Music

Music

Music

CMPN1000 Composition Through Improvisation 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Judy Bailey Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1hr workshop/wk Assessment: Weekly assignments (70%), final recorded composition (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims, through performance, to help students develop vital aural and improvisational skills which will significantly enhance their compositional process.
CMPN1003 Composition Through Improvisation 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Judy Bailey Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1hr workshop/wk Prerequisites: CMPN1000 Assessment: Weekly assignments (70%), final recorded composition (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit continues to develop through performance and investigation into experimental modes of presentation, to help students develop vital aural and improvisational skills which will significantly enhance their compositional process.
CMPN1611 Instrumentation and Orchestration

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Carl Vine Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour seminar/wk Assessment: Short orchestration exercises (45%), score analysis presentation (25%), Large ensemble arrangement (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Instrumentation and Orchestration enhances students' knowledge of the key instruments of the modern orchestra. The study of instrumentation assists in comprehending the technical limitations and creative potential of the main instrumental families of the orchestra. The unit examines a wide range of instrumental combinations in diverse music styles, and will enhance students' understanding of proper score layout, aural analysis of orchestral excerpts and visual analysis of complex scores. Additional content will include limited study of acoustics and timbre perception, arranging and transcribing as well as notational standards and conventions.
CMPN1612 New Music, New Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Ricketson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hour seminar/wk Prerequisites: CMPN1611 Assessment: Two assignments (2x50%) comprising an analytical essay and a composition exercise or performance project. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
New Music, New Thinking is designed to challenge the way in which students' understand the music of our time. Through in-depth analyses of music of the past 100 years, students will be exposed to a variety of compositional techniques, concepts and aesthetics. Areas of enquiry may include noise, stasis, pastiche, the open form, unconventional instruments and microtonality. The content and assessment of this subject will enable students to further develop critical thinking and judgments with regards to the composition of new classical music and relate this knowledge to other contemporary cultural practices. Students will be expected to undertake weekly readings and listenings, participate in discussion and conduct independent research.
CMPN1631 Electroacoustic Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ivan Zavada Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hr lab/studio class/wk Prerequisites: MUED1002 or MUSC2653 Assessment: Composition demonstrating electroacoustic techniques (40%), acousmatic composition in surround sound (60%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore current techniques in electroacoustic composition. Electronic music composers have been "diffusing" stereo works in surround spaces for many years. This unit of study explores composing for a surround space, and investigates writing multichannel electroacoustic works. Students will discuss recent examples of the electroacoustic repertoire to gain an understanding of current practices, and will gain an insight into the recording process leading to the making of their piece.
CMPN1632 Computer Music Fundamentals

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ivan Zavada Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lect/wk, 1 hr lab class. Prerequisites: MUED1002 or MUSC2653 Assessment: 2 programming assignments (2x25%), final project (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who don't have the prerequisite, but have prior computer programming experience can apply to the Coordinator for permission to enrol.
This unit will focus on interactive and algorithmic composition based on formal processes to create music with computers. This unit investigates an interactive graphical programming environment for music, audio and media called Max, allowing the composer to program and implement interactive music processes quickly and with varying levels of sophistication, thus encouraging the student to explore real-time creative possibilities of digital music technology.
CMPN2006 Sound Recording Fundamentals

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ivan Zavada Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr studio class/wk Assessment: Live Stereo Recording (40%), Solo Studio Recording (40%), Online Exam (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the theory of sound and acoustics, microphone design, stereo microphone techniques, mixing console operation, application of signal modifiers, digital audio recording and CD creation. Students will experience prac-based recording sessions to gain a comprehensive understanding of the recording technology on offer at the Sydney Conservatorium. Jazz students should have completed Jazz Performance 6 before enroling in this unit of study.
CMPN2007 Sound Recording Advanced

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ivan Zavada Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr studio class/wk Prerequisites: CMPN2006 Assessment: Class Attendance and Participation (10%), Recording Project 1 (35%), Recording Project 2 (35%), Online Exam (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit follows on from Sound Recording Fundamentals with an in-depth look at frequency-based aural training and its application in the use of equalisation in the recording and mixdown process. Additional topics including frequency response, dynamic range, phase relationships in audio systems, effects processors and analysis of audio mixdowns/mixing techniques will also be discussed.
CMPN2613 Comp Techniques: Number and Process

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Smetanin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour seminar/week Prerequisites: CMPN1612 Prohibitions: CMPN2011 Assessment: Two analytical essays of set works, combined with short compositional tasks: 3,000 words each (2x50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Strong music theory and notation skills are essential in this unit of study
This unit of study looks at classic techniques and processes in composition which emerged during the middle to the later part of the twentieth century. The focus is on key works of this period by composers such as Stockhausen, Xenakis and Ligeti and others. The material covered will enable the student to strengthen their own repertoire of compositional techniques and allow them to understand their own work in a clear historical context.
CMPN2614 Comp Techniques: Tonality and Process

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Smetanin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hour seminar/week Prerequisites: CMPN2613 or CMPN2011 Prohibitions: CMPN2012 Assessment: Two analytical essays of set work combined with short compositional tasks: 3,000 words each (2x50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Strong music theory and notation skills are essential in this unit of study
This unit of study looks at techniques and processes in tonal and minimalist composition which emerged during the later part of the twentieth century. The focus is on key works of this period by composers such as Andriessen, Reich, Adams and others. The material covered will enable the student to strengthen their own repertoire of compositional technique and allow them to understand their work in a clear historical context.
CMPN2633 Computer Music Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ivan Zavada Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hr lect/wk, 1 hr lab class. Prerequisites: CMPN1632 Assessment: 2 programming assignments (2x25%), final project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit will focus on interactive and generative composition within the digital audio domain and the application of sound synthesis to live electronic music performances in which sound is generated and transformed during the performance rather than pre-recorded. This unit investigates sound generation techniques allowing the composer to create and modify sound with current software applications. Students will explore the means by which sound is produced with computers to extend the creative possibilities of digital signal processing.
CMPN3634 Interactive Media & Sound Installations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ivan Zavada Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lect/wk Prerequisites: CMPN1632 Assessment: Creative projects (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will focus on electronic music composition involving new paradigms brought about by real-time performance, installations, network technology, human computer interaction, gestural control and integration with visual arts and video animations. This unit of study will also investigate the available literature on topics such as multimedia, interactive and installation work in the context of contemporary sound art practice.
CMPN3635 Writing Music for the Moving Image

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Felicity Wilcox Session: Semester 1 Classes: 6 x 1 hour lectures for the first six weeks; 6 x 2 hour tutorials thereafter Prerequisites: MUED1002 or MUSC2653 or MUED4002 Assessment: Written paper (20%), Presentation (30%), Final Music (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a practical introduction to composing music for the screen.
Topics for discussion will include, but not be limited to: the relationship between image and sound, music as a force in dramatic narrative, important scores in cinema history, sound design, music for documentary film and drama, music for games, and non-commercial applications of music for image. Importantly, the course will focus on the practical aspects of film scoring relevant to establishing professional practice; both at a business level and at a technical level. Students in this unit of study must be fluent in sequencing and/or recording and/or music notation software.
CMPN4666 Advanced Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Matthew Hindson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hr seminar/lecture per week Prerequisites: MCGY4601 or with permission of the Coordinator Assessment: Class presentation (1000 words) (15%), Composition analysis (20%), Weekly readings reports (15%), Research Project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to equip students with a working knowledge of current music theory and analysis practice, impart analytical skills that can be applied across a broad spectrum of activities and different musical genres and types, and develop an understanding of related concepts such as what analysis actually is, different types of analysis (functional, descriptive, surface, aural/perceptual vs. score based) and an understanding of working at different levels of abstraction.
ENSE1002 Choir 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Neil McEwan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3 hrs of rehearsals/wk Prerequisites: ENSE1015 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Rehearsals prepare members for public concerts at the end of each semester. The music chosen covers oratorio and large choral works in association with the Sydney Conservatorium Symphony Orchestra, the Sydney Conservatorium Chamber Orchestra, or the Early Music Ensemble. No auditions required. (Rehearsals are usually held on Thursdays, refer to timetable for details).
ENSE1015 Choir 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Neil McEwan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3 hrs of rehearsals/wk Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Rehearsals prepare members for public concerts at the end of each semester. The music chosen covers oratorio and large choral works in association with the Sydney Conservatorium Symphony Orchestra, the Sydney Conservatorium Chamber Orchestra, or the Early Music Ensemble. No auditions required. (Rehearsals are usually held on Thursdays, refer to timetable for details).
JAZZ1000 Jazz Large Ensemble 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr Elective Jazz Orchestra or 3hr Big Band class Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students
This unit of study covers all aspects of professional and creative ensemble performance, including: reading, improvisation, dynamics, tone, intonation, articulation, swing, time-feel, style and ensemble interaction. Enrolment is subject to audition.
JAZZ1001 Jazz Large Ensemble 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr Elective Jazz Orchestra or 3hr Big Band class Prerequisites: JAZZ1000 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students
This unit of study covers all aspects of professional and creative ensemble performance, including: reading, improvisation, dynamics, tone, intonation, articulation, swing, time-feel, style and ensemble interaction.
JAZZ1015 Jazz Ear Training 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Matt McMahon Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Assessment: Two tests (2x20%), one 2 hour exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students
This unit offers a systematic study of all simple intervals up to and including one octave, triadic harmony, four note chords in closed position and voice leading within these concepts, focusing on common harmonic movements that occur in the jazz repertoire.
JAZZ1016 Jazz Ear Training 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Matt McMahon Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ1015 Assessment: Two tests (2x20%), one 2 hour exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students
This unit consolidates and expands upon concepts and skills introduced in Jazz Ear Training 1, plus introducing compound intervals, open voicings, the addition of all upper extensions to all chord types, and increasingly complex harmonic structures.
JAZZ1019 Jazz Harmony and Arranging 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Evan Lohning Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), approved number of arrangements (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students
Students review clefs, key signatures, note values, dynamics, articulation, and learn copying and rehearsal techniques. In addition, instruction will include the ranges of and transpositions for the various instruments, chord symbols, scale-chord relationships, and rhythm section scoring. This unit deals with the study of the harmony of standard jazz repertoire. Students will learn to understand and use basic harmonic rules and the typical harmonic devices, diatonic progression and chord patterns with a view to generating a creative sense of jazz harmony and the ability to write small combo arrangements. Legibility in copying is an assessable aspect. The harmonic techniques explored in this unit are used as the theoretical basis for Jazz Improvisation
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) "Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band"
JAZZ1020 Jazz Harmony and Arranging 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Evan Lohning Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ1019 Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), approved number of arrangements (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students
In this unit voicing techniques for two to four horns stressing the most effective registers, harmonisation of passing tones, clusters and other techniques will be introduced. The harmonic techniques explored are used as the theoretical basis for Jazz Improvisation.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) "Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band"
JAZZ1025 Jazz Piano 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Julie Spithill Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1hr tut/wk Assessment: 15min technical exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is only available to non-Jazz majors.
This streamed class is available to all Conservatorium students as a free choice.The course will focus on basic keyboard technique as well as jazz chord progressions and voicings in small classes with students of like abilities. Students are assessed on their rate of progress by demonstrating successful completion of pieces and exercises. At the end of year examinations, students are required to demonstrate scales, chords, voicings, bass lines and comping.
JAZZ1026 Jazz Piano 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Julie Spithill Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ1025 Assessment: 15min technical exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is only available to non-Jazz majors.
Consolidation and development of concepts and skills introduced in Jazz Piano 1.
MCGY1000 Aural Perception 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Coady Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 1hr Lab and one 1hr Solfege tut/wk Assessment: Weekly Lab assignment (15%); 1hr mid-semester written test (15%); Solfege class work assessment (15%); 1hr written examination (30%): 10 min Solfege examination (25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students work on dictation and sightsinging exercises using diatonic pitch materials in all major and minor keys, and simple and compound metres, including rhythms using triplets and duplets. Sight singing exercises use both moveable-'do' sol-fa and letter-names systems. Dictation exercises emphasise the aural identification of tonic, pitch collection and metre.
Textbooks
Gary S. Karpinski and Richard Kram: Anthology for Sight Singing, New York; Norton (2007). Gary S. Karpinski: Manual for Ear Training and Sight Singing, New York, Norton (2007)
MCGY1001 Aural Perception 1A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Coady Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 1hr lab and one 1hr Solfege tut/wk Assessment: Weekly Lab tests (25%); weekly Lab assignments (15%); Solfege tutorial assessment (15%); 1hr Lab examination (25%); 5 min Solfege examination (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students work on dictation and sightsinging exercises using diatonic pitch materials in all major and minor keys, and simple and compound metres. Sight singing exercises use both moveable-'do' sol-fa and letter-names systems. Dictation exercises emphasise the aural identification of tonic, pitch collection and metre.
Textbooks
Gary S. Karpinski and Richard Kram: Anthology for Sight Singing, New York; Norton (2007). Gary S. Karpinski: Manual for Ear Training and Sight Singing, New York, Norton (2007)
MCGY1002 Aural Perception 1B

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Coady Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1hr Lab and one 1hr Solfege tut/wk Prerequisites: MCGY1001 Assessment: Weekly Lab assignment (15%); 1hr mid-semester written test (15%); Solfege class work assessment (15%); 1hr written examination (30%): 10 min Solfege examination (25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students continue to working on dictation and sightsinging exercises using diatonic pitch materials in all major and minor keys, and rhythms using triplets and duplets. Sight singing exercises use both moveable-'do' sol-fa and letter-names systems. Dictation exercises emphasise the aural identification of tonic, pitch collection and metre..
Textbooks
Gary S. Karpinski and Richard Kram: Anthology for Sight Singing, New York; Norton (2007). Gary S. Karpinski: Manual for Ear Training and Sight Singing, New York, Norton (2007)
MCGY1003 Aural Perception 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Coady Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: One 1hr Lab and one 1hr Solfege tut/wk Prerequisites: MCGY1000 or MCGY1002 Assessment: Weekly Lab assignment (15%); 1hr mid-semester written test (15%); Solfege class work assessment (15%); 1hr written examination (30%): 10 min Solfege examination (25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Materials studied include diatonic harmony, species counterpoint, modes and rhythms using sub- and supertriplets.
Textbooks
Gary S. Karpinski and Richard Kram: Anthology for Sight Singing, New York; Norton (2007). Gary S. Karpinski: Manual for Ear Training and Sight Singing, New York, Norton (2007)
MCGY1008 Harmony and Analysis 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Lewis Cornwell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 lecture,1 tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MUSC2699 Assumed knowledge: Ability to read musical notation including treble and bass clefs, and knowledge of scales, intervals and triads in tonal music. Assessment: Assignments (40%), examination (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An understanding of the materials of tonal music is fundamental to all aspects of a student's musicianship. The acquisition of practical skills in harmony provides a means of examining in their essence issues of musical structure and technique that apply throughout the tonal repertoire. In the first semester students gain fluency in writing four-part harmonisations using diatonic vocabulary, learning the basic chord functions and voice-leading patterns that will provide a framework for later elaboration. Exercises in species counterpoint are included to assist in the comprehension of voice leading principles, and the linear conception of music is further explored through introductory exercises in analysis.
Textbooks
Gauldin Robert, Harmonic practice in tonal music. 2nd ed. NY: Norton, 2004.
MCGY1009 Harmony and Analysis 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Lewis Cornwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 lecture,1 tutorial/wk Prerequisites: MCGY1008 Assessment: Assignments (40%), examination (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Having acquired basic skills in voice leading and an understanding of diatonic chord functions, students are introduced to more advanced concepts that are encountered frequently in the tonal repertoire. These include modulation, diatonic sequences and techniques for working with instrumental textures. Counterpoint studies are continued, both in practice and in analysis, where some aspects of Baroque musical forms are considered.
Textbooks
Gauldin Robert. Harmonic practice in tonal music. 2nd ed NY: Norton, 2004
MCGY2600 Advanced Harmony

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Lewis Cornwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2-hour seminar/wk Prerequisites: MCGY2011 Prohibitions: MCGY2001, MCGY2000 Assessment: Four 25-bar musical assignments (75%); 30 minute seminar presentation (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students in this unit will observe in detail a selection of Western musical styles and the work of particular composers, applying the knowledge thus gained by writing short compositions in the relevant styles. For the student with some creative inclinations, the activity of stylistic imitation offers unique insights into the music of any period. Topics for study will be selected according to the interests of the group, taking into account the need for a coherent and cumulative course structure.
MCGY2612 Music in the Classical and Romantic Eras

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Larkin Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2-hour lecture and one 1-hour tut/week Prohibitions: MCGY3012, MCGY2013 Assumed knowledge: Ability to read musical notation Assessment: Essay (30%); Tutorial assignments and participation (20%); In-Class tests (20%); 2-hour exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a Foundation unit in Analysis, history & culture studies.
This unit will survey the main lines of musical development between 1750 and 1890, with primary focus on the composition of music, and how this relates to the social and aesthetic currents of the time. The overview given in the lecture series will be reinforced by detailed focus on individual works in the tutorials from both historical and analytical perspectives. Topics will include the emergence and codification of classical form and syntax; style and genre in the works of the first Viennese School; Beethoven's 'heroic' and 'late' styles; national opera traditions; symphonic poem and music drama; nationalism and exoticism; and the conflict between progress and tradition.
Textbooks
J. P. Burkholder, D. J. Grout, and C. V. Palisca: A History of Western Music. 8th ed. (2010).
MCGY2613 Music in Modern Times

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Rachel Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1hr tut/week Prohibitions: MCGY2009, MCGY2008 Assumed knowledge: Ability to read musical notation Assessment: 1500 word essay (40%), mid-semester test (20%), 2 hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a Foundation unit in Analysis, history & culture studies.
Traces the essential developments in Western art music from the very end of the 19th century to the start of the 21st, and relates them to broad socio-historical and artistic changes. The overview given in the lectures is reinforced by the analysis of key works in tutorials. Areas covered include Late Romanticism, Impressionism, Expressionism, Free Atonality, Rhythmic Innovation, Neo-classicism, Serial Music, Political Music, American Experimentalism, Electro-Acoustic Music, Chance composition, Textural Composition, Minimalism, influences from Popular Music, Collage and Polystylism, East-West Encounters, Neo-Romanticism, Post Modernism and Spectralism. Works analysed include compositions by Andriessen, Bartok, Cage, Debussy, Ligeti, Messiaen, Part, Schoenberg, Strauss, Stravinsky, Stockhausen and Webern.
Textbooks
Griffiths P, Modern music and after, Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2011
MCGY2614 Musical Worlds of Today

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Rachel Campbell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1hr tut/week Assessment: 2000 word essay (40%), 1 tutorial report (20%), tutorial participation (20%), Listening test (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a Foundation unit in Analysis, history & culture studies.
Embracing popular music and examples of traditional and contemporary music in Australia and Asia, this unit offers an introduction not only to the genres themselves, but to the themes prevalent in the work of contemporary music scholars. These may include gender and race, ownership and appropriation, reception and transmission, technology and globalisation, music as social behaviour, and music and place. Such themes are considered across the three topic modules: Popular Music (including contemporary Aboriginal music); Traditional Music (Australia, Japan, Melanesia) and Australian Music (place and identity, from colonialism to the present day).
Textbooks
Weekly readings from a range of disciplines, available on eReserve
MCGY3013 Late Beethoven Seminar

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter McCallum Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2-hour seminar/wk Prerequisites: MCGY2612 or with permission of the coordinator Assumed knowledge: It is strongly recommended that students have completed MCGY2612, or have a sound knowledge of the Viennese Classical repertoire. Assessment: assignment, presentation, project and participation as specified in the course outline (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of the unit is to examine the changes in the last 12 years of Beethoven's creative output, and discuss these in terms of a transition between what are traditionally called 'classic' and 'romantic' periods. This will be done through analysis, and the discussion of critical surveys, aesthetics and contemporary sources. Themes covered will include: Classicism/Romanticism. the compositional process. Beethoven and the fugue in the late style. Variations as transformations. The late quartets. The last 5 Piano Sonatas. Missa Solemnis. The 9th Symphony. Reception of Beethoven's late works.
MCGY3610 Chant in the West

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kathleen Nelson Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 hr seminar/Week Prerequisites: MCGY2611 Assessment: Class research project activity and report (30%), Report on set reading and discussion 800 words (10%), Seminar presentation on essay topic (20%), Essay 2500 words (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chant was integral to early Christian practices in the western Roman Empire. Following its long history in medieval and later churches, chant from western European repertoires continues to be sung and appreciated today. This course studies aspects of its history and analysis, and introduces the research field of chant and its sources. Students will develop an appreciation of challenges met by performers and researchers working with chant. A class project will enter directly into the world of contemporary chant research.
MCGY3627 Paleography of Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kathleen Nelson Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: MCGY2611 or with permission of the coordinator Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of current musical notation is essential. Assessment: Assignments (50%); 2-hour examination (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paleography of Music introduces principles and issues of some different types of western musical notation in use during the medieval and Renaissance periods, and contributes to the development of an understanding of original sources of music of these eras. Through studying original notations and sources, students can develop an understanding of the characteristics and problems of medieval and renaissance musical repertories not otherwise available. Students will transcribe from the original notations studied into modern musical notation. Among the notations to be studied are several chant notations including that of the musical sources of Hildegard of Bingen; white mensural notation as used in sources of fifteenth and sixteenth vocal polyphony with examples likely to include music by Dufay, Ockeghem and Byrd; French and Italian lute tablatures; and German keyboard tablatures.
MCGY3631 African-American Music Inquiry

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Coady Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hr seminar/week Prerequisites: At least 12 cps of Foundation units (MCGY2611, MCGY2612, MCGY2613 MCGY2614) or with permission of the coordinator. Assessment: Essay 3000 words (50%), Tut presentation 2000 wds (30%), Tutorial participation and demonstrated knowledge of required reading (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to provide students with a framework for analysing African-American musical products. An historical survey of research into African-American performance is followed by a discussion of current critical debates and scholarship. Students will apply existing theoretical models to the analysis of jazz, funk and hip-hop works. In turn, they will develop original research methodologies for the analysis of an African-American expressive work of their choice.
MCGY3639 Modernism in Austria & Germany 1889-1914

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Larkin Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: MCGY2011 or with permission of the coordinator. Assumed knowledge: It is expected that students will have some knowledge of late 19th-century harmonic practices. Assessment: Essay (30%); Critical and analytical assignments (20%); Listening & score-based tests (20%); In-class presentation (20%); Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Between 1889 and 1914, certain Austro-Germanic composers played a crucial role in the emerging modernist movement. Richard Strauss, Mahler and Schoenberg engaged with past musical traditions and contemporary trends in visual art, literature and philosophy to produce a distinctively new type of music. Works to be studied include Strauss's tone poems, Mahler's symphonies and Schoenberg's chamber music, as well as Lieder and stage works. Crucial issues that will emerge include the way in which traditional formal structures are invoked and destabilised, the dissolution of tonality, and alternatives to the metaphysical understanding of music that were explored in this era.
MUSC1501 Extended Fundamentals of Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Matthew Hindson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2 x 1hr tutorials (aural & written)/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1503, MUSC1002, MUSC2693, MUSC1004, MUSC2699, MUSC1003, MUSC1005, MUSC1504, MUSC1001, MUSC1000, MCGY1008 Assumed knowledge: Material covered in MUSC1503 and MUSC1504, or advanced music theory qualifications, such as Music 2 for the NSW HSC, High Level Music for the IB (or equivalent). Students will take a diagnostic in Week 1 of semester to ensure they have the required level of music theory and aural skills. Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Through an integrated and research-based approach to music composition and analysis, student's knowledge of music theory and compositional techniques is extended. Skills in this area cover a range of Western and Non-Western musical styles, from classical music to film music to noise.
MUSC1503 Fundamentals of Music 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Matthew Hindson, Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2x 1hr tutorials (aural and written)/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1005, MUSC1001, MUSC2699, MUSC1502, MUSC1003, MUSC1002, MUSC1004, MUSC1501, MCGY1008, MUSC1000 Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (60%), aural assessment (30%), attendance and participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An introduction to basic music literacy skills, including learning to read and write music, and an understanding of fundamental aspects of its structure and composition. The material covered in this unit of study concentrates upon the basics of music theory and listening to ensure that participants have a solid grounding for a firm understanding of music notation and organisation.
MUSC1504 Fundamentals of Music 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Matthew Hindson, Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2 x 1hr tutorials (aural & written)/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1002, MUSC1003, MUSC1502, MUSC1005, MUSC1001, MUSC1000, MUSC1004, MUSC2699, MUSC1501 Assumed knowledge: Material covered in MUSC1503. Students interested in taking this unit who have not completed MUSC1503 are advised to see the co-ordinator beforehand to ascertain that they have the required knowledge. Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (60%), aural assessment (30%), attendance and participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A more advanced exploration of music literacy skills. The material covered in this course ranges from the broad to the specific: from an examination of musical elements and the way they are used in a variety of musical genres through to specific compositional aspects such as four-part writing or analysis of melodic writing across musical cultures. Listening skills are developed in this unit of study.
MUSC1506 Music in Western Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anne Boyd Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1 hr tut/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1001, MUSC1502, MUSC1000 Assumed knowledge: The ability to follow a musical score while listening to the music and some prior knowledge of elementary music theory. Assessment: Tutorial work including a Listening Journal (40%), 2000 word essay (30%), 60 minute listening exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will study a range of today's popular classics with a view to understanding how musical meaning is constructed in relation to the development of tonality and other European stylistic conventions from the Ancient Greeks to the present day. It will consider questions about how the Western art music tradition has been constructed through history. What are the social factors at work? How does music reflect the minds of its creators and create meaning? How does music reflect the minds of its creators and create meaning?
MUSC1507 Sounds, Screens, Speakers: Music & Media

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1 tut/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1001, MUSC1502, MUSC1000 Assessment: Article summary, 1000 words (25%); Critical analysis, 1000 words (25%); Tutorial test, 500 words (10%); Final Project, 2,000 words(30%), attendance and participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Music has been dramatically shaped and reshaped by every major change in communications technology in the 20th century from vinyl discs to MP3s. In this unit of study we will analyse such issues as the ways in which the early recording industry transformed jazz, the blues and country music, how the presentation of music on radio and television changed the ways the music industry created new musical celebrities, and the challenges the music industry faces as digital technology transforms the creation, distribution and consumption of music.
MUSC1601 Mathematical Models of Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Richard Cohn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hour lecture and 1 hour tut/wk Assumed knowledge: Exposure to musical notation. Assessment: Four Problem Sets (15% each); Final Examination (30%); Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Must have the ability to read music.
Music was a branch of mathematics until the late 18th century, and the specificity and consistency of mathematical constructs can help modern musicians and listeners describe musical objects in new and imaginative ways. Algebra, modular arithmetic, set theory, graph theory, geometry, and topology enhance recognition and interrelation of musical rhythms, melodies, scales, and chords in a wide range of repertory.
MUSC2612 Music Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 contact hours/wk Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points, AND audition Prohibitions: MUSC2012 Assessment: 50 minutes of performance throughout semester (50%); participation and peer contribution (10%); weekly performance journal (15%); researched programme notes (1200 words) (15%); knowledge test (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Audition Requirements: 2 contrasting pieces (or excerpts) totalling 6 minutes and a brief interview.
This unit of study is an integrated approach to live music performance that includes practical and research components. Students participate in solo and ensemble situations in weekly lunchtime concerts. Constructive feedback by peers is a significant part of this course and participants trace their own development in weekly reflective journals. Music of all genres (including classical, experimental, popular, jazz and world music), instruments and voice types are accepted, and collaboration across musical traditions is strongly encouraged. A number of seminars dealing with specific key issues are interspersed throughout this unit of study, including performance stress, technical and psychological preparation, ensemble communication and audience perception. Auditions are held during 'O Week' and Week 1 of semester. Please contact the Arts Music Unit Student Administration office on 9351 2923 for further information.
MUSC2614 Composition Workshop

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anne Boyd Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hr workshop/wk Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: Contribution in classes and concerts (30%), composition portfolio and process diary (60%), aural and/or written presentations (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An opportunity to create a new composition in a supported environment. Students will hear their works rehearsed and performed, usually by other participating students. The outcome is a performance in a public concert at the end of the semester. The workshops may be themed around particular genres and musical techniques such as music theatre, drone-based composition, song-writing, sound and rhythm, creating a sound space and media composition.
MUSC2622 Music in the Sixties

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hrs/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: MUSC2106 Assessment: Two critical analyses 1,000 words each (20% each); four online quizzes 1000 words (20%); major essay 3,000 words (30%); class participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The very term 'The Sixties' has lived on in myth as signifying a radical break with the past in the arts, literature and music. While these years saw a great change and social upheaval, this subject will seek link to the music of the era to much longer trajectories of social, political and aesthetic change. We will examine a wide range of music drawn from popular traditions, jazz and the avant garde. No formal music training is necessary.
MUSC2631 Music and Everyday Life

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lecture/wk Prerequisites: 12 junior music credit points Prohibitions: MUSC2903 Assessment: Fieldwork project paper 3000 words (40%); ethnographic description of a musical event 1000 words (20%); two critical response paper (1000 words each) ( 30%), class presentations and participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is a requirement for Honours.
What can we learn from non-textual approaches to understanding music? The primary goal of this unit of study is to study music not as a composer, producer, performer, listener or audience member, but as an ethnographer. That is, analysing music through an observational, experiential and intellectual understanding of how people make and take meaning from music.
MUSC2653 Introduction to Digital Music Techniques

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Matthew Hindson, Dr Damian Barbeler Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hr lecture/demonstration/wk Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: MUSC2053 Assessment: Sound recording and editing assignment (30%); creative assignments (60%); online assessments, attendance and participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: An ability to read music at a basic level and an understanding of fundamental musical terminology is an advantage in this unit of study.
This unit is an introduction to the use of digital sound and music in creative and multimedia contexts. It is a practical course in which students are introduced to tools of sound creation and manipulation. Students will undertake creative projects as a means to learning. In addition, participants will be exposed to a number of approaches to electroacoustic music across the 20th and 21st centuries.
MUSC2654 Popular Music

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hrs/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: MUSC2054 Assessment: Two critical analyses 1,000 words each (20% each); tutorial test 1000 words (20%); major essay 3,000 words (30%); class participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How did early American blues and country music develop in tandem? How was punk different in the US, the UK and Australia? What are the origins of the DJ culture? This unit of study presents a thematic overview of a wide variety of styles, movements and spectacles. It examines major genres of popular music, their stylistic features and historical antecedents as well as modes of reception and the role of popular music in everyday life. No formal music training is necessary.
MUSC2663 Survey of Film Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hour lecture and 1 hour tut/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: Review assignments 2,000 words (30%), final paper 2,500 words (50%), participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an introductory survey of the history and aesthetics of film music from the late 1890s to the present day. Topics for discussion will include the dramatic function of music as an element of cinematic narrative, the codification of musical iconography in cinematic genres, the symbolic use of pre-existing music, and the evolving musical styles of film composers.
MUSC2664 Popular Music and the Moving Image

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: Musical analysis 1000 words (20%); industrial critique 1000 words (20%);Listening and viewing test (20%); Final Project 3,000 words (30%); Participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The range of media channels through which we experience popular music has proliferated in recent years. The emotive power of music is used to tell stories, sell products and connect people to one another. This unit of study will analyse the use of popular music in a broad range of multimedia forms from film and television to video games and the use of digital media to disseminate a multitude of musical multimedia productions.
MUSC2667 Shakespeare as Opera

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Halliwell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points. Assessment: 1500 word mid-semester assignment (25%), 4,500 word essay (75%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will study the literary and musical strategies employed by composers and librettists in the adaption of the plays of Shakespeare into opera. Operas to be examined are taken from nearly 400 years of operatic repertoire including the classical, romantic, modernist and postmodernist periods. Recent CD and DVD recordings of both the plays and operas will be used, and current adaption theory as applicable to opera will be investigated.
MUSC2670 Music Festivals & Arts Events Management

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Matthew Hindson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour seminar + 1 hr tut/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: MUSC2070 Assessment: Participation and involvement including small written tasks as appropriate (e.g. preparation of a sample budget) (50%) equivalent to 3000 words of assessment. 1500 word groupwork written submission (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study includes a practical component in which participants will be actively involved in the administration and management of music and arts events. They will learn the procedures and protocols necessary for a smooth behind-the-scenes operation of music event presentation through their own involvement as well as examination of best practice event management nationally and internationally.
MUSC2679 Spirituality as Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anne Boyd Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr/wk and 1hr/tut Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: Listening/short answer test (1500 words) (30%) ; Seminar Presentation (20%);Individual Project as extended essay, or composition or performance accompanied by a shorter reflective essay (4500 words ) (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This 'survey' unit of study presents a diverse range of music, written and performed as a response to spiritual traditions, using the methods of depth psychology. The survey will include examples of music created in response to Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism and Islam, as well as Earth-based religions such as Australian Indigenous traditions. The focus will be upon the music rather than religion. Listening will provide the main framework for study.
MUSC2693 Fundamentals of Music 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Matthew Hindson, Dr. Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2 x 1hr tutorials (aural & written)/wk Prerequisites: MUSC1504 Prohibitions: MUSC2699, MUSC2615, MUSC1501 Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Through an integrated and research-based approach to music composition and analysis, student's knowledge of music theory and compositional techniques is extended. Skills in this area cover a range of Western and Non-Western musical styles, from classical music to film music to noise.
MUSC2694 Survey of World Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hr lecture, 1 hr tut/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: Brief reports (30%), Tutorial work including participation (20%), Final paper 3,000 words (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on sources of the 'world music' genre; surveying such regions as the Arab world, Aboriginal Australia, Indonesia, south and east Asia, the Arctic regions, North and South America and sub-Saharan Africa. It examines the music of these non-Western cultures and also the function of that music within society. The ability to read music notation is not required.
MUSC3601 Contemporary Music Making 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charles Fairchild; Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 hr lecture; 2 X 1 hr tut/wk Prerequisites: MUSC1503 or MUSC1504 or MUSC2653 Prohibitions: MUSC1401 or MUSC1402 or MUSC2403 or MUSC2404 Assessment: Two creative output process papers (50% in total); Post-Recording Assessment and Planning Paper (30%) Weekly peer review, critique and assessment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who do not meet the pre-requisite may seek special permission from the subject co-ordinator
Students will bring their composition, performance and music technology skills together to complete one project during the course of the semester. They will write, rehearse and perform their music. Then they will produce a high-quality demo. Finally, they will work with music industry professionals to create a plan to present their work to the public. Throughout the semester, students will engage in research, analysis and assessment of their own work and the work of their peers.
MUSC3602 Contemporary Music Making 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charles Fairchild; Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture; 2hrs tut/wk Prerequisites: (MUSC1503 or MUSC1504) and MUSC3601 Assessment: Two creative output and process papers (1000 words each) 50% in total; Post-Recording Assessment and Planning Paper (1500 words) 30%; Weekly Peer Review and Assessment (1000 words) 20%. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who do not meet the pre-requisite may seek special permission from the subject co-ordinator
This subject is a continuation of Contemporary Music Making 1. Students will bring their composition, performance and music technology skills together to plan, pursue and complete one project. Students will work on a semester-long collaboration with one or more other students. These pairs or groups will write, rehearse, and perform their music and then produce a high-quality demo. Throughout the semester, students will engage in research, analysis and assessment of their own work and the work of their peers.
MUSC3603 Advanced Digital Music Techniques

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Matthew Hindson, Dr Damian Barbeler Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hr lecture/demonstration/wk Prerequisites: MUSC2653 Assessment: Creative assignments (80%), Weekly review and presentation of work (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who do not meet the pre-requisite may seek special permission from the subject co-ordinator
This unit is an advanced exploration of digital sound and music in creative and multimedia contexts. It is a subject in which students are expected to make sophisticated use of sound creation and manipulation tools in pursuit of their own musical ideas. Students will undertake creative projects as a means to learning. An ability to read music at a basic level and an understanding of fundamental musical terminology is an advantage in this unit of study.
MUSC3606 Musical Australia and Asia

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anne Boyd Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1 hr tut/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assumed knowledge: An ability to read music at a basic level and an understanding of fundamental musical terminology would be an advantage but not essential. Assessment: One 3,000 word essay, or individual creative project (such as composition) (60%) accompanied by a short reflective essay; a listening test (20%); contribution to online discussion (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
An examination of Australian Music reflecting an engagement with the traditional music of Asia. Both the specific tradition as well as its musical influence will be studied with special emphasis upon China, Japan, Korea, Indonesia and India. Wherever possible workshops upon a specific tradition (such as gamelan performance) will be included.
MUSC3609 Musicology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr seminar/wk Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in music, or by arrangement with the coordinator Prohibitions: MUSC3904 Assessment: Written assessments (50%), weekly summaries of readings (30%), participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is a requirement for Honours.
What do we study when we study music? What kinds of stories do we tell about the history of music? What are the central issues, questions, and concerns that drive the study of music? This unit of study will begin to answer these questions and provide an overview of historical musicology as an academic discipline. In addition, students will also learn and practice the research skills necessary to find and evaluate sources, and to define and develop an area of interest. These skills will provide a solid foundation for the independent research work necessary in the Honours year.
MUSC3639 Music Journalism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 hr lecture, 1 hr tut/week. Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: Exercises in music journalism and reviewing 4,000 words (50%), final paper 2,000 words (30%), participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Even as the 'Age of Newspapers' seems to be coming to an end, human beings' need for authoritative commentary on music remains as strong as ever. Along with surveying the history of music journalism from the early eighteenth century up to the present day, this unit of study offers participants the chance to try their hands at various forms of music journalism.
MUSC3640 Rhythms and Sounds of Latin America

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lecture, 1 hr tut/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: Essay 2,500 word or creative project with reflective statement (50%), Two Listening Assessments (30%), Knowledge Exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Latin American music has become a powerful force in today's music industry, but its rich diversity and cultural contexts are not always acknowledged nor understood. This unit of study surveys a number of Latin American popular, folk and indigenous musical traditions in terms of their cultural milieu and historical development. Various musical, historical and cultural concerns are examined with a practical and creative involvement with a broad selection of genres. Particular attention will be given to Afro-Cuban, Brazilian, Peruvian and Argentinean music and special emphasis will be placed on the compositional characteristics and the repertoire pertinent to these traditions.
MUSC3699 Understanding Music: Modes of Hearing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lecture, 1 hr tut/wk Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: Analyses eq. 1,500 words (30%), final paper 3,000 words (50%), tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study deals with the different ways in which we comprehend music and with the different ways in which that comprehension might be explained. It deals with modes of hearing and musical analysis for the purpose of leading students towards a deeper knowledge of how music in various genres (ranging from the classical mainstream to the twentieth-century avant-garde, from Tin Pan Alley songs to punk rock and hip-hop) is understood. A good working knowledge of musical terminology and vocabulary is required. This is the required unit of study for a music major in an Arts degree.