Engineering unit of study descriptions

ENGG – Engineering unit of study descriptions

ENGG1000 History and Philosophy of Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning, Independent Research Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ENGG1000 is a unique course that aims to provide students with an understanding of the historical development of Engineering with relation to societal expectations of the period. Engineering as a field of study and profession has developed over millennia from simple (yet significant) advances in technology such as the lever and wheel, to modern day examples such as advanced computers, nanomaterials and space flight.
Interaction between human society and Engineers has helped develop and guide the advancement of engineering technology; with society posing problems for Engineers to solve and Engineers developing new technology that changed the course of human history, and helped shape the world we live in.
The general philosophy behind Engineering is that Engineers work to fulfill the needs of society (water, electricity, technological improvements etc. ), and as such Engineers are expected to act ethically towards society. The role of Engineers in society will be analysed and discussed from a humanistic perspective, with relation to the current Engineers Australia code of ethics. Other relevant philosophical analyses of Engineering as a skill and profession will also be examined such as, aesthetics, creativity, the epistemology of Engineering and more.
This course will use online resources extensively and help develop research and communication skills of students, whilst providing an overview of the historical significance of Engineers in society, and what it means to be an Engineer.
ENGG1111 Integrated Engineering 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: ENGG1803 or ENGG1061 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Integrated Engineering 1 is an introductory Unit of Study within the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies. It aims to provide commencing undergraduate engineering students with an understanding of the nature and diversity of engineering practice and begin the development of a set of intellectual tools for integrating their ongoing personal, academic, and professional development.
The unit highlights foundational engineering and professional practice skills, and the application of these skills to real world projects and workplace practice. It demonstrates the role that various professional and academic competencies play in the ability to manage contemporary professional engineering issues. The students are introduced to the Engineers Australia (EA) competency standards as one framework for evaluating their professional development, and students establish a preliminary portfolio which includes a self-assessment of their current understanding and capabilities against this framework. This portfolio will then be maintained and evolved throughout (and ideally beyond) their degree as a way of demonstrating current competencies and planning future development. This component also considers the way in which the diverse elements of their degree integrate together synergistically to establish emergent professional capabilities.
In developing knowledge of the discipline, students enhance their capacity for lifelong learning through critical reflection and self-assessment, creating and monitoring career goals as well as building a sense of responsibility for their learning. Through case studies, design projects and challenges, students expand their communication skills, develop competency in team-based problem solving and in creating innovative solutions, as well as apply critical thinking and inquiry. The activities encourage the development of research skills, experience of the engineering design process, leading and managing projects, and the significance of ethics, safety and sustainability.
Dalyell students may enrol in ENGD1000 Building a Sustainable World in place of ENGG1111
ENGG1800 Introduction to Engineering Disciplines

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Prohibitions: CIVL1900 OR CHNG1108 OR MECH1560 OR AERO1560 OR AMME1960 OR MTRX1701 OR ENGG1960 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit gives a brief introduction to a range of specialisations in Engineering including Aeronautical, Biomedical, Chemical, Civil, Mechanical, Electrical and Information Engineering. First-year students have the opportunity to experience aspects of each engineering stream and thus be able to better select which area they wish to pursue in their future studies. There are four Schools in the Faculty and each School will deliver a three-week module covering its specialisations.
School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.
This module enables students to gain an appreciation of the methods in transforming raw materials to value-added products. Students gain an insight into the application of the basic principles of chemistry, mathematics, material and energy balance in assessing and designing processes, operations and maintenance and safety requirements and procedures. This is achieved through a project based activity that involves a paper-based study of a process followed by construction and testing of performance.
School of Civil Engineering.
Introductory lectures in Engineering Economics and Construction Planning, Foundation Engineering, Structural Engineering, Materials, Environmental Engineering. Each student is involved in the erection and dismantling of several Scaled Model Structures in the Civil Engineering Courtyard. Preliminary lectures related to the models include safety issues, loading, static analysis, foundation calculations, construction management, engineering drawings and detailing, geometric calculations, and survey measurements. Exercises related to these issues are performed before assembly and disassembly of the models.
School of Electrical and Information Engineering.
Overview of Electrical Engineering, Basic circuit analysis: circuits, currents and voltages: Power and Energy; Ohms law, KCL, KVL. Resistive circuits: Resistance in series and parallel; voltage divider and current divider circuits. Introduction to digital systems: Basic logic circuit concepts, Synthesis of logic circuits, Sequential logic circuits. Microcomputers: Computer Organisation, Memory types, Digital process control, assembly language and programming. There are laboratory exercises based on the above topics.
School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering (AMME).
AMME has four degree streams: Aerospace, Mechanical, Biomedical and Mechatronics. Two or three of these streams are covered during this module in any year.
Mechanical Engineering demonstrates aspects of mechanical design and manufacturing techniques with a hands-on building task. Aerospace has a lecture on fundamentals of aircraft design. And a hands-on Design-Build-Test task where students work in small teams to gain an introduction to lightweight structures, aerodynamics and flight stability and control. Mechatronics covers software control of machines, including basic electronic knowledge with examples, concepts of software and hardware integration. Group based activity is to design and implement a simple mechatronics system using a Mindstorm Lego set. Biomedical engineering provides a hands-on design project to develop a joint replacement concept. The design process captures inputs such as joint range of motion considerations, biomaterials selection, manufacturing route, design risk analysis.
Mechanical Engineering demonstrates aspects of mechanical design and manufacturing techniques with a hands-on building task. Aerospace has a lecture on fundamentals of aircraft design. And a hands-on Design-Build-Test task where students work in small teams to gain an introduction to lightweight structures, aerodynamics and flight stability and control. Mechatronics covers software control of machines, including basic electronic knowledge with examples, concepts of software and hardware integration. Group based activity is to design and implement a simple mechatronics system using a Mindstorm Lego set. Biomedical engineering provides a hands-on design project to develop a joint replacement concept. The design process captures inputs such as joint range of motion considerations, biomaterials selection, manufacturing route, design risk analysis.
ENGG1801 Engineering Computing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to solving engineering problems using computers. Students learn how to organise data to present and understand it better using a spreadsheet (Excel), and also how to instruct the computer exactly what to do to solve complex problems using programming (Matlab). Real engineering examples, applications and case-studies are given, and students are required to think creatively and solve problems using computer tools.
Matlab will cover three-quarters of the unit. The remaining one-quarter will be devoted to the use of Excel in engineering scenarios. Furthermore, cross integration between Matlab and Excel will also be highlighted.
No programming experience is required or assumed. Students are assumed to have a basic understanding of mathematics and logic, and very elementary computing skills.
ENGG1802 Engineering Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The unit aims to provide students with an understanding of and competence in solving statics and introductory dynamics problems in engineering. Tutorial sessions will help students to improve their group work and problem solving skills, and gain competency in extracting a simplified version of a problem from a complex situation. Emphasis is placed on the ability to work in 3D as well as 2D, including the 2D and 3D visualisation of structures and structural components, and the vectorial 2D and 3D representations of spatial points, forces and moments. Introduction to kinematics and dynamics topics includes position, velocity and acceleration of a point; relative motion, force and acceleration, momentum, collisions and energy methods.
ENGG1805 Professional Engineering and IT

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ENGG1805 aims to introduce students to the fundamental principles that underlie professional practice in information technologies. It lays the foundation for later studies, and presents to the students challenges common to a multidisciplinary IT environment. The subject also provides students with the opportunity to develop important attributes such as communication skills, an understanding of professional ethics, and of working as a part of a team. Tool use is an important aspect of this unit: students are required to learn to use tools for testing, managing artefacts, planning and completing work, and communicating within the team. A selection of guest speakers will address students on different career paths.
ENGG1813 Engineering Critical Thinking

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Workgroups Assessment: Through semester assessment (80%) and Final Exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit concentrates on the rigors of communication in an engineering context including technical writing, teamwork, formal presentations and critical analysis. It is a precursor to ENGG1803 Professional Engineering 1 for students with a non-English speaking background in degrees that have a free elective available to students, and takes the place of one free elective. Students who enrol in this unit in 1st year will defer ENGG1803 Professional Engineering to 2nd year.
Aims: The Unit concerns critical thinking and Intensive English language (in an engineering context) aimed at building skills and confidence in students so that they better engage in the educational process at Sydney University by:
- Enhancing student ability to meet the challenges of study in Engineering in the Australian university context.
- Intensive focus on the language of Engineering in English.
- Developing cross-cultural awareness with a focus on consolidating the essential facets and practices in the tradition of science and research-based skills of sound reasoning.
- Increasing critical thinking capacity and preparing students for engaged enquiry in an Engineering context.
ENGG1850 Introduction to Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: CIVL3805 or QBUS2350 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Organisations today are heavily reliant on projects as part of their daily operations. A project is a temporary endeavour undertaken with limited resources to achieve organisational goals that are linked to broader organisational strategies and missions. Project management is therefore the process of planning, scheduling, resourcing, budgeting and monitoring the various phases of a project.
"Introduction to Project Management" is an introductory course that teaches students essential principles and concepts of project management, its application and related technologies. Students will learn about the project organisation, its structure, and role of the project manager, project sponsor and project committee. In addition, students will also learn how to identify business problems that require project-based solutions, how to select and evaluate projects, develop a business case, and manage the project at a basic level.
At completion of the course, students will have a high-level understanding of project management concepts, which equips them with basic technical and managerial skills required for project-based organisations.
ENGG2005 Engineering Studies C

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Special project specified for individual requirements.
ENGG2062 Engineering Project: Business Plan 2 Adv

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Research, Presentation Prerequisites: Distinction average WAM Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This course aims to extend student experience beyond the design and build phase of engineering to the business planning necessary to transform a good idea into a commercial reality. It will provide the opportunity for students to develop a range of skills used by professional engineers in a business environment, including planning, strategy development and assessment, business environment and market analysis together with financial management and resource allocation.
ENGG2111 Integrated Engineering 2

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: ENGG1111 or ENGG1061 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to enhance the capacity of students to assess, plan improve and evaluate their learning needs in relation to becoming a professional engineer. This unit will continue the development of both academic and professional skills through relevant and authentic activities and a project. Integrated Engineering 2 (ENGG2111) will use management and projects as a perspective to explore engineering approaches to addressing open-ended problems. The unit requires students to engage in a project that requires a degree of independence, innovation, resilience and resourcefulness as well as to investigate key skills associated with managing projects and relate these to national and global employability skills.
The project raises awareness about the complexity of engineering in that problems may be vague or ambiguous with no clear right or wrong answers, and students are encouraged to explore and critique ideas, use logical problem solving, and reflect on the process and decisions made with the explicit purpose of becoming critical thinkers. There are two main components: projects and professional development. Students learn project management skills which are then applied to a project. The professional development aspect involves students rating themselves and their peers on teamwork skills, including communication and conflict resolution. Achievements throughout the semester are documented for presentation in the students' e-portfolio. By the end of the semester students are expected to have a well-developed career concept that aligns with engineering competencies.
ENGG2850 Introduction to Project Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: CIVL3812 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a theory and case study based unit providing students with a unified approach to the analysis of project value, supported by explicit methods for ranking and selection of projects on the basis of returns and sensitivity. The unit uses "Project Finance" as a vehicle for descibing the fundamentals of project management financing and contrasts it with "Direct Financing", a more traditional approach to funding projects.
ENGG2851 Data Analytics for Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ENGG1850 AND (MATH1011 OR MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1013 OR MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923) AND (MATH1015 OR MATH1005 OR MATH1905) Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project Management Data analytics (DA) provides extensive coverage related to examining raw data with the purpose of drawing conclusions about that information. It is used in many industries to allow companies and organisation to make better business decisions and in the sciences to verify or disprove existing models or theories. Here, we focus our effort on providing in-depth knowledge and skills to students focusing on inference, process of deriving a conclusion based solely on what is already known by the project manager.
ENGG2852 Project Based Organisational Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ENGG1850 AND (PSYC1002 OR PMGT1852) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project based organisational behaviour focuses on human behaviour in organisational and project based context, with a focus on individual and group processes and actions. It involves an exploration of organisational and managerial processes in the dynamic context of organisation and is primarily concerned with human implications of project based activity. In this unit, we offer a succinct, lively and robust introduction to the subject of organisational behaviour. It aims to encourage critical examination of the theory of organisational behaviour whilst also enabling students to interpret and deal with real organisational problems in project management and combines relative brevity with thorough coverage and plentiful real-world examples.
ENGG2855 Project Quality Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Prerequisites: ENGG1850 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project Quality Management offers a specific, succinct, step-by-step project quality management process. It offers an immediate hands-on capability to improve project implementation and customer satisfaction in any project domain and will help maintain cost and schedule constraints to ensure a quality project. This unit introduces tools and techniques that implement the general methods defined in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge-Third Edition (PMBOK) published by the Project Management Institute (PMI), and augment those methods with more detailed, hands-on procedures that have been proven through actual practice. This unit is aimed at providing students an explicit step-by-step quality management process, along with a coherent set of quality tools organised and explained according to their application within this process that can be applied immediately in any project context. It further introduces a Wheel of Quality that codifies in one complete image the contributing elements of contemporary quality management. It also help in understanding the process for establishing a new quality tool, the pillar diagram, that provides a needed capability to identify root causes of undesirable effects.
ENGG3062 Technology Education (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Research, Presentation Prerequisites: Distinction average WAM Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to give the student experience in critically engaging an audience in the theoretical and practical understanding of engineering and technology. Students will learn professional skills in client relationship management, teaching and presenting, project management, leadership and teamwork. This work will be carried out with partner schools to enhance the engineering knowledge and understanding of Stage 5 high school students. This unit places students in an environment with which they are familiar, albeit in a very different and challenging role. It allows them the opportunity to deliver a project for a professional external client and in doing so showcase engineering, the faculty and the University to the wider community.
ENGG3111 Integrated Engineering 3

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture, Tutorial, Independent Study, Workshop, E-Learning, Prerequisites: ENGG2111 AND (84cp UoS from Engineering) Prohibitions: ENGG3062 Assessment: Portfolio 70%, Writing - Technical 20%, Oral Presentation 10% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on the development of students' abilities with respect to creativity and engineering design through project work and self guided learning building on achievements of the previous semester. Students explore the generation of alternative solutions in design such as lateral thinking, brainstorming, TRIZ, synectics and evaluate these alternatives. In preparation for industry experience, students evaluate their values, those of social responsibility and sustainable development relating these to engineering frameworks, such as the Professional Performance Innovation and Risk Protocol (PPIR), developed by the Warren Centre for Advanced Engineering at the University.
There are two main areas of work. One is where students work in groups on a project to be completed by the end of semester. The other is a self managed component in which students complete a number of workshops and online modules over the year that align with their individual learning plans. Workshops consist of an online module and a face-to-face session. Achievements over the year are documented for presentation in the student portfolio. The portfolio is also used for self and peer assessment. By the end of the year students are expected to have a well developed portfolio containing a CV and evidence of achievement of a set of Engineering Australia Stage 1 competencies demonstrating a commitment to continuing professional development.
ENGG3800 Industry and Community Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: E-Learning, Seminars, Project Work - own time Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is designed for third year students to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application.
ENGG3853 Project Risk Management Tools and Techniques

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ENGG2851. Prohibitions: CIVL4810 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Managing risk is an essential skill to be a successful project manager. This course will provide students with an understanding of what is risk and the key principles of risk management as described in AS/NZS ISO 31000: 2009. The course will show how these principles can be applied to project management both through the project development phase and the project delivery phase. This will include skills on how to measure and value risk and assess the potential impacts it may have on a project outcomes using qualitative and quantitative risk assessment techniques. Using case studies students will learn ways to treat risk to minimise the potential impact. The course will also cover techniques for establishing levels of risk appetite and risk tolerance. It will overview risk reporting tools and templates and conclude with a session on human behaviour and how this impacts on risk acceptance and risk aversion in a project context.
On successful completion of this course students will have a good understanding of the basic principles of risk and risk management, be able to apply risk assessment and treatment techniques, be able to quantify potential risk impacts and to establish a prioritised project risk register.
ENGG3854 Negotiating and Contracting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Prerequisites: ENGG1850 AND ENGG2850 AND ENGG2852. Prohibitions: CIVL3813 or CIVL4813 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, we draw on examples on project negotiation and contracting from "real-life" business situations and provide practical information on what to do and what not to do. Student would be exposed to the complexity involved in negotiation and contracting from initiation to formalization of final form of contract which is agreed upon and executed by all parties. Students will be taught how to understand each party's interests and then working towards reaching a common goal. In particular, dealing with complex characters including situations will be covered.
We will provide a basic understanding of commercial contracts and all their ramifications every step of the way. This unit also explains the basics of commercial contract law, highlights how to spot potential issues before they become a problem and then how to work with a lawyer more effectively if things go wrong which is intended for corporate managers rather than lawyers. This unit further contains coverage on forming contracts, restitution, contract interpretation, modification and dispute resolution. We also discuss remedies, performance, and third-party beneficiaries.
ENGG4000 Practical Experience

Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: Practical Experience Prerequisites: 36 credits of at least 3rd year units of study Prohibitions: ENGP1000 OR ENGP2000 OR CHNG4811 OR AMME4010 OR ELEC4714 OR ENGG5217 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students should have completed three years of their BE program before enrolling in this unit.
The BE requires students to obtain industrial work experience of twelve weeks duration (60 working days) or its equivalent towards satisfying the requirements for award of the degree. Students are recommended to undertake their work experience in the break between Year 3 and 4, however any engineering work taken after Year 2 may be accepted for the requirements of this unit.
Students must be exposed to professional engineering practice to enable them to develop an engineering approach and ethos, and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics. and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics.
The student is required to login to Sonia and start your Practical experience proposal applications. Assessment in this unit is by the submission portfolio containing written reports on the involvement of industry. Assessments is via Sonia. For details of the reporting requirements, go to the faculty's Practical Experience website http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/practical-experience/index.shtml. Students normally enrol in ENGG4000 after completing the practical work and will be assessed via written submission.
ENGG4061 Innovation/Technology Commercialisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: Advanced competence in technical engineering and moderate competence in professional engineering and management Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed as a 'Master Class' for final year Engineering students to grapple with the challenges of engaging in, facilitating and managing innovation and technology commercialisation. Key learning outcomes are: developing an understanding of the processes of management, and in particular of innovation, dealing with uncertain and inadequate information, how to communicate effectively to and motivate a group of people to work out what to do, and how to do it.
Content will include the challenges of modern management; understanding of the new rules of international competitiveness; effects of globalisation on Australia's economic performance; the competitiveness of Australian firms; the generation of employment and wealth; the changing requirements of the engineer; the engineer as manager and strategist; the role of innovation in business management; product innovation and commercialisation; IP recognition and management; starting a high-tech company.
ENGG4064 Advanced Engineering Design A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: Distinction average WAM Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Only students with an AAM of > 75% at the end of Year 3 will be invited to join this interdisciplinary group
The aim to this unit is to develop an understanding of the practice of engineering, utilising a diverse range of skills to solve complex problems. Students will gain skills in design, analysis and management by undertaking a significant project in a multi-disciplinary team comprising students from across the faculty. Each student will be required to work in a team to produce an integrated design in greater detail than is possible in ordinary classes and to write a significant design report presenting the results of the process. The ability to work in a team of engineers from different disciplines will be assessed as part of this design project.
We try to centre projects around a client, which can be an industrial facility, the Campus and Property Services Office of the University, Research departments within the university, or outside clients including non-profits and community groups.
Elements drawn from: Introduction to the design process, Clarification of the Brief, Inquiry, brainstorming, Design philosophy, Design optimisation, Equipment design and costing, Hazard assessment, Environmental Impact Assessment, Project financial Analysis, Business planning.
ENGG4065 Advanced Engineering Design B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: Distinction average WAM Corequisites: ENGG4064 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Only students with an AAM of > 75% at the end of Year 3 will be invited to join this interdisciplinary group
The aim to this unit is to develop an understanding of the practice of engineering, utilising a diverse range of skills to solve complex problems This Unit is an extension of the ENGG4064 unit of study and exists to allow students to extend the work they do in ENGG4064 and penetrate much more deeply into the subject in hand, so that it becomes much more like a thesis. The nature of these advanced engineering courses meaning the subject matter is negotiated every year The project in mind has to be amenable to extension in this way so agreement with the course coordinator needs to be sought at an early stage by anyone considering this unit. Students will gain skills in design, analysis and management by undertaking a significant project in a multi-disciplinary team comprising students from across the faculty. Each student will be required to work in a team to produce an integrated design in greater detail than is possible in ordinary classes and to write a significant design report presenting the results of the process. The ability to work in a team of engineers from different disciplines will be assessed as part of this design project. We try to centre projects around a client, which can be an industrial facility, the Campus and Property Services Office of the University, Research departments within the university, or outside clients (e. g. Nature Conservation Council NSW) Elements drawn from: Introduction to the design process, Clarification of the Brief, Inquiry, brainstorming, Design philosophy, Design optimisation, Equipment design and costing, Hazard assessment, Environmental Impact Assessment, Project financial Analysis, Business planning.
ENGG4111 Integrated Engineering 4

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture, Tutorial, Workshop, E-Learning Prerequisites: ENGG2111 AND (84cp UoS from Engineering) Prohibitions: ENGG4064 OR ENGG4065 Assessment: Other 50%, Portfolio 50% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
At this level, students are expected to work autonomously and collaboratively to generate innovative designs and solutions, and are conscious of the responsibilities and accountabilities of engineers and of directing the development of professional skills. The focus for this unit is on fostering systems thinking skills where students are encouraged to approach problems holistically, drawing together the disparate elements of their developing capacities, and show how the nature and boundaries are understood in order to formulate technically sound solutions as well as address broader needs. Through a number of activities, students are provided opportunities to demonstrate skills in leadership, implement innovative design solutions, and mentor others.
Students prepare for the transition from 4th year to post-graduate or employment assessing choices, refining options through a well developed, strategically focused academic or career plan. By the end of the year students are expected to have a sophisticated portfolio demonstrating achievements in alignment with Engineering Australia Stage 1 competencies thus demonstrating a commitment to the profession and capacity to achieve chartered engineering status.
ENGP1000 Professional Engagement Program 1

Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: practical experience Prohibitions: ENGG4000 OR ENGG5217 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career.
Once students have completed the requirements of the first stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP1.
ENGP2000 Professional Engagement Program 2

Session: Semester 2 Classes: practical experience Prerequisites: ENGP1000 Prohibitions: ENGG4000 OR ENGG5217 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career.
Once students have completed the requirements of the second stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP2.
ENGD1000 Building a Sustainable World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: ENGG1111 OR INFO1111 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 and HSC studies in one or more Science subjects. Students must have an ATAR equivalent score of at least 98 and faculty permission Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Real engineering in 1st year! The course is designed to introduce Dalyell students to the essential professional engineering skills of leadership, communication, problem identification and solution, design, teamwork, project management and understanding of the social, cultural, global, ethical and environment responsibilities of the professional engineer. These skills are pursued through a real world Engineers Without Borders Challenge project in a developing country.
ENGP3000 and ENGD2000 will be available from 2019.