Engineering

ENGG – Engineering unit of study descriptions

ENGG1000 History and Philosophy of Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning, Independent Research Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ENGG1000 is a unique course that aims to provide students with an understanding of the historical development of Engineering with relation to societal expectations of the period. Engineering as a field of study and profession has developed over millennia from simple (yet significant) advances in technology such as the lever and wheel, to modern day examples such as advanced computers, nanomaterials and space flight.
Interaction between human society and Engineers has helped develop and guide the advancement of engineering technology; with society posing problems for Engineers to solve and Engineers developing new technology that changed the course of human history, and helped shape the world we live in.
The general philosophy behind Engineering is that Engineers work to fulfill the needs of society (water, electricity, technological improvements etc. ), and as such Engineers are expected to act ethically towards society. The role of Engineers in society will be analysed and discussed from a humanistic perspective, with relation to the current Engineers Australia code of ethics. Other relevant philosophical analyses of Engineering as a skill and profession will also be examined such as, aesthetics, creativity, the epistemology of Engineering and more.
This course will use online resources extensively and help develop research and communication skills of students, whilst providing an overview of the historical significance of Engineers in society, and what it means to be an Engineer.
ENGG1111 Integrated Engineering 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford; Thomas Goldfinch Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: ENGG1803 or ENGG1061 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Note: Dalyell Scholars may enrol in ENGD1000 in place of ENGG1111. They may also replace ENGG2111 + ENGG3111 + ENGG4111 (3 x 2 cp) with another 6 cp ENGDXXXX (Engineering Dalyell) unit.
Integrated Engineering 1 provides students with an understanding of the nature and diversity of engineering practice and begins the development of a set of intellectual tools for integrating their ongoing personal, academic, and professional development.
An open-ended design project is used to highlight foundational engineering and professional practice skills, and the application of these skills to real world projects and workplace practice. The project demonstrates the role that various professional and academic competencies play in the ability to manage contemporary professional engineering issues.
Through developing their knowledge of the engineering discipline, students enhance their capacity for lifelong learning through critical reflection and self-assessment, creating and monitoring career goals as well as building a sense of responsibility for their learning. Through case studies, design projects and challenges, students expand their communication skills, develop competency in team-based problem solving and creating innovative solutions, as well as apply critical thinking and inquiry. These activities also develop student's research skills and enable them to experience the engineering design process, manage projects, and appreciate the significance of ethics, safety and sustainability.
Dalyell students may enrol in ENGD1000 Building a Sustainable World in place of ENGG1111.
ENGG1800 Introduction to Engineering Disciplines

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof John Kent Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Prohibitions: CIVL1900 OR CHNG1108 OR MECH1560 OR AERO1560 OR AMME1960 OR BMET1960 OR MTRX1701 OR ENGG1960 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit gives a brief introduction to a range of specialisations in Engineering including Aeronautical, Biomedical, Chemical, Civil, Mechanical, Electrical and Information Engineering. First-year students have the opportunity to experience aspects of each engineering stream and thus be able to better select which area they wish to pursue in their future studies. There are four Schools in the Faculty and each School will deliver a three-week module covering its specialisations.
School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.
This module enables students to gain an appreciation of the methods in transforming raw materials to value-added products. Students gain an insight into the application of the basic principles of chemistry, mathematics, material and energy balance in assessing and designing processes, operations and maintenance and safety requirements and procedures. This is achieved through a project based activity that involves a paper-based study of a process followed by construction and testing of performance.
School of Civil Engineering.
Introductory lectures in Engineering Economics and Construction Planning, Foundation Engineering, Structural Engineering, Materials, Environmental Engineering. Each student is involved in the erection and dismantling of several Scaled Model Structures in the Civil Engineering Courtyard. Preliminary lectures related to the models include safety issues, loading, static analysis, foundation calculations, construction management, engineering drawings and detailing, geometric calculations, and survey measurements. Exercises related to these issues are performed before assembly and disassembly of the models.
School of Electrical and Information Engineering.
Overview of Electrical Engineering, Basic circuit analysis: circuits, currents and voltages: Power and Energy; Ohms law, KCL, KVL. Resistive circuits: Resistance in series and parallel; voltage divider and current divider circuits. Introduction to digital systems: Basic logic circuit concepts, Synthesis of logic circuits, Sequential logic circuits. Microcomputers: Computer Organisation, Memory types, Digital process control, assembly language and programming. There are laboratory exercises based on the above topics.
School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering (AMME).
AMME has four degree streams: Aerospace, Mechanical, Biomedical and Mechatronics. Two or three of these streams are covered during this module in any year.
Mechanical Engineering demonstrates aspects of mechanical design and manufacturing techniques with a hands-on building task. Aerospace has a lecture on fundamentals of aircraft design. And a hands-on Design-Build-Test task where students work in small teams to gain an introduction to lightweight structures, aerodynamics and flight stability and control. Mechatronics covers software control of machines, including basic electronic knowledge with examples, concepts of software and hardware integration. Group based activity is to design and implement a simple mechatronics system using a Mindstorm Lego set. Biomedical engineering provides a hands-on design project to develop a joint replacement concept. The design process captures inputs such as joint range of motion considerations, biomaterials selection, manufacturing route, design risk analysis.
Mechanical Engineering demonstrates aspects of mechanical design and manufacturing techniques with a hands-on building task. Aerospace has a lecture on fundamentals of aircraft design. And a hands-on Design-Build-Test task where students work in small teams to gain an introduction to lightweight structures, aerodynamics and flight stability and control. Mechatronics covers software control of machines, including basic electronic knowledge with examples, concepts of software and hardware integration. Group based activity is to design and implement a simple mechatronics system using a Mindstorm Lego set. Biomedical engineering provides a hands-on design project to develop a joint replacement concept. The design process captures inputs such as joint range of motion considerations, biomaterials selection, manufacturing route, design risk analysis.
ENGG1801 Engineering Computing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mohammad Polash; Soyeon Han Session: Intensive January,Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: COSC1003 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to solving engineering problems using computers. Students learn how to organise data to present and understand it better using a spreadsheet (Excel), and also how to instruct the computer exactly what to do to solve complex problems using programming (Matlab). Real engineering examples, applications and case-studies are given, and students are required to think creatively and solve problems using computer tools.
Matlab will cover three-quarters of the unit. The remaining one-quarter will be devoted to the use of Excel in engineering scenarios. Furthermore, cross integration between Matlab and Excel will also be highlighted.
No programming experience is required or assumed. Students are assumed to have a basic understanding of mathematics and logic, and very elementary computing skills.
ENGG1813 Engineering Critical Thinking

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Workgroups Assessment: Through semester assessment (80%) and Final Exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit concentrates on the rigors of communication in an engineering context including technical writing, teamwork, formal presentations and critical analysis. It is a precursor to ENGG1803 Professional Engineering 1 for students with a non-English speaking background in degrees that have a free elective available to students, and takes the place of one free elective. Students who enrol in this unit in 1st year will defer ENGG1803 Professional Engineering to 2nd year.
Aims: The Unit concerns critical thinking and Intensive English language (in an engineering context) aimed at building skills and confidence in students so that they better engage in the educational process at Sydney University by:
- Enhancing student ability to meet the challenges of study in Engineering in the Australian university context.
- Intensive focus on the language of Engineering in English.
- Developing cross-cultural awareness with a focus on consolidating the essential facets and practices in the tradition of science and research-based skills of sound reasoning.
- Increasing critical thinking capacity and preparing students for engaged enquiry in an Engineering context.
ENGG1850 Introduction to Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kon Chung Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Organisations today are heavily reliant on projects as part of their daily operations. A project is a temporary endeavour undertaken with limited resources to achieve organisational goals that are linked to broader organisational strategies and missions. Project management is therefore the process of planning, scheduling, resourcing, budgeting and monitoring the various phases of a project.
"Introduction to Project Management" is an introductory course that teaches students essential principles and concepts of project management, its application and related technologies. Students will learn about the project organisation, its structure, and role of the project manager, project sponsor and project committee. In addition, students will also learn how to identify business problems that require project-based solutions, how to select and evaluate projects, develop a business case, and manage the project at a basic level.
At completion of the course, students will have a high-level understanding of project management concepts, which equips them with basic technical and managerial skills required for project-based organisations.
ENGG1860 Project Initiation and Scope

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Duro Kolar Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Projects need to be set up to succeed from the start. This includes careful consideration of the purpose of the project and how this breaks down through work, deliverables and responsibility. This Unit of Study addresses the techniques required to design a successful project. It provides the foundation for more detailed planning and execution. Upon completion of this course, students will develop thinking and listening skills, while demonstrating initiative and drive to achieve project related outcomes.
ENGG1863 Effective Project Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kon Chung Session: Intensive June,Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project management is a rapidly growing profession applied across all industries. This subject provides an overview of project management and its relationship to program and portfolio management and the broader business context. The Unit introduces students to variations in project management as interpreted and applied in different industries. It will cover the nature of the project management profession, project career paths and the graduate qualities sought by employers. It introduces the primary professional standards and project management terminology. Projects are constructed and progressed through communication. Effective communication can save a poor project just as much as poor communication can undermine previously successful implementation. This Unit of Study covers the essential skills of effective project communication and sets students up to exercise influence through interpersonal skills and construct patterns of communication suitable to the demands of different projects. This unit will help students develop critical thinking and source and use information in their decision making. Students will focus on personal integrity and reliability as well as self awareness.
ENGG1865 Project Time, Cost and Resources

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fatima Afzal Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prohibitions: CIVL3805 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project management requires complex planning decisions with regards to schedules, budgets and resources in both traditional and agile environments. This unit of study introduces students to tools, methods and approaches such as the work breakdown structure, milestone planning, precedence diagram, Gantt charts and critical pathways. These tools and techniques help project managers balance time, cost and resources; and understand the impact on the schedule, budget and resource allocation associated with potential risks.
ENGG2005 Engineering Studies C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Annamaria Brancato Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Special project specified for individual requirements.
ENGG2062 Engineering Project: Business Plan 2 Adv

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Research, Presentation Prerequisites: Distinction average WAM Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This course aims to extend student experience beyond the design and build phase of engineering to the business planning necessary to transform a good idea into a commercial reality. It will provide the opportunity for students to develop a range of skills used by professional engineers in a business environment, including planning, strategy development and assessment, business environment and market analysis together with financial management and resource allocation.
ENGG2111 Integrated Engineering 2

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Seyed Hadigheh Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Facilitated workshops, online courses (MOOC), independent study Prerequisites: ENGG1111 OR ENGG1061 OR ENGD1000 Assessment: Threshold exam (25%), EOI submission (5%), Project pitch (10%), Group project (35%), Project debrief (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Note: Dalyell Scholars may replace ENGG2111 + ENGG3111 + ENGG4111 (3 x 2 cp) with another 6 cp ENGDXXXX (Engineering Dalyell) unit.
The aim of this unit is to enhance the capacity of students to assess, plan improve and evaluate their learning needs in relation to becoming a professional engineer. This unit will continue the development of both academic and professional skills through relevant and authentic activities and a project. Integrated Engineering 2 (ENGG2111) will use management and projects as a perspective to explore engineering approaches to addressing open-ended problems. The unit requires students to engage in a project that requires a degree of independence, innovation, resilience and resourcefulness as well as to investigate key skills associated with managing projects and relate these to national and global employability skills.
The project raises awareness about the complexity of engineering in that problems may be vague or ambiguous with no clear right or wrong answers, and students are encouraged to explore and critique ideas, use logical problem solving, and reflect on the process and decisions made with the explicit purpose of becoming critical thinkers. There are two main components: projects and professional development. Students learn project management skills which are then applied to a project. The professional development aspect involves students rating themselves and their peers on teamwork skills, including communication and conflict resolution. Achievements throughout the semester are documented for presentation. At the end of the semester students reflect on the success of their project and the performance of their team and themselves based on Professional Performance Innovation and Risk (PPIR) protocol.
ENGG2850 Project Cost and Finance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Petr Matous Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prerequisites: ENGG1865 AND [30 cp of any 1000 level units of study] Prohibitions: CIVL2812 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a theory and case study based unit providing students with a unified approach to the analysis of project value, supported by explicit methods for ranking and selection of projects on the basis of returns and sensitivity. The unit uses "Project Finance" as a vehicle for descibing the fundamentals of project management financing and contrasts it with "Direct Financing", a more traditional approach to funding projects.
ENGG2851 Project Analytics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fatima Afzal Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prerequisites: ENGG1860 Corequisites: ENGG2855 Assessment: Through semester assessment (75%) and Final Exam 25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project Management Data analytics (DA) provides extensive coverage related to examining raw data with the purpose of drawing conclusions about that information. It is used in many industries to allow companies and organisation to make better business decisions and in the sciences to verify or disprove existing models or theories. Here, we focus our effort on providing in-depth knowledge and skills to students focusing on inference, process of deriving a conclusion based solely on what is already known by the project manager.
ENGG2852 Project Based Organisational Behaviour

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ENGG1850 AND (PSYC1002 OR PMGT1852) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project based organisational behaviour focuses on human behaviour in organisational and project based context, with a focus on individual and group processes and actions. It involves an exploration of organisational and managerial processes in the dynamic context of organisation and is primarily concerned with human implications of project based activity. In this unit, we offer a succinct, lively and robust introduction to the subject of organisational behaviour. It aims to encourage critical examination of the theory of organisational behaviour whilst also enabling students to interpret and deal with real organisational problems in project management and combines relative brevity with thorough coverage and plentiful real-world examples.
ENGG2855 Project Acceptance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Duro Kolar Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project Acceptance offers a specific, succinct, step-by-step project quality management process. It offers an immediate hands-on capability to improve project implementation and customer satisfaction in any project domain and will help maintain cost and schedule constraints to ensure a quality project. This unit introduces tools and techniques that implement the general methods defined in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge-Third Edition (PMBOK) published by the Project Management Institute (PMI), and augment those methods with more detailed, hands-on procedures that have been proven through actual practice. This unit is aimed at providing students an explicit step-by-step quality management process, along with a coherent set of quality tools organised and explained according to their application within this process that can be applied immediately in any project context. It further introduces a Wheel of Quality that codifies in one complete image the contributing elements of contemporary quality management. It also help in understanding the process for establishing a new quality tool, the pillar diagram, that provides a needed capability to identify root causes of undesirable effects.
ENGG3062 Technology Education (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Currie Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Research, Presentation Prerequisites: Distinction average WAM Prohibitions: ENGD3002 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to give the student experience in critically engaging an audience in the theoretical and practical understanding of engineering and technology. Students will learn professional skills in client relationship management, teaching and presenting, project management, leadership and teamwork. This work will be carried out with partner schools to enhance the engineering knowledge and understanding of Stage 5 high school students. This unit places students in an environment with which they are familiar, albeit in a very different and challenging role. It allows them the opportunity to deliver a project for a professional external client and in doing so showcase engineering, the faculty and the University to the wider community.
ENGG3111 Integrated Engineering 3

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Keith Willey Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Independent Study, Workshops, E-Learning Prerequisites: (ENGG2111 OR ENGG2062) AND 84cp ENGI UoS Prohibitions: ENGG3062 Assessment: Building your professional network activities 35%, Individual research and opportunity identification 15%, Group project with individual components 50% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 2
Note: In general, the Semester 2 offering is only for students who are unable to undertake ENGG3111 in Semester 1 due to an international exchange or involvement with another university program and completion of the unit in the following year would delay graduation. Note: While it is recommended that you undertake ENGG3111 before ENGG4111 the units can be taken in any order.
ENGG3111 continues the theme of integrating the students' professional development with practice. This integration is achieved through combining a series of interrelated activities which build on achievements of previous semesters. These learning activities combined to:
1. Develop student's abilities with respect to innovation, creativity and engineering design through self guided learning and project work.
2. Develop student's capacity to develop their professional network through undertaking a series of online modules followed by applying what they have learnt at an engineering networking event.
3. Enhance student's capacity to be independent lifelong learners through reflecting on their learning experience
Student teams focus on the early stages of opportunity identification ¿ exploring, recognising and analysing socio-political and industry trends, customer needs and requirements and investment directions that will lead to commercial opportunities for an expanding engineering firm.
Students will also be required to actively develop their professional network. After completing an online learning component students will be required to plan their attendance at and subsequently attend an engineering networking event. After the event students will be required to reflect on both their plan and their experience.
ENGG3800 Industry and Community Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Anthony Kadi Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: E-Learning, Seminars, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: Upper-level disciplinary knowledge. Required knowledge will vary by project. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is designed for third year students to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application.
ENGG3853 Project Risk Management Tools and Techniques

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ENGG2851. Prohibitions: CIVL4810 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Managing risk is an essential skill to be a successful project manager. This course will provide students with an understanding of what is risk and the key principles of risk management as described in AS/NZS ISO 31000: 2009. The course will show how these principles can be applied to project management both through the project development phase and the project delivery phase. This will include skills on how to measure and value risk and assess the potential impacts it may have on a project outcomes using qualitative and quantitative risk assessment techniques. Using case studies students will learn ways to treat risk to minimise the potential impact. The course will also cover techniques for establishing levels of risk appetite and risk tolerance. It will overview risk reporting tools and templates and conclude with a session on human behaviour and how this impacts on risk acceptance and risk aversion in a project context.
On successful completion of this course students will have a good understanding of the basic principles of risk and risk management, be able to apply risk assessment and treatment techniques, be able to quantify potential risk impacts and to establish a prioritised project risk register.
ENGG3854 Legal Aspects of Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Natalie Perisa Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prerequisites: PMGT2821 Prohibitions: CIVL4813 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, we draw on examples on project negotiation and contracting from "real-life" business situations and provide practical information on what to do and what not to do. Student would be exposed to the complexity involved in negotiation and contracting from initiation to formalization of final form of contract which is agreed upon and executed by all parties. Students will be taught how to understand each party's interests and then working towards reaching a common goal. In particular, dealing with complex characters including situations will be covered.
We will provide a basic understanding of commercial contracts and all their ramifications every step of the way. This unit also explains the basics of commercial contract law, highlights how to spot potential issues before they become a problem and then how to work with a lawyer more effectively if things go wrong which is intended for corporate managers rather than lawyers. This unit further contains coverage on forming contracts, restitution, contract interpretation, modification and dispute resolution. We also discuss remedies, performance, and third-party beneficiaries.
ENGG4000 Practical Experience

Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Lowe Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: Practical Experience Prerequisites: 24 credit points of 3000 or higher level ENGI units Prohibitions: ENGP1000 OR ENGP2000 OR ENGP3000 OR ENGG5217 OR CHNG4203 OR AMME4010 OR ELEC4714 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students should have completed three years of their BE program before enrolling in this unit.
The BE requires students to obtain industrial work experience of twelve weeks duration (60 working days) or its equivalent towards satisfying the requirements for award of the degree. Students are recommended to undertake their work experience in the break between Year 3 and 4, however any engineering work taken after Year 2 may be accepted for the requirements of this unit.
Students must be exposed to professional engineering practice to enable them to develop an engineering approach and ethos, and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics. and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics.
The student is required to login to Sonia and start your Practical experience proposal applications. Assessment in this unit is by the submission portfolio containing written reports on the involvement of industry. Assessments is via Sonia. For details of the reporting requirements, go to the faculty's Practical Experience website http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/practical-experience/index.shtml. Students normally enrol in ENGG4000 after completing the practical work and will be assessed via written submission.
ENGG4061 Innovation/Technology Commercialisation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ron Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: Advanced competence in technical engineering and moderate competence in professional engineering and management Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed as a 'Master Class' for final year Engineering students to grapple with the challenges of engaging in, facilitating and managing innovation and technology commercialisation. Key learning outcomes are: developing an understanding of the processes of management, and in particular of innovation, dealing with uncertain and inadequate information, how to communicate effectively to and motivate a group of people to work out what to do, and how to do it.
Content will include the challenges of modern management; understanding of the new rules of international competitiveness; effects of globalisation on Australia's economic performance; the competitiveness of Australian firms; the generation of employment and wealth; the changing requirements of the engineer; the engineer as manager and strategist; the role of innovation in business management; product innovation and commercialisation; IP recognition and management; starting a high-tech company.
ENGG4064 Advanced Engineering Design A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Archie Johnston Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: Distinction average WAM Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Only students with an AAM of > 75% at the end of Year 3 will be invited to join this interdisciplinary group
The aim to this unit is to develop an understanding of the practice of engineering, utilising a diverse range of skills to solve complex problems. Students will gain skills in design, analysis and management by undertaking a significant project in a multi-disciplinary team comprising students from across the faculty. Each student will be required to work in a team to produce an integrated design in greater detail than is possible in ordinary classes and to write a significant design report presenting the results of the process. The ability to work in a team of engineers from different disciplines will be assessed as part of this design project.
We try to centre projects around a client, which can be an industrial facility, the Campus and Property Services Office of the University, Research departments within the university, or outside clients including non-profits and community groups.
Elements drawn from: Introduction to the design process, Clarification of the Brief, Inquiry, brainstorming, Design philosophy, Design optimisation, Equipment design and costing, Hazard assessment, Environmental Impact Assessment, Project financial Analysis, Business planning.
ENGG4065 Advanced Engineering Design B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Archie Johnston Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: Distinction average WAM Corequisites: ENGG4064 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Only students with an AAM of > 75% at the end of Year 3 will be invited to join this interdisciplinary group
The aim to this unit is to develop an understanding of the practice of engineering, utilising a diverse range of skills to solve complex problems This Unit is an extension of the ENGG4064 unit of study and exists to allow students to extend the work they do in ENGG4064 and penetrate much more deeply into the subject in hand, so that it becomes much more like a thesis. The nature of these advanced engineering courses meaning the subject matter is negotiated every year The project in mind has to be amenable to extension in this way so agreement with the course coordinator needs to be sought at an early stage by anyone considering this unit. Students will gain skills in design, analysis and management by undertaking a significant project in a multi-disciplinary team comprising students from across the faculty. Each student will be required to work in a team to produce an integrated design in greater detail than is possible in ordinary classes and to write a significant design report presenting the results of the process. The ability to work in a team of engineers from different disciplines will be assessed as part of this design project. We try to centre projects around a client, which can be an industrial facility, the Campus and Property Services Office of the University, Research departments within the university, or outside clients (e. g. Nature Conservation Council NSW) Elements drawn from: Introduction to the design process, Clarification of the Brief, Inquiry, brainstorming, Design philosophy, Design optimisation, Equipment design and costing, Hazard assessment, Environmental Impact Assessment, Project financial Analysis, Business planning.
ENGG4111 Integrated Engineering 4

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Thomas Goldfinch Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture, Tutorial, Workshop, E-Learning Prerequisites: (ENGG2111 OR ENGG2062) AND 84cp ENGI UoS Prohibitions: ENGG4064 OR ENGG4065 Assessment: Other 50%, Portfolio 50% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 2
Note: Note: While it is recommended that you undertake ENGG3111 before ENGG4111 the units can be taken in any order.
The focus for this unit is on fostering leadership capacity in engineering through exploration of 'Grand Challenges' impacting engineering as a socially, economically and environmentally influential field of practice. Through a number of activities, students are provided opportunities to demonstrate skills in leadership, influencing, research and analysis. At this level, students are expected to work autonomously and collaboratively to generate forward thinking policy positions for an engineering entity in response to a global Grand Challenge.
ENGP1000 Professional Engagement Program 1

Teacher/Coordinator: Anthony Kadi Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: practical experience Prohibitions: ENGG4000 OR ENGG5217 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career.
Once students have completed the requirements of the first stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP1.
ENGP2000 Professional Engagement Program 2

Teacher/Coordinator: Anthony Kadi Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: practical experience Prerequisites: ENGP1000 AND [24cp of ENGI units of study] Prohibitions: ENGG4000 OR ENGG5217 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career.
Once students have completed the requirements of the second stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP2.
ENGP3000 Professional Engagement Program 3

Teacher/Coordinator: Anthony Kadi Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: practical experience Prerequisites: ENGP2000 AND [72cp of ENGI units of study]. Students must enrol in ENGP3000 in the semester immediately following completion of ENGP2000 and once they have completed at least 72cp of engineering units of study. Prohibitions: ENGG4000 OR ENGG5217 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career. Once students have completed the requirements of the third stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP3.
ENGD1000 Building a Sustainable World

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ehssan Sakhaee Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Prohibitions: ENGG1111 OR INFO1111 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course is designed to introduce Dalyell students to the essential professional skills of leadership, communication, problem identification and solution, design, teamwork, project management and understanding of the social, cultural, global, ethical and environment responsibilities of emerging servant leaders by applying both technical and non-technical skills to real world challenges. The course ends with a Rapid Response Challenge where a number of organisations provide challenges to student teams who will work on the challenge for 10 days and present back to the company. This is all complemented by industry and academic mentors throughout the course. Through the course students learn how to lead themselves, lead a project team and attempt to contribute to society and lead change.
ENGD2001 Protecting People Who Use Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Alan Fekete Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit takes an interdisciplinary approach to think strategically about a selection of key issues that emerge from human-technology interactions. This unit shows how the human-technology interface impacts on what people do with technology (whether a computer program, or a physical equipment), and especially on mistakes that might be made, which can threaten physical safety, social well-being, privacy, and other human needs. The unit will analyse risks that arise from poor or malicious interface design, how one can evaluate these risks, some different ways to limit the risks, and the ethical implications of this. Students will learn about physiological, cognitive, social and cultural aspects of human interaction; diversity among people (including cultural norms etc) impacting both what they aim to do, and how they 'read' instructions, discover affordances and actually use systems. The unit deals with fairness, accountability and transparency of sophisticated interfaces. The unit will provide insights that are important for future leaders, both of technology creation activities and of organizations that include the users. An interdisciplinary approach to evaluating these systems provides an opportunity for collaboration and identification of many factors that would otherwise not typically be considered by the designers of the system. This leads to a collective effort to improve current systems and for future systems to be designed that not only consider better functionality and usability, but also their impact on people, society and the environment across time and space.
ENGD3001 Technological Innovation through New Ventures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ehssan Sakhaee Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, project work Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed to provide students with the challenging experience of transforming a good idea, of their own choosing, into a commercial reality. It provides the opportunity for students to assess and develop their entrepreneurial skills. It develops the key competencies of opportunity identification, creativity, vision, ideas assessment, self-awareness, motivation, mobilising resources, financial and economic literacy, planning and management, coping with uncertainty and the pursuit of learning through experience.
ENGD3002 Sustainable Tech. and Community Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Research, Project Work Prerequisites: Must be in the Dalyell program Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Knowledge of the STEAMM disciplines (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics and Medicine) is required, together with the interdisciplinary skills of STEAMM students, to enhance community education and facilitate creative solutions to the complex problems in developing a sustainable physical environment and human society in Australia. This unit will allow students to deepen their experience of the interdisciplinary teams while working with groups external to the University on community focused projects. The wide range of skills to be developed by students include: team development; project management; community consultation; client relationship development; research skills; problem identification and solving, presentation skills; verbal and written communication; and team evaluation and individual reflection. The learning approach will be a mix of lectures, together with project consultations and workshops held at university, and on-site, with community project partners. Schools, particularly Stage 5 (Years 9 and10) students and teachers, will be a primary client group. Other potential project partners may include public, private and non-government sector organisations. Projects undertaken will involve a process of client consultation, research and investigation, project design, implementation and evaluation.
ENGD3003 Complexity of the Interconnected World

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mahendra Piraveenan Session: Semester 1 Prerequisites: Must be in the Dalyell program Assumed knowledge: Assumed level of preparedness includes an understanding of current issues of globalisation and interdependencies in modern world, across a range of domains, from engineering to economics to ecology to health security, caused by global economic volatility, high rates of urbanisation, limited habitable land areas, continuing climate variability, threats of pandemics, dispersed infrastructure, and long-range transport networks and supply chains. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide students an in-depth appreciation of the inter-connected world, its complexities and challenges, and the necessary systems-thinking and analytical skills to handle them. Globalisation, better transport, as well as technical and cultural exchanges have made the modern world truly interconnected, interdependent, and diverse. This interdependent structure and behaviour bring about significant new challenges associated with the design and management of complex systems. This unit will enable the students to tackle these challenges by providing them with the necessary systems-thinking, inter-disciplinary analysis, and leadership skills. The studied topics will include dynamical analysis of complex interdependent networks, local and global measures of network structure and evolution, cascading failures, as well as predictive measures of catastrophic failure in complex adaptive systems, and the tools that enable planning for resilient system design. This unit will equip future professionals with sufficient expertise and technical know-how for the design of efficient failure-prevention and intervention policies, and robust crisis forecasting and management.
ENGF1661 Flexible First Year Enrolment 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Timothy Wilkinson Session: Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a shell unit to enable Flexible First Year students to complete their Semester 2 enrolment.
ENGF1662 Flexible First Year Enrolment 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Timothy Wilkinson Session: Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a shell unit to enable Flexible First Year students to complete their Semester 2 enrolment.
ENGF1663 Flexible First Year Enrolment 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Timothy Wilkinson Session: Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a shell unit to enable Flexible First Year students to complete their Semester 2 enrolment.