their participation in its production.
DAAE2005 Designing with Colour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Davis Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Early,Winter Main Classes: Online. Expected total workload is approximately 35 hours online, plus independent study and preparation. Assumed knowledge: DESA1004 Assessment: Assignment (40%), Assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: On-line
Note: Enrolment numbers limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful, please seek permission from the Student Administration Centre (SAC).
All design decisions involve decisions about colour within the fields of architecture, applied design and art. This unit presents knowledge about colour theory as well as research-based information about colour and associated topics that can be used in design. Information and knowledge about colour can vary in quality and reliability, which is demonstrated. Students apply their skills and knowledge about colour theory and colour design in the assignments of this unit. This unit covers the processes of colour vision and other aspects of visual perception. It also explores colour application from the Pre-history period, as well as selected colour theories of the Renaissance period through to the 21st century. Common colour-related constructs and the application of these in art, architecture and design are discussed. In completing the assessments tasks, students must demonstrate understanding of the knowledge presented in learning modules of the unit and critically analyse and apply knowledge related to colour design and application.
DAAE2008 Innovative Building Structures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Fiorito Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2 hrs/wk; tutorial 1 hr/wk Prerequisites: BDES2013 Assessment: Group Report (60%); Individual Report (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of this unit is to engage students in detailed studies of innovative building structures, covering the three aspects of innovation in architectural and structural design (modeling, materials and technology). The main topics covered are: Architectural Form and Structural Function; interpretation of basic (arch, beam, column, space and spatial portal) and advanced (truss, vault, dome, shell) structural principles with an intuitive graphical method, the Load Plan Method. Examples of significant case studies will be shown in interpreted (works by A. Gaudi, B. Fuller, F. Otto, N. Grimshaw, S. Calatrava, N. Foster, R. Piano and others); Biomimetics; bioinspired structures as a way to increase structural efficiency. Innovative structural materials: the use of glass as structural material, innovative reinforcements for composite structures, smart and nanostructured materials; Kinetic architecture: structural movement as the 4th architectural dimension. A case study assignment will be used to assess student's competence in investigating and presenting case studies and being able to identify and evaluate issues and factors contributing to innovative structural solutions.
DAAE2009 Designing Effective Visual Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof William Martens Session: Semester 1,Summer Early,Winter Main Classes: Online; expected total workload is approximately 35 hours online, plus independent study and preparation Assessment: Critical Evaluation & Analysis (50%); Report (50%) Mode of delivery: On-line
Visual communications such as PowerPoint presentations are now a common expectation at any level of employment. But how can we make sure our visual communication presentations are effective? The aims of this unit are: (1) Awareness that the design of effective visual communications (such as PowerPoint presentations, etc) involves decisions about the elements and principles of design. (2) To present knowledge about design theory as well as research- based information about design and associated topics that can be applied to visual communications design. (3) To demonstrate how information and knowledge about the mechanics of human vision and theories of visual perception can contribute to the design of effective visual communications. (4) To have students use their skills and knowledge about the elements and principles of design as well as theories of visual perception in the assessment tasks of this unit. The information provided in this course builds on Bauhaus principles and elements of design, and examines current theories of design within the context of visual communications design. In addition, students are provided with evidence-based information about visual perception and the cognitive processing of information relevant to visual communication design. The assessments tasks provide students with the opportunity to examine and evaluate examples of visual communications, and apply their knowledge in practical exercises in which they can demonstrate their understanding of the information presented in the learning modules of the unit.
DAAE3001 Sustainable Architectural Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Michael Muir Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/wk lectures, tutorial/lab 1 hr/wk for weeks 1 to 12 Prerequisites: DESA2111 or BDES1023 or DESA1102 Assessment: Case Study (20%), Design Exercise (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The unit of study begins by exploring the concept of ecologically sustainable design as it applies to architectural practice and defines those key attributes of buildings which make them sustainable. The second part of the unit discusses the implication of applying sustainable design principles upon contemporary architectural practice. Potential new design paradigms are explored which could lead to more sustainable design practice in the future. At the end of the unit of study students will be expected to: have explored the form making and space making potential of sustainable design principles by critically examining relevant contemporary architecture; demonstrate their ability to locate relevant published literature on sustainable architecture and to critically examine and discuss it in relation to the themes explored in the unit of study; demonstrate their ability to critique key recent buildings claimed by their designers to be sustainable and to evaluate these claims against established sustainable design principles; enunciate a personal position on the impact on applying sustainable design principles on future design practice. On the successful completion of this unit of study students will have demonstrated: competence at critically evaluating buildings which their designers have claimed to be sustainable through a series of case studies performed in small groups; their ability to formulate and articulate a written response to a series of propositions developed in lectures addressing the impact of sustainability issues on future architectural practice.
This unit is an Architecture Elective in the Bachelor of Design in Architecture and elective in other courses.
DECO2010 Designing Social Media

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rob Saunders Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: 1 x group work on sociable media (30%), 1 x individual analysis document (20%), 1 x group design project (40%), weekly tutorials (10%), attendance and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Enrolment numbers limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful, please seek permission from the Student Administration Centre (SAC). First preference to Bachelor of Design Computing students.
The aim of this unit is to understand principles and technologies relevant to the design of social media, that is, media supporting social interaction. Design principles for the representation of personal and collective identity, the history and theory of social networks, and the creation of virtual spaces for socialisation are emphasised. Students study methods for motivating collaboration, learning how to analyse social media through the notions of crowdsourcing, produsage and gaming. Students will gain proficiency designing social media platforms and usage scenarios that solve a range of design challenges. Students will participate in, critically review and prototype new forms of sociable media to demonstrate their understanding of the subject matter. This is a core unit in the Bachelor of Design Computing.
DECO2101 Digital Image Design & Representation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Caitlin de Berigny Wall Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial, 2 hrs/wk Prohibitions: DECO1100 Assessment: Three assignments (90%); attendance (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Places in this unit are limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful, please seek permission from the Student Administration Centre (SAC). Bachelor of Design in Architecture students will receive preference. Not available in the Bachelor of Design Computing.
In studying this unit, students will: develop an understanding of how to conceptualise and communicate design concepts through image and video production; be introduced to digital image representation and technology through design projects; become proficient with the elements of digital design technology including digital images, photography and video; develop skills in digital imaging software such as Photoshop, and video software such as Final Cut Pro; and develop experience with significant digital design issues relating to photography and video. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will have demonstrated skills in sourcing, developing, designing, and creating documentary video content through a series of tutorial exercises; knowledge of how to incorporate documentary video design will be developed in tutorial exercises. This unit is not available in the Bachelor of Design Computing but may be taken as an elective in other programs.
DECO2102 Interactive Multimedia Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Martin Tomitsch Session: Semester 2a Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial 2 hrs/wk; studio 3 hrs/wk for 7 weeks Prohibitions: DECO2200 Assessment: Design project (80%); tutorial activities (10%); participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Places in this unit are limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful, please seek permission from the Student Administration Centre (SAC). Bachelor of Design Architecture students will receive preference. Not available in the Bachelor of Design Computing.
This unit introduces interactivity and multimedia through design projects. Students will develop technical as well as methodological skills for designing and developing interactive products and services. Elements of interaction design will be addressed for various media and platforms, including the Internet and mobile devices. Methods for interaction design that will be covered include requirement analysis, storyboarding, and prototyping. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will have demonstrated: the application of knowledge of interaction design to a range of contexts, for the Internet and standalone media, through the design project; knowledge of narrative and engagement in non-linear interactive contexts through the design project; knowledge of scripting and markup languages for enabling dynamic content and interactive designs, e.g. HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, through tutorial exercises; understanding of different types of user interaction, with an emphasis on traditional interfaces, but including innovative methods of interaction.
DECO2103 3D Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1hr/wk; tutorial 2 hrs/wk Prohibitions: DECO1008 Assessment: Tutorials: (10%); Geometric Modeling (20%); Lighting and Texture (30%); Fully Rendered Model (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Places in this unit are limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful, please seek permission from the Student Administration Centre (SAC). Bachelor of Design Architecture students will receive preference. Not available in the Bachelor of Design Computing.
This unit aims to give the student an understanding of the basic concepts of modelling and presentation so that they will develop skills in creating and using 3D models for various design tasks. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will have: demonstrated an understanding of how physical objects are represented in 3D digital models by modelling various 3D geometric entities; demonstrated critical judgment, be capable of rigorous and independent thinking and use appropriate information technology techniques to communicate their knowledge through the production of efficient design presentations and documentation; an understanding of boundary representations, solid and parametric modelling, texture mapping, light sources, camera locations and projections, and model constraints through model development and presentation; acquire skills in using a 3D modelling system for 2D and 3D objects and in creating photorealistic images that accurately and efficiently describe intent, structure, geometric and surface variations of 3D models. These skills will be assessed through the tutorial exercises and the submission of 3D models. This unit is not available in the Bachelor of Design Computing.
DECO3003 Design Computing Research Opportunity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Martin Tomitsch Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk and tutorial 2 hrs/wk, commencing week 2 Prerequisites: 96 credit points and minimum WAM of 65. Assumed knowledge: Computer programming. Assessment: Two progress reports (2 x 15%); final report (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students from other faculties may apply directly to the Architecture Student Administration Centre (SAC).
The aim of the Design Computing Research Opportunity is to allow a student to participate in each phase of research activity: developing a research plan in conjunction with the staff member; proposal writing; conducting research; analysing data; and presenting results in oral and written form. At the end of the unit the student will have experience in developing research proposals, conducting research and presenting their results. Design Computing Research Opportunity offers the opportunity for a Bachelor of Design Computing student to work with an academic staff member on research-based intellectual collaborations. The student works on an existing research activity of the staff member. It can be one of the most important means for students to develop an understanding of research as an intellectual endeavour and to foster mentoring research relationships with academic staff.
The research proposal, which is the first progress report, will demonstrate the student's ability to work within an existing research. The second progress report will identify the student's capacity to work on a research project within an existing research program and becomes a demonstration of the research skills being developed. The final report will take the form of a research paper and is used to develop the student's skills in presenting research results.
DECO3005 Advanced Interaction Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, Tutorial 2hrs/wk Prerequisites: DECO2200 or DECO2102 Assessment: Design project (90%); participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Enrolment numbers limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful, please seek permission from the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Student Administration Centre. First preference to Bachelor of Design Computing students.
The objectives of the unit are to extend interaction design fundamentals learned in Interaction Design Studio (DECO2200) or Interactive Multimedia Design (DECO2102); to understand how humans interact with digital interfaces; to develop interface design that elicits engagement and interaction; and to develop an advanced knowledge of interaction design principles and methodologies. Students will develop further understanding of interaction design and develop strategies to apply this understanding to interactive design projects. The unit focuses on methodologies for interface and interaction design. Programming tools learned in previous units, such as HTML, Javascript, and Processing, will be used for creating interactive prototypes. Applications will be developed and deployed for different platforms, such as physical interfaces, mobile platforms, public screens. At the conclusion of the unit students should have a well-developed understanding of interaction design demonstrated through the design and implementation of an interactive product; an understanding of aesthetic design and usability principles applied to interface design eliciting user engagement and demonstrated knowledge of responsive media; and an understanding of technical methods to link content and external data (e.g. from sensors or online sources) to the interactive product.
DECO3006 Principles of Animation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rob Saunders Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1hr/wk, tutorial 2 hr/wk, commencing Week 2 Prerequisites: DECO1008 or DECO2103 Assessment: Conceptual development (20%); fundamental techniques (30%); final project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Enrolment numbers limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful, please seek permission from the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Student Administration Centre (SAC). First preference to Bachelor of Design Computing students.
The aims of this unit of study are to introduce the fundamental principles of the animation process, to develop an understanding of the process involved in developing character, text and motion graphics based animation, and to develop an understanding of the integration between 2D artwork and 3D composition. Students will develop an understanding of the application of animation in the production of film, television, Web, electronic art, and other platforms that can show visual content. Students will acquire basic animation skills, transfer traditional animation principles to computer graphics, and develop the skills to create an animated sequence and the critical vocabulary to describe animation. Basic knowledge will be related to foundational technical skills in industry standard software for animation and aims to serve as an introduction to further animation learning. At the conclusion of this unit a student should have the ability to perform various animated techniques to be incorporated into a variety of platforms.
DESA3441 Design Architecture Independent Study A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weekly meetings by arrangement. Prerequisites: 48 credit points and WAM of at least 70. Assessment: Report or equivalent (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Adminstration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor and program coordinator, with your request to enrol.
This unit provides an opportunity to high achieving students to develop an interest in a specific Design Architecture topic; to develop skills in independent study; and to develop advanced report writing skills. This elective is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on an agreed topic related to Design Architecture. The student will meet with the supervisor weekly to discuss progress. The outcome should be a reflective report on a selected topic demonstrating mastery of the topic.
DESA3442 Design Architecture Independent Study B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weekly meetings by arrangement. Prerequisites: 48 credit points and WAM of at least 70. Assessment: Report or equivalent (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Administration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor and program coordinator, with your request to enrol.
This unit provides an opportunity to high achieving students to develop an interest in a specific Design Architecture topic; to develop skills in independent study; and to develop advanced report writing skills.
This elective is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on an agreed topic related to Design Architecture. The student will meet with the supervisor weekly to discuss progress.
The outcome should be a reflective report on a selected topic demonstrating mastery of the topic.
DESA3443 Design Architecture Independent Study C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weekly meetings by arrangement. Prerequisites: 48 credit points and WAM of at least 70. Assessment: Report or equivalent (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Administration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor and program coordinator, with your request to enrol.
This unit provides an opportunity to high achieving students to develop an interest in a specific Design Architecture topic; to develop skills in independent study; and to develop advanced report writing skills.
This elective is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on an agreed topic related to Design Architecture. The student will meet with the supervisor weekly to discuss progress.
The outcome should be a reflective report on a selected topic demonstrating mastery of the topic.
DESA3444 Design Architecture Independent Study D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weekly meetings by arrangement. Prerequisites: 48 credit points and WAM of at least 70. Assessment: Report or equivalent (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Administration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor and program coordinator, with your request to enrol.
This unit provides an opportunity to high achieving students to develop an interest in a specific Design Architecture topic; to develop skills in independent study; and to develop advanced report writing skills.
This elective is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on an agreed topic related to Design Architecture. The student will meet with the supervisor weekly to discuss progress.
The outcome should be a reflective report on a selected topic demonstrating mastery of the topic.
DESA3551 Design Architecture General Elective A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Int July,Int June,Int November,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Prerequisites: 48 credit points. Assessment: Assignments as determined by Unit Coordinator (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Administration Centre (SAC), signed by the elective coordinator, with your request to enrol.
This elective allows a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.
This unit of study is available to a minimum of 10 students to engage in a topic related to Design Architecture that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. The topic for this elective is proposed by a member of academic staff and approved by the Associate Dean (Undergraduate).
Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and tutorial exercises.
DESA3552 Design Architecture General Elective B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Int January,Int June,Int November,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Prerequisites: 48 credit points. Assessment: Assignments as determined by Unit Coordinator (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Administration Centre (SAC), signed by the elective coordinator, with your request to enrol.
This elective allows a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.
This unit of study is available to a minimum of 10 students to engage in a topic related to Design Architecture that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. The topic for this elective is proposed by a member of academic staff and approved by the Associate Dean (Undergraduate).
Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and tutorial exercises.
DESA3553 Design Architecture General Elective C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Int June,Int November,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Prerequisites: 48 credit points. Assessment: Assignments as determined by Unit Coordinator (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Administration Centre (SAC), signed by the elective coordinator, with your request to enrol.
This elective allows a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.This unit of study is available to a minimum of 10 students to engage in a topic related to Design Architecture that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. The topic for this elective is proposed by a member of academic staff and approved by the Associate Dean (Education). Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and tutorial exercises.
DESA3554 Design Architecture General Elective D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Int January,Int June,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Prerequisites: 48 credit points. Assessment: Assignments as determined by Unit Coordinator (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Administration Centre (SAC), signed by the elective coordinator, with your request to enrol.
This elective allows a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment. This unit of study is available to a minimum of 10 students to engage in a topic related to Design Architecture that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. The topic for this elective is proposed by a member of academic staff and approved by the Associate Dean (Education). Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and tutorial exercises.
DESP2001 Planning for the Public Domain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Martin Payne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/wk Assessment: workbook presenting studies, reviewing materials, envisaging work to be done, demonstrating critical thinking, and presenting proposals (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Students will be able to: undertake background studies to inform designing for various elements of the public domain (streets and roads, open space and public places, car parking, pedestrian networks and centres); formulate and respond to complex planning problems; prepare and present simple proposals; use basic terms, concepts and methods in practical urban design and planning situations. On successful completion of this unit, each student will be able to demonstrate their ability to: to prepare short documents, using photos, maps, drawings and other illustrations, with annotated comments and supporting text, to present planning studies and proposals; to use basic ideas (such as: vistas, viewing and over-viewing, connectivity, legibility, enclosure, uses, activities, environs, links, built form, interest, amenity networks, nodes) in reviewing design situations and preparing site analyses and proposals; to apply a critical and reflective approach in understanding planning and design situations, and in preparing informative documents which move from planning studies to proposals with supporting arguments; to be able to prepare proposals for built form outcomes and related planning instruments, with supporting studies and arguments.
DESP2002 Planning for the Built Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Martin Payne Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Assessment and presentation (20%); final presentation (20%); workbook (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Students will be able to: undertake background studies to inform designing for various elements of the public domain (streets and roads, open space and public places, car parking, pedestrian networks and centres); formulate and respond to complex planning problems; prepare and present simple proposals; use basic terms, concepts and methods in practical urban design and planning situations. On satisfactory completion of this unit each student will demonstrate capability: to prepare short documents, using photos, maps, drawings and other illustrations, with annotated comments and supporting text, to present planning studies and proposals; to use basic ideas (such as: vistas, viewing and over-viewing, connectivity, legibility, enclosure, uses, activities, environs, links, built form, interest, amenity networks, nodes) in reviewing design situations and preparing site analyses and proposals; to apply a critical and reflective approach in understanding planning and design situations, and in preparing informative documents which move from planning studies to proposals with supporting arguments; to be able to prepare proposals for built form outcomes and related planning instruments, with supporting studies and arguments.
MARC6204 Graduate Exhibition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Michael Tawa Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; Studio 5 hrs/wk Assessment: Preliminary exhibition design (individual) (15%); Logbook/Journal & performance assessment against criteria stated in the Student Role Statement (individual) (55%); Exhibition and Yearbook (group) (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study enables students to engage in a collaborative project to research, design and produce a high-profile public exhibition and accompanying yearbook of 2012 graduating work from the BDESARC and MARC programs. The project will exercise and extend design skills and knowledge required to produce a plausible concept for the exhibition and yearbook and to implement the necessary logistical, technical and practical means to realize it. The project integrates multiple activities which exercise different skill sets including research and precedent studies of exhibition, curation and potential venues; developing a critical, plausible and achievable concept for the event; fundraising; budgeting and financial management; marketing and communication; exhibition design; graphic design; construction and installation of the exhibition; production of the yearbook; consultation and engagement with staff and students and event management and implementation. Students will extend their research, design and implementation skills through a real project with a concrete outcome to real-time deadlines and resource limitations.