Table S Electives - Science, including Sydney Medical School

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

Classes have changed for the following units:

IMMU3102 Molecular and Cellular Immunology. Classes are now: Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight:  2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week.  Two hour tutorials will run weeks 2 to 7 and four hour practical will run from week 8 to 13.

IMMU3902 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (Advanced). Classes are now: Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight:  2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week.  Two hour tutorials will run weeks 2 to 7 and four hour practical will run from week 8 to 13.

14/1/2019
2.

The description has changed for the following unit. The description should now read:

IMMU3102 Molecular and Cellular Immunology. Description: This study unit builds on the series of lectures that outlined the general properties of the immune system, effector lymphocytes and their functions, delivered in the core courses, IMMU2101 - Introductory Immunology and BMED2404 - Microbes, Infection and Immunity (formerly IMMU2001 and BMED2807). In this unit the molecular and cellular aspects of the immune system are investigated in detail. We emphasise fundamental concepts to provide a scientific basis for studies of the coordinated and regulated immune responses that lead to elimination of infectious organisms. Guest lectures from research scientists eminent in particular branches of immunological research are a special feature of the course. These provide challenging information from the forefront of research that will enable the student to become aware of the many components that come under the broad heading 'Immunology'. Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week, for the duration of the course.

14/1/2019
3.

The description has changed for the following unit. The description should now read:

IMMU3902 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (Advanced). Description: This unit is available to students who have performed well in Introductory Immunology (IMMU2101). Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material and carry out practical work as students in IMMU3102 but attend a series of specialized seminar and research based tutorial classes.
14/1/2018
4.

Prohibitions for the following units have changed. They now read:

PSYC2017 Personality and Social Psychology Prohibition: PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911

PSYC2915 Brain and Behavioural Psychology (Advanced) Prohibition: PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2014

PSYC2015 Brain and Behavioural Psychology Prohibition: PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2915 or PSYC2014

14/1/2019
5.

The following unit is missing from Table S Electives - Science

PHYS2923 Astrophysics and Relativity (SSP)
Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2hrs/week for 13 weeks; laboratory 3hrs/wk for 12 weeks, tutorial 1 hr/wk for 12 wks, duty tutor 1 hr/wk. Prerequisites: 75 or above in (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and 75 or above in (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921). Prohibitions: PHYS2013 or PHYS2913 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and (MATH1X05) Assessment: Final examination 40% (Relativity/Astrophysics modules), Experimental Lab sessions and logbook 25%, Experimental Lab Talk 6%, Experimental Lab report (draft and final) 11%, Assignments (3x Relativity, 2x Astrophysics) 14%, and in class Quiz (Astrophysics) 4%. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial)
day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

Are you someone with a very strong interest in Physics who wants a more open-ended approach to your learning? This unit of study delves into Cosmology/Astrophysics, Special Relativity, and Laboratory Experimental Physics. In Special Relativity, you will  earn about Einstein's theory of special relativity, relative motion, twin paradox, Doppler shift, Lorentz transformations, spacetime and causality, relativistic momentum, relativistic kinetic energy, and mass as a measure of energy. In Cosmology/Astrophysics, you will learn about cosmological models, the cosmological principle, the Friedmann equations, the Friedmann-Robertson Walker metric, cosmological redshift, the cosmic microwave background radiation, big-bang nucleosynthesis, the thermal history of the Universe, inflation, dark
matter and dark energy. Experimental Physics Laboratory will involve you performing experimental test and investigations of relevant topics in a mix of prescribed measurement exercises and open ended investigations, as well as the option of a research project. The lecture modules will be identical to PHYS2913 Astrophysics and Relativity (Advanced) but the labs will be different. The differentiation from PHYS2913 Astrophysics and Relativity (Advanced) is that Experimental Laboratory for PHYS2923 Astrophysics and Relativity (SSP) offers open-ended style, prescribed experiments in place of conventional prescribed exercises, as well as the option of doing a research style project (subject to not also choosing a 2nd research project in the Computational Lab of Phys2922 Physics 2B (SSP)).
21/1/2019
6.

Prerequisites for PSYC3014 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience have been corrected for a typing error. Where is says PSYC015 it should read PSYC2015.

The prerequisites are now:
Prerequisites: [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) and PCOL2011]
21/1/2019
7.

The following unit has been added to the list of Table S Science electives:

MATH1111 Introduction to Calculus
Sessions: Semester 1 Prohibition: MATH1011 or MATH1901 or MATH1906 or MATH1001 or HSC Mathematics Extension 1 or HSC Mathematics Extension 2 or ENVX1001 or MATH1021 or MATH1921 or MATH1931 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of algebra and trigonometry equivalent to NSW Year 10

21/2/2019
8.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units:

BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]



BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

21/2/2019
9.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]


BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

21/2/2019
10.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]



BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

21/2/2019
11.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3092 Proteomics and Functional Genomics  Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]



BCHM3992 Proteomics and Functional Genomics (Adv)  Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

21/2/2019
12.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MEDS2003)



BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv) Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MEDS2003)]

21/2/2019
13.

The following units are now available in Semester 1 2019:

MATH2069 Discrete Mathematics and Graph Theory
MATH2969
Discrete Mathematics and Graph Theory Adv

12/3/2019

Table S Electives - Science

Units of study

Chemistry
1000-level units of study
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1012 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1112 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x3-hr lecture; 1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviours, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do we develop lotions that don't burn us, how do we measure UV absorption by sunscreens, how can we measure and alter soil pH, how are sticky things made, and how do we determine the concentration of vitamin C in juice? Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1912 Chemistry 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101) or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Advanced units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B (Advanced) is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A (Advanced). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
2000-level units of study
CHEM2401 Molecular Reactivity and Spectroscopy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Siegbert Schmid Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, seven 1-hour tutorials per semester, eight 4-hour practicals per semester Prerequisites: (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) and (CHEM1XX2 or CHEM1904) Prohibitions: CHEM2001 or CHEM2101 or CHEM2301 or CHEM2311 or CHEM2502 or CHEM2901 or CHEM2903 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 Assumed knowledge: 6cp MATH1XXX Assessment: Quizzes, lab reports and final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: This is a required chemistry unit of study for students intending to major in chemistry.
This is one of the two core units of study for students considering majoring in chemistry, and for students of other disciplines who wish to acquire a good general background in chemistry. The unit considers fundamental questions of molecular structure, chemical reactivity, and molecular spectroscopy: What are chemical reactions and what makes them happen? How can we follow and understand them? How can we exploit them to make useful molecules? This course includes the organic and medicinal chemistry of aromatic and carbonyl compounds, organic reaction mechanisms, molecular spectroscopy, quantum chemistry, and molecular orbital theory.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/intermediate-chemistry.shtml
CHEM2402 Chemical Structure and Stability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Siegbert Schmid Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, seven 1-hour tutorials per semester, eight 4-hour practicals per semester Prerequisites: (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) and (CHEM1XX2 or CHEM1904) Prohibitions: CHEM2202 or CHEM2302 or CHEM2902 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 Assumed knowledge: 6cp MATH1XXX Assessment: Quizzes, lab reports and final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: This is a required chemistry unit of study for students intending to major in chemistry.
This is the second core unit of study for students considering majoring in chemistry, and for students seeking a good general background in chemistry. The unit continues the consideration of molecular structure and chemical reactivity. Topics include the structure and bonding of inorganic compounds, the properties of metal complexes, materials chemistry and nanotechnology, thermodynamics and kinetics.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/intermediate-chemistry.shtml
CHEM2403 Chemistry of Biological Molecules

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Siegbert Schmid Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, six 1-hour tutorials per semester, five 4-hour practical sessions per semester Prerequisites: (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) and (CHEM1XX2 or CHEM1904) Prohibitions: CHEM2001 or CHEM2101 or CHEM2301 or CHEM2311 or CHEM2502 or CHEM2901 or CHEM2903 or CHEM2913 Assumed knowledge: 6cp MATH1XXX Assessment: Quizzes, lab reports and final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: To enrol in Senior Chemistry, students are required to have completed (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916).
Life is chemistry, and this unit of study examines the key chemical processes that underlie all living systems. Lectures cover the chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids and DNA, the mechanisms of organic and biochemical reactions that occur in biological systems, chemical analysis of biological systems, the inorganic chemistry of metalloproteins, biomineralisation, biopolymers and biocolloids, and the application of spectroscopic techniques to biological systems. The practical course includes the chemical characterisation of biopolymers, experimental investigations of iron binding proteins, organic and inorganic chemical analysis, and the characterisation of anti-inflammatory drugs.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/intermediate-chemistry.shtml
CHEM2404 Forensic and Environmental Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Siegbert Schmid Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, six 1-hour tutorials and five 4-hour practical sessions per semester Prerequisites: (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) and (CHEM1XX2 or CHEM1904) Prohibitions: AGCH3033 Assumed knowledge: 6cp MATH1XXX Assessment: Quizzes, lab reports and final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: To enrol in Senior Chemistry students are required to have completed (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916).
The identification of chemical species and quantitative determination of how much of each species is present are the essential first steps in solving all chemical puzzles. In this course students learn analytical techniques and chemical problem solving in the context of forensic and environmental chemistry. The lectures on environmental chemistry cover atmospheric chemistry (including air pollution, global warming and ozone depletion), and water/soil chemistry (including bio-geochemical cycling, chemical speciation, catalysis and green chemistry). The forensic component of the course examines the gathering and analysis of evidence, using a variety of chemical techniques, and the development of specialised forensic techniques in the analysis of trace evidence. Students will also study forensic analyses of inorganic, organic and biological materials (dust, soil, inks, paints, documents, etc) in police, customs and insurance investigations and learn how a wide range of techniques are used to examine forensic evidence.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/intermediate-chemistry.shtml
CHEM2911 Molecular Reactivity and Spectroscopy Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Siegbert Schmid Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, seven 1-hour tutorials per semester and eight 4-hour practicals per semester Prerequisites: (A mark of 65 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1903) and (a mark of 65 or above in CHEM1112 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1904) Prohibitions: CHEM2001 or CHEM2101 or CHEM2301 or CHEM2311 or CHEM2312 or CHEM2401 or CHEM2502 or CHEM2901 or CHEM2903 or CHEM2915 Assumed knowledge: 6cp MATH1XXX Assessment: Quizzes, lab reports and final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The syllabus for this unit is the same as that of CHEM2401 together with special Advanced material presented in the practical program. The lectures cover fundamental consideration of molecular electronic structure and its role in molecular reactivity and spectroscopy and include applications of spectroscopy, the organic chemistry of aromatic systems, molecular orbital theory and quantum chemistry. For more details of the lecture syllabus, please read the entry for CHEM2401.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/intermediate-chemistry.shtml
CHEM2912 Chemical Structure and Stability (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Siegbert Schmid Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, seven 1-hour tutorials per semester, eight 4-hour practicals per semester Prerequisites: (A mark of 65 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1903) and (a mark of 65 or above in CHEM1112 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1904) Prohibitions: CHEM2202 or CHEM2302 or CHEM2402 or CHEM2902 or CHEM2916 Assumed knowledge: 6cp MATH1XXX Assessment: Quizzes, lab reports and final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The syllabus for this unit is the same as that of CHEM2402 together with special Advanced material presented in the practical program. The lectures include the properties of inorganic compounds and complexes, statistical thermodynamics, the chemistry of carbonyls, nucleophilic organometallic reagents, and synthetic methods. For more details of the lecture syllabus, please read the entry for CHEM2402.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/intermediate-chemistry.shtml
3000-level units of study
CHEM3110 Biomolecules: Properties and Reactions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester Prerequisites: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916) Prohibitions: CHEM3910 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
DNA, proteins and carbohydrates represent three classes of essential biomolecules present in all biological systems. This unit will cover the structure, reactivity and properties of biomolecules and the building blocks from which these molecules are assembled. Interactions between biomolecules and metalions, small molecules and other biomolecules will be covered and the chemical tools for studying biomolecules highlighted. The design and synthesis of small molecules which mimic the functions of biomolecules will also be illustrated.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3910 Biomolecules: Properties and Reactions Adv

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: WAM of 65 or greater and (Credit or better in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) and (Credit or better in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)) Prohibitions: CHEM3110 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
DNA, proteins and carbohydrates represent three classes of essential biomolecules present in all biological systems. This unit will cover the structure, reactivity and properties of biomolecules and the building blocks from which these molecules are assembled. Interactions between biomolecules and metal ions, small molecules and other biomolecules will be covered and the chemical tools for studying biomolecules highlighted. The design and synthesis of small molecules which mimic the functions of biomolecules will also be illustrated. CHEM3910 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3110 students but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3111 Organic Structure and Reactivity

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester Prerequisites: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916) Prohibitions: CHEM3911 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The structure and shape of organic molecules determines their physical properties, their reaction chemistry as well as their biological/medicinal activity. The determination of this structure and understanding its chemical consequences is of fundamental importance in chemistry, biochemistry, medicinal and materials chemistry. This course examines the methods and techniques used to establish the structure of organic molecules as well as the chemistry which dictates the shapes that they adopt. The first part of the course examines the use of modern spectroscopic methods (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy) which are used routinely to identify organic compounds. The second part of the course examines the chemical consequences of molecular shapes in more depth and looks at the inter-relationship between molecular shape and the processes by which bonds are made and broken (the reaction mechanism). An understanding of these processes allows the outcome of reactions to be predicted, which is an essential tool enabling the construction of complex molecules from simple starting materials.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3911 Organic Structure and Reactivity (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: WAM of 65 or greater and (Credit or better in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) and (Credit or better in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)) Prohibitions: CHEM3111 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The structure and shape of organic molecules determines their physical properties, their reaction chemistry as well as their biological/medicinal activity. The determination of this structure and understanding its chemical consequences is of fundamental importance in chemistry, biochemistry, medicinal and materials chemistry. This course examines the methods and techniques used to establish the structure of organic molecules as well as the chemistry which dictates the shapes that they adopt. The first part of the course examines the use of modern spectroscopic methods (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy) which are used routinely to identify organic compounds. The second part of the course examines the chemical consequences of molecular shapes in more depth and looks at the inter-relationship between molecular shape and the processes by which bonds are made and broken (the reaction mechanism). An understanding of these processes allows the outcome of reactions to be predicted, which is an essential tool enabling the construction of complex molecules from simple starting materials. CHEM3911 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3111 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3112 Materials Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916) Prohibitions: CHEM3912 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This course concerns the inorganic chemistry of solid-state materials: compounds that possess 'infinite' bonding networks. The extended structure of solid materials gives rise to a wide range of important chemical, mechanical, electrical, magnetic and optical properties. Consequently such materials are of enormous technological significance as well as fundamental curiosity. In this course you will learn how chemistry can be used to design and synthesise novel materials with desirable properties. The course will start with familiar molecules such as C60 and examine their solid states to understand how the nature of chemical bonding changes in the solid state, leading to new properties such as electronic conduction. This will be the basis for a broader examination of how chemistry is related to structure, and how structure is related to properties such as catalytic activity, mechanical strength, magnetism, and superconductivity. The symmetry of solids will be used explain how their structures are classified, how they can transform between related structures when external conditions such as temperature, pressure and electric field are changed, and how this can be exploited in technological applications such as sensors and switches. Key techniques used to characterise solid-state materials will be covered, particularly X-ray diffraction, microscopy, and physical property measurements.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3912 Materials Chemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: WAM of 65 or greater and (Credit or better in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) and (Credit or better in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)) Prohibitions: CHEM3112 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This course concerns the inorganic chemistry of solid-state materials: compounds that possess 'infinite' bonding networks. The extended structure of solid materials gives rise to a wide range of important chemical, mechanical, electrical, magnetic and optical properties. Consequently, such materials are of enormous technological significance as well as fundamental curiosity. In this course you will learn how chemistry can be used to design and synthesize novel materials with desirable properties. The course will start with familiar molecules such as C60 and examine their solid states to understand how the nature of chemical bonding changes in the solid state, leading to new properties such as electronic conduction. This will be the basis for a broader examination of how chemistry is related to structure, and how structure is related to properties such as catalytic activity, mechanical strength, magnetism, and superconductivity. The symmetry of solids will be used explain how their structures are classified, how they can transform between related structures when external conditions such as temperature, pressure and electric field are changed, and how this can be exploited in technological applications such as sensors and switches. Key techniques used to characterise solid-state materials will be covered, particularly X-ray diffraction, microscopy, and physical property measurements. CHEM3912 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3112 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3113 Catalysis and Sustainable Processes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916) Prohibitions: CHEM3913 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
At present rates of consumption, the resources of 5 planets would be needed for everyone on earth to enjoy our standard of living. Since so much of our consumption and waste involves chemical processes in some way, more efficient chemical processes are needed in a sustainable tomorrow. Catalysis is and will increasingly be at the heart of these sustainable processes. This unit examines the fundamentals of catalysis and its use to design sustainable processes. The course will initially focus on the organometallic fundamentals in order to show how they can be used to understand and design homogeneous catalytic processes from a molecular perspective, which, in turn, leads on to biocatalytic conversions where the enzyme is treated like a large ligand with a special surface, pointing towards the surface chemistry involved in supported catalysts - the next topic. Within this general discussion, the special case of the three-dimensional surface found in zeotypes will be developed and the acid/base and redox catalysis (the mainstay of the majority of industrial processes) in such confined spaces of molecular dimensions will be examined. The course will continue with examining the production of polymers as an example of a major industrial process. An introduction on polymer chemistry and polymer properties will be given, followed by the examination of the various synthetic routes and processes that yield to the production of polymers. The recent advances in polymer synthesis and the design of new materials of improved properties and function will be reviewed. The last part of this section will explore the various approaches designed to improve the sustainability of polymer synthesis, in particular for the specific case of free radical polymerization, with an emphasis on the design of novel catalysts. The course will conclude by examining a variety of case studies. All the preceding topics find their way into the discussion of the key role of catalysts in the design of sustainable chemical processes, rationalizing the choices behind catalyst design.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3913 Catalysis and Sustainable Process (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: WAM of 65 or greater and (Credit or better in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) and (Credit or better in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)) Prohibitions: CHEM3113 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
At present rates of consumption, the resources of 5 planets would be needed for everyone on earth to enjoy our standard of living. Since so much of our consumption and waste involves chemical processes in some way, more efficient chemical processes are needed in a sustainable tomorrow. Catalysis is and will increasingly be at the heart of these sustainable processes. This unit examines the fundamentals of catalysis and its use to design sustainable processes. The course will initially focus on the organometallic fundamentals in order to show how they can be used to understand and design homogeneous catalytic processes from a molecular perspective, which, in turn, leads on to biocatalytic conversions where the enzyme is treated like a large ligand with a special surface, pointing towards the surface chemistry involved in supported catalysts - the next topic. Within this general discussion, the special case of the three-dimensional surface found in zeotypes will be developed and the acid/base and redox catalysis (the mainstay of the majority of industrial processes) in such confined spaces of molecular dimensions will be examined. The course will continue with examining the production of polymers as an example of a major industrial process. An introduction on polymer chemistry and polymer properties will be given, followed by the examination of the various synthetic routes and processes that yield to the production of polymers. The recent advances in polymer synthesis and the design of new materials of improved properties and function will be reviewed. The last part of this section will explore the various approaches designed to improve the sustainability of polymer synthesis, in particular for the specific case of free radical polymerization, with an emphasis on the design of novel catalysts. The course will conclude by examining a variety of case studies. All the preceding topics find their way into the discussion of the key role of catalysts in the design of sustainable chemical processes, rationalizing the choices behind catalyst design. CHEM3913 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3113 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3114 Metal Complexes: Medicine and Materials

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916). Prohibitions: CHEM3914 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Coordination compounds, with bonds between a central metal atom and surrounding ligands, play critical roles in biology, biochemistry and medicine, controlling the structure and function of many enzymes and their metabolism. They play similarly vital roles in many industrial processes and in the development of new materials with specifically designed properties. Building on the foundation of crystal field theory, this course offers a comprehensive treatment of the structures and properties of coordination compounds, with a qualitative molecular orbital description of metal-ligand bonds, and their spectroscopic, magnetic and dynamic effects. The exploitation of these properties in medicine and materials will be emphasized. Medical topics include descriptions of the essential and toxic elements of the Periodic Table, metal complexes as anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs, and their use as tumour imaging and radiotherapeutic agents. Materials topics include metal directed self assembly into unique structures, ligand design and control of the synthesis of nanoporous materials with new electronic and magnetic properties and applications in catalysis and molecular separations.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3914 Metal Complexes: Medic. and Mater. (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: WAM of 65 or greater and (Credit or better in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) and (Credit or better in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)) Prohibitions: CHEM3114 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Coordination compounds, with bonds between a central metal atom and surrounding ligands, play critical roles in biology, biochemistry and medicine, controlling the structure and function of many enzymes and their metabolism. They play similarly vital roles in many industrial processes and in the development of new materials with specifically designed properties. Building on the foundation of crystal field theory, this course offers a comprehensive treatment of the structures and properties of coordination compounds, with a qualitative molecular orbital description of metal-ligand bonds, and their spectroscopic, magnetic and dynamic effects. The exploitation of these properties in medicine and materials will be emphasized. Medical topics include descriptions of the essential and toxic elements of the Periodic Table, metal complexes as anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs, and their use as tumour imaging and radiotherapeutic agents. Materials topics include metal directed self assembly into unique structures, ligand design and control of the synthesis of nanoporous materials with new electronic and magnetic properties and applications in catalysis and molecular separations. CHEM3914 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3114 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3115 Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916) Prohibitions: CHEM3915 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The development of new pharmaceuticals fundamentally relies on the ability to design and synthesize new compounds. Synthesis is an enabling discipline for medicinal chemistry - without it, the development of new drugs cannot progress from design to implementation, and ultimately to a cure. This unit will tackle important factors in drug design, and will highlight the current arsenal of methods used in the discovery of new drugs, including rational drug design, high throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry. We will develop a logical approach to planning a synthesis of a particular target structure. The synthesis and chemistry of heterocycles, which comprise some 40% of all known organic compounds and are particularly common in pharmaceuticals, will be outlined. Examples will include important ring systems present in biological systems, such as pyrimidines and purines (DNA and RNA), imidazole and thiazole (amino acids and vitamins) and porphyrins (natural colouring substances and oxygen carrying component of blood). Throughout the course, the utility of synthesis in medicinal chemistry will be illustrated with case studies such as anti-influenza (Relenza), anaesthetic (benzocaine), anti-inflammatory (Vioxx), antihypertensive (pinacidil) and cholesterol-lowering (Lovastatin) drugs.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3915 Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: WAM of 65 or greater and (Credit or better in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) and (Credit or better in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)) Prohibitions: CHEM3115 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The development of new pharmaceuticals fundamentally relies on the ability to design and synthesize new compounds. Synthesis is an enabling discipline for medicinal chemistry - without it, the development of new drugs cannot progress from design to implementation, and ultimately to a cure. This unit will tackle important factors in drug design, and will highlight the current arsenal of methods used in the discovery of new drugs, including rational drug design, high throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry. We will develop a logical approach to planning a synthesis of a particular target structure. The synthesis and chemistry of heterocycles, which comprise some 40% of all known organic compounds and are particularly common in pharmaceuticals, will be outlined. Examples will include important ring systems present in biological systems, such as pyrimidines and purines (DNA and RNA), imidazole and thiazole (amino acids and vitamins) and porphyrins (natural colouring substances and oxygen carrying component of blood). Throughout the course, the utility of synthesis in medicinal chemistry will be illustrated with case studies such as anti-influenza (Relenza), anaesthetic (benzocaine), anti-inflammatory (Vioxx), antihypertensive (pinacidil) and cholesterol-lowering (Lovastatin) drugs. CHEM3915 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3115 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3116 Membranes, Self Assembly and Surfaces

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916) Prohibitions: CHEM3916 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Away from the covalent and ionic interactions that hold molecules and solids together is the world of fragile objects - folded polymers, membranes, surface adsorption and stable molecular aggregates - held together by weak forces such as van der Waals and the hydrophobic effect. The use of molecules rather than atoms as building blocks means that there are an enormous number of possibilities for stable aggregates with interesting chemical, physical and biological properties, many of which still wait to be explored. In this course we will examine the molecular interactions that drive self assembly and the consequences of these interactions in supramolecular assembly, lipid membrane formations and properties, microemulsions, polymer conformation and dynamics and range of fundamental surface properties including adhesion, wetting and colloidal stability.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3916 Membranes, Self Assembly and Surfaces(Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: WAM of 65 or greater and (Credit or better in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) and (Credit or better in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)) Prohibitions: CHEM3116 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Away from the covalent and ionic interactions that hold molecules and solids together is the world of fragile objects - folded polymers, membranes, surface adsorption and stable molecular aggregates - held together by weak forces such as van der Waals and the hydrophobic effect. The use of molecules rather than atoms as building blocks means that there are an enormous number of possibilities for stable aggregates with interesting chemical, physical and biological properties, many of which still wait to be explored. In this course we examine the molecular interactions that drive self assembly and the consequences of these interactions in supramolecular assembly, lipid membrane formations and properties, microemulsions, polymer conformation and dynamics and range of fundamental surface properties including adhesion, wetting and colloidal stability. CHEM3916 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3916 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3117 Molecular Spectroscopy and Quantum Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916) Prohibitions: CHEM3917 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This course will cover the fundamentals of molecular spectroscopy as a modern research tool and as a theoretical basis with which to understand everyday phenomena. This course is aimed at the student wishing a rigorous understanding of the fabric of nature -- electronic structure -- and the interaction between light and matter. The course teaches the quantum theory needed to understand spectroscopic phenomena (such as the absorption of light) at the empirical and deeper levels. A student completing this course will take with him/her an understanding of spectroscopy as both a phenomenon and a research tool. The course teaches application and theory, with descriptions of applied spectroscopic techniques. Alongside the coverage of modern spectroscopy, the course provides an accessible treatment of the science behind vision, flames, solar cells and photochemical smog.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3917 Mol. Spectroscopy and Quantum Theory (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: WAM of 65 or greater and (Credit or better in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) and (Credit or better in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)) Prohibitions: CHEM3117 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This course will cover the fundamentals of molecular spectroscopy as a modern research tool and as a theoretical basis with which to understand everyday phenomena. This course is aimed at the student wishing a rigorous understanding of the fabric of nature -- electronic structure -- and the interaction between light and matter. The course teaches the quantum theory needed to understand spectroscopic phenomena (such as the absorption of light) at the empirical and deeper levels. A student completing this course will take with him/her an understanding of spectroscopy as both a phenomenon and a research tool. The course teaches application and theory, with descriptions of applied spectroscopic techniques. Alongside the coverage of modern spectroscopy, the course provides an accessible treatment of the science behind vision, flames, solar cells and photochemical smog. CHEM3917 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3117 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
Geosciences
1000-level units of study
GEOS1001 Earth, Environment and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Sabin Zahirovic, Dr Bree Morgan, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1901 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assessment: Exam (40%), 2000 word essay (25%), practical reports (15%), presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This is the gateway unit of study for Human Geography, Physical Geography, Environmental Studies and Geology. Its objective is to introduce the big questions relating to the origins and current state of the planet: climate change, environment, landscape formation, and the growth of the human population. During the semester you will be introduced to knowledge, theories and debates about how the world's physical and human systems operate. The first module investigates the evolution of the planet through geological time, with a focus on major Earth systems such as plate tectonics and mantle convection and their interaction with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and human civilisations. The second module presents Earth as an evolving and dynamic planet, investigating global environmental change, addressing climate variability and human impacts on the natural environment and the rate at which these changes occur and how they have the potential to dramatically affect the way we live. Finally, the third module, focuses on human-induced challenges to Earth's future. This part of the unit critically analyses the relationships between people and their environments, with central consideration to debates on population change, resource use and the policy contexts of climate change mitigation and adaptation.
GEOS1002 Introductory Geography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kurt Iveson, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 hour lecture per week and eight 2 hour practicals during semester. Prohibitions: GEOS1902 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 word essay, two online quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study provides a geographical perspective on the ways in which people interact with each other and the physical world, focussing on the processes that generate spatial variation and difference. Students will consider the development and characteristics of natural environments across the globe, and will explore how these environments both constrain, and are influenced by, humans. In the process, they will learn about the biophysical, political, economic, cultural and urban geographies that shape contemporary global society. Each of these themes will be discussed with reference to key examples, in order to understand the ways in which the various processes (both physical and human) interact. The unit of study is designed to attract and interest students who wish to pursue geography as a major within their undergraduate degree, but also has relevance to students who wish to learn how to think geographically about the contemporary world.
GEOS1003 Introduction to Geology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tom Hubble Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical per week Prohibitions: GEOS1903 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or GEOL1501 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, quizzes, tests, practical reports, field report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The aim of this unit of study is to examine the chemical and physical processes involved in mineral formation, the interior of the Earth, surface features, sedimentary environments, volcanoes, and metamorphism. Lectures and laboratory sessions on mountain building processes and the formation of mineral deposits will lead to an understanding of the forces controlling the geology of our planet. Processes such as weathering, erosion and nature of sedimentary environments are related to the origin of the Australian landscape. In addition to laboratory classes there is a one-day excursion to the western Blue Mountains and Lithgow to examine geological objects in their setting.
Textbooks
The recommended text is is Christiansen, E. H., and Hamblin, W. K. (2015). Dynamic earth: An introduction to physical geology. Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett Learning.
GEOS1901 Earth, Environment and Society Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Sabin Zahirovic, Dr Bree Morgan, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1001 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: Exam (40%), 2000 word essay (25%), practical reports (15%), presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1001, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.
GEOS1902 Introductory Geography (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kurt Iveson, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 hour lecture per week and 8 2 hour practicals per semester, plus independent group work. Prohibitions: GEOS1002 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 1000 word essay, two online quizzes, one practical report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1002, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.
GEOS1903 Introduction to Geology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tom Hubble Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical per week, field classes. Prohibitions: GEOS1003 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: One 2 hour exam, tests, quizzes, practical reports, field report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS1003 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their ATAR or UAI and/or their university performance at the time of enrolment. Students that elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives. This unit may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced).
Textbooks
The recommended text is Christiansen, E. H., and Hamblin, W. K. (2015). Dynamic earth: An introduction to physical geology. Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett Learning.
2000-level units of study
GEOS2111 Natural Hazards: a GIS Approach

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dale Dominey-Howes Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two hour lecture; two hour practical/tute/lab Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Geosciences units Prohibitions: GEOS2911 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, three reports (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Staff will organize a non-compulsory half-day weekend field excursion to explore local Sydney hazards for interested students.
The unit provides an essential framework for understanding the environmental response to short- and long-term geologic, oceanic and atmospheric processes. This Unit of Study introduces students to a variety of natural phenomena that affect society with impact levels ranging from nuisance to disastrous. The discussion of each hazard focuses on: (1) the process mechanics, (2) hazards and risk, and (3) methods for mitigation. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used by scientists, planners, policy-makers and the insurance industry alike to address many issues relating to natural hazards. This Unit of Study will introduce students to the major concepts relating to GIS and provide practical experience in the application of GIS techniques to hazard mapping, risk assessment and mitigation.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbook
GEOS2114 Volcanoes, Hot Rocks and Minerals

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Derek Wyman, A/Prof Patrice Rey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: A minimum of one unit of study from the following (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501), and 24 credit points of Junior Science units of study. Prohibitions: GEOL2111 or GEOL2911 or GEOS2914 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical reports, field trip report, group presentation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: An optional volcano field study trip to New Zealand's North Island in February is available for up to 20 students. Extra costs apply. Contact with the School in the preceding November or December is advisable to secure a place on the trip.
This unit of study relates plate tectonics to a) volcanoes and magma systems that create them; b) the formation of precious metal and gemstone ores; and c) an understanding of how Earth's materials (minerals, rocks, rock formations, lithospheric plates etc.) respond to stresses and the forces that deform them. Methods of analysis involve studies at the microscopic scale (performed on thin sections) and the mesoscopic scale performed on hand specimens and outcrops. The unit includes a day field trip to study an extinct volcano in NSW. Practical work includes independent study of igneous systems, rocks and minerals employing both microscope-based techniques and computer modelling.
GEOS2115 Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dietmar Muller Session: Semester 1 Classes: Twenty-five 1 hour lectures, three 1 hour workshops, eight 2 hour practical classes. Prerequisites: 24 credit points from Junior Units of Study Prohibitions: GEOS2915 or MARS2006 Assumed knowledge: GEOG1001 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOS1003 or GEOS1903 or ENVI1002 or GEOL1902 or GEOL1501 Assessment: Lab reports (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study introduces core concepts about how the formation of ocean basins and their influence on climate govern the development of coasts and continental margins. These concepts provide a framework for understanding the geographic variation of coasts, continental shelves and sediment accumulations in the deep ocean. Ocean-basin evolution is explained in terms of movements within the Earth's interior and how these movements determine the geometry of ocean basins, and their alpine counterparts, which interact with the global circulation of the ocean and atmosphere. This interaction plays a key role in marine sedimentation and controls the environmental conditions responsible for the development of coral reefs and other ecosystems. The Unit of Study systematically outlines how these factors have played out to produce, by gradual change, the coasts we see today, as well as the less familiar deposits hidden beneath the sea and coastal lands. The Unit thereby outlines how knowledge of responses to climate change in the past allow us to predict environmental responses to accelerated climate change occurring now and in the future due to the industrial greenhouse effect, but places these responses into perspective against the geological record. Overall therefore, the Unit aims to provide familiarity with fundamental phenomena central to the study of marine geoscience and environmental impacts, introduced through process-oriented explanations. The Unit of Study is structured around GIS-based practical sessions and problem-based project work, for which lectures provide the theoretical background.
Textbooks
On line reading material provided via Fisher Library
GEOS2116 Earth Surface Processes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x3-hr practical (lab/computer) sessions each week Prohibitions: GEOS2916 or GEOG2321 Assessment: practical and field assignments, final exam Practical field work: 3-5 day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The surface of the planet on which you live is the product of a balance between tectonic forces and numerous agents of erosion. The landscapes in which you live and work, and from which you draw resources, are therefore the legacy of many processes operating synchronously over long time periods. It is also true that Earth's landscapes are dynamic, and constantly changing around you in response to climate, tectonics and patterns of life. The sustainable management of landscapes is strongly dependent upon an awareness of those processes and the ways that they constrain human-environment interactions. In Earth Surface Processes, you will learn how landscapes are produced, and what this means for contemporary land use. Lectures by experts in physical geography, geology, soil science and environmental science will introduce you to the planetary and regional-scale controls on landforms and landscape dynamics, and the nature and distribution of major Australian landscape types. Focussed around 'hands on' field and laboratory-based tasks, students will gain essential practical, analytical and interpretive skills in the analysis of landscapes and earth surface processes that shape them. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the planet on which they live.
Textbooks
Allen, P.A., 2009. Earth surface processes. John Wiley and Sons. Scitech, 551.3 72 Sharma, V.K., 2010. Introduction to process geomorphology. CRC Press. Scitech, 551.41 113
GEOS2121 Environmental and Resource Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sophie Webber Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two hour lecture; one hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 6 credit points of first year Geosciences units or ECOP1001 or ECOP1002 Prohibitions: GEOS2921 Assessment: One exam, one essay, one report, tutorial attendance (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
We are in the midst of an unprecedented global ecological and climatological crisis, and consequently need to transform our social, political and economic systems. This crisis - its causes, its effects, and its solutions - are geographically unevenly distributed and situated. Therefore, this unit of study uses geographical concepts to consider what has caused this global crisis, how we should think about the relations and interactions between humans and their environments, and what some strategies are for managing our environment and resources to negotiate this predicament. Using examples focused in Australia, Asia, and the Pacific region, students will learn how to integrate environmental, economic, political, social and cultural considerations and perspectives, and how to evaluate environmental and resource management policies and ideas.
GEOS2123 The Geography of Cities and Regions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kurt Iveson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/wk for 8 wks, 1x1hr tutorial/wk for 8 wks, 1x2hr GIS practical/wk for 6 wks, 1x6hr fieldtrip Prerequisites: 6 credit points of first year Geosciences units. Prohibitions: GEOS2923 Assessment: Written reports (20%), exam (40%), field report (20%), GIS project (20%) Practical field work: Two hours on average, including fieldtrips within Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
How can we understand the ways that cities and regions change over time, and how these processes shape people's lives? This Unit of Study provides conceptual and practical material for exploring these questions. A program of lectures and tutorials in complemented by close study of Sydney, using GIS (census and satellite imagery) and a series of walking tours to different parts of the city. Assessment is tailored to projects in which students are required to integrate conceptual ideas about cities and regions with GIS mapping and field observations.
GEOS2124 Fossils and Tectonics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Patrice Rey (Coordinator), Dr Adriana Dutkiewicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures plus one 2 hour practical each week. Prerequisites: 24cp of 1000-level units of study, including (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903) and (GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) Prohibitions: GEOL2123 or GEOL2124 or GEOS2924 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical reports, field report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The unit aims to convey how fossils, stratigraphic and structural data are used together to determine ages and environments and the deformation history of rock layers. It covers an introduction to historical geology and the evolution of the major fossils groups. Methods of stratigraphic age determination include litho-, bio-, chemo-, magneto- stratigraphy, as well as radiometric geochronology and the stratigraphic characteristics of the main geological time intervals. Structural methods are focused on brittle deformation in the upper crust and sediments. Students will gain familiarity with the most important fossil groups and how to identify them, and with the most important types of faults and folds. The formation of fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas will also be covered in an earth history and resource exploration context. The simultaneous use of fossils, stratigraphy and structure to unravel the geological history of a set of exposed rock layers is demonstrated during a field excursion to Yass.
Textbooks
Class notes for the stratigraphy and fossils part will be available for purchase from The University Copy Centre.
GEOS2911 Natural Hazards: A GIS Approach (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dale Dominey-Howes Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two hour lecture; two hour practical/tute/lab Prerequisites: A mark of 75 in a 6 credit point Junior Geosciences unit of study Prohibitions: GEOS2111 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, three reports (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Staff will organize a non-compulsory half-day weekend field excursion to explore local Sydney hazards for interested students.
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS2111 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance to date. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives.
Textbooks
No set textbook
GEOS2914 Volcanoes, Hot Rocks and Minerals Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Derek Wyman, A/Prof Patrice Rey, Dr Nicolas Flament Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior Science units of study and Distinction in (GEOL1002 or GEOS1002 or ENVI1002 or GEOL1501 or GEOL1902 or GEOS1902 or GEOS1003 or GEOS1903). Prohibitions: GEOS2114 or GEOL2001 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical reports, field trip report, group presentation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: An optional volcano field study trip to New Zealand's North Island in February is available for up to 20 students. Extra costs apply. Contact with the School is the preceding November or December is advisable to secure a place on the trip.
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS2114 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance to date. Students that elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives. This unit may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced).
Textbooks
No required textbook. Course notes available.
GEOS2915 Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dietmar Muller Session: Semester 1 Classes: Twenty-five 1 hour lectures, three 1 hour workshops, eight 2 hour practical classes. Prerequisites: Distinction average in 48 credit points from Junior units of study. Prohibitions: GEOS2115 or MARS2006 Assumed knowledge: GEOG1001 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOS1003 or GEOS1903 or ENVI1002 or GEOL1902 or GEOL1501 Assessment: Lab reports (60%), one 2 hour exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS2115 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance to date. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives.
Textbooks
Online reading materials are provided via Fisher Library.
GEOS2916 Earth Surface Processes (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x3-hr practical (lab/computer) sessions each week Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GEOS2116 or GEOG2321 Assessment: practical and research assignments, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The surface of the planet on which you live is the product of a balance between tectonic forces and numerous agents of erosion. The landscapes in which you live and work, and from which you draw resources, are therefore the legacy of many processes operating synchronously over long time periods. It is also true that Earth's landscapes are dynamic, and constantly changing around you in response to climate, tectonics and patterns of life. The sustainable management of landscapes is strongly dependent upon an awareness of those processes and the ways that they constrain human-environment interactions. In the Advanced mode of Earth Surface Processes, you will learn how landscapes are produced, and what this means for contemporary land use. Lectures by experts in physical geography, geology, soil science and environmental science will introduce you to the planetary and regional-scale controls on landforms and landscape dynamics, and the nature and distribution of major Australian landscape types. Focussed around 'hands on' field and laboratory-based tasks, students will gain essential practical, analytical and interpretive skills in the analysis of landscapes and earth surface processes that shape them. The Advanced mode of Earth Surface Processes challenges you to create new knowledge, and provides a higher level of academic rigour. You will take part in a series of small-group practical exercises that will develop your skills in research design and execution, and will provide you with a greater depth of understanding in core aspects of geomorphology. The Advanced mode will culminate in a research-focussed Advanced Assignment. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the planet on which they live, and who may wish to develop higher-level analytical and research skills in geomorphology and landscape analysis.
Textbooks
Allen, P.A., 2009. Earth surface processes. John Wiley and Sons. Scitech, 551.3 72 Sharma, V.K., 2010. Introduction to process geomorphology. CRC Press. Scitech, 551.41 113
GEOS2921 Environmental and Resource Management (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sophie Webber Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two hour lecture; one hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: A mark of 75 in a 6 credit point Junior Geosciences unit of study or a mark of 75 in ECOP1001 or ECOP1002 Prohibitions: GEOS2121 Assessment: One exam, one essay, one report, tutorial attendance (100%) Practical field work: Seminar, maximum of four hours Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Advanced students will receive the same core lecture materials as for GEOS2121 but have a separate seminar and are required to complete alternative written work.
GEOS2923 The Geography of Cities and Regions (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kurt Iveson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/wk for 8 wks, 1x1hr tutorial/wk for 8 wks, 1x2hr GIS practical/wk for 6 wks, 1x6hr fieldtrip Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in 6 credit points of first year Geosciences units. Prohibitions: GEOS2123 Assessment: Written reports (20%), exam (40%), field report (20%), GIS project (20%) Practical field work: Two hours on average, including fieldtrips within Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
GEOS2923 has the same thematic content as GEOS2123 however with elements taught at an Advanced level.
GEOS2924 Fossils and Tectonics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Patrice Rey (Coordinator), Dr Adriana Dutkiewicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures plus one 2 hour practical each week. Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in [(GEOS1003 or GEOS1903) or (GEOS2114 or GEOS2914)] Prohibitions: GEOL2123 or GEOL2124 or GEOS2124 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical reports, field report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS2124 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance to date. Students that elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives. This unit may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced).
Textbooks
The same as for GEOS2124.
3000-level units of study
ENVI3111 Environmental Law and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate units Prohibitions: ENVI3911 Assessment: Essays, in-class tests, tutorials, exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Environmental regulation and governance plays an important role in regulating human impacts on the environment. This unit provides an introduction to environmental regulation. We investigate key environmental issues through an examination of environmental policies, legislation and case law at a variety of scales (international, national and state/local). The ethics component helps students develop thoughtful and informed positions on issues in environmental ethics. The aim of this Unit is to enable students to understand the broad principles of environmental law and ethics and to apply this understanding to contemporary environmental problems.
ENVI3911 Environmental Law and Ethics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across 12 credit points of Intermediate units Prohibitions: ENVI3111 Assessment: Essays, tutorial attendance, exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This advanced unit of study will cover the same core lecture material as for ENVI3111, but students will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments based on a fieldtrip activity.
ENVI3114 Energy and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture and 1 hour seminar per week; field trips Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate units Prohibitions: ENVI3001 or PHYS3600 Assumed knowledge: Junior Physics units or Intermediate Environmental Science units Assessment: Essay (50%), quantitative assessment (20%), seminar talk (20%), quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit covers many aspects of energy and the environment: energy resources and use; electrical power generation including fossil fuelled and alternate methods; environmental impacts of energy use and power generation including greenhouse gas emissions; transportation and pollution; energy management in buildings; solar thermal energy, photovoltaics, wind power and nuclear energy; embodied energy and net emissions analysis and, importantly, socio-economic and political issues related to energy provision.
ENVI3888 Environmental Studies Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Phil McManus Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 2hrs week x 6, project based worik 2hrs x 5 then 4hrs x 4, presentations 1x4 hours (depending on student numbers) Prerequisites: GEOS2X21 and (GOVT2228 or AREC2003 or GEOS2X11) Prohibitions: ENVI3112 or ENVI3912 Assessment: Literature review (individual, 2000 words) 20%, Report (group, 3000 words) 60%, Presentation (group, 15 minutes plus questions) 20% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Understanding and being able to undertake Environmental Assessment is a challenge for graduates of many academic disciplines. This unit will investigate the history, strengths, weaknesses and potential of various forms of environmental assessment through an integrated project that enables students to build on their disciplinary knowledge, work in cross-disciplinary teams and develop an interdisciplinary approach and knowledge. You will learn the methods of environmental assessment, and to understand critically the theory and practice of Environmental Assessment from both positive (scientific) and normative (value) perspectives. The positive perspective will focus on the scientific aspects of the assessment process, the quality of science in Environmental Assessment, mitigation measures. By doing this unit, you will develop teamwork skills, decision-making skills, research and communication skills and a knowledge of environmental assessment relevant for future employment. There will also be involvement from organisations that are potential employers of graduates from this major.
GEOG3888 Integrated Geographical Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Dan Penny Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 2 hrs/week for 12 weeks, practcal/laboratory class 3 hrs per week for 11 weeks Prerequisites: GEOS2X21 and (GEOS2X11 or GEOS2X15 or GEOS2X16 or GEOS2X23) Assessment: Assignments (10%), Written Exam (35%), Projet Report (35%), Project Oral Presentations (15%), Team work participation and evaluation (5%) Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Science
Global environmental challenges demand interdisciplinary thinking, and professional practice in interdisciplinary teams. Geography straddles thought and practice in both social and natural sciences, and is therefore inherently interdisciplinary. This unit will provide students with an opportunity to integrate the concepts and skills acquired during their Geography program. In teams, you will work with external partners on specific projects relevnt to them, and provide outcomes directly to those partners. Students will draw on concepts and skills drawn from their training in physical and human geography, and apply them in an integrated way. By completing this unit you will develop skills in contemporary geographical practice with 'real world' impact.
GEOL3888 Economic Geology Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Derek Wyman Session: Semester 1 Classes: Weeks 1- 7: lecture 2 hrs/week ; practical 3 hours/week Weeks 8-13: mentoring sessions 2 hrs/week; shared practical space availble 3 hours/week Prerequisites: GEOS2X14 and GEOS2X24 Prohibitions: GEOS3102 or GEOS3802 or GEOS3003 or GEOS3004 or GEOS3904 or GEOS3006 or GEOS3906 or GEOS3017 or GEOS3917 or GEOS3903 Assessment: Practicals (10% individual), Final Exam (40% individual), Research Brief (10% individual - project component), Project Report (25% group), Group Presentation and teamwork (15% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The extraction of natural resources is critical to the Australian economy and to modern technologies but involves complex economic, environmental and societal issues. This unit introduces the multidisciplinary concept of ore deposits, which are the product of complex interactions between rocks, fluids and deformation including, fluid-assisted earthquakes in subduction zones, partial melting of the mantle, magma mixing and the transfer of heat energy and metals into seafloor black smokers where sulphides bodies form. The social license needed for the exploration and mining of these systems demands that economic interests are balanced with environment sustainability and long-term wellbeing of local communities. Using the Geology of Australia as a natural laboratory, this unit of study presents the geology of ore deposits within a social, environmental and global economic context. The unit will employ the mineral system approach combining plate tectonic reconstructions, satellite data, virtual core libraries, geochemical data, field observations and microscopic observations. Organized in multi-disciplinary teams, students will compare known regions of mineralization with potential new mining districts as they address the social and environmental impact of exploration and mining.
GEOS3333 Geographical Concepts, Skills and Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hour lecture, 1 hour tutorials per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study, including 6 credit points from following (GEOS2112 or GEOS2912 or GEOS2123 or GEOS2923 or GEOS2115 or GEOS2915 or GEOS2121 or GEOS2921 or SOIL2002 or LWSC2002) Prohibitions: GEOS3933 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of ARC GIS software. Assessment: Two 1 hr in-class exams (50%), active participation in fieldwork and classes (25%), one 2000w fieldwork report (25%) Practical field work: Approximately 13 hours of fieldwork per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
GEOS3333 is designed to be the 'capstone' for a Major in Geography. Its aim is to bring together the core concepts within the discipline; connect these to methodological practices, and further develop the field-based skills associated with geographical research. Reflecting the straddle of the discipline across the natural and social sciences, this unit draws on a wide diversity of material to impart key insights about the essential qualities of 'doing Geography'. This includes (i) a weekly lecture program which addresses three thematic concerns of Geography (human-environment interactions; spatial relations; and politics, policy and practice) using examples from the natural and social science perspectives at global, national and local scales; (ii) a two-hour prac class each week which introduces key methods (relevant to both the natural and social science parts of the discipline) and which leads to a major research proposal exercise; and (iii) 24 hours fieldwork through the semester, which can take the form either of a three-day field trip to rural NSW or three separate day-trips within Sydney. GEOS3333 is one of two compulsory units for the Geography Major (the other is GEOS3053) and is highly recommended for students contemplating Honours in Geography.
GEOS3933 Geog. Concepts, Skills and Methods (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 lecture, 2 tutorials per week Prerequisites: Distinction average in 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOIL2002, LWSC2002. Prohibitions: GEOS3333 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of ARC GIS software. Assessment: One 2hr exam, one practical report, one 2000w fieldwork report (100%) Practical field work: 24 hours of fieldwork per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
GEOS3933 has the same thematic content as GEOS3333 however with elements taught at an Advanced level.
GEOS3008 Field Geology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Geoffrey Clarke Session: Intensive July Classes: 14 days of field work (weeks 1-7) Prerequisites: GEOS2124 or GEOS2924 Prohibitions: GEOL3103 or GEOS3908 Assessment: The field work will be assessed by written reports (up to 10 pages in total), field exercises and practical tests (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is an essential component of the Geology and Geophysics major. Students will undertake a range of exercises, including: the field mapping and the analysis of geological objects in the field, in weakly to complexly deformed sedimentary and volcanic sequences; the field investigations of mineral deposits and their relationships to host rocks; and the practical application of geophysical methods in field mapping. The field course complements other subject areas in Geology and Geophysics and will give students experience in the field identification of rocks and minerals, regional geology, stratigraphy, structure and rock relationships. The educational objectives of the excursion involve concentrated learning met in two compulsory one-day workshops and the field excursion. Due to the nature of the exercises, there are no alternatives to attending the excursion and workshops, and students must attend and satisfactorily complete all components of the unit to pass. Students will be required to pay the cost of transport and hostel-style accommodation during fieldwork, which may involve camping. All participants need be physically capable of completing day walks at remote locations in central Australia, have previously discussed with the School any personal health and safety issues that could affect their participation in remote area fieldwork, and must submit a signed student travel form that includes up-to-date emergency contact details. In addition, it expected that students will have attained competency in HLTFA311A Apply First Aid (or equivalent) through a registered training organization.
GEOS3908 Field Geology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Geoffrey Clarke Session: Intensive July Classes: 14 days of fieldwork. Prerequisites: Credit or greater in (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924) Prohibitions: GEOS3008 Assessment: Written reports and field exercises (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS3008 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance at the time of enrolment. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives. Specific details for this unit of study will be announced in meetings with students in week prior to the field camp which is usually in the break between semester 1 and 2. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced).
GEOS3009 Coastal Environments and Processes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jody Webster, A/Prof Ana Vila-Concejo, Dr Tristan Salles Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical per week; weekend excursion. Prerequisites: (6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units) and (6 further credit points of Intermediate Geoscience or 6 credit points of Physics or Mathematics or Information Technology or Engineering units) or ((MARS2005 or MARS2905) and (MARS2006 or MARS2906)) Prohibitions: GEOS3909 or MARS3003 or MARS3105 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, research reports and an online quiz (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The aim of this course is to introduce students to a variety of Coastal Environments and the major processes which control the morphodynamic evolution of these systems. The course offers a unique opportunity of learning the full spectrum of marine sedimentary environments from siliciclastic, temperate, highly urbanised and impacted estuarine ecosytems to carbonate, tropical, pristine and undeveloped/protected coastal and continental margin environments. The course is divided in three sections: Section A covers the basic morphodynamics and processes impacting carbonate-dominated coastal and continental margin environments. The focus is on carbonate reefal and margin systems and their geologic and biologic responses to past, present and future environmental changes; Section B covers the basic morphodynamics of temperate and tropical coasts, including beach morphodynamics and basic knowledge on waves and currents; Section C consolidates all concepts learnt in the previous sections by applying them to numerical modelling.
There is a compulsory weekend fieldtrip to the NSW coast to study beach morphodynamics and fieldwork techniques. Depending on the year, there may be a voluntary fieldtrip to a coral reef environment, for example, The University of Sydney One Tree Island Research Station.
Textbooks
List of selected readings provided online.
GEOS3909 Coastal Environments and Processes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jody Webster Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical per week; weekend excursion Prerequisites: Distinction average in (6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units) and (6 further credit points of Intermediate Geoscience or 6 credit points of Physics, Mathematics, Information Technology or Engineering units) or ((MARS2005 or MARS2905) and (MARS2006 or MARS2906)) Prohibitions: GEOS3009 or MARS3003 or MARS3105 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, research reports and an online quiz (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: A distinction average in prior Geography or Geology units is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS3009 but will carry out more challenging projects, practicals, assignments and tutorials.
GEOS3101 Earth's Structure and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Patrice Rey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical class per week, and a 3-day excursion. Prerequisites: (GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924) Prohibitions: GEOS3801 or GEOS3003 or GEOS3903 or GEOS3004 or GEOS3904 or GEOS3006 or GEOS3906 or GEOS3017 or GEOS3917 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical and field reports (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The Earth's crust and upper mantle, or lithosphere, are a consequence of dynamic and thermal processes operating since the beginning of the Archaean. This unit focuses on information and techniques that enable an understanding of these processes. The main topics presented in this unit include: the formation and evolution of oceanic and continental lithosphere; tectonic deformation, magmatism and metamorphism at plate boundaries; and the mesoscopic and microscopic analysis of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Practical classes and field exercises are designed to enable students to competently and independently identify the common crystalline rocks in hand-specimen; and to gather and interpret the structural field data which enables the determination of the structural style and deformational history presented in particular tectonic settings. The concepts and content presented in this unit are generally considered to be essential knowledge for geologists and geophysicists and provide a conceptual framework for their professional practice. Students wishing to specialise in the field and become professional geologists will normally need to expand upon the knowledge gained from this unit and either complete an honours project or progress to postgraduate coursework in this field.
GEOS3801 Earth's Structure and Evolutions (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Patrice Rey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical class per week. Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in [(GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924)] Prohibitions: GEOS3101 or GEOS3003 or GEOS3903 or GEOS3004 or GEOS3904 or GEOS3006 or GEOS3906 or GEOS3017 or GEOS3917 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical and field reports (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Prerequisites: Students who have a credit average for all Geoscience units may enrol in this unit with the permission of the Head of School.
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS3101 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance at the time of enrolment. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives. Specific details for this unit of study will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester.
GEOS3103 Environmental and Sedimentary Geology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dan Penny (Coordinator), Dr. Adriana Dutkiewicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical class per week Prerequisites: (GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924) Prohibitions: GEOS3803 Assumed knowledge: (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903) Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical reports and quizes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Sediments and sedimentary rocks cover most of the Earth's surface, record much of the Earth's geological and climatic history and host important resources such as petroleum, coal, water and mineral ores. The aim of this unit is to provide students with the skills required to examine, describe and interpret sediments and sedimentary rocks for a variety of different purposes. Specific foci of the unit will be the identification of the recent or ancient environment in which sedimentary materials were deposited, the environmental controls which produce sedimentary structures, and the processes that control the production, movement and storage of sediment bodies. On completion of this unit students will be familiar with the natural processes that produce and modify sediments across a range of environments at the Earth's surface, including fluvial, aeolian, lacustrine, marginal marine and deep marine environments. The various controls on the sedimentary record such as climate and sea-level change, as well as diagenesis and geochemical cycles will also be discussed. Practical exercises will require students to examine global datasets, and determine the properties and significance of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The course is relevant to students interested in petroleum or mineral exploration, environmental and engineering geology as well as marine geoscience.
Textbooks
Course notes will be available from the Copy Centre and an appropriate set of reference texts will be placed on special reserve in the library.
GEOS3104 Geophysical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dietmar Muller Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical class per week. Prerequisites: (GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924) Prohibitions: GEOS3804 or GEOS3003 or GEOS3006 or GEOS3016 or GEOS3017 or GEOS3903 or GEOS3906 or GEOS3916 or GEOS3917 or GEOS3004 Assessment: One 2 hour exam (50%), practical work (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit introduces the common geophysical methods used to investigate the interior and dynamics of the Earth and focuses on the techniques used for mineral and hydrocarbon exploration. On completion of this unit students will have developed a thorough understanding of the common geophysical methods utilised in industry and academia. They will be able to evaluate and critically assess most forms of geophysical data as well as actively participate in geophysical exploration. The course will provide the students with the computational skills to process different types of geophysical data and link them to simulations of Earth processes through time, especially focussing on linking deep Earth and surface processes, such as subsidence/uplift and erosion/sedimentation. The unit is aimed at students with interests in land-based and marine exploration, plate tectonics, internal earth structure/dynamics, and near-surface investigations of groundwater resources and environmental pollution. Students wishing to specialise in the field and become professional geophysicists will need to expand upon the geophysics knowledge gained from this unit and either complete an honours project or progress to postgraduate coursework in this field.
GEOS3803 Environmental and Sedimentary Geology(Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dan Penny (Coordinator), Dr. Adriana Dutkiewicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical class per week. Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in [(GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924)] Prohibitions: GEOS3103 Assumed knowledge: (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903) Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical, field reports and quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Students who have a credit average for all Geoscience units may enrol in this unit with the permission of the Head of School.
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS3103 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance at the time of enrolment. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives. Specific details for this unit of study will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester.
Textbooks
Course notes will be available from the Copy Centre and appropriate set of reference texts will be placed on special reserve in the library.
GEOS3804 Geophysical Methods (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dietmar Muller Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical class per week. Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in [(GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924)] Prohibitions: GEOS3104 or GEOS3003 or GEOS3006 or GEOS3016 or GEOS3017 or GEOS3903 or GEOS3906 or GEOS3916 or GEOS3917 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical work (100%) Practical field work: Geophysical Field Prac (details to be announced) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Students who have a credit average for all Geoscience units may enrol in this unit with the permission of the Head of School.
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS3104 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance at the time of enrolment. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independant work to meet unit objectives. Specific details for this unit of study will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester.
GEOS3520 Urban Citizenship and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kurt Iveson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week, six 2 hours practical sessions. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study, including 6 credit points from the following (GEOS2112 or GEOS2912 or GEOS2123 or GEOS2923 or GEOS2115 or GEOS2915 or GEOS2121 or GEOS2921 or SOILS2002 or LWSC2002) Prohibitions: GEOS3920 Assessment: One 2hr exam, one 2000w essay, one 2000w group-based prac report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
More than half the world's population now live in cities. The contemporary growth of cities, however, is attached to profound political and environmental questions about what it means to be urban, what 'being urban' means for the planet, and how we might produce more just and sustainable urban spaces and experiences. This Unit provides grounding to these crucial questions by examining urban environments from the dual perspectives of citizenship and sustainability. The Unit has three modules. Module 1 examines the intersection of urban environmental change with questions of citizenship and justice. Module 2 considers key urban environmental issues such as energy, transport and food, and how cities and citizens might address stresses and shocks in these systems. Module 3 studies new models for governing emergent urban environmental challenges. Throughout the semester, a Practical Project will involve a research project with real-world partners to introduce key skills related to working in collaboration with external organisations.
GEOS3920 Urban Citizenship and Sustainability (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kurt Iveson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Distinction average in 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOIL2002, LWSC2002 Prohibitions: GEOS3520 Assessment: One 2hr exam, one 2000w essay, one 2000w group-based prac report. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
GEOS3920 has the same thematic content as GEOS3520 however with elements taught at an Advanced level
GEOS3524 Global Development and Livelihoods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson; Prof Bill Pritchard Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures, 1 tutorial per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience Prohibitions: GEOS3924 or GEOS2112 or GEOS2912 Assessment: Two 1hr exams, one 2000w essay, Tutorial participation, Discussion papers (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study provides students with grounding in core theories and frameworks used in Geography to account for the social, spatial and economic unevenness in global development. During the first half of the semester, we focus on questions relating to who are the winners and losers from contemporary patterns of global economic change. This includes the analysis of relevant conceptual approaches to understand processes of global development and inequality (including comparative advantage, global value chain theory, developmentalism, structuralism, neo-liberalism, and post-development). Then, in the second half of the semester, we adopt a livelihoods approach to better understand these broader processes from the perspective of individuals, households and communities. In general, issues are tailored to themes being played out in Asia-Pacific countries. Students are expected to participate in a variety of practical class exercises throughout the semester. This unit provides a feeder-unit into the Southeast Asia Field School.
GEOS3924 Global Development and Livelihoods (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson; Prof Bill Pritchard Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures, 1 tutorial per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study, including a distinction in 6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience Prohibitions: GEOS3524 or GEOS2112 or GEOS2912 Assessment: Two 1hr exams, one 2000w essay, Tutorial participation, Discussion papers (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
GEOS3924 has the same thematic content as GEOS3524 however with elements taught at an Advanced level.
GEOS3014 GIS in Coastal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1 hour lectures and 1x3h practical/week Prerequisites: Either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115, GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)] Prohibitions: GEOS3914 or MARS3104 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, two project reports, quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Coastal Management is about how scientific knowledge is used to support policy formulation and planning decisions in coastal environments. The course links coastal science to policy and practice in management of estuaries, beaches and the coastal ocean. The principles are exemplified through specific issues, such as coastal erosion, pollution, and impacts of climate-change. The issues are dealt with in terms of how things work in nature, and how the issues are handled through administrative mechanisms. These mechanisms involve planning strategies like Marine Protected Areas and setback limits on civil development in the coastal zone. The coastal environments and processes that are more relevant to coastal management including: rocky coasts; beaches, barriers and dunes; and coral reefs will also be introduced. At a practical level, the link between science and coastal management is given substance through development and use of 'decision-support models'. These models involve geocomputing methods that entail application of simulation models, remotely sensed information, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course therefore includes both principles and experience in use of these methods to address coastal-management issues. (It thus also involves extensive use of computers.) Although the focus is on the coast, the principles and methods have broader relevance to environmental management in particular, and to problem-solving in general. That is, the course has vocational relevance in examining how science can be exploited to the benefit of society and nature conservation.
GEOS3914 GIS in Coastal Management (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two hours of lectures, one 3 hour practical per week comprising one 1 hour practical demonstration and one 2 hour practical Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115 or GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)]. Prohibitions: GEOS3014 or MARS3104 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, project work, two practical-based project reports, fortnightly progress quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: A distinction average in prior Geography, Geology or Marine Science units of study is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS3014 but will carry out more challenging projects, practicals, assignments and tutorials.
GEOS3103 Environmental and Sedimentary Geology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dan Penny (Coordinator), Dr. Adriana Dutkiewicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical class per week Prerequisites: (GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924) Prohibitions: GEOS3803 Assumed knowledge: (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903) Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical reports and quizes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Sediments and sedimentary rocks cover most of the Earth's surface, record much of the Earth's geological and climatic history and host important resources such as petroleum, coal, water and mineral ores. The aim of this unit is to provide students with the skills required to examine, describe and interpret sediments and sedimentary rocks for a variety of different purposes. Specific foci of the unit will be the identification of the recent or ancient environment in which sedimentary materials were deposited, the environmental controls which produce sedimentary structures, and the processes that control the production, movement and storage of sediment bodies. On completion of this unit students will be familiar with the natural processes that produce and modify sediments across a range of environments at the Earth's surface, including fluvial, aeolian, lacustrine, marginal marine and deep marine environments. The various controls on the sedimentary record such as climate and sea-level change, as well as diagenesis and geochemical cycles will also be discussed. Practical exercises will require students to examine global datasets, and determine the properties and significance of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The course is relevant to students interested in petroleum or mineral exploration, environmental and engineering geology as well as marine geoscience.
Textbooks
Course notes will be available from the Copy Centre and an appropriate set of reference texts will be placed on special reserve in the library.
GEOS3803 Environmental and Sedimentary Geology(Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dan Penny (Coordinator), Dr. Adriana Dutkiewicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical class per week. Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in [(GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924)] Prohibitions: GEOS3103 Assumed knowledge: (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903) Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical, field reports and quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Students who have a credit average for all Geoscience units may enrol in this unit with the permission of the Head of School.
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS3103 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance at the time of enrolment. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives. Specific details for this unit of study will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester.
Textbooks
Course notes will be available from the Copy Centre and appropriate set of reference texts will be placed on special reserve in the library.
GEOS3053 Asia-Pacific Field School

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard Session: Intensive February Classes: Three weeks in-country intensive involving lectures, fieldwork and field-based methods training, readings and small group discussions. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Intermediate units of study in Geography. Prohibitions: GEOG3201 or GEOS3953 Assessment: Group participation; one major essay; one seminar report; one blog post. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must contact the unit coordinator no later than September in the year before taking this unit.
The unit of study uses classroom and field-based learning to introduce students to the application of geographical concepts and methods to environmental and development problems in Asia-Pacific countries. The location and timing of this unit may change from year to year in accordance with the availability of lecturers and climatic considerations. In 2019, it will be run over two to three weeks in February, in India. This unit can be taken only with prior permission from the unit of study coordinator, and involves mandatory atttendance at pre-departure briefings. You will learn skills and knowledge about: (1) India's environmental and development challenges at a national scale (2) processes of rural social, environmental and economic change; (3) the challenges of sustainable urbanisation; (4) social transformations in India, specifically relating to gender, migration and mobility, and class. The unit is conducted in partnership with pre-eminent Indian universities, who provide guest lectures as appropriate in addition to those by the unit of study coordinator. The unit will also expose students to civil society groups working on issues of geo-political, economic and environmental importance. By doing this unit you will develop skills and knowledge that are highly relevant to research and careers in the Asia-Pacific.
GEOS3953 Asia-Pacific Field School (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard Session: Intensive February Classes: Three weeks in-country intensive involving lectures, fieldwork and field-based methods training, readings and small group discussions. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Intermediate units of study in Geography. Prohibitions: GEOS3053 Assessment: Group participation; one major essay; one seminar report; one blog post. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must contact the unit coordinator no later than September in the year before taking this unit.
The unit of study uses classroom and field-based learning to introduce students to the application of geographical concepts and methods to environmental and development problems in Asia-Pacific countries. The location and timing of this unit may change from year to year in accordance with the availability of lecturers and climatic considerations. In 2019, it will be run over two to three weeks in February, in India. This unit can be taken only with prior permission from the unit of study coordinator, and involves mandatory atttendance at pre-departure briefings. You will learn skills and knowledge about: (1) India's environmental and development challenges at a national scale (2) processes of rural social, environmental and economic change; (3) the challenges of sustainable urbanisation; (4) social transformations in India, specifically relating to gender, migration and mobility, and class. The unit is conducted in partnership with pre-eminent Indian universities, who provide guest lectures as appropriate in addition to those by the unit of study coordinator. The unit will also expose students to civil society groups working on issues of geo-political, economic and environmental importance. By doing this unit you will develop skills and knowledge that are highly relevant to research and careers in the Asia-Pacific.
History and Philosophy of Science
1000-level units of study
HPSC1000 Bioethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Dominic Murphy Session: Intensive June,Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week Prohibitions: HPSC1900 Assessment: 3 x 1,250 word papers and tutorial work Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: This Junior unit of study is highly recommended to Intermediate and Senior Life Sciences students.
Science has given us nearly infinite possibilities for controlling life. Scientists probe the origins of life through research with stem cells and embryos. To unlock the secrets of disease, biomedicine conducts cruel experiments on animals. GM crops are presented as the answer to hunger. Organ transplantation is almost routine. The international traffic in human body parts and tissues is thriving. The concept of brain death makes harvesting organs ethically more acceptable. It may also result in fundamental changes in our ideas about life. Science has provided new ways of controlling and manipulating life and death. As a consequence, difficult ethical questions are raised in increasingly complex cultural and social environments. This course will discuss major issues in the ethics of biology and medicine, from gene modification to Dolly the sheep. This unit will be introductory, but a small number of topical issues will be studied in depth. No scientific background beyond Year 10 level will be assumed.
Textbooks
Weekly readings
HPSC1001 What is this Thing Called Science?

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Godfrey-Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr online study; and 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: HPSC2101 or HPSC2901 or HPSC1901 Assessment: essays and online tasks Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
What distinguishes creationism from evolutionary theory, or astrology from astronomy? Can we have good reason to believe that our current scientific theories represent the world "as it really is"? This course critically examines the most important attempts to describe the scientific method, to draw a line dividing science from non-science, and to justify the high status generally accorded to scientific knowledge. Views studied include Karl Popper's idea that scientific theories are falsifiable in principle, Thomas Kuhn's proposal that science consists of a series of paradigms separated by abrupt scientific revolutions, and claims by Feyerabend and others that there are no objective criteria by which science can be distinguished from pseudo-science. This unit of study also explores contemporary theories of evidence and explanation, the role of social values in science, sociological approaches to understanding science, and the nature of scientific change.
Textbooks
Godfrey-Smith, P (2003). Theory and Reality. The University of Chicago Press. USA/ Curd, Cover and Pincock (2013). Philosophy of Science: The Central Issues (2nd edition). W. W. Norton and Company.
HPSC1900 Bioethics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Dominic Murphy Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: HPSC1000 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: 3 x 1,250 word papers and tutorial work Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The topics covered by HPSC1000 - Bioethics will be treated in more depth, in a special tutorial set aside for Advanced students.
Textbooks
Weekly readings
HPSC1901 What is this Thing Called Science? (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Godfrey-Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr online study; and 1x1-hr advanced tutorial per week Prohibitions: HPSC2101 or HPSC2901 or HPSC1001 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: essays, online tasks and presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What distinguishes creationism from evolutionary theory, or astrology from astronomy? Can we have good reason to believe that our current scientific theories represent the world "as it really is"? This course critically examines the most important attempts to describe the scientific method, to draw a line dividing science from non-science, and to justify the high status generally accorded to scientific knowledge. Views studied include Karl Popper's idea that scientific theories are falsifiable in principle, Thomas Kuhn's proposal that science consists of a series of paradigms separated by abrupt scientific revolutions, and claims by Feyerabend and others that there are no objective criteria by which science can be distinguished from pseudo-science. This unit of study also explores contemporary theories of evidence and explanation, the role of social values in science, sociological approaches to understanding science, and the nature of scientific change.
Textbooks
Godfrey-Smith, P (2003). Theory and Reality. The University of Chicago Press. USA/ Curd, Cover and Pincock (2013). Philosophy of Science: The Central Issues (2nd edition). W. W. Norton and Company.
2000-level units of study
HPSC2011 Science, Ethics and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniela Helbig Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 X 1 hour lecture PLUS 1 X 1 hour tutorial per week and an online component. Prohibitions: HPSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar will introductory material in Philosophy of Science, Ethics or Sociology. Assessment: assignments, quizzes, tutorial participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study investigates the place of science in society, the internal dynamics of science, and ethical issues within science and in relation to its application. The key idea in this course is that science is a social activity that can be studied like other social phenomena and behaviour. There are three components to this Unit of Study: an exploration of the motivations of scientists and how they can be described using cognitive and ethical rules; science and the media; and ethical issues that have become prominent because of recent developments in science.
Textbooks
Weekly readings
HPSC2100 The Birth of Modern Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Ofer Gal Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture, 1 X 1 hour tutorial, 1 x 1 hour independent online work. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior units of study Prohibitions: HPSC2900 Assessment: 4xquizzes (30%) and 6x100wd questions (30%) and 3x750wd essays (30%) and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Modern culture is a culture of science and modern science is the outcome of a historical process of 2,500 years. In this course we investigate how traditional knowledge gradually acquired the characteristics of 'science': the social structure, contents, values and methods we are familiar with. We will look at some primary chapters of this process, from antiquity to the end of the seventeenth century, and try to understand their implications to understanding contemporary science in its culture. Special emphasis will be given to the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century, which is often described as the most important period in the history of science and as one of the most vital stages in human intellectual history.
Textbooks
Weekly readings
HPSC2900 The Birth of Modern Science (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof. Ofer Gal Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture, 1 X 1 hour tutorial, 1 x 1 hour independent online work. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior study with a Distinction average Prohibitions: HPSC2100 Assessment: 2x1500wd essays (45%) and 1x3000 wd essay (45%) and class presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The topics covered in 'The Birth of Modern Science' will be covered in more depth, in a special tutorial set aside for advanced students.
Textbooks
Weekly readings
3000-level units of study
HPSC3016 The Scientific Revolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ofer Gal Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and two 1 hour tutorials per week. Individual student consultation as required. Prerequisites: (HPSC2100 or HPSC2900) and (HPSC1001 or HPSC1901 or HPSC2101 or HPSC2901) Assessment: 10x150wd questions (40%) and 1x 3500wd essay (40%) and 1 x Experiment (10%) and Class Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Modern Western science has a number of characteristics that distinguish it from other scientific cultures. It ascribes its tremendous success to sophisticated experiments and meticulous observation. It understands the universe in terms of tiny particles in motion and the forces between them. It is characterised by high- powered mathematical theorising and the rejection of any intention, value or purpose in Nature. Many of these characteristics were shaped in the 17th century, during the so-called scientific revolution. We will consider them from an integrated historical- philosophical perspective, paying special attention to the intellectual motivations of the canonical figures of this revolution and the cultural context in which they operated. Topics will include: experimentation and instrumentation, clocks, mechanistic philosophy, and the changing role of mathematics.
Textbooks
Weekly Readings
HPSC3002 Hist and Phil of the Biomedical Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Hans Pols Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and two 1 hour tutorials per week. Prerequisites: (HPSC2100 or HPSC2900) and (HPSC2101 or HPSC2901) Assessment: 2x300-400wd reports (25%) and 1xclass presentation (25%) and class questions (10%) and 1x2500-3000 wd essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Throughout the ages people have been born, have died, and in between have lived in various stages of sickness or health. In this unit of study we shall look at how these states of being were perceived in different times and places throughout history, while at the same time noting the increasing medicalisation of everyday life, together with the irony that the "miracles" of modern medicine appear to have created a generation of the "worried well". Using this historical perspective, we shall ask how perceptions of sickness, health and the related provision of health care have been intertwined with social, political and economic factors and, indeed still are today.
Textbooks
Weekly Readings
HPSC3108 Hist and Phil of the Physical Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Dean Rickles Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2-hour lecture and two 1-hour tutorials per week. Prerequisites: HPSC2101 or HPSC2901 Assessment: Four 1500-word essays (4x25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study deals with a selection of contemporary debates in the history and philosophy of natural sciences. It covers four main themes: (1) the question of how evidence is gathered in the natural sciences and how it is (and/or other factors) go into confirming theories-we also consider what confirmation consists in (including an examination of Bayesianism). (2) Issues of modelling, representation, and measurement, including an analysis of the ways idealisation, approximation, and simulation are to be understood. (3) Models of scientific explanation, including recent work on laws, prediction, and causality. (4) issues of emergence and reduction, including the problems associated with defining such concepts - we also consider notions of simplicity and the impact of the sciences of complexity. The unit of study involves case studies from the natural sciences that allow students to apply their knowledge and test their understanding. Upon completion of the unit, students will have developed a range of skills that will allow them to explore the physical sciences with more critical attitude.
Textbooks
Weekly readings
HPSC3023 Psychology and Psychiatry: History and Phil

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Hans Pols and Dr Fiona Hibberd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (12 credit points of Intermediate HPSC units) OR (Credit or greater in an HPSC Intermediate unit) OR (12 Intermediate credit points in Psychology units) Assumed knowledge: HPSC2100 and HPSC2101 Assessment: 1x 2500wd essay (45%) and 1x2hr exam (45%) class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Across the unit we examine one of the most interesting aspects of the history and philosophy of science. viz., the scientific practices and assumptions involved in making human beings an object of study. We will examine the ways in which psychologists and psychiatrists have investigated human nature, the kinds of experimental approaches they have developed to that end, the major controversies in this field, and the basic philosophical assumptions that have been made in the sciences of human nature. We investigate the developments of psychological theories and investigative methods as well as the development of psychiatric theory, treatment methods, and institutions.
Life and Environmental Sciences
1000-level units of study
AVBS1003 Animals and Us

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brandon Velie Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical; one peer assisted study session per week Assessment: Assignments, presentation, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
We live in a world surrounded by and dependent on animals. Australia has one of the highest rates of animal ownership in the world: dogs, cats, rabbits, birds and reptiles being common. In this unit, you explore animals in society (including companion, pocket and pet, wildlife and zoo animals). You will investigate relationships between humans and animals and normal function of animals including development, disease, aging and death. This unit will describe how human and animal health are related, outline legislation and policies on the care and use of animals, cover topical issues in animal welfare and ethics, provide opportunities for students to observe animal behaviours and discuss how cultural backgrounds influence our relationships with animals. You will visit captive and clinical animal facilities where animals are displayed for conservation, curiosity, aesthetics and research. Practicals and workshops will provide students with skills in critical thinking, communication, information/digital literacy and an evidence informed basis on which to make decisions. This unit is for students who are interested in a professional career working with animals, such as those in the AVBS stream and BVB/DVM program or who generally seek an understanding of how animals enrich our lives.
Textbooks
Animals and Us Unit of Study Guide and Practical Manual TBD
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1008 Human Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-3hr Lectures per week; six 3-hour practical sessions; six workshops/tutorials; students encouraged to spend 1-2 hours per week accessing online resources Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Written and oral presentation, quiz, skills-based assessment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), project report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in a research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1908 Human Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-3hr Lectures per week; six 3-hour practical sessions; six workshops/tutorials; students encouraged to spend 1-2 hours per week accessing online resources Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Written and oral presentation, quiz, skills-based assessment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in alternative components which may for example include guest lecturers from medical science industries. The nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Practical field work: As advised and required by the project; approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1998 Human Biology (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalyn Gloag Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1908; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1996 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical report (25%), practical presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), pre laboratory quizzes (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The practical work syllabus consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
ENVI1003 Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, 2-hour computer lab per week, two-day weekend field trip Assessment: 2-hour exam (50%), field trip report (15%), group work presentation (20%), GIS reports (15%) Practical field work: Computer practicals and two-day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
In the 21st century the population of the world will increase both in size and its expectation in terms of food, energy and consumer demands. Against this demand we have a planet in crisis where natural resources are degraded, biodiversity is diminishing and planetary cycles related to climate are reaching points of irreversible change. Management of our precious natural resources is a balancing act between production and conservation as always, but now we have to do this against a background of potential large scale changes in climate. In this unit students will gain an understanding of the key environmental challenges of the 21st century; namely food security, climate change, water security, biodiversity protection, ecosystems services and soil security. In the second half, using Australian case studies, we will explore how we manage different agro-ecosystems within their physical constraints around water, climate and soil, while considering linkages with the global environmental challenges. Management now, in the past and the future will be considered, with an emphasis on food production. This unit is recommended unit for students interested in gaining a broad overview of the environmental challenges of the 21st century, both globally and within Australia.
ENVX1002 Introduction to Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Bishop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours per week of lectures; 2 hours per week of computer tutorials Prohibitions: ENVX1001 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or MATH1115 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 or BUSS1020 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness streams
This is an introductory data science unit for students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It provides the foundation for statistics and data science skills that are needed for a career in science and for further study in applied statistics and data science. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. It has 4 modules; exploring data, modelling data, sampling data and making decisions with data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology, ENVX1002 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data.
Textbooks
Statistics, Fourth Edition, Freedman Pisani Purves
2000-level units of study
AGRI2001 Plant Management in Agroecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Brett Whelan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures two hours per week; tutorial three hours per week; three field trips Prohibitions: AGRO3004 Assumed knowledge: Understanding of experimental design and analysis including dependent and independent variables, random and representative sampling, t-tests a simple designs and interpretation of univariate analysis. Assessment: Quizzes, practical report, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
World population is projected to reach 9 billion within 50 years and food production needs to double in a sustainable manner in order to feed human population. This profound challenge will be met by improving our knowledge and management of agroecosystems. This unit of study will provide students with the skills to understanding the biology and management of plants in dryland agroecosystems, focussing on major Australian broad acre crops. Dryland agroecosystems are defined as ecosystems modified for the purpose of producing crops, pastures and animals in environments where water limits productivity during part of the year. These agroecosystems involve regular agricultural interventions, such as cultivation, sowing, nutrient, weed, pest and disease management, and harvest. This unit will explore the interaction of environment, crops/pastures and agricultural management. You will gain knowledge and skills on crop physiological, growth and development responses to the climatic, edaphic, biotic factors in the growing environment. You will also develop a sound understanding of how to manage crops, weeds, diseases, pests and employ precision agriculture. This unit will prepare you to continue on a pathway of understanding and developing improved plant production systems and joining the vast range of professionals that are eagerly sought around the globe.
Textbooks
Pratley J (Ed.) (2003) Principles of Field Crop Production. 4th edition. Oxford University Press: Melbourne, Australia. Marschner P (Ed) (2012) Marschner's Mineral Nutrition of Higher Plants, 3rd edition. Elsevier, London Anderson WK, Garlinge JR (Eds) (2000) The Wheat Book. Department of Agriculture Western Australia: South Perth, Australia. Whelan, B.M., Taylor, J.A. (2013) Precision Agriculture for Grain Production Systems. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, Australia. Pearson CJ, Ison RL (1998) Agronomy of Grassland Systems. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, New York, Melbourne.
AVBS2001 Introductory Veterinary Pathogenesis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Damien Higgins Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours per week (lectures and practicals) Prerequisites: 12cp of (BIOL1XX6 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX1 or BIOL1XX2 or MBLG1XX1) Assumed knowledge: The basic structure, morphology, metabolism and behaviour of bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Fundamental histological structure and function of cells and key tissues, including blood vessels, skin, liver, lung, kidneys, intestine, and organs and cells of the immune system (lymph node, spleen, white blood cells). Assessment: Online exercises (15%), mid-semester exam (25%), practical assessment (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The overarching theme for this unit of study is the concept of the interaction between the host (or the animal), the agent of disease (genetics, physical, chemical and infectious agents) and environmental factors. In disease states, the host responds to the aetiological agent of disease and the environment through one of the basic five pathological processes that occur in tissues. These include inflammation and repair, degeneration and necrosis, circulatory disturbances, tissue deposits and pigments, and disorders of growth. A case based approach will be used whenever possible to illustrate these principles and enable the student to develop a problem solving approach and the skills of critical thinking.
Textbooks
See unit of study guide.
BCMB2001 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quizzes, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. Our practicals, along with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to widely applied and cutting edge tools that are essential for modern biochemistry and molecular biology. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the life and medical sciences.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
BCMB2002 Proteins in Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2902 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quiz, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. Our practicals, other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to a wide range of currently utilised techniques for protein biochemistry ranging from protein visualization, quantification, purification and enzymatic activity, to in silico studies and cellular targeting experiments. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the cellular and molecular biosciences.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
BCMB2901 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, quiz, skills-based assessment, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. The advanced laboratory component will provide students with an authentic research laboratory experience while in the theory component, current research topics will be presented in a problem-based format through dedicated advanced tutorial sessions. This material will be assessed by creative student-centered activities supported by eLearning platforms.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
BCMB2902 Proteins in Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2002 Assessment: Assignment, skills-based assessment, quiz, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. There will be a research-focused approach to the advanced practical component, including real and virtual extensions to key experiments. This approach will continue in the lecture series with several unique advanced lectures covering current research topics. You will further investigate a selected area of interest from these topics using original source material and present your findings through an oral presentation in dedicated advanced tutorials.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
BIOL2021 Zoology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mathew Crowther Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL2921 or BIOL2011 or BIOL2911 or BIOL2012 or BIOL2912 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (60%), Lab book (20%), Oral presentation (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study provides an overview of the functional and phylogenetic diversity of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. The material is presented within the conceptual framework of evolution, the foundation of biology. Lectures explore the diversity of major functional systems and behaviour in the context of environmental challenges and the ecological roles of different animal groups. Laboratory classes include dissections and demonstrations of the functional anatomy of invertebrates and vertebrates, as well as experiments. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Hickman CP, Roberts LS, Larson A, l'Anson H 2004. Integrated Principles of Zoology, 12th ed. McGraw Hill, NY. Withers, P. 1992 Comparative Animal Physiology. Saunders, New York
BIOL2022 Biology Experimental Design and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or MATH1XX5) Prohibitions: BIOL2922 or BIOL3006 or BIOL3906 or ENVX2001 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit provides foundational skills essential for doing research in biology and for critically judging the research of others. We consider how biology is practiced as a quantitative, experimental and theoretical science. We focus on the underlying principles and practical skills you need to explore questions and test hypotheses, particularly where background variation (error) is inherently high. In so doing, the unit provides you with an understanding of how biological research is designed, analysed and interpreted using statistics. Lectures focus on sound experimental and statistical principles, using examples in ecology and other fields of biology to demonstrate concepts. In the practical sessions, you will design and perform, analyse (using appropriate statistical tools) and interpret your own experiments to answer research questions in topics relevant to your particular interest. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2016. Experimental design for the life sciences. 4th Ed. Oxford University Press
BIOL2024 Ecology and Conservation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL2924 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study examines the ecological principles driving the major ecosystems of the world and ecological processes behind the world's major conservation issues. It aims to develop in students the core foundations for an understanding of Ecology and its application in conservation. Lectures will focus on the ecology of the major terrestrial and marine biomes of the world. Application of ecological theory and methods to practical conservation problems will be integrated throughout the unit of study. Practical sessions will provide hands-on experience in ecological sampling and data handling to understand the ecology of marine and terrestrial environments, as well as ecological simulations to understand processes. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 4th edition (2014). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
BIOL2029 Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Murray Thomson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 4-hour practical per week Prerequisites: BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX8 or MBLG1XXX or MEDS1X01 Prohibitions: BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 or BIOL2929 Assessment: 3-hour theory exam (60%), quizzes (lectures and laboratory work) (10%), marks for laboratory work (10%), report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Cell Biology is one of the most dynamic areas in science today. In both plants and animals, cell to cell communication and coordination of the cell cycle, as well as cellular division and migration, are vital for normal development of various tissues from stem cells. In this unit you will investigate, the diversity of cell types, how these different cells interact with each other, how the cell cycle is controlled, as well as studying the roles of cellular movement, differentiation and interaction in reproduction and development. In Cells you will acquire a deep understanding of the established knowledge base and develop research skills to extend this knowledge. Discussions will incorporate recent advances in cell research including the regenerative potential of stem cells to replace damaged and diseased tissue and how the placenta can control the physiology of the mother and foetus. The laboratory program, provides you with hands on training in key techniques such as cell culture, cell signal transduction, mitochondrial physiology, drug discovery in marine organisms, digital microscopy and tissue specific gene expression. These skills will prepare you for a research pathway and/or a career that includes cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K., Walter P. (2014) Molecular Biology of the Cell (Sixth edition). Garland Publishing Inc., New York and London (ISBN-9780815344643)
BIOL2030 Botany

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lecture/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or AGEN2001 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2930 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), anatomy project report and presentation (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to enhance biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes, and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frame works in plant identification, plant physiology, plant anatomy, and plant morphology. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by self-instructional audio-visual sessions and by small group discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. Successful completion of Botany will allow you to contribute to a range of disciplines including: ecology, bioinformatics, molecular and cell biology, genetics and biotechnology, environmental law, agriculture, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
BIOL2031 Plants and Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Brent Kaiser Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 4-hour practical session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: AGEN2005 or BIOL3043 or BIOL3943 or BIOL2931 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quiz (20%), lab assignment (15%), presentation (15%), exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Plants grow across a range of environments, influencing form, function and ultimately reproductive success. Being sessile, plants lack the luxury of seeking an alternative 'stress-free lifestyle' and therefore rely on genetic and physical adaptations to survive and reproduce. To understand how a plant can achieve such flexibility requires knowledge of plant structure and the influence of environmental drivers on plant growth and function. In this unit, you will examine the physiological processes controlling plant growth and reproduction linked to environmental constraints. You will understand the relationship between tissue and cellular structure and their underlying role in physiological and metabolic activities, particularly processes involving light capture, photosynthesis, water regulation, nutrient management and metabolite redistribution. Lectures and interactive practicals will together introduce you to plant processes that underpin life on earth. Experimentation and analysis of plant physiological processes will develop a skill base that will lead to a greater understanding and appreciation of common plant processes. As a component of the Plant Science minor and the Plant Production major, BIOL2031 will provide an important platform to extend your interests in plant science and plant related fields across the curriculum.
Textbooks
Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E. (2010) Plant Physiology, Fifth Edition. Sinauer Associates. Sunderland, MA.
BIOL2032 Australian Wildlife Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Herbert Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three lectures; one 2-hour tutorial or practical session each week Prohibitions: ANSC2005 Assessment: Quizzes, presentation assignment, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Australia is home to a broad diversity of vertebrate wildlife species, many of which are unique to the Australian environment, having evolved in isolation from other large land-masses for millions of years. This unit examines the diversity of Australian reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals (including all three mammalian lineages; monotremes, marsupials and eutherian mammals). We focus on the unique anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have enabled our wildlife to survive and thrive within varied Australian ecosystems. We also examine how the uniqueness of our wildlife is also one of its greatest challenges, being naive to the new threats that are present in our rapidly changing environments. At the end of this unit you should have an appreciation of the diversity and uniqueness of Australian wildlife; be able to determine the links between form and function in wildlife and understand the significance of these functional adaptations in relation to ecological challenges. You will also have an understanding of the interactions between humans and wildlife, and how the unique characteristics of our wildlife also make them vulnerable to threats within the rapidly changing Australian environment. Students will also develop enhanced scientific literacy and communication skills through tutorial activities and assessment tasks.
Textbooks
No text book requirements. Recommended reading throughout semester provided by each lecture relevant to their class content. Relevant scientific papers will be uploaded to LMS
BIOL2033 Entomology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tanya Latty Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 3-hour practical sessions a weekly basis Prohibitions: ENTO2001 Assessment: Practical test (10%), insect collection (30%), insect display (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Insects are the most abundant and diverse group of animals on earth; beetles alone account for 25% of animal life. Insects impact almost every facet of the ecosystem and our lives. Many insects play valuable and essential roles in pollinating different plant species, in predating and controlling insect pests and in recycling nutrients. Other insects are harmful and are the vectors for major diseases such as plague, malaria and recently emerged viral disease Zika. This unit will provide students with a broad introduction to entomology including insect evolution, ecology, anatomy and physiology. Students will learn applied entomological topics such as sustainable insect management in agricultural ecosystems, medical and veterinary entomology, insect-inspired technologies, and insects as a future food source for both livestock and humans. This theoretical background will be complemented by training in how to use and evaluate a range of identification tools such as lucid and traditional dichotomous keys that enable you to identify and classify major groups of insects. Practical classes will allow you to develop your identification, classification and preservation skills though examination of boxes of 'mystery insects' and through creating a museum-quality insect collection. Students will also learn procedures for caring and rearing live insects. By the end of the unit you will be well prepared to work in fields that require entomological skills.
Textbooks
Info will be made available via Canvas. Keys will be available in practical classes and in the lab Manual
BIOL2921 Zoology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mathew Crowther Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures, one tutorial/lecture and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: BIOL2021 or BIOL2011 or BIOL2911 or BIOL2012 or BIOL2912 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (60%), Lab book (20%), Advanced poster presentation (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The content of BIOL2921 will be based on BIOL2021 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Hickman CP, Roberts LS, Larson A, l'Anson H 2004. Integrated Principles of Zoology, 12th ed. McGraw Hill, NY. Withers, P. 1992 Comparative Animal Physiology. Saunders, New York
BIOL2924 Ecology and Conservation (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An annual average mark of at least 70 in the previous year Prohibitions: BIOL2024 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The content of BIOL2924 will be based on BIOL2024 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 4th edition (2014). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
BIOL2929 Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Murray Thomson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 4-hour practical per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX8 or MBLG1XXX or MEDS1X01) Prohibitions: BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 orBIOL2029 Assessment: 3-hour theory exam (60%), quizzes (lectures and laboratory work) (10%), marks for laboratory work (10%), advanced report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Cell biology is one of the most dynamic areas of modern research. In both plants and animals, cell-to-cell communication and coordination of the cell cycle, as well as cellular division and migration, are vital for normal development of various tissues from stem cells. In this unit you will investigate, the diversity of cell types, how these different cells interact with each other, how the cell cycle is controlled, as well as studying the roles of cellular movement, differentiation and interaction in reproduction and development. In Cells you will acquire a deep understanding of the established knowledge base and develop research skills to extend this knowledge. Discussions will incorporate recent advances in cell research including the regenerative potential of stem cells to replace damaged and diseased tissue and how the placenta can control the physiology of the mother and foetus. The laboratory training will provide you with hands on experience with key equipment and techniques. The advanced program, will provide you with an opportunity to complete an authentic research project in a specialized area of cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K., Walter P. (2014) Molecular Biology of the Cell (Sixth edition). Garland Publishing Inc., New York and London (ISBN-9780815344643)
BIOL2930 Botany (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or AGEN2001 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2030 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), advanced project report (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to inform biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frameworks in plant identification, and plant physiology, morphology and anatomy. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. The Advanced Botany unit of study requires engagement at a high standard of academic rigour and affords opportunities to engage with core aspect of Botany at depth and to create new knowledge. In partnership with academic staff advanced students will undertake an independent research project, which will develop skills in research and communication.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
BIOL2931 Plants and Environment (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Brent Kaiser Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures/week; one 4-hour practical/week Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: AGEN2005 or BIOL3043 or BIOL3943 or BIOL2031 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: On-line quiz (20%), lab assignment (15%), independent project (15%), exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Plants grow across a range of environments, which influence form, function and ultimately reproductive success. Being sessile, plants lack the luxury of seeking an alternative 'stress-free lifestyle' and therefore rely on genetic and physical adaptations to help survive and reproduce. To understand how a plant can achieve such flexibility requires an understanding of plant structure and the influence that environmental drivers have on plant growth and function. In this unit, you will examine the physiological processes controlling plant growth and reproduction linked to environmental constraints. You will understand the relationship between tissue and cellular structure and their underlying role in physiological and metabolic activities, particularly processes involving light capture, photosynthesis, water regulation, nutrient management and metabolite redistribution. Lectures and interactive practicals will together introduce you to plant processes that we commonly depend upon for food production, and plant related materials. Experimentation and analysis of plant physiological processes will develop a skill base that will lead to a greater understanding and appreciation of common plant processes that guide plant growth. As a component of the Plant Science minor, this unit will provide an important platform to extend your interests in plant science and plant-related fields, including ecology, cell biology, genetics, breeding, agriculture, molecular biology, environmental law, education and the arts. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as BIOL2031 but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in BIOL2931 participate in alternative components, which include a separate practical stream. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Resources required by the unit will be provided on the Blackboard learning management page for the unit. Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E. (2010) Plant Physiology, Fifth Edition. Sinauer Associates. Sunderland, MA.
ENSC2001 Environmental Monitoring

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Feike Dijkstra Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2-hour lecture per week; one 3-hour computer/laboratory practical per week; one 1-hour tutorial every three weeks; two half-day field trips Prohibitions: AGCH3033 Assumed knowledge: Understanding of scientific principles and concepts including biodiversity, human impacts on the environment, properties of substances (e.g., acidity, alkalinity, solvents) and basic knowledge of statistics. Assessment: Group presentation (10%), quiz (10%), lab reports (30%), final exam (50%) Practical field work: Two half-day field trips Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Human population growth is causing irreversible change to almost all environments on earth. The extent of human change has been so great that a new geological epoch, the anthropocene, has been defined. Global warming, the introduction of pollutants and excessive use of nutrients are stressors affecting the biodiversity and resilience of ecosystems, and pose threats to human and environmental health. These human impacts carefully need to be monitored to guide appropriate management of urban, natural and agricultural systems. In this unit you will learn about transport pathways of pollutants, bioaccumulation, environmental toxicology (e.g., LD50 values), environmental monitoring and remediation techniques. Through lectures, laboratories and group work, concepts and methods of environmental monitoring will be illustrated and discussed including findings from the latest research. You will participate in structured practical exercises and field trips where you will apply sampling techniques, use bio-indicators and diversity indices to monitor ecosystem functioning. You will interpret the results and assess what the implications are for the ecological functioning and sustainable management of the environment. These hands-on exercises will be complemented with case-studies to guide you in critically analysing and evaluating environmental monitoring data. By taking this unit, you will acquire the necessary skills and knowledge in monitoring sites impacted by human activity.
Textbooks
Artiola, Pepper, and Brusseau. 2004. Environmental Monitoring and Characterization. Elsevier Academic Press.
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 3-hour computer practical per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 or MATH1015 or DATA1001 or DATA1901)] OR [3cp from (MATH1XX1 or MATH1906 or MATH1XX3 or MATH1907) and an additional 3cp from (MATH1XX5)] Assessment: One exam during the exam period (50%),three reports (10% each), ten online quizzes (2% each) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness streams
This unit builds on introductory 1st year statistics units and is targeted towards students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It consists of two parts and presents, in an applied manner, the statistical methods that students need to know for further study and their future careers. In the first part the focus is on designed studies including both surveys and formal experimental designs. Students will learn how to analyse and interpret datasets collected from designs from more than than 2 treatment levels, multiple factors and different blocking designs. In the second part the focus is on finding patterns in data. In this part the students will learn to model relationships between response and predictor variables using regression, and find patterns in datasets with many variables using principal components analysis and clustering. This part provides the foundation for the analysis of big data. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the statistical software package R. A key feature of the unit is using R to develop coding skills that are become essential in science for processing and analysing datasets of ever increasing size.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
FOOD2000 Principles of Food Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalind Deaker Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/week; guest lectures 2 x 1 h, 12 x 3 h practicals Prerequisites: BIOL1XXX or AGEN1004 or MBLG1XX1 Prohibitions: AGEN2002 Assessment: 3 x online quizzes (10%), 2 x practical assignments (30%), 1 x oral presentation (10%), exam (50%) Practical field work: 1 site visit Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Managing safety and quality of food is critical to health, social, environmental and economic security. In this unit of study, you will examine the structural and functional properties of foods, and the science underpinning their production and management. Different categories of food will be described on the basis of physiology and biochemistry and how this underpins quality, organoleptic and nutritional properties. Typical spoilage processes in different foods, quality deterioration during the postharvest period, and the industry practices and technology used to prolong shelf-life will be covered. The main food safety challenges for the food industry and their control will be introduced. The unit focuses on core skills in assessment of food quality and safety, and the understanding of management practices and technology used to ensure these meet market or regulatory requirements. Case study examples will be drawn from grain, fruit and vegetable, meat, eggs, dairy and seafood products. Food standards, food safety systems and government regulations will also be covered. Students are introduced to basic chemistry and microbiology techniques used in food science as well as common industrial methods for food quality assessment.
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes and presentation (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Sharp Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan and carry out a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.
Textbooks
TBA
ITLS2000 Managing Food and Beverage Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hr seminar/tutorial per week Prohibitions: AGEN2003 or AGEN1005 Assessment: tutorial quiz (10%), individual assignment (35%), group project report (15%), group project presentation (10%), final 2hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Business (Business School)
The food and beverage sector is one of the key economic activities in virtually all countries in the world today. When it comes to logistics and supply chain management within this sector, there is a level of complexity, not frequently found in other industries. This includes the need to consider products bulkiness, perishability and seasonality, coupled with potential additional infrastructure requirements in respect of temperature-controlled storage and transport. As a consequence, there is a higher imperative to have a well-designed end-to-end supply chain. Equally, it is important to understand issues from the perspectives of the various actors in food and beverage supply chains including farms, processing units, wholesalers / distributors, and retailers. Overarching the structuring of any food and beverage supply chain will be consideration of issues such as perishability, quality and risk. Further, for a supply chain to be effective and efficient consideration also needs to be given to the support functions of information management, use of technology, and financial reporting. In today's world, companies compete on supply chains. Those who have the ability to establish a distinctive supply chain and create it as a strategic asset will therefore emerge as industry leaders.
MICR2031 Microbiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2931 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: written assignment (10%), group oral presentation (20%) and online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the earth's trees. This unit of study will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require if you specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology or science education.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
MICR2931 Microbiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2031 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: two written assignments (10%, 20%), and online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the Earth's trees. In this unit of study you will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Detailed aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require to specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology, or science education. As an Advanced unit, MICR2931 provides increased challenge and academic rigour to develop a greater understanding and depth of disciplinary expertise. You will actively participate in a series of small group tutorials investigating the molecular detail of microbial communication and function, which will culminate in you creating a scientific research report that communicates your understanding of recent research in microbiology.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
MIMI2002 Microbes, Infection and Immunity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Helen Agus Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, and scenario-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX3) Prohibitions: MEDS2004, BMED2404, MIMI2902, IMMU2101, MICR2021, MICR2921, MICR2022, MICR2922, BMED2807, BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Final examination (50%), practical exercises (20%), online quizzes (10%), integrated assessment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Transmission, pathogenicity and immune response to microbes are key concepts for understanding infectious disease processes. In this unit of study you will establish a conceptual foundation and, using an integrated approach, explore selected case studies of infection from a body system of origin perspective. You will explore the characteristics of viral, bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens and their virulence mechanisms for establishment and progression of disease. Comprehensive consideration of host immune response and characteristic pathological changes to tissue that arise will then be considered. Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to explain microbial pathogenic processes of infection including: mechanisms for colonisation, invasion and damage to host tissue; the ways in which your immune system recognises and destroys invading microbes; how T cell response is activated and antibodies function. You will learn about pathogenesis, symptoms, current challenges of treatment including antibiotic resistance, control and vaccination strategies. You will develop a holistic perspective of infectious diseases. You will work collaboratively to solve challenging problems in Biomedical Sciences. Practical classes will investigate normal flora, host defences and case studies of medically important microbes with linkage to disease outcome. You will also obtain experience and understanding of modern experimental techniques in microbiology and immunopathology.
MIMI2902 Microbes, Infection and Immunity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Helen Agus Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, online lecturettes, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry- and scenario-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX3) Prohibitions: MEDS2004, BMED2404, MIMI2002, IMMU2101, MICR2021, MICR2921, MICR2022, MICR2922, BMED2807, BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Final examination (50%), practical exercises (20%), online quizzes (10%), research publication-based assignment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Transmission, pathogenicity and immune response to microbes are key concepts for understanding infectious disease processes. In this unit you will establish a conceptual foundation and, using an integrated approach, explore selected infection case studies from a body system of origin perspective. You will explore characteristics of viral, bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens and their virulence mechanisms for establishment and progression of disease. Comprehensive consideration of host immune response and consequent characteristic pathological changes to tissue will be considered. Upon completion, you will be able to explain microbial pathogenic processes of infection including: mechanisms for colonisation, invasion and damage to host tissue; the ways your immune system recognises and destroys invading microbes; how T cell response is activated and antibodies function. You will learn about pathogenesis, symptoms, current challenges of treatment including antibiotic resistance, control and vaccination strategies. This advanced unit has the same overall structure as MIMI2002 but contains a unique science communication exercise in which you will actively participate in small group sessions and be assessed with a short essay. This advanced component explores how recent advances in microbiology, infection and immunity are communicated to the wider public and is based on recent publications with potential high impact for society.
QBIO2001 Molecular Systems Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Edward Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 3-hour practical session on a weekly basis Assumed knowledge: Basic concepts in metabolism; protein synthesis; gene regulation; quantitative and statistical skills Assessment: One 3-hour final exam (50%), three 45-minute quizzes (20%), one 5-minute presentation (10%), laboratory assessment and practical book (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Experimental approaches to the study of biological systems are shifting from hypothesis driven to hypothesis generating research. Large scale experiments at the molecular scale are producing enormous quantities of data ("Big Data") that need to be analysed to derive significant biological meaning. For example, monitoring the abundance of tens of thousands of proteins simultaneously promises ground-breaking discoveries. In this unit, you will develop specific analytical skills required to work with data obtained in the biological and medical sciences. The unit covers quantitative analysis of biological systems at the molecular scale including modelling and visualizing patterns using differential equations, experimental design and data types to understand disease aetiology. You will also use methods to model cellular systems including metabolism, gene regulation and signalling. The practical program will enable you to generate data analysis workflows, and gain a deep understanding of the statistical, informatics and modelling tools currently being used in the field. To leverage multiple types of expertise, the computer lab-based practical component of this unit will be predominantly a team-based collaborative learning environment. Upon completion of this unit, you will have gained skills to find meaningful solutions to difficult biological and disease-related problems with the potential to change our lives.
Textbooks
An Introduction to Systems Biology: Design Principles of Biological Circuits, Uri Alon, (Chapman and Hall/CRC, 2007). Systems Biology, Edda Klipp, Wolfram Liebermeister, Christoph Wierling, Axel Kowald, Hans Lehrach, and Ralf Herwig, (Wiley-Blackhall, 2009). Molecular biology of the cell, Alberts B et al (6th edition, Garland Science, 2015) Discovering Statistics Using R, Andy Field (2012, SAGE Publications Ltd). Computational and Statistical Methods for Protein Quantitation by Mass Spectrometry, Martens L et al (Wiley, 2013)
SOIL2004 The Soil Resource

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour practical per week, 6-day fieldtrip in the week immediately preceding the start of Semester 2 (Week 0) Assessment: Fieldtrip participation (5%), soil survey mapping report (35%), laboratory report and poster presentation (20%), group tutorials (15%), viva voce exam (25%) Practical field work: Computer and laboratory practical sessions; 6-day fieldtrip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit will familiarise students with the description and mapping of soil types in the Australian landscape, with common analytical methods for soil and with the various forms of degradation that may alter the quality and function of soil. It is an applied soil science unit that builds on the fundamental soil science concepts learned in the SOIL2003/SOIL2005 unit. The first practical component of the unit, a six-day soil survey, will give students experience in soil description and classification in the field, and soil samples collected during this survey will be subsequently analysed for a variety of attributes by the students in laboratory practicals. In the lecture series, topics including soil security, soil fertility and soil degradation will be discussed and linked to practical sessions. By the end of this unit, students will be able to construct maps of soil properties and soil type distribution, describe primary soil functions, soil attributes and types of soil degradation in an agricultural context, and be able to recognize and communicate the ability of a soil profile to sustain plant growth. Students will gain research and inquiry skills by collecting, analysing and interpreting soil survey data, and will gain communication skills by having to prepare and present a poster.
SOIL2005 Soil and Water: Earth's Life Support Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Balwant Singh Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures: 3 hours per week; lab: 3 hours per week for 10 weeks Prohibitions: SOIL2003 or LWSC2002 Assessment: Field excursion: attendance and creative assessment (5%), the attendance at the excursion is complusory to get any mark for this assessment task; quiz: (10%); written assignment: modelling assessment including modelling (15%); laboratory report: group oral presentation and written assignment (20%); final exam: final written exam (50%) Practical field work: Approximately eight hours working field at Cobbitty Farm Wk 0 (Friday, 22 Feb 2019) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Soil and water are the two most essential natural resources on the Earth's surface which influence all forms of terrestrial life. This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the fundamental properties and processes of soil and water that affect food security and sustain ecosystems. These properties and processes are part of the grounding principles that underpin crop and animal production, nutrient and water cycling, and environmental sustainability. You will participate in a field excursion to examine soils in a landscape to develop knowledge and understanding of soil properties, water storage, water movement and cycling of organic carbon and nutrients in relation to food production and ecosystem functioning. At the end of this unit you will be able to articulate and quantify the factors and processes that determine the composition and behaviour of soil, composition of water, soil water storage and the movement of water on the land surface. You will also be able to describe the most important properties of soil and water for food production and sustaining ecosystem functions and link this to human and climatic factors. The field excursion, report and laboratory/computer exercises have been designed to develop communication, team work and collaborative efforts.
Textbooks
Brady, N.C. and Ray R. Weil. (2007). The Nature and Properties of Soils. 14th Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey. White, R.E. (2006) Principles and Practice of Soil Science: the Soil as a Natural Resource. 4th ed., Blackwell Science, Oxford. Diana H. Wall, Richard D. Bardgett, Valerie Behan-Pelletier, Jeffrey E. Herrick, T. Hefin Jones, Karl Ritz, Johan Six, Donald R. Strong, and Wim H. van der Putten (Eds.) (2012). Soil Ecology and Ecosystem Services. Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780199575923. Kutllek, M and Nielsen, D.R. (2015). Soil: The Skin of the Planet Earth, Springer, ISBN: 978-94-017-9788-7 (Print) 978-94-017-9789-4 (Online). Gordon, N. D., McMahon, T. A., Finlayson, B. L., Gippel, C. J., and Nathan, R. J. (2004) Stream Hydrology: an Introduction for Ecologists, John Wiley and Sons Inc.
2000-level units of study
ANSC3102 Animal Reproduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Simon de Graaf Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hours per week, tutorials 1 hour per week, practicals 3 hours per week; there will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus Prerequisites: AVBS1002 and AVBS2XXX Assumed knowledge: A background in animal anatomy and physiology Assessment: Written and oral assignments (30%), mid-semester practical exam (15%), end of semester written exam (55%) Practical field work: There will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study provides a comprehensive programme on basic and applied aspects of male and female reproductive biology, with particular emphasis on livestock and domestic animals. The fundamental topics include reproductive cycles, sexual differentiation, gametogenesis, fertilization, embryo development, gestation and parturition. An understanding of the applications of advanced reproductive technologies is developed through lectures, tutorials and the assignments. In addition, practical instruction is given on semen collection and processing, manipulation of the reproductive cycle, artificial insemination, and pregnancy diagnosis in sheep and pigs. Classes are held at the Camperdown Campus in Sydney and at the Camden Campus Animal Reproduction Unit and Mayfarm piggery.
Textbooks
Senger, PL 2013, Pathways to pregnancy and parturition 3rd ed., Current Conceptions Inc
ANSC3106 Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sabrina Lomax Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours per week (including lectures, demonstrations, discussions and practical activities); classes will be held at the Camden campus; practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Prerequisites: AVBS1002 or BIOL1XX6 Assessment: Assignments/presentations (50%), theory exam (50%) Practical field work: Practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
In Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science 3, the behavioural and physiological responses of mammals, birds and fish to stressors related to husbandry, housing, transport and slaughter are explored in some detail. This Unit enables students to develop an appreciation of the responses of animals to common interventions that arise in the context of interacting with humans, including the domestication of livestock species and the management of wildlife. The principles of animal responses to stress are illustrated with production species as the main examples. Contemporary approaches to the scientific measurement of animal stress and welfare, based on an appropriate selection of scientific disciplines including ethology, psychology, physiology and neuroscience, are assessed with an emphasis on farmed livestock species. Genetic, environmental and evolutionary determinants of pain, stress and fear responses in animals are considered in the light of what is known about cognition and motivation in animals. Methods for assessing and enhancing animal environments and husbandry systems are examined and the impact on animal behaviour and welfare of stockmanship is explored in the context of human-animal interactions. Finally, the design and conduct of scientific experiments are assessed with a focus on animal ethics and current welfare issues.
Textbooks
Broom, DM and Fraser, AF 2007, Domestic animal behaviour and welfare, 4th edition, CAB International, Cambridge Uni Press, Cambridge
AVBS3003 Wildlife Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Herbert Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 3 hours per week, tutorials 2 hours per week on average (consult timetable), up to two days of field excursions Prerequisites: BIOL2032 and 6cp of BIOL2X2X Assessment: Group assignment (20%), individual assignments and tutorial participation (40%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Up to two days of field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study describes and evaluates key contemporary challenges faced by wildlife management professionals and conservation biologists. A key component of the course is to give students an appreciation of different stakeholder perspectives in wildlife management and how rigorous scientific method can be used to inform wildlife management decisions, using contemporary examples. This unit of study also explores the techniques and methods for undertaking wildlife research, with an emphasis on terrestrial vertebrate species. On completion of this unit, students will have experience in articulating and acknowledging various stakeholder views, both orally and in written form, and understand the processes involved in formulating an evidence-based management approach to contentious wildlife management scenarios.
Textbooks
Students should consult lecturers for recommended reading
BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester practical work and assignments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3071. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in gene expression and manipulation will be covered.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3072 Human Molecular Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3972 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3972 Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3072 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3072. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in modern molecular cell biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3981 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3081 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3081. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in protein biochemistry will be covered.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3982 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with molecular biology methods and studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry.
BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3082 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with new methods, including magnetic resonance techniques and molecular biology methods, as well as studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry. Qualified students will attend some lectures/practical classes in common with BCHM3082 and some separate lectures/ practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in metabolic biochemistry will be covered.
BCHM3092 Proteomics and Functional Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stuart Cordwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3992 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will focus on the high throughput methods for the analysis of gene structure and function (genomics) and the analysis of proteins (proteomics), which are at the forefront of discovery in the biomedical sciences. The course will concentrate on the hierarchy of gene-protein-structure-function through an examination of modern technologies built on the concepts of genomics versus molecular biology, and proteomics versus biochemistry. Technologies to be examined include DNA sequencing, nucleic acid and protein microarrays, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, uses of mass spectrometry for high throughput protein identification, isotope tagging for quantitative proteomics, high-performance liquid chromatography, high-throughput functional assays, affinity chromatography and modern methods for database analysis. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these technologies can provide insight into the molecular basis of changes in cellular function under both physiological and pathological conditions as well as how they can be applied to biotechnology for the discovery of biomarkers, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in proteomics and genomics.
BCHM3992 Proteomics and Functional Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stuart Cordwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3092 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will focus on the high throughput methods for the analysis of gene structure and function (genomics) and the analysis of proteins (proteomics) which are at the forefront of discovery in the biomedical sciences. The course will concentrate on the hierarchy of gene-protein-structure-function through an examination of modern technologies built on the concepts of genomics versus molecular biology, and proteomics versus biochemistry. Technologies to be examined include DNA sequencing, nucleic acid and protein microarrays, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, uses of mass spectrometry for high throughput protein identification, isotope tagging for quantitative proteomics, high-performance liquid chromatography, high-throughput functional assays, affinity chromatography and modern methods for database analysis. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these technologies can provide insight into the molecular basis of changes in cellular function under both physiological and pathological conditions as well as how they can be applied to biotechnology for the discovery of biomarkers, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in proteomics and genomics.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3092. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in proteomics and genomics will be covered.
BIOL3004 Terrestrial Plant Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tina Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: The general weekly schedule comprises 2 x 1 hour lectures and 1 x 3 hour practical session. A mandatory 2-3 day field trip to southern New South Wales will take place in the middle of the semester. Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or AGEN2001 or GEOS2X21 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09 Prohibitions: ENSY3003 or ENSY3002 Assumed knowledge: Students should have a basic understanding of plant biology, plant ecology and/or plant physiology. Some background knowledge in mathematics and chemistry would be beneficial. Assessment: Assessment tasks include two in-class quizzes (10% each); field report (20%); 2000w group-based land management plan (35%); 500w individual component to the land management plan (15%); group-based oral presentation (10%). Practical field work: A mandatory 2-3 day field trip to southern New South Wales will take place in the middle of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Australian native vegetation is a unique resource for diversity, ecosystem services and public use. The objective of this unit is to provide a broad understanding of three major plant terrestrial ecosystems that are found across Australia: forests, heathlands and grasslands and how they are managed. While the focus will be on native plant systems in an Australian setting, their importance at a global level will also be discussed. You will develop an understanding of the characteristics of key plant ecosystems, including where they are found and their main ecophysiology features. Each of the ecosystems described has the potential to be a?ected (positively or negatively) by a range of natural and anthropogenic disturbances. They include ?re, climate change (drought and temperature), changes in nutrient ?ows and more broadly human-induced disturbances such as logging, mining, urban development and agricultural management. The impact of these disturbances along with mitigation via conservation and associated management changes will also be covered. Finally, government policy around conservation/management of these ecosystems will be examined. At the completion of this unit you will have developed an understanding of the environmental and economic importance of forests, heathlands and grasslands, their vulnerability to a range of external factors and the extent that these can be mitigated.
BIOL3005 Evolutionary Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ben Oldroyd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hours per week 13 weeks, tutorial or laboratory 4 hours per week for 13 weeks, field trip 24 hours, once during semester. Prerequisites: (12cp of BIOL2XXX) or [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3044 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 or BIOL3944 or PLNT3003 or PLNT3903 Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the structure of DNA molecules and the genetic code, understand the concept of a phylogenetic tree and have basic laboratory skills like pipetting and PCR. A knowledge of elementary statistics and algebra is assumed. Completion of intermediate units in genetics and genomics (i.e.GEGE2X01) and diverisity (e.g. botany or zoology) is highly recommended. Assessment: Oral presentation in a debate format (10%), Short reports in practical classes (10%), Draft scientific report (10%), Scientific report (20%), Final exam (50%). Practical field work: 24-hour period over a weekend during semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Evolution is the biological process that has generated the biodiversity on this planet. It explains the common ancestry of all life on earth, why all organisms use the same genetic code, and why major life forms are constrained to a relatively small number of basic body plans such as four limbs in tetrapods. Thus, the principles of evolution and population genetics underpin all biology, including ecology, medicine and agriculture. For example, it is only because rats and humans share an evolutionary past that we can use rats as models for human medical research. In this unit, you will explore the mechanisms that generate evolutionary change at both contemporary and ancient scales. You will learn how to use DNA sequences to reconstruct the relationships among organisms and to estimate evolutionary timescales. Evolution is an ongoing process, so you will use genetic techniques to discover whether populations are divided into subpopulations. By completing this unit, you will develop skills in genomics, phylogenetic analysis, population genetics and conservation genetics. You will learn about fundamental aspects of evolution such as adaptation, sexual selection, and the origins of life. You will gain general skills in computer literacy, data management and statistical genetics.
BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, group presentations, one essay, one project report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.
Textbooks
Begon M, Townsend CR, Harper JL (2005) Ecology, From individuals to ecosystems. Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3907 Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, weekly tutorial and 3-hour practical per week Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3007 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, presentations, one essay, one project report (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3007 Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be encouraged to pursue the objectives by more independent means in a series of research tutorials. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester 2. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
Textbooks
As for BIOL3007
BIOL3008 Marine Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman Session: Intensive July Classes: Intensive 8-day field course held in the pre-semester break. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or (6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)) Prohibitions: BIOL3908 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928 Assessment: Discussion groups, research project proposal, biodiversity survey report, data analysis and checking, research project report (100%). Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Science
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This field course provides a practical introduction to the experimental analysis of marine populations and assemblages. Students gain experience using a range of intertidal sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments. No particular mathematical or statistical skills are required for this subject. Group experimental research projects in the field are the focus of the unit during the day, with lectures and discussion groups about the analysis of experimental data and current issues in experimental marine ecology occurring in the evening.
Textbooks
No textbook is prescribed but Coastal Marine Ecology of Temperate Australia. Eds. Underwood, A.J. and Chapman, M.G. 1995. University of New South Wales Press, provides useful background reading.
BIOL3908 Marine Field Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman. Session: Intensive July Classes: One 8-day field course held in the pre-semester break, plus four 1-hour tutorials during semester 2. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either- 12cp Intermediate BIOL, or (6cp Intermediate BIOL and(MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)) Prohibitions: BIOL3008 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928 Assessment: Discussion groups, research project proposal, biodiversity report, data analysis and checking, research project report (100%). Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Science
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas nvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This unit has the same objectives as Marine Field Ecology BIOL3008, and is suitable for students wishing to pursue certain aspects of marine field ecology in a greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from applicants on the basis of past performance. Students taking this unit of study will be expected to take part in a number of additional tutorials after the field course on advanced aspects of experimental design and analysis and will be expected to incorporate these advanced skills into their analyses and project reports. This unit may be taken as part of the BSc(Advanced).
Textbooks
As for BIOL 3008.
BIOL3009 Terrestrial Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Glenda Wardle Session: Intensive July Classes: Note: One 7-day field trip held in the pre-semester break (week immediately prior to start of Semester 2) and four 4-hour practical classes on Friday mornings during weeks 1-4 of Semester 2 Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3909 or BIOL2009 or BIOL2909 Assumed knowledge: Basic ecological concepts of species and communities, and experimental deisgn and analysis. Assessment: Field practical skills (10%), field survey methods quiz (10%), research project proposal and brief presentation (10%), sampling project report (20%), specimen collection (10%), major research project report (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This intensive field-based course provides practical experience in terrestrial ecology suited to a broad range of careers in ecology, environmental consulting and wildlife management. Students learn a broad range of ecological sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments. The field work takes place in native forest and incorporates survey techniques for plants, small mammals and invertebrates and thus provides a good background for ecological consulting work and an introduction into large-scale project management. Students attend a week-long field course and participate in a large-scale research project as well as conducting their own research project. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking in the context of environmental management and technical skills are developed in the area of data handling and analysis, report writing and team work. Invited experts contribute to the lectures and discussions on issues relating to the ecology, conservation and management of Australia's terrestrial flora and fauna.
BIOL3909 Terrestrial Field Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Glenda Wardle Session: Intensive July Classes: One 7-day field trip held in the pre-semester break (week immediately prior to start of semester 2) and four 4-hour practical classes on Friday mornings during weeks 1-4 of semester 2 Prerequisites: An average mark of 70 or above in (12cp of BIOL2XXX) OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3009 or BIOL2009 or BIOL2909 Assumed knowledge: Basic ecological concepts of species and communities, and experimental design and analysis. Assessment: Field survey methods quiz (10%), sample and data processing (10%), research project proposal and brief presentation (10%), sampling project report (20%), major research project report (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3009 Terrestrial Field Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from applicants on the basis of previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will complete an individual research project on a topic negotiated with a member of staff. It is expected that much of the data collection will be completed during the field trip but some extra time may be needed during semester 2. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students at the beginning of the unit. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
BIOL3010 Tropical Wildlife Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Greenlees Session: Intensive February Classes: One week intensive field trip to the Northern Territory plus one week intensive lecture and prac session at Sydney University. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or (6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)) Prohibitions: BIOL3910 or BIOL2010 or BIOL2910 Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam, one 1-hour practical exam, one 1500-word report, one 2000-word paper, one 15-minute oral presentation (100%). Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Science
Note: This unit runs in February. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
Australia has a unique terrestrial vertebrate fauna, but also has the worst record of recent mammalian extinctions. Because of Australia's unusual climate, landforms, and the rarity of many species, the management of our native wildlife presents special challenges for biologists, conservationists and land managers. This unit of study addresses the biogeography, ecology and management of Australia's terrestrial fauna. The subject comprises of a five-day field course at Mary River Park in the Northern Territory. During the course, students will learn how to carry out wildlife surveys, how to identify animals, how to track wildlife, and how to design and complete a field experiment. The field trip will be complemented by guest lectures from experts in the fields of evolution, ecology and wildlife management. A one day field trip to Litchfield National Park will be held on the last day of the field course.
BIOL3910 Tropical Wildlife Biology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Greenlees Session: Intensive February Classes: One week intensive field trip to the Northern Territory plus one week intensive lecture and prac session at Sydney University. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either- 12cp Intermediate BIOL, or (6cp Intermediate BIOL and(MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)) Prohibitions: BIOL3010 or BIOL2010 or BIOL2910 Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam, one 1-hour practical exam, one 1500-word report, one 2000-word paper, one 15-minute oral presentation (100%). Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Science
Note: This unit runs in February. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3010 Tropical Wildlife Biology and Management, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be required to pursue the objectives by more independent means. For example, student willl be able to design and carry out their own field or laboratory experiment, and complete it during the five day firled trip. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students at the beginning of the unit.
BIOL3013 Marine Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Will Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp from BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3913 Assessment: Practical reports, data exercises and exams (100%). Practical field work: Combination of field, lab and computer based practical activities Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
We will examine in detail processes that are important for the establishment and maintenance of marine communities. Lectures will expose students to the key ideas, researchers and methodologies within selected fields of marine biology. Laboratory sessions and field excursions will complement the lectures by providing students with hands-on experience with the organisms and the processes that affect them. Students will develop critical analysis and scientific writing skills while examining the current literature.
BIOL3913 Marine Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Will Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: See BIOL3013. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3013 Assessment: Practical reports, data exercises and exams (100%). Practical field work: Combination of field, lab and computer-based practical activities Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of the BIOL3013 Marine Biology unit. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year but generally involves an individual or group project, conducted with unit instructors, which takes the place of one of the practical-based assessments..
BIOL3016 Coral Reef Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Will Figueira Session: Intensive July Classes: Fieldwork 80 hours block mode (during July) Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp from BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3916 or BIOL2020 or BIOL2920 or NTMP3001 Assessment: Participation in field work, essay, project report and an exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
Coral Reef Biology is an intensive unit held at a research station on the Great Barrier Reef. The unit focuses on the dominant taxa in coral reef environments and the linkages between them. Emphasis is placed on the biological adaptations for life in tropical waters and the ecological, oceanographic and physiological processes involved. Aspects covered include: processes influencing the distribution of coral reefs, symbiosis, reef connectivity, lagoon systems, nutrient cycling and the impacts of climate change and other anthropogenic pressures on the world's corals reefs.
BIOL3916 Coral Reef Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Will Figueira Session: Intensive July Classes: Fieldwork 80 hours block mode (during July) Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3016 or BIOL2020 or BIOL2920 or NTMP3001 Assessment: Participation in field work, essay, project report and exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit requires School permission to enrol; please see the School of Life and Environmental Sciences website for details on how to apply. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered.
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3016, Coral Reef Biology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects of tropical marine biology in greater depth, with a focus on the GBR. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will pursue individual projects in consultation with, and under the guidance of, the course coordinator. The aim is to design a project relating to the particular interests of the student. The nature of these projects will vary from year to year. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX) Prohibitions: BIOL3918 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the regulation, impact and implications of genetic engineering and genomics. Topics include biological sequence data and databases, comparative genomics, the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, and the genetic engineering of animals and plants. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.
BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX)] Prohibitions: BIOL3018 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
BIOL3020 Applied Plant Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Warren Session: Semester 1 Classes: You are required to attend 2 x lectures, 1 x 4-hour practical session on a weekly basis. On-line Learning Requirements. Please check for updates regularly. Prerequisites: BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or AGEN2001 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09 Prohibitions: BIOL3920, BIOL3043, BIOL3943, AGEN2005, PLNT3001, PLNT3901, PLNT3002, PLNT3902, ENSY3001 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6 Assessment: Assessment in BIOL3020 is based on a written laboratory report (30%), laboratory notebook (15%), group presentation (15%) anda 2-hour exam at the end of semester (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Plants are truly amazing. Plants lift water to heights that defy physics. Plants take sunlight and simple inorganic ingredients to create a bewildering diversity of organic compounds. What's even more amazing is that we are only just beginning to understand how plants achieve these amazing feats. This unit explores how plants function and illustrates how this knowledge can be applied to real-World problems. Major topics include how plants function as integrated systems, resource partitioning and the dilemmas faced by plants, interaction of plants with the world around them. Emphasis will be placed on integration of plant responses from molecular through to whole plant scales, and how this knowledge can be practically applied to maximise plant growth, optimise use of water and nutrients, and understand how plants a?ect (and are a?ected by) their environment. Lectures are augmented by experimental work that leads to practical hands-on experience with research tools and techniques that can be applied across the sciences, and bespoke instruments used in the world's leading plant science research laboratories. This unit of study complements other senior units of study in the Plant Science minor and is essential for those seeking a career in plant biology and plant-related ?elds, including ecology, cell biology, genetics, breeding, agriculture, molecular biology, environmental law, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Pedigo LP and Rice ME. 2009. Entomology and Pest Management. 6th edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: 24 1-hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX) Prohibitions: BIOL3926 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Developmental genetics discusses major concepts and our current understanding of developmental biology with an emphasis on molecular genetics. The developmental genetics of animal and plant systems will be investigated, along with approaches used to determine gene function in relation to development of complex multicellular organisms. Topics include the features and resources for model organisms; the generation of mutants for forward and reverse genetics; the application of mutants to the study gene function and gene networks; spatial and temporal gene expression in pattern formation; quantitative trait loci analysis; utility of genome wide association studies; epigenetics in relation to inheritance; genome information in the study of human genetics. Reference will be made to the use of modern techniques in developmental biology such as transgenics, recombinant DNA technology, tissue-specific expression analysis. Various methods of genetic mapping will be covered. Practical work complements the theoretical aspects of the course and develops important skills in genetics.
BIOL3926 Developmental Genetics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: 24 1-hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX)] Prohibitions: BIOL3929 or BIOL3026 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Qualified students will participate in alternative components to BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year. Some assessment will be in an alternative format to components of BIOL3026.
BIOL3029 Molecular Plant Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Brian Jones Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2hrs/week for 13 weeks, Practicals 1 x 3hr practical/week for 13 weeks Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or BCMB2X0X or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X72 or GENE2002 Assessment: Laboratory eNotebook - (Week 5 x 5% + Week 13 x 5%, total = 10%), Research paper (2500 words, 20%), Oral presentation (20%), Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The enormous variety of plant forms is a reflection of the need to adapt to a life lived with environmental extremes. Plants provide the air we breathe, the food we eat and the landscapes we love. Having diverged from animals prior to the evolution of multicellularity, plants also provide us with a unique opportunity to discover how environmental adaptability and productivity features are enabled at the molecular level. This unit of study explores the molecular mechanisms that give rise to plant form and function, focussing on higher plants. You will learn about plant genomes and the molecular tool kits that are used in the making of a plant, the signaling pathways that drive growth and responses to the environment, and how this deep knowledge is being used to improve plant performance and better manage ecosystems. By doing this unit, students will advance their knowledge of how plants grow, develop and adapt in the context of the molecular mechanisms controlling these processes. The new tools of biology are giving us an unprecedented understanding of life. The skills developed in this unit will enable you to play a role in designing better ways to manage plants and ecosystems.
Textbooks
Schumann GL and Darcy CJ. 2010. Essential Plant Pathology (2nd ed.). APS Press, St Paul, Minn., USA.
BIOL3033 Applied Entomology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tanya Latty Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2hr/week, practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2XXX or ENTO2001 or MEDS200X or ANAT2XXX or PHSI2XXX or BMED240X or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2101 Prohibitions: ENTO4003 Assessment: Assessments will include a consultant report (15%), a research proposal (15%), a final group presentation (25%), an arthropod identification test (15%) and a final exam (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Insects effect almost every facet of our lives from vectoring major diseases like the plague, malaria and Zika virus to the billions of dollars of free ecosystems services they provide by consuming pest insects, pollinating agricultural crops and removing waste. This unit takes an applied approach to entomology by covering topics such as medical entomology, sustainable pest management, pollination ecology, insects as human/livestock foods and insect conservation. You will learn how to identify a variety of economically and medically important arthropods and how to sample insects in a variety of settings. You will also learn how insects are managed in agricultural, urban and natural environments as well as how we can use insects to solve some of humanities most pressing problems. You will learn about the many important ecosystems services that insects provide, as well as how practitioners can help encourage and support populations of beneficial insects. Field trips to Westmead hospital's medical entomology unit and the Biosecurity unit at Botany Bay will show you how practicing entomologists use their knowledge of insects to solve important problems. You will build your skills in research and inquiry through group research projects that you design and run. This unit will give you the basic skills needed to pursue careers in a variety of entomology-related fields.
Textbooks
Sindel BM (Ed) (2000). Australian Weed Management Systems. R.G. and F.J. Richardson, Melbourne.
BIOL3034 Evolution of the Australian Biota

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Murray Henwood Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 2 hrs/wk; practical class/discussion group 3-4 hrs/wk Prerequisites: (12cp of BIOL2XXX) or [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3044 or BIOL3944 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 or PLNT3003 or PLNT3903 Assessment: Final theory exam (50%), Research project proposal - outline and scope (10%), Participation in group discussion/presentation (10%), Presentation of completed research project (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The diverse Australian biota presents a compelling story of how history and environmental processes have shaped its evolution and the distribution of species over the landscape. For example, the high level of endemism, and the dominance of eucaplypts and wattles are distinctive, along with the complex interactions among species, including humans. This unit of study will consider the historical and contemporary processes of change that have led to, and currently influence, the biological diversity of Australia across a range of temporal and spatial scales. You will examine the timing and tempo of the evolution of major groups of plants and animals of Australia, and how these have been influenced by, and continue to interact with, significant earth history events and other organisms. By understanding the past, and the spatial distributions of species, you will be equipped to inform management and conservation decisions about the future of ecosystems and the plants and animals that comprise them. By doing this unit you will develop a deep understanding of the origin and diversity of the plants and animals of Australia. You will become proficient at the techniques and concepts used to infer past events, map current species distributions and to anticipate future changes in biological diversity.
BIOL3045 Animal Ecological Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Seebacher Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and three practicals per week Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3945 or BIOL3011 or BIOL3911 or BIOL3012 or BIOL3912 Assessment: Two practical reports (20% and 40% of total marks, respectively), one 1.5-hour exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Animal Ecological Physiology is a conceptually based unit of study that covers physiological interactions between organisms and their environments. The unit explores evolutionary processes that allow animals to persist in variable environments. These concepts are essential to understanding biodiversity and ecological function of animal populations, and how these are likely to change under future climate change. The unit will be suitable for those with an interest in zoology, as well as students with a particular interest in ecology and evolution. There is a strong focus on experimental biology and incorporating theory into practical classes, during which students design their own experiments. Good working knowledge of statistical analyses is assumed. The unit provides essential skills for conducting and presenting research, and for critical evaluation of published research.
BIOL3945 Animal Ecological Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Seebacher Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and three practicals per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3045 or BIOL3011 or BIOL3911 or BIOL3012 or BIOL3912 Assessment: One practical report (20%) and one advanced report (40%), one 1.5-hour exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3045 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. Animal Ecological Physiology is a conceptually based unit of study that covers physiological interactions between organisms and their environments. The unit explores evolutionary processes that allow animals to persist in variable environments. These concepts are essential to understanding biodiversity and ecological function of animal populations, and how these are likely to change under future climate change. The unit will be suitable for those with an interest in zoology, as well as students with a particular interest in ecology and evolution. There is a strong focus on experimental biology and incorporating theory into practical classes, during which students design their own experiments. Good working knowledge of statistical analyses is assumed. The unit provides essential skills for conducting and presenting research, and for critical evaluation of published research.
BIOL3046 Animal Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ashley Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp from BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3946 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 Assessment: Practical reports, one 2-hour exam (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The unit will provide a broad overview of the scientific study of animal behaviour. It will consider mechanistic and functional explanations of animal behaviour across contexts including kin selection and altruism, sociality, foraging, aggression and competition, sexual selection and mate choice, the behaviour of predators and prey, and communication and signalling. The information presented and discussed in this unit will reflect the most up-to-date research in each aspect of the field of animal behaviour. Practical sessions are closely aligned with the lecture material and will foster the development of key skills by providing hands-on experience of experimental design, data collection and analysis.
Textbooks
Davies, Krebs, West: An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3946 Animal Behaviour (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ashley Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3046 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 Assessment: Practical reports, one 2-hour exam (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3046 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The unit will provide a broad overview of the scientific study of animal behaviour. It will consider mechanistic and functional explanations of animal behaviour across contexts including kin selection and altruism, sociality, foraging, aggression and competition, sexual selection and mate choice, the behaviour of predators and prey, and communication and signalling. The information presented and discussed in this unit will reflect the most up-to-date research in each aspect of the field of animal behaviour. Practical sessions are closely aligned with the lecture material and will foster the development of key skills by providing hands-on experience of experimental design, data collection and analysis.
Textbooks
Davies, Krebs, West: An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3055 Field Studies in Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Pauline Ross Session: Intensive January Classes: Intensive field work format. Prerequisites: Completion of 96cp of units of study Assessment: Reflective journal and 500 word summary, 2 x Scientific reports, presentation, exam Practical field work: Pratical work over 2 week intensive Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Our planet is undergoing significant change and the marine environments are arguably the most critical for supporting life. Both tropical reef and estuarine environments are visibly deteriorating in ways we still poorly understand. This unit is a unique opportunity for you to explore and document these environments in the relatively pristine locations of the southern Great Barrier Reef. You will work together with world-class scientists to document how the reef, tropical rainforests and mangroves are being impacted by human and climatological activity. Experts will teach you how to monitor, sample and record a broad variety of physical and physiological environmental parameters and you will gather your own unique sets of data. You will also use cutting edge methods to capture and document your research sites using tools such as 360 and normal video and photography to capture the environment (both above and below the water) as well as UV photography to capture the natural fluorescent beauty of the plants and animals. You will learn creative ways to visualize your data. At the completion of the unit you will create both a scientific report and a multimedia communication piece that explain your findings. This unit will give you new tools and skills to observe, capture and explain exciting marine environments and provide you with a strong foundation for further careers in marine biology and ecology.
ENVX3001 Environmental GIS

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bradley Evans Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three-day field trip, (two lectures and two practicals per week) Prerequisites: 6cp from (ENVI1003 or AGEN1002) or 6cp from GEOS1XXX or 6cp from BIOL1XXX or GEOS2X11 Assessment: 15-minute presentation (10%), 3500 word prac report (35%), 1500 word report on trip excursion (15%), 2-hour exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit is designed to impart knowledge and skills in spatial analysis and geographical information science (GISc) for decision-making in an environmental context. The lecture material will present several themes: principles of GISc, geospatial data sources and acquisition methods, processing of geospatial data and spatial statistics. Practical exercises will focus on learning geographical information systems (GIS) and how to apply them to land resource assessment, including digital terrain modelling, land-cover assessment, sub-catchment modelling, ecological applications, and soil quality assessment for decisions regarding sustainable land use and management. A three day field excursion during the mid-semester break will involve a day of GPS fieldwork at Arthursleigh University farm and two days in Canberra visiting various government agencies which research and maintain GIS coverages for Australia. By the end of this UoS, students should be able to: differentiate between spatial data and spatial information; source geospatial data from government and private agencies; apply conceptual models of spatial phenomena for practical decision-making in an environmental context; apply critical analysis of situations to apply the concepts of spatial analysis to solving environmental and land resource problems; communicate effectively results of GIS investigations through various means- oral, written and essay formats; and use a major GIS software package such as ArcGIS.
Textbooks
Burrough, P.A. and McDonnell, R.A. 1998. Principles of Geographic Information Systems. Oxford University Press: Oxford.
ENVX3002 Statistics in the Natural Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Thomson Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2-hour workshop per week, one 3-hour computer practical per week Prerequisites: ENVX2001 or BIOM2001 or STAT2X12 or BIOL2X22 or DATA2002 or QBIO2001 Assessment: One computer-based exam during the exam period (50%), assessment tasks focusing on analysing and interpreting real datasets (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Interdisciplinary Unit
This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the analysis of data they may face in their future careers, in particular data that are not well behaved. The data may be non-normal, there may be missing observations, they may be correlated in space and time or too numerous to analyse with standard models. The unit is presented in an applied context with an emphasis on correctly analysing authentic datasets, and interpreting the output. It begins with the analysis and design experiments based on the general linear model. In the second part, students will learn about the generalisation of the general linear model to accommodate non-normal data with a particular emphasis on the binomial and Poisson distributions. In the third part linear mixed models will be introduced which provide the means to analyse datasets that do not meet the assumptions of independent and equal errors, for example data that is correlated in space and time. The units ends with an introduction to machine learning and predictive modelling. A key feature of the unit is using R to develop coding skills that are become essential in science for processing and analysing datasets of ever increasing size.
ENVX3003 Hydrological Monitoring and Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Willem Vervoort Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2hrs/week, computer practical 3hrs/wk Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Prohibitions: LWSC3007 Assumed knowledge: SOIL2005 or GEOS2116 or ENVI1003 or GEOS1001 or ENSC2001 Assessment: Three individual assignments (25%), group based field report (25%), 2 hr final exam (50%). Practical field work: 3 days fieldwork near Cootamundra Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Globally, and in Australia in particular, water quantity and quality problems are growing due to increasing human use and a changing climate. In this unit, you will engage with field-based and quantitative problems related to water quantity and quality. This includes a multi-day field trip to regional NSW to collect samples and engage with field-based activities. During these activities, you will develop field-based skills for collection of hydrological data. The data will be used later in the unit to analyse and map the water quantity and quality issues in the catchment, relating this to landscape, management and climate. The second part of the unit focusses on developing an insight into model building, model calibration, validation and sensitivity analysis. It links back to the field experience by using long-term data collected by previous student cohorts and focussing on the identified landscape issues. This part of the study will allow you to directly engage with numerical approaches in prediction and forecasting in landscape hydrological models. The unit of study is specifically designed to extend your field hydrological knowledge and to strengthen your analytical and numerical skills in this area.
FOOD3001 Food Processing and Value Adding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week (4 replaced by tutorials); practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Prohibitions: AGEN3004 Assumed knowledge: 6cp of (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of CHEM1XXX Assessment: Structure and food quality lab report (10%), QC investigation lab report (20%), Processingcase study report (20%), Processing case study presentation (10%), Final exam(40%) Practical field work: A few optional site visits Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: This unit needs to be available as a non-award course so that students seeking admission to the MND have an option to fulfil the 6 cp Food Science prerequisite, if their previous study does not fulfil theis requirement already.
All of the food that we produce and consume is processed in some way. The manufacture of composite food products, which have distinct properties to their constituent ingredients, requires a complex series of processing operations. However, even ready-to-eat fresh foods undergo processing to facilitate distribution to consumers, maximise shelf-life, and ensure food safety. This unit will examine the biochemical and physicochemical transformations that occur in food materials during processing and how processing parameters affect the fulfilment of food quality, shelf-life, and safety objectives. The unit is divided into modules on (1) processing to modify food structure; (2) processing for preservation; and value-adding, focused on (3) healthier food and (4) fermentation as interesting case studies in food processing. You will learn methods of food analysis and apply a scientific approach to investigating the relationships between food composition, functionality, processing conditions, and end-product properties. By doing this unit, you will develop a sound understanding of the scientific principles underpinning food processing decisions and outcomes. This is well-regarded in the food industry, particularly FMCG and manufacturing, as the ability to systematically characterise, analyse, and troubleshoot processes can be applied to a wide range of industrial situations.
FOOD3002 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Foods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Roberts Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 2x1 hr/week for 13 weeks; pre-lab 1x1 hr/week for 6 weeks; practical class 1x3 hr/week for 6 weeks Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Prohibitions: AGCH3025 or AFNR5102 or AGCH3024 Assumed knowledge: Equivalent to 1st-year Biology plus 2nd-year chemistry/biochemistry: -biology, chemistry, biochemistry -Carbohydrates, proteins (including enzymes), lipids -Principles of cellular metabolism Assessment: 6 x short answer assignment (30%), 3 x lab reports (15%), 2 x short answer lab exercises (10%), video presentation (5%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The molecular basis of foods is a critical aspect of food science. FOOD3002 investigates the (bio)chemical properties of food constituents, as well as the interactions between these constituents during food processing, storage, cooking and digestion. You will develop an understanding of the relationship between form and functionality of food constituents and the concept of quality in converting agricultural products into foods. You will gain an appreciation of the relationship between chemical composition and properties of macro-constituents (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids) and micro-constituents (vitamins, minerals, flavour and antinutritional chemicals) and their functions in plant- and animal-based foods. FOOD3002 will enable you to develop research and inquiry skills and an analytical approach to understand the (bio)chemistry of foods and food processing. You will gain experience in laboratory techniques used in industry and research for the analysis of a range of food products, as well as developing information literacy and communication skills, through the preparation of written and in-lab assignments, practical reports and the creation of a short video. On completing this unit, you will be able to describe the (bio)chemical properties of food constituents and demonstrate an understanding of the functionality of these constituents in food processing and nutrition.
GEGE3004 Computational Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Claire Wade Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 hours per week, Practical 3hours per week during standard semester. Prerequisites: 6cp of (GEGE2X01 or QBIO2XXX or DATA2X01 or GENE2XXX or MBLG2X72 or ENVX2001 or DATA2X02) Prohibitions: ANSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Genetics at 2000 level, Biology at 1000 level, algebra Assessment: The assessment will consist of one intra-semester examination (20%), group work assignment (30%)[ including assessment both of a project report (20%) and the team process (10%)], individual assignment (10%) and final examination (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening Faculty: Science
Note: This unit must be taken by all students in the Genetics and Genomics major.
The average mammalian genome is 3 billion nucleotides long and some other organisms have genomes that are even larger. Working with DNA at the nucleotide level on an organismal scale is impossible without the assistance of high performance computing. This unit will investigate strategies to manipulate genomic data on a whole organism scale. You will learn how scientists use high performance computing and web-based resources to compare and assemble genomes, map genes that cause specific phenotypes, and uncover mutations that cause phenotypic changes in organisms that influence health, external characteristics, production and disease. By doing this unit you will develop skills in the analysis of big data, you will gain familiarity with high performance computing worktop environments and learn to use bioinformatics tools that are commonly applied in research.
HORT3005 Production Horticulture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 3-hour practical/workshop per week Prerequisites: 72cp of 1000-3000 level units Assessment: One 3-hour exam (55%), three assignments (45%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study covers topics on the production of high quality food from perennial fruit crops, wine grapes, vegetables. It also covers the key aspects of the postharvest handling and quality assurance of fresh produce. At the end of this unit students are expected to have a detailed understanding of these areas of horticultural food production and be able to discuss related literature and the physiological principles underlying the commercial success of these horticultural enterprises. Students will also gain research and enquiry skills through research based practical sessions and assignments.
Textbooks
Recommended reading:
MICR3011 Microbes in Infection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Helen Agus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week. Eight 3-hour practical sessions and three 2-hour clinical tutorials per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404] Prohibitions: MICR3911 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 2-hour exam; Practical (40%): case study: worksheet, lab work, presentation; one quiz; one 1-hour theory of prac exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit is designed to further develop an interest in, and understanding of, medical microbiology from the introduction in Intermediate Microbiology. Through an examination of microbial structure, virulence, body defences and pathogenesis, the process of acquisition and establishment of disease is covered. The unit is divided into three themes: 1. Clinical Microbiology: host defences, infections, virulence mechanisms; 2. Public health microbiology: epidemiology, international public health, transmission, water and food borne outbreaks; 3. Emerging and re-emerging diseases: the impact of societal change with respect to triggering new diseases and causing the re-emergence of past problems, which are illustrated using case studies. The practical component is designed to enhance students' practical skills and to complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Clinical tutorial sessions underpin and investigate the application of the material covered in the practical classes.
Textbooks
Murray PR et al. Medical Microbiology. 8th edition. Mosby. 2016.
MICR3911 Microbes in Infection (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Helen Agus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week including six 1-hour advanced sessions. Eight 3-hour practical sessions and three 2-hour clinical tutorials per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and a mark of 70 or above in (MICR2X22 or MIMI2X02)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 70 or above in BMED2404] Prohibitions: MICR3011 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 1.5-hour exam (45%), one essay, one in-semester exam; Practical (40%): case study: worksheet, lab work, presentation; quiz; one 1-hour theory of prac exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Intermediate Microbiology. This unit is designed to further develop an interest in, and understanding of, medical microbiology from the introduction in Intermediate Microbiology. Through an examination of microbial structure, virulence, body defences and pathogenesis, the process of acquisition and establishment of disease is covered. The unit is divided into three themes: 1. Clinical Microbiology: host defences, infections, virulence mechanisms; 2. Public health microbiology: epidemiology, international public health, transmission, water and food borne outbreaks; 3. Emerging and re-emerging diseases: the impact of societal change with respect to triggering new diseases and causing the re-emergence of past problems, which are illustrated using case studies. The unique aspect of this advanced unit that differentiates it from the mainstream unit is six tutorial style sessions that replace six mainstream lectures in the theme 'Emerging and re-emerging diseases'. These dedicated research-led interactive advanced sessions support self-directed learning and involve discussion around specific topics that will vary from year to year. Nominated research papers and reviews in the topic area will be explored with supported discussion of the relevance to and impact of the work on current thinking around emergence of microbial disease. The focus will be on microbial change that lies critically at the centre of understanding the reasons for the emergence of new diseases and challenges in an era of significant scientific ability to diagnose and treat infection. The practical component is identical to the mainstream unit and is designed to enhance students' practical skills and to complement the lectures. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Clinical tutorial sessions underpin and investigate the application of the material covered in the practical classes.
Textbooks
Murray PR.et al. Medical Microbiology. 8th ed., Mosby, 2016
MICR3032 Cellular and Molecular Microbiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three lectures per week and one 2-hour practical or tutorial per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and MICR2X22] OR (BMED2401 and BMED2404) OR [12cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: MICR3932 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 1-hour exam (mid semester); one 2-hour exam (end of semester); Prac (40%): One 2-hour exam (open book, mid-semester), one oral presentation (end of semester); one in-prac bioinformatics assessment task, one 1.5 hr bioinformatics prac exam (end of semester) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This Unit of Study introduces students to key concepts in cellular and molecular microbiology. The lectures explore areas of microbial evolution, pathogenesis, physiology, ecology, biotechnology and genetics, with each key theme explored with a series of 6 lectures led by an expert in the field. Lectures will be complemented with practical/tutorial sessions that explore recent research in these areas. The first set of practical/tutorial sessions are small-group sessions led by demonstrators, that are focused on critical interpretation of the scientific literature in the area of host-microbe interactions. The focus is on experimental design, and analysis of the raw data. The second set of pracs are bioinformatics labs, which introduce software such as ORF Finder, BLAST, ClustalX, and TreeView and databases such as NCBI-Nucleotide and KEGG; the aim is to figure out the identity, functions, and biotechnological applications of a mystery piece of microbial DNA. It is recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study MICR3042 or MICR3942.
MICR3932 Cellular and Molecular Microbiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three lectures per week and one 2-hour prac/tute per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 70 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [6cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31) and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: MICR3032 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 1-hour theory exam (mid semester); one 2-hour exam (end of semester); Prac (40%): one written assessment task, assessment of website. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study introduces students to key concepts in cellular and molecular microbiology. The lectures explore areas of microbial evolution, pathogenesis, physiology, ecology, biotechnology and genetics, with each key theme explored with a series of 6 lectures led by an expert in the field.The first set of practical/tutorial sessions are small-group sessions led by an academic, which are focused on critical interpretation of the scientific literature in the area of host-microbe interactions. The focus is on evaluating the scientific significance of published papers, and determining the level of experimental support for key conclusions. The second set of prac sessions teaches the creative presentation of science to both fellow scientists and the public by designing a website around an area of interest in microbiology. It is recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study, MICR3042 or MICR3942.
Textbooks
None
MICR3042 Microbiology Research Skills

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dee Carter Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week from week 1-7, one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and MICR2X22] OR (BMED2401 and BMED2404) OR [12cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: MICR3942 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Two 40-min in-semester theory exams (20% each). One 1-hour theory of prac exam (20%). In-lab continuous assessment, two prac reports, one short video presentation (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Research in molecular microbiology is needed to tackle problems in medicine, agriculture, environmental science, and biotechnology. This Unit of Study focuses on developing practical skills and training in experimental approaches and that are essential for laboratory research in molecular microbiology, together with knowledge of the underlying theoretical concepts. We will focus on key areas of modern microbiology including Bioremediation, where micro-organisms are used to break down harmful substrates in the environment; Microbial biotechnology, which explores how microbes can be used as cellular factories to produce useful products; Medical microbiology, where molecular epidemiology is used to track a disease outbreak, and Yeast genetics, where we explore genes and protein interaction networks that cells regulate in their response to antibiotic agents. It is strongly recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study MICR3032 or MICR3932.
MICR3942 Microbiology Research Skills (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dee Carter Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week from Week 1-7. Project work equivalent to 4 hours per week. Research project in an academic microbiology lab, 48 hours total, at times decided between student and supervisor. Research projects will be announced at the start of semester. Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [6cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: MICR3022 or MICR3922 or MICR3042 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Two 40-min in-semester theory of prac exams (20% each). Two reports, presentation of research via short video, supervisor mark based on performance in research project (60%). Practical field work: Research project in an academic microbiology lab, 48 hours total, at times decided between student and supervisor. Research projects will be announced at the start of semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Research in molecular microbiology is needed to tackle problems in medicine, agriculture, environmental science, and biotechnology. This Unit of Study focuses on developing practical skills and training in experimental approaches that are essential for laboratory research in molecular microbiology, together with knowledge of the underlying theoretical concepts. In this Unit the practical component is entirely replaced by a research project undertaken in an academic microbiology lab. The lecture material in MICR3942 focuses on the areas of microbial biotechnology and bioremediation, and the genetic and molecular diversity of medically important eukaryotic microbes. It is strongly recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study, MICR3032 or MICR3932.
NUTM3001 Introductory Nutrition and Metabolism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Wendy Stuart-Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures, one tutorial per week, 1-5hour laboratory/presentation class most weeks Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Assumed knowledge: PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06 Assessment: In semester reports, presentations and quizzes (40%) one 2.5-hour exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Nutrition is a multidisciplinary science that covers the role of food in health and disease. Advances in biomolecular science have increased the focus of nutrition on the metabolic pathways that transform nutrients. This unit of study aims to explore fundamentals in nutritional science to develop an understanding of the core concepts in human nutrition through exploring the role of macro- and micro-nutrients and their interaction across the lifespan, mostly in the healthy individual. The focus will be the biochemical reactions that take place in cells, how these are influenced by different nutrients and what are the implications for the whole body. This unit of study will consider the structure and chemical characteristics of nutrients, their metabolism, and their roles in health and disease. This unit of study will explore how animal models, cell culture techniques and human trials have contributed to advancing nutritional science. Examples from current research will be used to illustrate how nutrients are metabolised, mostly in health, and the expanding scope of research in human nutrition.
Textbooks
Essentials of Human Nutrition 4th Edition, 2012. Edited by Jim Mann and A. Stewart Truswell. Oxford University Press. ISBN: 9780199566341*
VIRO3001 Virology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Newsome Session: Semester 1 Classes: 26 1-hour lectures, seven 4-hour practical classes, one 2-hour tutorial Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from (BCHM2XXX or BCMB2X01 or BIOL2XXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or IMMU2101 or MICR2XXX or PCOL2X0X or PHSI2X0X)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404] Prohibitions: VIRO3901 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems Assessment: Pre-class assessment for practical classes: (5 x 1%), continuous assessment for practical classes: (3 x 2%), project assessment for practical classes: (7%), presentation on virology-themed research literature: (7%), theory of practical exam: (15%) (30 minutes), theory exam (60%) (120 minutes). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Students are strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902. BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Viruses are some of the simplest biological machinery known yet they are also the etiological agents for some of the most important human diseases. New technologies that have revolutionised the discovery of viruses are also revealing a hitherto unappreciated abundance and diversity in the ecosphere, and a wider role in human health and disease. Developing new gene technologies have enabled the use of viruses as therapeutic agents, in novel vaccine approaches, gene delivery and in the treatment of cancer. This unit of study is designed to introduce students who have a basic understanding of molecular biology to the rapidly evolving field of virology. Viral infection in plant and animal cells and bacteria is covered by an examination of virus structure, genomes, gene expression and replication. Building upon these foundations, this unit progresses to examine host-virus interactions, pathogenesis, cell injury, the immune response and the prevention and control of infection and outbreaks. The structure and replication of sub-viral agents: viroids and prions, and their role in disease are also covered. The practical component provides hands-on experience in current diagnostic and research techniques such as molecular biology, cell culture, serological techniques, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses and is designed to enhance the students' practical skills and complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Tutorials cover a range of topical issues and provide a forum for students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills. The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Microbiology within the School of Life and Environmental Sciences with the involvement of the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
VIRO3901 Virology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Newsome Session: Semester 1 Classes: 29 1-hour lectures, seven 4-hour practical classes, four 1-hour tutorials Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2XXX or BCMB2X01 or BIOL2XXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or IMMU2101 or MICR2XXX or PCOL2X0X or PHSI2X0X)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 70 or above in BMED2404] Prohibitions: VIRO3001 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems Assessment: Pre-class assessment for practical classes: (5 x 1%), continuous assessment for practical classes: (3 x 2%), project assessment for practical classes: (7%), individual presentation on virology-themed research literature: (7%), theory of practical exam: (15%) (30 minutes), theory exam: (60%) (120 minutes) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Students are strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902. BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Intermediate Microbiology and is based on VIRO3001 with additional lectures related to the research interests in the Discipline. Consequently, the unit of study content may change from year to year. Viruses are some of the simplest biological machinery known yet they are also the etiological agents for some of the most important human diseases. New technologies that have revolutionised the discovery of viruses are also revealing a hitherto unappreciated abundance and diversity in the ecosphere, and a wider role in human health and disease. Developing new gene technologies have enabled the use of viruses as therapeutic agents, in novle vaccine approaches, gene delivery and in the treatment of cancer. This unit of study is designed to introduce students who have a basic understanding of molecular biology to the rapidly evolving field of virology. Viral infection in plant and animal cells and bacteria is covered by an examination of virus structure, genomes, gene expression and replication. Building upon these foundations, this unit progresses to examine host-virus interactions, pathogenesis, cell injury, the immune response and the prevention and control of infection and outbreaks. The structure and replication of sub-viral agents: viroids and prions, and their role in disease are also covered. The practical component provides hands-on experience in current diagnostic and research techniques such as molecular biology, cell culture, serological techniques, immunofluroescence and immunoblot analyses and is designed to enhance the students' practical skills and complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Advanced lectures cover cutting-edge research in the field of virology in small group discussions and presentations that provide a forum for students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills. The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Microbiology within the School of Life and Environmental Sciences with the involvement of the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
Mathematics and Statistics
1000-level units of study
DATA1001 Foundations of Data Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Qiying Wang Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x2-hr lab/wk Prohibitions: DATA1901 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or MATH1115 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or ECMT1010 or BUSS1020 or STAT1021 or STAT1022 Assessment: RQuizzes (10%); 3 x projects (30%); final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
DATA1001 is a foundational unit in the Data Science major. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. Does mobile phone usage increase the incidence of brain tumours? What is the public's attitude to shark baiting following a fatal attack? Statistics is the science of decision making, essential in every industry and undergirds all research which relies on data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology, DATA1001 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data. It is the prerequisite for DATA2002.
Textbooks
Statistics, (4th Edition), Freedman Pisani Purves (2007)
DATA1901 Foundations of Data Science (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Qiying Wang Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 3 hrs/week + Computer lab 2 hr/week Prohibitions: MATH1905 or ECMT1010 or ENVX2001 or BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or MATH1115 Assumed knowledge: An ATAR of 95 or more Assessment: RQuizzes (10%), Projects (30%), Final Exam (60%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
DATA1901 is an advanced level unit (matching DATA1001) that is foundational to the new major in Data Science. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. Does mobile phone usage increase the incidence of brain tumours? What is the public's attitude to shark baiting following a fatal attack? Statistics is the science of decision making, essential in every industry and undergirds all research which relies on data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology and masterclasses, DATA1901 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data at an advanced level. By completing this unit you will have an excellent foundation for pursuing data science, whether directly through the data science major, or indirectly in whatever field you major in. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the regular unit but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour.
Textbooks
All learning materials will be on Canvas. In addition, the textbook is Statistics (4th Edition) { Freedman, Pisani, and Purves (2007), which is available in 3 forms: 1) E-text $65 (www.wileydirect.com.au/buy/statistics-4th-international-student-edition/), 2) hard copy (Co-op Bookshop), and 3) the Library.
MATH1002 Linear Algebra

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MATH1012 or MATH1014 or MATH1902 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics or MATH1111. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Online quizzes (20%); 4 x assignments (15%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
MATH1002 is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in mathematics and statistics. It is a core unit of study providing three of the twelve credit points required by the Faculty of Science as well as a Junior level requirement in the Faculty of Engineering.
This unit of study introduces vectors and vector algebra, linear algebra including solutions of linear systems, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
Textbooks
Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction, (4th edition), David Poole
MATH1004 Discrete Mathematics

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MATH1904 or MATH1064 or MATH2011 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics or MATH1111. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (5%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
MATH1004 is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in Mathematics.
This unit provides an introduction to fundamental aspects of discrete mathematics, which deals with 'things that come in chunks that can be counted'. It focuses on the enumeration of a set of numbers, viz. Catalan numbers. Topics include sets and functions, counting principles, discrete probability, Boolean expressions, mathematical induction, linear recurrence relations, graphs and trees.
Textbooks
Introduction to Discrete Mathematics, K G Choo and D E Taylor, Addison Wesley Long-man Australia, (1998)
MATH1005 Statistical Thinking with Data

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr lab/wk Prohibitions: MATH1015 or MATH1905 or STAT1021 or STAT1022 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: RQuizzes(10%); projects (25%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
In a data-rich world, global citizens need to problem solve with data, and evidence based decision-making is essential is every field of research and work.
This unit equips you with the foundational statistical thinking to become a critical consumer of data. You will learn to think analytically about data and to evaluate the validity and accuracy of any conclusions drawn. Focusing on statistical literacy, the unit covers foundational statistical concepts, including the design of experiments, exploratory data analysis, sampling and tests of significance.
Textbooks
Statistics, (4th Edition), Freedman Pisani Purves (2007)
MATH1011 Applications of Calculus

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1906 or BIOM1003 or ENVX1001 or MATH1021 or MATH1921 or MATH1931 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Please note: this unit does not normally lead to a major in Mathematics or Statistics or Financial Mathematics and Statistics. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (5%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit is designed for science students who do not intend to undertake higher year mathematics and statistics. It establishes and reinforces the fundamentals of calculus, illustrated where possible with context and applications. Specifically, it demonstrates the use of (differential) calculus in solving optimisation problems and of (integral) calculus in measuring how a system accumulates over time. Topics studied include the fitting of data to various functions, the interpretation and manipulation of periodic functions and the evaluation of commonly occurring summations. Differential calculus is extended to functions of two variables and integration techniques include integration by substitution and the evaluation of integrals of infinite type.
Textbooks
Applications of Calculus (Course Notes for MATH1011)
MATH1013 Mathematical Modelling

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1003 or MATH1903 or MATH1907 or MATH1023 or MATH1923 or MATH1933 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics or a credit or higher in MATH1111. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Please note: this unit does not normally lead to a major in Mathematics or Statistics or Financial Mathematics and Statistics. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (5%); online homework (10%); final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
MATH1013 is designed for science students who do not intend to undertake higher year mathematics and statistics.
In this unit of study students learn how to construct, interpret and solve simple differential equations and recurrence relations. Specific techniques include separation of variables, partial fractions and first and second order linear equations with constant coefficients. Students are also shown how to iteratively improve approximate numerical solutions to equations.
Textbooks
Mathematical Modelling, Leon Poladian, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sydney (2011)
MATH1014 Introduction to Linear Algebra

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MATH1012 or MATH1002 or MATH1902 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics or MATH1111. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Please note: this unit does not normally lead to a major in Mathematics or Statistics or Financial Mathematics and Statistics. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (5%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit is an introduction to Linear Algebra. Topics covered include vectors, systems of linear equations, matrices, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Applications in life and technological sciences are emphasised.
Textbooks
A First Course in Linear Algebra (3rd edition), David Easdown, Pearson Education (2010)
MATH1021 Calculus Of One Variable

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1011 or MATH1901 or MATH1906 or ENVX1001 or MATH1001 or MATH1921 or MATH1931 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 or equivalent. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (5%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates differential calculus and integral calculus of one variable and the diverse applications of this theory. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include complex numbers, functions of a single variable, limits and continuity, differentiation, optimisation, Taylor polynomials, Taylor's Theorem, Taylor series, Riemann sums, and Riemann integrals.
Textbooks
Calculus of One Variable (Course Notes for MATH1021)
MATH1023 Multivariable Calculus and Modelling

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1013 or MATH1903 or MATH1907 or MATH1003 or MATH1923 or MATH1933 Assumed knowledge: MATH1X21, HSC Mathematics Extension 1 or equivalent. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (5%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates multivariable differential calculus and modelling. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include mathematical modelling, first order differential equations, second order differential equations, systems of linear equations, visualisation in 2 and 3 dimensions, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, the gradient vector, and optimisation for functions of more than one variable.
Textbooks
Multivariable Calculus and Modelling (Course Notes for MATH1023)
MATH1064 Discrete Mathematics for Computation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lecture/wk for 13 weeks; 1x1-hr practice class/wk for 13 weeks; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk for 12 wks. Prohibitions: MATH1004 or MATH1904 Assessment: Examination (60%), assignments (10%), quiz (20%), online quizzes (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit introduces students to the language and key methods of the area of Discrete Mathematics. The focus is on mathematical concepts in discrete mathematics and their applications, with an emphasis on computation. For instance, to specify a computational problem precisely one needs to give an abstract formulation using mathematical objects such as sets, functions, relations, orders, and sequences. In order to prove that a proposed solution is correct, one needs to apply the principles of mathematical logic, and to use proof techniques such as induction. To reason about the efficiency of an algorithm, one often needs to estimate the growth of functions or count the size of complex mathematical objects. This unit provides the necessary mathematical background for such applications of discrete mathematics. Students will be introduced to mathematical logic and proof techniques; sets, functions, relations, orders, and sequences; counting and discrete probability; asymptotic growth; and basic graph theory.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook.
MATH1115 Interrogating Data

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Qiying Wang Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2-hr lab/wk Prerequisites: MATH1005 or MATH1015 Prohibitions: STAT1021 or STAT1022 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BUSS1020 or ECMT1010 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 Assessment: LQuizzes (5%); projects (30%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
In a data-rich world, global citizens need to problem solve with data, and evidence based decision-making is essential is every field of research and work. This unit equips you with foundational statistical thinking to interrogate data. Focusing on statistical literacy, the unit covers foundational statistical concepts such as visualising data, the linear regression model, and testing significance using the t and chi-square tests. Based on a flipped learning approach, you will experience most of your learning in weekly collaborative 2 hour labs, supplemented by readings and lectures. Working in teams, you will explore three real data stories across different domains, with associated literature. The combination of MATH1005/1015 and MATH1115 is equivalent to DATA1001, allowing you to pathway to the Data Science, Statistics, or Quantitative Life Sciences majors.
Textbooks
Statistics, (4th edition), Freedman, Pisani and Purves, (2007)
MATH1902 Linear Algebra (Advanced)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MATH1002 or MATH1012 or MATH1014 Assumed knowledge: (HSC Mathematics Extension 2) OR (90 or above in HSC Mathematics Extension 1) or equivalent Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); 4 x assignments (20%); final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in mathematics and statistics. It is a core unit of study providing three of the twelve credit points required by the Faculty of Science as well as a Junior level requirement in the Faculty of Engineering. It parallels the normal unit MATH1002 but goes more deeply into the subject matter and requires more mathematical sophistication.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook
MATH1904 Discrete Mathematics (Advanced)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MATH1004 or MATH1064 or MATH2011 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1. Students who have not completed HSC Extension 1 Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Extension 1 Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (5%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in mathematics. It parallels the normal unit MATH1004 but goes more deeply into the subject matter and requires more mathematical sophistication.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook
MATH1905 Statistical Thinking with Data (Advanced)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MATH1005 or MATH1015 or STAT1021 or STAT1022 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 Assumed knowledge: (HSC Mathematics Extension 2) OR (90 or above in HSC Mathematics Extension 1) or equivalent Assessment: 2 x quizzes (20%); 2 x assignments (10%); final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in mathematics and statistics. It is a core unit of study providing three of the twelve credit points required by the Faculty of Science as well as a Junior level requirement in the Faculty of Engineering. This Advanced level unit of study parallels the normal unit MATH1005 but goes more deeply into the subject matter and requires more mathematical sophistication.
Textbooks
A Primer of Statistics (4th edition), M C Phipps and M P Quine, Prentice Hall, Australia (2001)
MATH1921 Calculus Of One Variable (Advanced)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1001 or MATH1011 or MATH1906 or ENVX1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1021 or MATH1931 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 2 or equivalent. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (20%); 2 x assignments (10%); final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates differential calculus and integral calculus of one variable and the diverse applications of this theory. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include complex numbers, functions of a single variable, limits and continuity, differentiation, optimisation, Taylor polynomials, Taylor's Theorem, Taylor series, Riemann sums, and Riemann integrals. Additional theoretical topics included in this advanced unit include the Intermediate Value Theorem, Rolle's Theorem, and the Mean Value Theorem.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook
MATH1923 Multivariable Calculus and Modelling (Adv)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; and 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1003 or MATH1013 or MATH1907 or MATH1903 or MATH1023 or MATH1933 Assumed knowledge: MATH1X21, HSC Mathematics Extension 2 or equivalent. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (20%); 2 x assignments (10%); final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates multivariable differential calculus and modelling. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include mathematical modelling, first order differential equations, second order differential equations, systems of linear equations, visualisation in 2 and 3 dimensions, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, the gradient vector, and optimisation for functions of more than one variable. Additional topics covered in this advanced unit of study include the use of diagonalisation of matrices to study systems of linear equation and optimisation problems, limits of functions of two or more variables, and the derivative of a function of two or more variables.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook
MATH1931 Calculus Of One Variable (SSP)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; and 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1001 or MATH1011 or MATH1901 or ENVX1001 or MATH1906 or MATH1021 or MATH1921 Assumed knowledge: Band 4 in HSC Mathematics Extension 2 or equivalent. Assessment: Seminar participation (10%); 3 x special assignments (10%); 2 x quizzes (16%); 2 x assignments (8%); final exam (56%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrolment is by invitation only
The Mathematics Special Studies Program is for students with exceptional mathematical aptitude, and requires outstanding performance in past mathematical studies. Students will cover the material of MATH1921 Calculus of One Variable (Adv), and attend a weekly seminar covering special topics on available elsewhere in the Mathematics and Statistics program.
MATH1933 Multivariable Calculus and Modelling (SSP)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; and 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1003 or MATH1903 or MATH1013 or MATH1907 or MATH1023 or MATH1923 Assumed knowledge: MATH1X21, Band 4 in HSC Mathematics Extension 2 or equivalent. Assessment: Seminar participation (10%); 3 x special assignments (10%); 2 x quizzes (16%); 2 x assignments (8%); final exam (56%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrolment is by invitation only.
The Mathematics Special Studies Program is for students with exceptional mathematical aptitude, and requires outstanding performance in past mathematical studies. Students will cover the material of MATH1923 Multivariable Calculus and Modelling (Adv), and attend a weekly seminar covering special topics on available elsewhere in the Mathematics and Statistics program.
2000-level units of study
DATA2002 Data Analytics: Learning from Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jennifer Chan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lecture; 1x2-hr computer laboratory/wk Prerequisites: [DATA1001 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002] or [MATH10X5 and MATH1115] or [MATH10X5 and STAT2011] or [MATH1905 and MATH1XXX (except MATH1XX5)] or [BUSS1020 or ECMT1010 or STAT1021] Prohibitions: STAT2012 or STAT2912 or DATA2902 Assumed knowledge: Basic Linear Algebra and some coding Assessment: Computer practicals (10%), online quizzes (15%), group work assignment and presentation (15%), and final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Technological advances in science, business, engineering have given rise to a proliferation of data from all aspects of our life. Understanding the information presented in these data is critical as it enables informed decision making into many areas including market intelligence and science. DATA2002 is an intermediate unit in statistics and data sciences, focusing on learning data analytic skills for a wide range of problems and data. How should the Australian government measure and report employment and unemployment? Can we tell the difference between decaffeinated and regular coffee ? In this unit, you will learn how to ingest, combine and summarise data from a variety of data models which are typically encountered in data science projects as well as reinforcing your programming skills through experience with a statistical programming language. You will also be exposed to the concept of statistical machine learning and develop the skill to analyse various types of data in order to answer a scientific question. From this unit, you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to embrace data analytic challenges stemming from everyday problems.
DATA2902 Data Analytics: Learning from Data (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jennifer Chan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 3 hrs/week + computer tutorial 2 hr/week Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in any of the following (DATA1001 or DATA1901 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002) or (MATH10X5 and MATH1115) or (MATH10X5 and STAT2011) or (MATH1905 and MATH1XXX [except MATH1XX5]) or (QBUS1020 or ECMT1020 or STAT1021) Prohibitions: STAT2012 or STAT2912 or DATA2002 Assumed knowledge: Basic linear algebra and some coding for example MATH1014 or MATH1002 or MATH1902 and DATA1001 or DATA1901 Assessment: Computer practicals in-class (10%), Online quizzes (15%), Project group work assignment (5%), Project group work presentation (10%), Final exam (60%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Technological advances in science, business, and engineering have given rise to a proliferation of data from all aspects of our life. Understanding the information presented in these data is critical as it enables informed decision making into many areas including market intelligence and science. DATA2902 is an intermediate unit in statistics and data sciences, focusing on learning advanced data analytic skills for a wide range of problems and data. How should the Australian government measure and report employment and unemployment? Can we tell the difference between decaffeinated and regular coffee? In this unit, you will learn how to ingest, combine and summarise data from a variety of data models which are typically encountered in data science projects as well as reinforcing their programming skills through experience with statistical programming language. You will also be exposed to the concept of statistical machine learning and develop the skill to analyse various types of data in order to answer a scientific question. From this unit, you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to embrace data analytic challenges stemming from everyday problems.
MATH2021 Vector Calculus and Differential Equations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr practice class/wk Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1XX2) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) Prohibitions: MATH2921 or MATH2065 or MATH2965 or (MATH2061 and MATH2022) or (MATH2061 and MATH2922) or (MATH2961 and MATH2022) or (MATH2961 and MATH2922) or MATH2067 Assessment: 2 x quizzes (24%); 2 x assignments (16%); final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit opens with topics from vector calculus, including vector-valued functions (parametrised curves and surfaces; vector fields; div, grad and curl; gradient fields and potential functions), line integrals (arc length; work; path-independent integrals and conservative fields; flux across a curve), iterated integrals (double and triple integrals, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; areas, volumes and mass; Green's Theorem), flux integrals (flow through a surface; flux integrals through a surface defined by a function of two variables, through cylinders, spheres and other parametrised surfaces), Gauss' and Stokes' theorems. The unit then moves to topics in solution techniques for ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications. It provides a basic grounding in these techniques to enable students to build on the concepts in their subsequent courses. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series).
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MATH2022 Linear and Abstract Algebra

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr practice class/wk Prerequisites: MATH1XX2 Prohibitions: MATH2922 or MATH2968 or (MATH2061 and MATH2021) or (MATH2061 and MATH2921) or (MATH2961 and MATH2021) or (MATH2961 and MATH2921) Assessment: 3 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (10%); final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Linear and abstract algebra is one of the cornerstones of mathematics and it is at the heart of many applications of mathematics and statistics in the sciences and engineering. This unit investigates and explores properties of linear functions, developing general principles relating to the solution sets of homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear equations, including differential equations. Linear independence is introduced as a way of understanding and solving linear systems of arbitrary dimension. Linear operators on real spaces are investigated, paying particular attention to the geometrical significance of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, extending ideas from first year linear algebra. To better understand symmetry, matrix and permutation groups are introduced and used to motivate the study of abstract group theory.
Textbooks
Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction, (4th edition), David Poole
MATH2023 Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr practice class/wk Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and (MATH1XX2) Prohibitions: MATH2923 or MATH3068 or MATH2962 Assessment: 2 x in-class quizzes (20%); a take-home assignment (10%); and a final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Analysis grew out of calculus, which leads to the study of limits of functions, sequences and series. It is one of the fundamental topics underlying much of mathematics including differential equations, dynamical systems, differential geometry, topology and Fourier analysis. This unit introduces the field of mathematical analysis both with a careful theoretical framework as well as selected applications. It shows the utility of abstract concepts and teaches an understanding and construction of proofs in mathematics. This unit will be useful to students of mathematics, science and engineering and in particular to future school mathematics teachers, because we shall explain why common practices in the use of calculus are correct, and understanding this is important for correct applications and explanations. The unit starts with the foundations of calculus and the real numbers system. It goes on to study the limiting behaviour of sequences and series of real and complex numbers. This leads naturally to the study of functions defined as limits and to the notion of uniform convergence. Returning to the beginnings of calculus and power series expansions leads to complex variable theory: elementary functions of complex variable, the Cauchy integral theorem, Cauchy integral formula, residues and related topics with applications to real integrals.
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MATH2069 Discrete Mathematics and Graph Theory

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour practice class per week. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics units Prohibitions: MATH2011 or MATH2009 or MATH2969 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, assignments, quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit introduces students to several related areas of discrete mathematics, which serve their interests for further study in pure and applied mathematics, computer science and engineering. Topics to be covered in the first part of the unit include recursion and induction, generating functions and recurrences, combinatorics. Topics covered in the second part of the unit include Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, the theory of trees (used in the study of data structures), planar graphs, the study of chromatic polynomials (important in scheduling problems).
MATH2070 Optimisation and Financial Mathematics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Martin Wechslberger Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr computer lab/wk Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1011 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1014 or MATH1X02) Prohibitions: MATH2010 or MATH2033 or MATH2933 or MATH2970 or ECMT3510 Assumed knowledge: MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 Assessment: 1 x2 exam (70%) , 1 x assignments (10%), 1 x quizzes (10%); 1 x computational project (10%). To pass the course at least 50% in the final exam is necessary. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Students may enrol in both MATH2070 and MATH3075 in the same semester
Problems in industry and commerce often involve maximising profits or minimising costs subject to constraints arising from resource limitations. The first part of this unit looks at programming problems and their solution using the simplex algorithm; nonlinear optimisation and the Kuhn Tucker conditions.
The second part of the unit deals with utility theory and modern portfolio theory. Topics covered include: pricing under the principles of expected return and expected utility; mean-variance Markowitz portfolio theory, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, log-optimal portfolios and the Kelly criterion; dynamical programming. Some understanding of probability theory including distributions and expectations is required in this part.
Theory developed in lectures will be complemented by computer laboratory sessions using MATLAB. Minimal computing experience will be required.
MATH2088 Number Theory and Cryptography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour computer laboratory per week. Prerequisites: (MATH1014 or MATH1902 or MATH1902) and (MATH1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1906 or MATH1003 or MATH1903 or MATH1907 or MATH1011 or MATH1021 or MATH1921 or MATH1931 or MATH1013 or MATH1023 or MATH1923 or MATH1933 or MATH1008 or MATH1904 or MATH1064) Prohibitions: MATH2068 or MATH2988 Assessment: 2 hour exam, assignments, quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Cryptography is the branch of mathematics that provides the techniques for confidential exchange of information sent via possibly insecure channels. This unit introduces the tools from elementary number theory that are needed to understand the mathematics underlying the most commonly used modern public key cryptosystems. Topics include the Euclidean Algorithm, Fermat's Little Theorem, the Chinese Remainder Theorem, Mobius Inversion, the RSA Cryptosystem, the Elgamal Cryptosystem and the Diffie-Hellman Protocol. Issues of computational complexity are also discussed.
MATH2916 Working Seminar A (SSP)

Credit points: 3 Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 1 hour seminar per week. Prerequisites: High Distinction average over 12 credit points of Junior Advanced Mathematics Assessment: One 1 hour presentation, 15-20 page essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The main aim of this unit is to develop the students' written and oral presentation skills. The material will consist of a series of connected topics relevant to modern mathematics and statistics. The topics are chosen to suit the students' background and interests, and are not covered by other mathematics or statistics units. The first session will be an introduction on the principles of written and oral presentation of mathematics. Under the supervision and advice of the lecturer(s) in charge, the students present the topics to the other students and the lecturer in a seminar series and a written essay in a manner that reflects the practice of research in mathematics and statistics.
MATH2917 Working Seminar B (SSP)

Credit points: 3 Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1 hour seminar per week. Prerequisites: High Distinction average over 12 credit points of Junior Advanced Mathematics Assessment: One 1 hour presentation, 15-20 page essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The main aim of this unit is to develop the students' written and oral presentation skills. The material will consist of a series of connected topics relevant to modern mathematics and statistics. The topics are chosen to suit the students' background and interests, and are not covered by other mathematics or statistics units. The first session will be an introduction on the principles of written and oral presentation of mathematics. Under the supervision and advice of the lecturer(s) in charge, the students present the topics to the other students and the lecturer in a seminar series and a written essay in a manner that reflects the practice of research in mathematics and statistics.
MATH2921 Vector Calculus and Differential Eqs (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr practice class/wk Prerequisites: [(MATH1921 or MATH1931 or MATH1901 or MATH1906) or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1021 or MATH1001)] and [MATH1902 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002)] and [(MATH1923 or MATH1933 or MATH1903 or MATH1907) or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1023 or MATH1003)] Prohibitions: MATH2021 or MATH2065 or MATH2965 or (MATH2061 and MATH2022) or (MATH2061 and MATH2922) or (MATH2961 and MATH2022) or (MATH2961 and MATH2922) or MATH2067 Assessment: Quizzes (10%), assignments (20%); final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This is the advanced version of MATH2021, with more emphasis on the underlying concepts and mathematical rigour. The vector calculus component of the course will include: parametrised curves and surfaces, vector fields, div, grad and curl, gradient fields and potential functions, lagrange multipliers line integrals, arc length, work, path-independent integrals, and conservative fields, flux across a curve, double and triple integrals, change of variable formulas, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, areas, volumes and mass, flux integrals, and Green's Gauss' and Stokes' theorems. The Differential Equations half of the course will focus on ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications with more complexity and depth. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), series solutions near a regular point, higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, matrix equations and solutions, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, elementary Sturm-Liouville theory, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series). The unit then moves to topics in solution techniques for ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications. It provides a more thorough grounding in these techniques to enable students to build on the concepts in their subsequent courses. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series).
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MATH2922 Linear and Abstract Algebra (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr practice class/wk Prerequisites: MATH1902 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002) Prohibitions: MATH2022 or MATH2968 or (MATH2061 and MATH2021) or (MATH2061 and MATH2921) or (MATH2961 and MATH2021) or (MATH2961 and MATH2921) Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); 2 x assignments (20%); final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Linear and abstract algebra is one of the cornerstones of mathematics and it is at the heart of many applications of mathematics and statistics in the sciences and engineering. This unit is an advanced version of MATH2022, with more emphasis on the underlying concepts and on mathematical rigour. This unit investigates and explores properties of vector spaces, matrices and linear transformations, developing general principles relating to the solution sets of homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear equations, including differential equations. Linear independence is introduced as a way of understanding and solving linear systems of arbitrary dimension. Linear operators on real spaces are investigated, paying particular attention to the geometrical significance of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, extending ideas from first year linear algebra. To better understand symmetry, matrix and permutation groups are introduced and used to motivate the study of abstract groups theory. The unit culminates in studying inner spaces, quadratic forms and normal forms of matrices together with their applications to problems both in mathematics and in the sciences and engineering.
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MATH2923 Analysis (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr practice class and 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: [(MATH1921 or MATH1931 or MATH1901 or MATH1906) or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1021 or MATH1001)] and [MATH1902 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002)] and [(MATH1923 or MATH1933 or MATH1903 or MATH1907) or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1023 or MATH1003)] Prohibitions: MATH2023 or MATH2962 or MATH3068 Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); an assignment (10%); and a final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Analysis grew out of calculus, which leads to the study of limits of functions, sequences and series. It is one of the fundamental topics underlying much of mathematics including differential equations, dynamical systems, differential geometry, topology and Fourier analysis. This advanced unit introduces the field of mathematical analysis both with a careful theoretical frame- work as well as selected applications.This unit will be useful to students with more mathematical maturity who study mathematics, science, or engineering. Starting off with an axiomatic description of the real numbers system, this unit concentrates on the limiting behaviour of sequences and series of real and complex numbers. This leads naturally to the study of functions defined as limits and to the notion of uniform con-vergence. Special attention is given to power series, leading into the theory of analytic functions and complex analysis. Besides a rigourous treatment of many concepts from calculus, you will learn the basic results of complex analysis such as the Cauchy integral theorem, Cauchy integral formula, the residues theorems, leading to useful techniques for evaluating real integrals. By doing this unit, you will develop solid foundations in the more formal aspects of analysis, including knowledge of abstract concepts, how to apply them and the ability to construct proofs in mathematics.
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MATH2969 Discrete Mathematics and Graph Theory Adv

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour practice class per week. Prerequisites: 9 credit points of Junior Mathematics (advanced level or Credit at the normal level) Prohibitions: MATH2011 or MATH2009 or MATH2069 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit will cover the same material as MATH2069 with some extensions and additional topics.
MATH2970 Optimisation and Financial Mathematics Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Martin Wechslberger Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr computer lab/wk (lectures given in common with MATH2070). Prerequisites: [MATH19X1 or MATH1906 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1021 or MATH1001)] and [MATH1902 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002)] Prohibitions: MATH2010 or MATH2033 or MATH2933 or MATH2070 or ECMT3510 Assumed knowledge: MATH19X3 or MATH1907 or a mark of 65 or above in MATH1003 or MATH1023 Assessment: 1 x2-hr exam (70%), 1 x assignment (10%), 1 x quiz (10%); 1 x computational project (10%). To pass the course at least 50% in the final exam is necessary. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Students may enrol in both MATH2970 and MATH3975 in the same semester
The content of this unit of study parallels that of MATH2070, but students enrolled at Advanced level will undertake more advanced problem solving and assessment tasks, and some additional topics may be included.
MATH2988 Number Theory and Cryptography Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Martin Wechslberger Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr computer lab/wk Prerequisites: [MATH19X1 or MATH1906 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1021 or MATH1001)] and [MATH19X3 or MATH1907 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1023 or MATH1003)] and [MATH1902 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002)] Prohibitions: MATH2068 or MATH2088 Assessment: Quiz (10%); 2 x assignments (20%); final 2-hr exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study is an advanced version of MATH2068, sharing the same lectures but with more advanced topics introduced in the tutorials and computer laboratory sessions.
Textbooks
Number Theory and Cryptography, R. Howlett, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sydney, 2018.
STAT2011 Probability and Estimation Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jennifer Chan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr computer lab/wk Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (DATA1X01 or MATH10X5 or MATH1905 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 or BUSS1020) Prohibitions: STAT2911 Assessment: 2 x quizzes (25%); weekly computer practical reports (10%); a 1-hr computer exam in week 13 (15%); and a final 2-hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit provides an introduction to probability, the concept of random variables, special distributions including the Binomial, Hypergeometric, Poisson, Normal, Geometric and Gamma and to statistical estimation. This unit will investigate univariate techniques in data analysis and for the most common statistical distributions that are used to model patterns of variability. You will learn the method of moments and maximum likelihood techniques for fitting statistical distributions to data. The unit will have weekly computer classes where you will learn to use a statistical computing package to perform simulations and carry out computer intensive estimation techniques like the bootstrap method. By doing this unit you will develop your statistical modeling skills and it will prepare you to learn more complicated statistical models.
Textbooks
An Introduction to Mathematical Statistics and Its Applications (5th edition), Chapters 1-5, Larsen and Marx (2012)
STAT2911 Probability and Statistical Models (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jennifer Chan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr computer lab/wk Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and a mark of 65 or greater in (DATA1X01 or MATH10X5 or MATH1905 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 or BUSS1020) Prohibitions: STAT2011 Assessment: 2 x quizzes (10%); 2 x assignments (5%); computer work (5%); weekly computer lab reports (5%); a computer lab exam (10%) and a final 2-hr exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit is essentially an advanced version of STAT2011, with an emphasis on the mathematical techniques used to manipulate random variables and probability models. Common distributions including the Poisson, normal, beta and gamma families as well as the bivariate normal are introduced. Moment generating functions and convolution methods are used to understand the behaviour of sums of random variables. The method of moments and maximum likelihood techniques for fitting statistical distributions to data will be explored. The notions of conditional expectation and prediction will be covered as will be distributions related to the normal: chi^2, t and F. The unit will have weekly computer classes where candidates will learn to use a statistical computing package to perform simulations and carry out computer intensive estimation techniques like the bootstrap method.
Textbooks
Mathematical Statistics and Data Analysis (3rd edition), J A Rice
STAT2912 Statistical Tests (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour computer laboratory per week. Prerequisites: MATH1905 or Credit in MATH1005 or Credit in ECMT1010 or Credit in BUSS1020 Prohibitions: STAT2012 or STAT2004 or DATA2002 Assumed knowledge: STAT2911 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments and/or quizzes, computer practical reports and one computer practical exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit is essentially an advanced version of STAT2012 with an emphasis on both methods and the mathematical derivation of these methods: Tests of hypotheses and confidence intervals, including t-tests, analysis of variance, regression - least squares and robust methods, power of tests, non-parametric methods, non-parametric smoothing, tests for count data, goodness of fit, contingency tables. Graphical methods and diagnostic methods are used throughout with all analyses discussed in the context of computation with real data using an interactive statistical package.
3000-level units of study
DATA3404 Data Science Platforms

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: DATA2001 OR DATA2901 OR ISYS2120 OR INFO2120 OR INFO2820 Prohibitions: INFO3504 OR INFO3404 Assumed knowledge: This unit of study assumes that students have previous knowledge of database structures and of SQL. The prerequisite material is covered in DATA2001 or ISYS2120. Familiarity with a programming language (e.g. Java or C) is also expected. Assessment: through semester assessment (40%), final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study provides a comprehensive overview of the internal mechanisms data science platforms and of systems that manage large data collections. These skills are needed for successful performance tuning and to understand the scalability challenges faced by when processing Big Data. This unit builds upon the second' year DATA2001 - 'Data Science - Big Data and Data Diversity' and correspondingly assumes a sound understanding of SQL and data analysis tasks.
The first part of this subject focuses on mechanisms for large-scale data management. It provides a deep understanding of the internal components of a data management platform. Topics include: physical data organization and disk-based index structures, query processing and optimisation, and database tuning.
The second part focuses on the large-scale management of big data in a distributed architecture. Topics include: distributed and replicated databases, information retrieval, data stream processing, and web-scale data processing.
The unit will be of interest to students seeking an introduction to data management tuning, disk-based data structures and algorithms, and information retrieval. It will be valuable to those pursuing such careers as Software Engineers, Data Engineers, Database Administrators, and Big Data Platform specialists.
DATA3406 Human-in-the-Loop Data Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
MATH3061 Geometry and Topology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Florica Cirstea Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate Mathematics Prohibitions: MATH3001 or MATH3006 Assessment: 1 x Geometry assignment (5%); 1 x Topology assignment (5%); 1 x Geometry quiz (12%); 1 x Topology quiz (12%); 2-hr final exam (66%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The aim of the unit is to expand visual/geometric ways of thinking. The Geometry section is concerned mainly with transformations of the Euclidean plane (that is, bijections from the plane to itself), with a focus on the study of isometries (proving the classification theorem for transformations which preserve distances between points), symmetries (including the classification of frieze groups) and affine transformations (transformations which map lines to lines). The basic approach is via vectors and matrices, emphasising the interplay between geometry and linear algebra. The study of affine transformations is then extended to the study of collineations in the real projective plane, including collineations which map conics to conics. The Topology section considers graphs, surfaces and knots from a combinatorial point of view. Key ideas such as homeomorphism, subdivision, cutting and pasting and the Euler invariant are introduced first for graphs (1-dimensional objects) and then for triangulated surfaces (2-dimensional objects). Topics include the classification of surfaces, map colouring, decomposition of knots and knot invariants.
MATH3063 Nonlinear ODEs with Applications

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Florica Cirstea Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 credit points of MATH2XXX units of study Prohibitions: MATH3963 or MATH4063 Assumed knowledge: MATH2061 or MATH2961 or [MATH2X21 and MATH2X22] Assessment: 3 x assignments (20%); 2 x class tests (20%); final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study is an introduction to the theory of systems of ordinary differential equations. Such systems model many types of phenomena in engineering, biology and the physical sciences. The emphasis will not be on finding explicit solutions, but instead on the qualitative features of these systems, such as stability, instability and oscillatory behaviour. The aim is to develop a good geometrical intuition into the behaviour of solutions to such systems. Some background in linear algebra, and familiarity with concepts such as limits and continuity, will be assumed. The applications in this unit will be drawn from predator-prey systems, transmission of diseases, chemical reactions and other equations and systems from mathematical biology.
MATH3066 Algebra and Logic

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Florica Cirstea Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Intermediate Mathematics Prohibitions: MATH3062 or MATH3065 Assessment: Quiz (10%); 2 x assignments (30%); cognitive, problem-based final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study unifies and extends mathematical ideas and techniques that most participants will have met in their first and second years, and will be of general interest to all students of pure and applied mathematics. It combines algebra and logic to present and answer a number of related questions of fundamental importance in the development of mathematics, from ancient to modern times.
The Propositional and Predicate Calculi are studied as model axiomatic systems in their own right, including proofs of consistency and completeness. The final part of the course introduces precise notions of computability and decidability, through abstract Turing machines, culminating in the unsolvability of the Halting Problem the undecidability of First Order Logic, and a discussion of Godel's Incompleteness Theorem.
Classical and novel arithmetics are introduced, unified and described abstractly using field and ring axioms and the language of field extensions. Quotient rings are introduced, which are used to construct different finite and infinite fields. A construction of the real numbers, by factoring out rings of Cauchy sequences of rationals by the ideal of null sequences, is presented. Axiomatics are placed in the context of reasoning within first order logic and set theory.
MATH3075 Financial Derivatives

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Georg Gottwald Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate Mathematics, including (MATH2070 or MATH2970) Prohibitions: MATH3975 or MATH3015 or MATH3933 Assessment: 2 x assignments (20%); 2-hr final exam (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit will introduce you to the mathematical theory of modern finance with the special emphasis on the valuation and hedging of financial derivatives, such as: forward contracts and options of European and American style. You will learn about the concept of arbitrage and how to model risk-free and risky securities. Topics covered by this unit include: notions of a martingale and a martingale measure, the fundamental theorems of asset pricing, complete and incomplete markets, the binomial options pricing model, discrete random walks and the Brownian motion, the Black-Scholes options pricing model and the valuation and heding of exotic options. Students completing this unit have been highly sought by the finance industry, which continues to need graduates with quantitative skills. Lectures in the mainstream unit are held concurrently with those of the corresponding advanced unit.
MATH3975 Financial Derivatives (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Georg Gottwald Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: Credit average or greater in 12 credit points of Intermediate Mathematics (including MATH2070 or MATH2970) Prohibitions: MATH3933 or MATH3015 or MATH3075 Assessment: 2 x assignments; 2-hr final exam (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit will introduce you to the mathematical theory of modern finance with the special emphasis on the valuation and hedging of financial derivatives, such as: forward contracts and options of European and American style. You will learn about the concept of arbitrage and how to model risk-free and risky securities. Topics covered by this unit include: the notions of a martingale and a martingale measure, the fundamental theorems of asset pricing, complete and incomplete markets, the binomial options pricing model, discrete random walks and the Brownian motion, the Black-Scholes options pricing model and the valuation and heding of exotic options. Students completing this unit have been highly sought by the finance industry, which continues to need graduates with quantitative skills. Students enrolled in this unit at advanced level will have to undertake more challenging assessment tasks, but lectures in the advanced level are held concurrently with those of the corresponding mainstream unit.
MATH3076 Mathematical Computing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Georg Gottwald Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr computer lab/wk Prerequisites: 12 credit points of MATH2XXX and 6 credit points from (MATH1021 or MATH1001 or MATH1023 or MATH1003 or MATH19X1 or MATH19X3 or MATH1906 or MATH1907) Prohibitions: MATH3976 or MATH4076 Assessment: One 3 hour exam (55%), 2 assignments (15%+15%), 1 quiz (15%). To pass the course, students much achieve more than 50% on the final exam. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study provides an introduction to programming and numerical methods. Topics covered include computer arithmetic and computational errors, systems of linear equations, interpolation and approximation, solution of nonlinear equations, quadrature, initial value problems for ordinary differential equations and boundary value problems, and optimisation.
MATH3979 Complex Analysis (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Georg Gottwald Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3 hrs/week; tutorial 1 hr/week Prerequisites: [A mark of 65 or greater in 12cp from (MATH2021 or MATH2921 or MATH2022 or MATH2922 or MATH2023 or MATH2923 or MATH2061 or MATH2961 or MATH2065 or MATH2965 or MATH2962)] Prohibitions: MATH4079 or MATH3964 Assumed knowledge: MATH2023 or MATH2923 or MATH2962 or MATH3068 Assessment: 2 x assessment (30%), final exam worth (70%) (requires pass mark of 50% or more) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit continues the study of functions of a complex variable introduced in the second year unit Analysis (MATH2023/2923). It is aimed at highlighting certain topics from analytic function theory that have wide applications and intrinsic beauty. By learning about the analysis of functions of a complex variable, you will acquire a very important background for mathematical areas such as dynamics, algebraic and differential geometry, and number theory; and advanced theoretical physics such as quantum mechanics, string theory, and quantum field theory. The unit will begin with a revision of properties of complex numbers and complex functions. This will be followed by material on conformal mappings, Riemann surfaces, complex integration, entire and analytic functions, the Riemann mapping theorem, analytic continuation, and Gamma and Zeta functions. Finally, special topics chosen by the lecturer will be presented, which may include elliptic functions, normal families, Julia sets, functions of several complex variables, or complex manifolds. At the end of this unit you will have received a broad introduction and gained a variety of tools to apply them within your further mathematical studies and/or in other disciplines.
MATH3078 PDEs and Waves

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Georg Gottwald Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x 1 hour lectures; 1x1 hour laboratory /wk Prerequisites: 12 credit points of MATH2XXX units of study Prohibitions: MATH3978 or MATH4078 Assumed knowledge: [MATH2X61 and MATH2X65] or [MATH2X21 and MATH2X22] Assessment: One 3 hour exam (70%), 2 assignments (15%+15%). To pass the course, students much achieve more than 50% on the final exam. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study introduces Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problems and their role in finding solutions to boundary value problems. Analytical solutions of linear PDEs are found using separation of variables and integral transform methods. Three of the most important equations of mathematical physics - the wave equation, the diffusion (heat) equation and Laplace's equation - are treated, together with a range of applications. There is particular emphasis on wave phenomena, with an introduction to the theory of nonlinear waves, dimensional analysis, symmetry.
STAT3021 Stochastic Processes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Ormerod Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 lectures per week, tutorial 1hr per week. Prerequisites: STAT2X11 and (MATH1003 or MATH1903 or MATH1907 or MATH1023 or MATH1923 or MATH1933) Prohibitions: STAT3911 or STAT3011 Assessment: 2 x Quiz (2 x 15%), 2 x Assignment (2 x 5%), Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
A stochastic process is a mathematical model of time-dependent random phenomena and is employed in numerous fields of application, including economics, finance, insurance, physics, biology, chemistry and computer science. After setting up basic elements of stochastic processes, such as time, state, increments, stationarity and Markovian property, this unit develops important properties and limit theorems of discrete-time Markov chain and branching processes. You will then establish key results for the Poisson process and continuous-time Markov chains, such as the memoryless property, super positioning, thinning, Kolmogorov's equations and limiting probabilities. Various illustrative examples are provided throughout the unit to demonstrate how stochastic processes can be applied in modeling and analyzing problems of practical interest. By completing this unit, you will develop the essential basis for further studies, such as stochastic calculus, stochastic differential equations, stochastic control and financial mathematics.
STAT3022 Applied Linear Models

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Ormerod Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour computer laboratories per week. Prerequisites: STAT2X11 and (DATA2X02 or STAT2X12) Prohibitions: STAT3912 or STAT3012 or STAT3922 Assessment: 2 x assignment (15%), 3 x quizzes (30%), final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
In today's data-rich world more and more people from diverse fields are needing to perform statistical analyses and indeed more and more tools for doing so are becoming available; it is relatively easy to point and click and obtain some statistical analysis of your data. But how do you know if any particular analysis is indeed appropriate? Is there another procedure or workflow which would be more suitable? Is there such thing as a best possible approach in a given situation? All of these questions (and more) are addressed in this unit. You will study the foundational core of modern statistical inference, including classical and cutting-edge theory and methods of mathematical statistics with a particular focus on various notions of optimality. The first part of the unit covers various aspects of distribution theory which are necessary for the second part which deals with optimal procedures in estimation and testing. The framework of statistical decision theory is used to unify many of the concepts. You will apply the theory to various real-world problems using statistical software in laboratory sessions. By completing this unit you will develop the necessary skills to confidently choose the best statistical analysis to use in many situations.
STAT3922 Applied Linear Models (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Ormerod Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour computer laboratory per week. Prerequisites: STAT2X11 and [a mark of 65 or greater in (STAT2X12 or DATA2X02)] Prohibitions: STAT3912 or STAT3012 or STAT3022 Assessment: 2 x assignment (10%), 3 x quizzes (35%), final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit will introduce the fundamental concepts of analysis of data from both observational studies and experimental designs using classical linear methods, together with concepts of collection of data and design of experiments. You will first consider linear models and regression methods with diagnostics for checking appropriateness of models, looking briefly at robust regression methods. Then you will consider the design and analysis of experiments considering notions of replication, randomization and ideas of factorial designs. Throughout the course you will use the R statistical package to give analyses and graphical displays. This unit is essentially an Advanced version of STAT3012, with additional emphasis on the mathematical techniques underlying applied linear models together with proofs of distribution theory based on vector space methods.
STAT3023 Statistical Inference

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Ormerod Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour computer laboratory per week. Prerequisites: STAT2X11 Prohibitions: STAT3913 or STAT3013 or STAT3923 Assumed knowledge: DATA2X02 or STAT2X12 Assessment: 2 x Quizzes (25%), Computer Lab Report (10%), Computer Exam (10%), Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
In today's data-rich world more and more people from diverse fields are needing to perform statistical analyses and indeed more and more tools for doing so are becoming available; it is relatively easy to point and click and obtain some statistical analysis of your data. But how do you know if any particular analysis is indeed appropriate? Is there another procedure or workflow which would be more suitable? Is there such a thing as the best possible approach in a given situation? All of these questions (and more) are addressed in this unit. You will study the foundational core of modern statistical inference, including classical and cutting-edge theory and methods of mathematical statistics with a particular focus on various notions of optimality. The first part of the unit covers various aspects of distribution theory which are necessary for the second part which deals with optimal procedures in estimation and testing. The framework of statistical decision theory is used to unify many of the concepts. You will apply the methods learnt to real-world problems in laboratory sessions. By completing this unit you will develop the necessary skills to confidently choose the best statistical analysis to use in many situations.
STAT3923 Statistical Inference (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Ormerod Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 2 hour advanced workshop. Prerequisites: STAT2X11 and a mark of 65 or greater in (DATA2X02 or STAT2X12) Prohibitions: STAT3913 or STAT3013 or STAT3023 Assessment: 2 x Quizzes (20%), weekly homework (5%), Computer Lab Reports (10%), Computer Exam (10%), Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
In today's data-rich world more and more people from diverse fields are needing to perform statistical analyses and indeed more and more tools for doing so are becoming available; it is relatively easy to point and click and obtain some statistical analysis of your data. But how do you know if any particular analysis is indeed appropriate? Is there another procedure or workflow which would be more suitable? Is there such thing as a best possible approach in a given situation? All of these questions (and more) are addressed in this unit. You will study the foundational core of modern statistical inference, including classical and cutting-edge theory and methods of mathematical statistics with a particular focus on various notions of optimality. The first part of the unit covers various aspects of distribution theory which are necessary for the second part which deals with optimal procedures in estimation and testing. The framework of statistical decision theory is used to unify many of the concepts. You will rigorously prove key results and apply these to real-world problems in laboratory sessions. By completing this unit you will develop the necessary skills to confidently choose the best statistical analysis to use in many situations.
4000-level units of study
MATH4061 Metric Spaces

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Florica Cirstea Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or greater in 12cp from the following units (MATH3061 orMATH3066 or MATH3063 or MATH3076 or MATH3078 or MATH3962 or MATH3963 or MATH3968 or MATH3969 or MATH3971 or MATH3974 or MATH3976 or MATH3977 or MATH3978 or MATH3979) Prohibitions: MATH3961 Assumed knowledge: MATH2023 or MATH2923 or MATH2962 or MATH3068 Assessment: Quiz (10%), two assignments (2 x 10%) and a final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
At the end of this unit you will have received a broad introduction and gained a variety of tools to apply them within your further mathematical studies and/or in other disciplines.
MATH4062 Rings, Fields and Galois Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Florica Cirstea Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 lectures 3 hrs/week; 1 tutorial 1 hr/week Prerequisites: (MATH2922 or MATH2961) or a mark of 65 or greater in (MATH2022 or MATH2061) or 12cp from (MATH3061 or MATH3066 or MATH3063 or MATH3076 or MATH3078 or MATH3962 or MATH3963 or MATH3968 or MATH3969 or MATH3971 or MATH3974 or MATH3976 or MATH3977 or MATH3978 or MATH3979) Prohibitions: MATH3062 or MATH3962 Assumed knowledge: MATH2922 or MATH2961 Assessment: 4 x homework assignments (4 x 5%), tutorial participation (10%), final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study lies at the heart of modern algebra. In the unit we investigate the mathematical theory that was originally developed for the purpose of studying polynomial equations. In a nutshell, the philosophy is that it should be possible to completely factorise any polynomial into a product of linear factors by working over a large enough field (such as the field of all complex numbers). Viewed like this, the problem of solving polynomial equations leads naturally to the problem of understanding extensions of fields. This in turn leads into the area of mathematics known as Galois theory. The basic theoretical tool needed for this program is the concept of a ring, which generalises the concept of a field. The course begins with examples of rings, and associated concepts such as subrings, ring homomorphisms, ideals and quotient rings. These tools are then applied to study quotient rings of polynomial rings. The final part of the course deals with the basics of Galois theory, which gives a way of understanding field extensions. Along the way you will see some beautiful gems of mathematics, including Fermat's Theorem on primes expressible as a sum of two squares, solutions to the ancient greek problems of trisecting the angle, squaring the circle, and doubling the cube, and the crown of the course: Galois' proof that there is no analogue of the quadratic formula for the general quintic equation. On completing this unit of study you will have obtained a deep understanding of modern abstract algebra.
MATH4063 Dynamical Systems and Applications

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Georg Gottwald Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures, one tutorial per week Prerequisites: (A mark of 65 or greater in 12cp of MATH2XXX units of study) or [12cp from (MATH3061 or MATH3066 or MATH3076 or MATH3078 or MATH3961 or MATH3962 or MATH3968 or MATH3969 or MATH3971 or MATH3974 or MATH3976 or MATH3977 or MATH3978 or MATH3979)] Assumed knowledge: MATH2061 or MATH2961 or (MATH2X21 and MATH2X22) Assessment: Midterm exam (25%), two assignments (20% in total), final exam (55%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The theory of ordinary differential equations is a classical topic going back to Newton and Leibniz. It comprises a vast number of ideas and methods. The theory has many applications and stimulates new developments in almost all areas of mathematics. The emphasis is on qualitative analysis including phase-plane methods, bifurcation theory and the study of limit cycles. The more theoretical part includes existence and uniqueness theorems, linearisation, and analysis of asymptotic behaviour. The applications in this unit will be drawn from predator-prey systems, population models, chemical reactions, and other equations and systems from mathematical biology. You will learn how to use ordinary differential equations to model biological, chemical, physical and/or economic systems and how to use different methods from dynamical systems theory and the theory of nonlinear ordinary differential equations to find the qualitative outcome of the models. By doing this unit you will develop skills in using and analyzing nonlinear differential equations which will prepare you for further studies in mathematics, systems biology or physics or for careers in mathematical modelling.
MATH4068 Differential Geometry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Florica Cirstea Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (A mark of 65 or greater in 12cp of MATH2XXX units of study) or [12cp from (MATH3061 or MATH3066 or MATH3063 or MATH3076 or MATH3078 or MATH3961 or MATH3962 or MATH3963 or MATH3969 or MATH3971 or MATH3974 or MATH3976 or MATH3977 or MATH3978 or MATH3979)] Prohibitions: MATH3968 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2921 and MATH2922) or MATH2961 Assessment: The grade is determined by student works throughout the semester, including Quiz 1 (10%), Assignment 1 (15%), Assignment 2 (15%), and Exam (60%). Moreover, to provide flexibility, the final grade is taken as the maximum between the above calculated score and the score of the exam out of 100. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit is an introduction to Differential Geometry, one of the core pillars of modern mathematics. Using ideas from calculus of several variables, we develop the mathematical theory of geometrical objects such as curves, surfaces and their higher-dimensional analogues. For students, this provides is the first taste of the investigation on the deep relation between geometry and topology of mathematical objects, highlighted in the classic Gauss-Bonnet Theorem. Differential geometry also plays an important part in both classical and modern theoretical physics. The course aims to develop geometrical ideas such as curvature in the context of curves and surfaces in space, leading to the famous Gauss-Bonnet formula relating the curvature and topology of a surface. A second aim is to remind the students about all the content covered in the mathematical units for previous years, most importantly the key ideas in vector calculus, along with some applications. It also helps to prepare the students for honours courses like Riemannian Geometry. By doing this unit you will further appreciate the beauty of mathematics which is originated from the need in solving practical problems / develop skills in understanding the geometry of the surrounding environment / prepare yourself for future study or the workplace by developing advanced critical thinking skills / gain a deep understanding of the underlying rules of the Universe.
MATH4069 Measure Theory and Fourier Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Florica Cirstea Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorials per week. Prerequisites: (A mark of 65 or greater in 12cp of MATH2XXX units of study) or [12cp from the following units (MATH3061 or MATH3066 or MATH3063 or MATH3076 or MATH3078 or MATH3961 or MATH3962 or MATH3963 or MATH3969 or MATH3971 or MATH3974 or MATH3976 or MATH3977 or MATH3978 or MATH3979)] Prohibitions: MATH3969 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2921 and MATH2922) or MATH2961 Assessment: 2 x quiz (20%), 2 x written assignment (20%), final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Measure theory is the study of fundamental ideas as length, area, volume, arc length and surface area. It is the basis for Lebesgue integration theory used in advanced mathematics ever since its development in about 1900. Measure theory is also a key foundation for modern probability theory. The course starts by establishing the basics of measure theory and the theory of Lebesgue integration, including important results such as Fubini's Theorem and the Dominated Convergence Theorem which allow us to manipulate integrals. These ideas are applied to Fourier Analysis which leads to results such as the Inversion Formula and Plancherel's Theorem. The Radon-Nikodyn Theorem provides a representation of measures in terms of a density. Key ideas of this theory are applied in detail to probability theory to provide a rigorous framework for probability which takes in and generalizes familiar ideas such as distributions and conditional expectation. When you complete this unit you will have acquired a new generalized way of thinking about key mathematical concepts such as length, area, integration and probability. This will give you a powerful set of intellectual tools and equip you for further study in mathematics and probability.
MATH4071 Convex Analysis and Optimal Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Georg Gottwald Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3hours/week, tutorial 1hr/week Prerequisites: [A mark of 65 or greater in 12cp from (MATH2070 or MATH2970 or STAT2011 or STAT2911 or MATH2021 or MATH2921 or MATH2022 or MATH2922 or MATH2023 or MATH2923 or MATH2061 or MATH2961 or MATH2065 or MATH2965 or MATH2962 or STAT2012 or STAT2912 or DATA2002 or DATA2902) or [12 cp from (MATH3075 or MATH3975 or STAT3021 or STAT3011 or STAT3911 or STAT3888 or STAT3014 or STAT3914 or MATH3063 or MATH3963 or MATH3061 or MATH3961 or MATH3962 or MATH3963 or MATH3968 or MATH3969 or MATH3971 or MATH3974 or MATH3976 or MATH3977 or MATH3978 or MATH3979)] Prohibitions: MATH3971 Assumed knowledge: MATH2X21 and MATH2X23 and STAT2X11 Assessment: Assignment (15%), assignment (15%), exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The questions how to maximise your gain (or to minimise the cost) and how to determine the optimal strategy/policy are fundamental for an engineer, an economist, a doctor designing a cancer therapy, or a government planning some social policies. Many problems in mechanics, physics, neuroscience and biology can be formulated as optimisation problems. Therefore, optimisation theory is an indispensable tool for an applied mathematician. Optimisation theory has many diverse applications and requires a wide range of tools but there are only a few ideas underpinning all this diversity of methods and applications. This course will focus on two of them. We will learn how the concept of convexity and the concept of dynamic programming provide a unified approach to a large number of seemingly unrelated problems. By completing this unit you will learn how to formulate optimisation problems that arise in science, economics and engineering and to use the concepts of convexity and the dynamic programming principle to solve straightforward examples of such problems. You will also learn about important classes of optimisation problems arising in finance, economics, engineering and insurance.
MATH4074 Fluid Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Georg Gottwald Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (A mark of 65 or greater in 12cp of MATH2XXX units of study) or [12cp from (MATH3061 orMATH3066 or MATH3063 or MATH3076 or MATH3078 or or MATH3961 or MATH3962 or MATH3963 or MATH3969 or MATH3971 or MATH3974 or MATH3976 or MATH3977 or MATH3978 or MATH3979)] Prohibitions: MATH3974 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2961 and MATH2965) or (MATH2921 and MATH2922) Assessment: Assignment 1 (10%), Assignment 2 (10%), Assignment 3 (10%), Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Fluid Mechanics is the study of systems which allow for a macroscopic description in some continuum limit. It is not limited to the study of liquids such as water but includes our atmosphere and even car traffic. Whether a system can be treated as a fluid, depends on the spatial scales involved. Fluid mechanics presents a cornerstone of applied mathematics and comprises a whole gamut of different mathematical techniques, depending on the question we ask of the system under consideration. The course will discuss applications from engineering, physics and mathematics. ò How and in what situations a system which is not necessarily liquid can be described as a fluid ò The link between an Eulerian description of a fluid and a Lagrangian description of a fluid ò The basic variables used to describe flows; the need for continuity, momentum and energy equations; simple forms of these equations; geometric and physical simplifying assumptions; streamlines and stream functions; incompressibility and irrotationality; simple examples of irrotational flows. By the end of this unit, students will have received a basic understanding into fluid mechanics and have acquired general methodology which they can apply in their further studies in mathematics and/or in their chosen discipline.
MATH4076 Computational Mathematics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Georg Gottwald Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: (A mark of 65 or greater in 12cp of MATH2XXX units of study) or [12cp from (MATH3061 or MATH3066 or MATH3063 or MATH3078 or or MATH3961 or MATH3962 or MATH3963 or MATH3969 or MATH3971 or MATH3974 or MATH3977 or MATH3978 or MATH3979)] Assumed knowledge: (MATH2X21 and MATH2X22) or (MATH2X61 and MATH2X65) Assessment: Quiz (15%), Assignment (15%), Assignment (15%), Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Sophisticated mathematics and numerical programming underlie many computer applications, including weather forecasting, computer security, video games, and computer aided design. This unit of study provides a strong foundational introduction to modern interactive programming, computational algorithms, and numerical analysis. Topics covered include: (I) basics ingredients of programming languages such as syntax, data structures, control structures, memory management and visualisation; (II) basic algorithmic concepts including binary and decimal representations, iteration, linear operations, sources of error, divide-and-concur, algorithmic complexity; and (III) basic numerical schemes for rootfinding, integration/differentiation, differential equations, fast Fourier transforms, Monte Carlo methods, data fitting, discrete and continuous optimisation. You will also learn about the philosophical underpinning of computational mathematics including the emergence of complex behaviour from simple rules, undecidability, modelling the physical world, and the joys of experimental mathematics. When you complete this unit you will have a clear and comprehensive understanding of the building blocks of modern computational methods and the ability to start combining them together in different ways. Mathematics and computing are like cooking. Fundamentally, all you have is sugar, fat, salt, heat, stirring, chopping. But becoming a good chef requires knowing just how to put things together in creative ways that work. In previous study, you should have learned to cook. Now you're going to learn how to make something someone else might want to pay for more than one time.
MATH4077 Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Georg Gottwald Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (A mark of 65 or greater in 12cp of MATH2XXX units of study) or [12cp from (MATH3061 orMATH3066 or MATH3063 or MATH3076 or MATH3078 or MATH3961 or MATH3962 or MATH3963 or MATH3968 or MATH3969 or MATH3971 or MATH3974 or MATH3976 or MATH3978 or MATH3979)] Prohibitions: MATH3977 Assumed knowledge: 6cp of 1000 level calculus units and 3cp of 1000 level linear algebra and (MATH2X21 or MATH2X61) Assessment: One 2 hour exam (70%), two mid-term quizzes (10% each) and one assignment (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics are a reformulation of classical Newtonian mechanics into a mathematically sophisticated framework that can be applied in many different coordinate systems. This formulation generalises elegantly to modern theories of relativity and quantum mechanics. The unit develops dynamics from the Principle of Least Action using the calculus of variations. Emphasis is placed on the relation between the symmetry and invariance properties of the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian functions and conservation laws. Coordinate and canonical transformations are introduced to make apparently complicated dynamical problems appear simpler. In this unit you will also explore connections between geometry and different physical theories beyond classical mechanics. You will be expected to solve fully dynamical systems of some complexity including planetary motion and to investigate stability using perturbation analysis. You will use Hamilton-Jacobi theory to solve problems ranging from geodesic motion (shortest path between two points) on curved surfaces to relativistic motion in the vicinity of black holes. This unit is a useful preparation for units in dynamical systems and chaos, and complements units in differential equations, quantum theory and general relativity.
MATH4078 PDEs and Applications

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Georg Gottwald Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 lectures 1 hr/week; tutorial 1 hr/week Prerequisites: (A mark of 65 or greater in 12cp of 2000 level units) or [12cp from (MATH3061 or MATH3066 or MATH3063 or MATH3076 or MATH3961 or MATH3962 or MATH3963 or MATH3968 or MATH3969 or MATH3971 or MATH3974 or MATH3976 or MATH3977 or MATH3979)] Prohibitions: MATH3078 or MATH3978 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2X61 and MATH2X65) or (MATH2X21 and MATH2X22) Assessment: Quiz (15%), Assignment (15%), Assignment (15%), Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Partial differential equations (PDEs) describe rates of change with respect to more than one variable, for example in both space and time or in two spatial directions. PDEs are powerful tools, used in a vast number of different applications, and of deep intrinsic mathematical interest. This unit will show you how to formulate and analyse PDEs in many different contexts. Many classical examples come naturally from physics, chemistry, and biology. But many more examples exist in areas, such as economics, finance, population dynamics, image analysis, and even the study of mathematics itself. Formulating and analysing PDEs was, for example, critical in proving the Poincare conjecture; a pure mathematical statement about the topology of spheres. This unit will teach you the tricks of the trade for modelling important systems with PDEs. You will learn both the technical skills needed to solve a challenging system of equations; and the insight needed to understand the meaning behind the mathematical expressions that result from solutions and formulations. When you complete this unit you will have a thorough foundational knowledge of classical PDE theory and application and be equipped for further study of research that uses PDE or for employment in scientific areas that use applications of PDEs.
MATH4079 Complex Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Georg Gottwald Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3 hrs/week; tutorial 1 hr/week Prerequisites: (A mark of 65 or greater in 12cp of MATH2XXX units of study) or [12cp from the following units (MATH3061 or MATH3066 or MATH3063 or MATH3076 or MATH3078 or MATH3961 or MATH3962 or MATH3963 or MATH3968 or MATH3969 or MATH3971 or MATH3974 or MATH3976 or MATH3977 or MATH3978)] Prohibitions: MATH3979 or MATH3964 Assumed knowledge: MATH2X23 Assessment: 2 x assessment (30%), final exam worth (70%) (requires pass mark of 50% or more) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The unit will begin with a revision of properties of complex numbers and complex functions. This will be followed by material on conformal mappings, Riemann surfaces, complex integration, entire and analytic functions, the Riemann mapping theorem, analytic continuation, and Gamma and Zeta functions. Finally, special topics chosen by the lecturer will be presented, which may include elliptic functions, normal families, Julia sets, functions of several complex variables, or complex manifolds.
STAT4025 Time Series

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Ormerod Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 lectures, one tutorial and one computer class per week. Prerequisites: STAT2X11 and (MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1X23 or MATH1933) Prohibitions: STAT3925 Assessment: 2 x Quiz (20%), Computer lab participation / task completion (10%), Computer Exam (10%), Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit will study basic concepts and methods of time series analysis applicable in many real world problems applicable in numerous fields, including economics, finance, insurance, physics, ecology, chemistry, computer science and engineering. This unit will investigate the basic methods of modelling and analyzing of time series data (ie. Data containing serially dependence structure). This can be achieved through learning standard time series procedures on identification of components, autocorrelations, partial autocorrelations and their sampling properties. After setting up these basics, students will learn the theory of stationary univariate time series models including ARMA, ARIMA and SARIMA and their properties. Then the identification, estimation, diagnostic model checking, decision making and forecasting methods based on these models will be developed with applications. The spectral theory of time series, estimation of spectra using periodogram and consistent estimation of spectra using lag-windows will be studied in detail. Further, the methods of analyzing long memory and time series and heteroscedastic time series models including ARCH, GARCH, ACD, SCD and SV models from financial econometrics and the analysis of vector ARIMA models will be developed with applications. By completing this unit, students will develop the essential basis for further studies, such as financial econometrics and financial time series. The skills gain through this unit of study will form a strong foundation to work in a financial industry or in a related research organization.
STAT4026 Statistical Consulting

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Ormerod Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; workshop 2hrs/week Prerequisites: At least 12cp from STAT2X11, STAT2X12, DATA2X02 and STAT3XXX Prohibitions: STAT3926 Assessment: 4 x reports (40%), take-home exam report (40%), oral presentation (20%) Practical field work: Face to face client consultation: approximately 1 - 1.5 hrs/week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
In our ever-changing world, we are facing a new data-driven era where the capability to efficiently combine and analyse large data collections is essential for informed decision making in business and government, and for scientific research. Statistics and data analytics consulting provide an important framework for many individuals to seek assistant with statistics and data-driven problems. This unit of study will provide students with an opportunity to gain real-life experience in statistical consulting or work with collaborative (interdisciplinary) research. In this unit, you will have an opportunity to have practical experience in a consultation setting with real clients. You will also apply your statistical knowledge in a diverse collection of consulting projects while learning project and time management skills. In this unit you will need to identify and place the client's problem into an analytical framework, provide a solution within a given time frame and communicate your findings back to the client. All such skills are highly valued by employers. This unit will foster the expertise needed to work in a statistical consulting firm or data analytical team which will be essential for data-driven professional and research pathways in the future.
Physics
1000-level units of study
PHYS1001 Physics 1 (Regular)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 9 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently. Assessment: 3 hour exam plus laboratories, assignments and mid-semester tests (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study is for students who gained 65 marks or better in HSC Physics or equivalent. The lecture series covers the topics of mechanics, thermal physics, and oscillations and waves.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS1002 Physics 1 (Fundamentals)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 9 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: PHYS1001 or PHYS1901 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903 Assumed knowledge: Students are encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently. Assessment: 3 hour exam plus laboratories, assignments and mid-semester tests (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study is designed for students who have not studied Physics previously or scored below 65 in HSC Physics. The lecture series contains modules on the language of physics, mechanics, and oscillations and waves.
Textbooks
College Physics: A Strategic Approach by Knight, Jones and Field, 3rd edition. Pearsons 2014. Course lab manual.
PHYS1003 Physics 1 (Technological)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Intensive August,Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 10 weeks, one 1-hour tutorial per week. Corequisites: Recommended Co-requisites: (MATH1003 or MATH1903) and (MATH1005 or MATH1905). Prohibitions: PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently. Assessment: 3 hour exam plus laboratories, tutorials, and assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: It is recommended that PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 be completed before this unit
This unit of study is designed for students majoring in physical and engineering sciences and emphasis is placed on applications of physical principles to the technological world. The lecture series covers the topics of fluids, electromagnetism, and quantum physics.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS1004 Physics 1 (Environmental and Life Science)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 10 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: PHYS1003 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently. Assessment: 3-hour exam plus laboratories and assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: It is recommended that PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 be completed before this unit
This unit of study has been designed specifically for students interested in further study in environmental and life sciences. The lecture series contains modules on the topics of properties of matter, electromagnetism, and radiation and its interactions with matter.
Textbooks
College Physics: A Strategic Approach by Knight, Jones and Field, 3rd edition. Pearsons 2014. Course lab manual.
PHYS1901 Physics 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 9 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903 Assumed knowledge: (85 or above in HSC Physics or equivalent) OR (75 or above in one of PHYS1003 or PHYS1004) OR (PHYS1902 or PHYS1904). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently. Assessment: 3-hour exam plus laboratories, assignments and mid-semester tests (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is intended for students who have a strong background in Physics and an interest in studying more advanced topics. It proceeds faster than Physics 1 (Regular), covering further and more difficult material. The lecture series contains modules on the topics of mechanics, thermal physics, oscillations and waves and chaos. The laboratory work also provides an introduction to computational physics using chaos theory as the topic of study.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS1902 Physics 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 10 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Corequisites: Recommended Co-requisites: (MATH1003 or MATH1903) and (MATH1005 or MATH1905) Prohibitions: PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1904 Assumed knowledge: (85 or above in HSC Physics or equivalent) OR (75 or above in one of PHYS1001 or PHYS1002) OR (PHYS1901 or PHYS1903). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently. Assessment: 3-hour exam plus laboratories, and assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is a continuation of the more advanced treatment of Physics 1A (Advanced). Students who have completed PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 at Distinction level may enrol. It proceeds faster than Physics 1 (Technological), covering further and more difficult material. The lecture series contains modules on the topics of fluids, electricity and magnetism, and quantum physics.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS1903 Physics 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures per week, 1x1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1901 Assumed knowledge: [92 or above in HSC Physics (or equivalent)] OR [80 or above in one of PHYS1904 or PHYS1902]. Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently. Assessment: 3hr exam plus laboratories, assignments, mid-semester tests and end-of-semester lab project presentation Practical field work: 1x3hr laboratory for 9 weeks, including short project-based exercises Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The unit is intended for high achieving students who have a strong background in Physics and an interest in studying more advanced topics. It shares lecture and tutorial classes with PHYS1901, with modules on the topics of mechanics, thermal physics oscillations and wave and chaos. However, it features a laboratory component that is very different, with project-based exercises and a more open-ended research format than other lab classes.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics, 14th edition with Modern Physics, Global Edition, Pearson 2015. Course lab manual
PHYS1904 Physics 1B (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr lectures per week, 1x1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 Assumed knowledge: 75 or above in PHYS1903 or 85 or above in PHYS1901. Entry is by invitation. This unit of study is deemed to be an Advanced unit of study. Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently. Assessment: 3hr exam plus laboratories, assignments, mid-semester tests and end-of-semester research project report and presentation Practical field work: 1x3hr laboratory for 4 weeks and a research project in the other weeks of semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The unit is a continuation for high achieving students of PHYS1904. It shares lecture and tutorial classes with PHYS1902, with modules on the topics of fluids, electricity and magnetism, and quantum physics. The lab component features a research project to be performed with researchers in one of the School's research groups.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics, 14th edition with Modern Physics, Global Edition, Pearson 2015. Course lab manual
2000-level units of study
COSC2002 Computational Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tristram Alexander Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2x1 hr/week; labs 1x1 hr/wk + 1x2 hrs/wk Prohibitions: COSC1003 or COSC1903 or COSC2902 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics; DATA1002, or equivalent programming experience, ideally in Python. Assessment: In-lab checkpoints (10%), Assignment (10%), Class test 1 (20%), Class test 2 (20%), Final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit will introduce a wide range of modelling and simulation techniques for tackling real-world problems using a computer. Data is often expensive to obtain, so by harnessing the enormous computational processing power now available to us we can answer what if questions based on data we already have. You will learn how to break a problem down into its key components, identifying necessary assumptions for the purposes of simulation. You will learn how to develop suitable metrics within computational models, to allow comparison of simulation data with real-world data. You will learn how to iteratively improve simulations as you validate them against real results, and you will gain experience in identifying the types of exploratory questions that computational modelling opens up. Programming will be in python. You will learn how to generate probabilistic data, solve systems of differential equations numerically, and tackle complex adaptive systems using agent-based models. Dynamical systems ranging from traffic flow to social segregation will be considered. By doing this unit you will develop the skills to go behind your data, understand why the data you observe might be as it is, and test scenarios which might otherwise be inaccessible.
COSC2902 Computational Modelling (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tristram Alexander Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2x1 hr/wk; Labs 1x1 hr/wk + 1x2 hr/wk Prerequisites: 48 credit points of 1000 level units with an average of 65 Prohibitions: COSC1003 or COSC1903 or COSC2002 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics; DATA1002, or equivalent programming experience, ideally in Python. Assessment: In-lab checkpoints [10%] Assignment [10%] Class test 1 [20%] Class test 2 [20%] Final exam [40%] Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit will introduce a wide range of modelling and simulation techniques for tackling real-world problems using a computer. Data is often expensive to obtain, so by harnessing the enormous computational processing power now available to us we can answer what if questions based on data we already have. You will learn how to break a problem down into its key components, identifying necessary assumptions for the purposes of simulation. You will learn how to develop suitable metrics within computational models, to allow comparison of simulation data with real-world data. You will learn how to iteratively improve simulations as you validate them against real results, and you will gain experience in identifying the types of exploratory questions that computational modelling opens up. Programming will be in python. You will learn how to generate probabilistic data, solve systems of differential equations numerically, and tackle complex adaptive systems using agent-based models. Dynamical systems ranging from traffic flow to social segregation will be considered. By doing this unit you will develop the skills to go behind your data, understand why the data you observe might be as it is, and test scenarios which might otherwise be inaccessible. This is an advanced unit. It runs jointly with the associated mainstream unit, however the lab work and assessment requires a greater level of academic rigour. You will be required to engage in more challenging real-world computational modelling problems than the mainstream unit, and explore more deeply the reasons behind simulation results.
NANO2002 Introduction to Nanoscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stefano Palomba Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week; 3 hrs/week tutorials fortnightly; 3 hrs/week practical demonstration fortnightly Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 or AMME1362 or AMME2302 or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904 or CIVL2110 Assumed knowledge: A first-year level knowledge about the atomic and molecular structure of matter, of the electronic structure of atoms, and basic mathematical knowledge. Assessment: Assessment:Three quizzes - 40%Final Project Report (individual, 2000 words) - 30%Final Project presentation (group) - 20%Worksheets in lab/tutorials - 10% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: This unit must be taken by all students in the Nanoscience Program.
Nanoscience concerns the study of matter at the nanometer scale. At the microscale and even more at the nanoscale, the properties of matter are very different from those in the bulk. Modern methods used in nanoscience enable the manipulation and fabrication of matter and devices with unique properties. Nanoscience is a multidisciplinary research field that bridges the boundaries of traditional disciplines such as Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Engineering, generating impact across a wide range of sectors, from academic institutions and research centres to industry, addressing societal challenges in energy, environment, communication, computing, and health. This unit provides an introduction to nanostructured materials and the physical properties they exhibit. You will learn the fabrication tools and processes used in nanoscience, such as top-down and bottom-up, and the nanoscale characterization tools used across different disciplines. You will get direct exposure to research labs and tools available at the University, and in particular within the Sydney Nano Institute. You will develop skills required to address the complex and multidisciplinary problems in Nanoscience. By doing this unit, you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding nanoscience solutions to global challenges that impact our lives.
PHYS2011 Physics 2A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week for 11 weeks; one 2-hour computational laboratory and one 3-hour experimental laboratory per week for 10 weeks. Prerequisites: (PHYS1901 or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1903) and (PHYS1902 or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1904) Prohibitions: PHYS2911 or PHYS2921 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, one 1-hour computational test, practical work, practical report and presentation, computational lab work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
In combination with two semesters of Junior Physics, this unit of study continues a first pass through the major branches of classical and modern physics, providing students with a sound basis for later Physics units or for studies in other areas of science or technology. Hence, this unit suits students continuing with the study of Physics at the Intermediate level, and those wishing to round out their knowledge of physics before continuing in other fields. The modules in this unit of study are: Optics: The wave nature of light, and its interactions with matter; applications including spectroscopy and fibre optics. Thermodynamics: The thermal properties of matter. Computational Physics: In a PC-based computing laboratory students use simulation software to conduct virtual experiments in physics, which illustrate and extend the relevant lectures. Students also gain general skills in the use of computers to solve problems in physics. An introductory session of MATLAB is held in the first three lab sessions for students who are not familiar with programming. Practical: Experimental Physics is taught as a laboratory module and includes experiments in the areas of electrical circuits, nuclear decay and particles, properties of matter, and other topics. Assessment is based on mastery of each attempted experiment. At the end of the semester students prepare a short report on one experiment and make an oral presentation on it.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics with Modern Physics Technology Update, 13th edition. with Mastering Physics, Pearsons, 2014.
PHYS2012 Physics 2B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week; one 2-hour computational laboratory per week for 11 weeks. Prerequisites: (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921) Prohibitions: PHYS2912 or PHYS2922 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 3-hour exam, assignments, one 1-hour computational test, computational lab work and project, practical work and report (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study is designed for students continuing with the study of Physics at the general Intermediate level, and represents the beginning of a more in-depth study of the main topics of classical and modern physics. The modules in this unit of study are: Quantum Physics: The behaviour of matter and radiation at the microscopic level. Electromagnetic Properties of Matter: Electric and magnetic effects in materials; the combination of electric and magnetic fields to produce light and other electromagnetic waves; the effects of matter on electromagnetic waves. Computational Physics: The computational physics component is similar to that of PHYS2011.
Textbooks
Serway, Moses and Moyer. Modern Physics. 3rd edition. Brooks/Cole. 2005.
PHYS2013 Astrophysics and Relativity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week for 11 weeks and one 3-hour experimental laboratory per week for 12 weeks. Prerequisites: (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921) Prohibitions: PHYS2923 or PHYS2913 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, practical work, practical report and oral presentation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study builds on the foundation provided by Junior Physics and first semester of Intermediate Physics, to provide introductions to Cosmology (Structure and evolution of the Universe), and Special Relativity (Space and time at high velocities). Practical: Experimental Physics is taught as a laboratory module and includes experiments in the areas of analysis of stellar images, electromagnetic phenomena, electronic instrumentation, quantum physics, and other topics. Assessment is based on mastery of each attempted experiment. At the end of the semester students may work in teams on a project. Students prepare a written report and oral presentation on their project or one experiment.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics with Modern Physics Technology Update, 13th edition. with Mastering Physics, Pearsons, 2014.
PHYS2911 Physics 2A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week for 11 weeks; one 2-hour computational laboratory and one 3-hour experimental laboratory per week for 10 weeks. Prerequisites: 65 or above in (PHYS1901 or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1903) and 65 or above in (PHYS1902 or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1904) Prohibitions: PHYS2011 or PHYS2921 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, one 1-hour computational test, practical work, practical report and presentation, computational lab work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study is designed for students with a strong interest in Physics. The lecture topics are as for PHYS2011. They are treated in greater depth and with more rigorous attention to derivations than in PHYS2011. The assessment reflects the more challenging nature of the material presented.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics with Modern Physics Technology Update, 13th edition. with Mastering Physics, Pearsons, 2014.
PHYS2912 Physics 2B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, one-2 hour computational laboratory per week for 11 weeks. Prerequisites: 65 or above in (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and 65 or above in (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921) Prohibitions: PHYS2012 or PHYS2922 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 3-hour exam, assignments, one 1-hour computational test, computational lab work and project, practical work and report (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Refer to PHYS2911 for an overall description of the Advanced Intermediate Physics program. The lecture topics are as for PHYS2012 with some advanced content. Computational Physics: As for PHYS2012, but at a more advanced level.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics with Modern Physics Technology Update, 13th edition. with Mastering Physics, Pearsons, 2014.
PHYS2913 Astrophysics and Relativity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week for 11 weeks; one 3-hour experimental laboratory per week for 12 weeks. Prerequisites: 65 or above in (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and 65 or above in (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921) Prohibitions: PHYS2013 or PHYS2923 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 3-hour exam, assignments, practical work, practical report and oral presentation (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The lecture topics are as PHYS2013 with some advanced content. Practical: as for PHYS2013.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics with Modern Physics Technology Update, 13th edition. with Mastering Physics, Pearsons, 2014.
PHYS2921 Physics 2A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 2hrs/week for 13 weeks; laboratory 5hrs/wk for 11 wks; tutorial 1 hr/wk for 12 wks, duty tutor 2 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: 75 or above in (PHYS1901 or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1903) and 75 or above in (PHYS1902 or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1904) Prohibitions: PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and (MATH1X05) Assessment: Final examination 40% (Optics/Thermodynamics modules), Experimental Lab sessions and logbook 18%, Experimental Lab Talk 4.5%, Experimental Lab Report (draft and final) 7.5%, Computational Lab sessions 8%, Computational Lab mid-semester test 4%, Computational Lab Exam 8%, Assignments (2x Optics, 1x Thermodynamics) 7.5%, and in class Quiz (Thermodynamics) 2.5%. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Are you someone with a very strong interest in Physics who wants a more open-ended approach to your learning? This unit of study gives a first pass through the major branches of classical and modern physics, providing a sound basis for later Physics units or for studies in other areas of science or technology. You will learn about Optics - the wave nature of light, and its interactions with matter; and applications including spectroscopy and fibre optics; Thermodynamics-Entropy, free energy, and the thermal properties of matter; Computational Physics Laboratory, where you will perform simulations that essentially conduct virtual experiments in physics, which illustrate and extend the relevant lectures. An introductory session of MATLAB is held in the first three lab sessions for students who are not familiar with programming. In Experimental Physics Laboratory, you will perform experimental tests and investigations that underlie modern society. This involves a mix of prescribed measurement exercises and open-ended investigations, and the option of a research style project, on topics including electrical circuits, nuclear decay and particles, and properties of matter. The lecture modules will be identical to PHYS2911 Physics 2A (Advanced) but the labs will be different. The differentiations from PHYS2911 Physics 2A (Advanced) are that both Experimental and Computational Labs in PHYS2921 Physics 2A (SSP) offer open ended style prescribed lab exercises in place of conventional prescribed exercises, and in the case of Experimental Labs, the additional option of doing a research project in place of some of the open-ended prescribed exercises.
PHYS2922 Physics 2B (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 3hrs/week for 13 weeks; laboratory 2hrs/wk for 11wks, tutorial 1hr/wk for 12 wks, duty tutor 1 hr/wk. Prerequisites: 75 or above in (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and 75 or above in (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921). Prohibitions: PHYS2012 or PHYS2912 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and (MATH1X05) Assessment: Final examination 50% (Quantum Physics/Electromagnetics modules), Computational Laboratory 8%, Computational Physics Lab Exam 12%, Computational Physics, Lab Test 5%, Assignments (1x Quantum, 2x Electromagnetics) 10%, and in class Quizzes (1x Quantum, 1x Electromagnetics) 15%. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Are you someone with a very strong interest in Physics who wants a more open-ended approach to your learning? This unit of study delves into the topics of Quantum physics, Electromagnetic Properties of Matter, and Computational Physics (Laboratory). In Quantum physics, you will learn about the fundamentals of quantum mechanics, including the quantum physics of two-level systems (such as the Stern-Gerlach experiment, single-photon interferometry, two-level atoms, and spin-1/2 particles in a magnetic field), quantum measurement and its consequences for non-classical behavior, non-classical properties of quantum entanglement and the implications of Bell nonlocality, wavefunction approaches to quantum mechanics, including the Schroedinger equation, and the quantum harmonic oscillator. In Electromagnetics, you will learn about electrostatics, Gauss's Law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, conductors, magnetism and magnetic materials (ferromagnetism, paramagnetism, diamagnetism), and Laplace's equation. Computational Physics Lab will involve you performing numerical calculations and simulations that essentially conduct virtual experiments in Quantum Physics, which illustrate and extend the relevant lectures. The lecture modules will be identical to PHYS2912 Physics 2B (Advanced) but the labs will be different. The differentiation from PHYS2912 Physics 2B (Advanced) is that the Computational Lab module for PHYS2922 Physics 2B (SSP) offers open-ended style, prescribed exercises in place of conventional prescribed exercises, as well as the option of doing a research style project (subject to not also choosing a 2nd research project in the Experimental Lab of Phys2923 Astrophysics and Relativity (SSP)).
3000-level units of study
PHYS3034 Quantum, Statistical and Comp Physics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, computational lab 3h/week Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922) Prohibitions: PHYS3934, PHYS3039, PHYS3939, PHYS3042, PHYS3942, PHYS3043, PHYS3943, PHYS3044, PHYS3944, PHYS3090, PHYS3990, PHYS3991, PHYS3999, PHYS3099 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: Weekly Quiz x 12 (25%), 3x topical assignments (15%), 1 x overarching problem assignment (10%), Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Quantum statistical physics has revolutionized the world we live in- providing a profound understanding of the microscopic world and driving the technological revolution of the last few decades. Modern physics increasingly relies on solving equations using computational techniques, for modelling anything from the big bang to quantum dot lasers. Building on 2000-level physics, this unit will develop the full formalism for deriving properties of individual atoms and large collections of atoms, and introduce advanced numerical techniques. You will start from Schroedinger's equation and derive the full properties of hydrogen atoms, and systems of particles. You will study perturbation techniques qualitatively, including for the interaction of radiation with atoms. You will study the theoretical foundation of statistical mechanics, including both classical and quantum distributions. You will apply a variety of numerical schemes for solving ordinary and partial differential equations, learn about the suitability of particular methods to particular problems, and their accuracy and stability. The module includes computational lab sessions, in which you will actively solve a range of physics problems. In completing this unit you will gain understanding of the foundations of modern physics and develop skills that will enable you to numerically solve complex problems in physics and beyond.
PHYS3934 Quantum, Statistical and Comp Phys (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, computational lab 3h/week Prerequisites: Average of 70 or above in [(PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)] Prohibitions: PHYS3034, PHYS3039, PHYS3939, PHYS3042, PHYS3942, PHYS3043, PHYS3943, PHYS3044, PHYS3944, PHYS3090, PHYS3990, PHYS3991, PHYS3999, PHYS3099 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: Weekly Quiz x 12 (25%), 3x topical assignments (15%), 1 x overarching problem assignment (10%), Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Quantum statistical physics has revolutionized the world we live in - providing a profound understanding of the microscopic world and driving the technological revolution of the last few decades. Modern physics increasingly relies on solving equations using computational techniques, for modelling anything from the big bang to quantum dot lasers. The advanced unit covers the same overall concepts as PHYS3034 but with a greater level of challenge and academic rigour, largely in separate lectures. You will study techniques of quantum mechanics to predict the energy-level structure of electrons in atoms, introducing techniques useful in the broad field of quantum physics, with applications e. g. in atomic clocks. You will study the theoretical foundation of statistical mechanics, including both classical and quantum distributions. You will apply a variety of numerical schemes for solving ordinary and partial differential equations, learn about the suitability of particular methods to particular problems, and their accuracy and stability. The module includes computational lab sessions, in which you will actively solve a range of physics problems. In completing this unit you will gain understanding of the foundations of modern physics and develop skills that will enable you to numerically solve complex problems in physics and beyond.
PHYS3035 Electrodynamics and Optics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, experimental lab 18h/semester Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922) Prohibitions: PHYS3935, PHYS3040, PHYS3940, PHYS3941, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3069, PHYS3969, PHYS3080, PHYS3980 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: Quiz x 4 - 15%, 2x topical assignments 10%, 1 x overarching problem assignment - 10%, Experimental physics logbook 10%, Experimental physics report - 15%, Final exam - 40% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The development of electrodynamic field theory laid the foundation on which all of modern physics is built, from relativity to quantum field theory. Its application to electromagnetic waves and optics underpins all of modern telecommunications, but also some of the most delicate physics experiments, from gravitational wave detection to quantum computing. This is a core unit in the physics major, which has three components: electrodynamics lectures, optics lectures, and experimental lab. In electrodynamics you will learn to manipulate Maxwell's equations in their differential form. You will apply the formalism to deriving properties of electromagnetic waves, including the interaction of waves with matter through reflection and absorption. This will lead to optics lectures in which you will investigate aspects of modern optics, using the laser to illustrate the topics covered, in combination with a discussion of the basic optical properties of materials, including the Lorentz model. You will investigate spontaneous and stimulated emission of light, laser rate equations, diffraction, Gaussian beam propagation, anisotropic media and nonlinear optics. You will carry out in-depth experimental investigations into key aspects of electrodynamics, optics, as well as other topics in physics, with expert tutoring.
PHYS3935 Electrodynamics and Optics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, experimental lab 18h/semester Prerequisites: Average of 70 or above in [(PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)] Prohibitions: PHYS3035, PHYS3040, PHYS3940, PHYS3941, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3069, PHYS3969, PHYS3080, PHYS3980 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: Quiz x 4 (15%), 2x topical assignments (10%), 1 x overarching problem assignment (10%), Experimental physics logbook (10%), Experimental physics report (15%), Final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The development of electrodynamic field theory laid the foundation on which all of modern physics is built, from relativity to quantum field theory. Its application to electromagnetic waves and optics underpins all of modern telecommunications, but also some of the most delicate physics experiments, from gravitational wave detection to quantum computing. This is a core unit in the physics major, which has three components: electrodynamics lectures, optics lectures, and experimental lab. The advanced unit covers the same concepts as PHYS3035 but with a greater level of challenge and academic rigour, largely in separate lectures. You will apply Mawell's equations to derive properties of electromagnetic waves, the interaction of waves with matter, waveguides, radiation and Gauge transformations. This will lead to optics lectures in which you will investigate aspects of modern optics, using the laser to illustrate the topics covered, in combination with a discussion of the basic optical properties of materials, including the Lorentz model. You will investigate spontaneous and stimulated emission of light, laser rate equations, diffraction, Gaussian beam propagation, anisotropic media and nonlinear optics. You will design your own in-depth experimental investigations into key aspects of electrodynamics, optics, as well as other topics in physics, with expert tutoring.
PHYS3036 Condensed Matter and Particle Physics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, experimental lab 18h/semester Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922) Corequisites: PHYS3034 OR PHYS3934 Prohibitions: PHYS3099, PHYS3999, PHYS3936, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3069, PHYS3969, PHYS3074, PHYS3974, PHYS3080, PHYS3980 Assumed knowledge: Students will need to have some knowledge of special relativity, for example from prior study of PHYS2013 or PHYS2913, or from studying Chapter 12 of Introduction to Electrodynamics by D.J. Griffith. (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: 2x topical assignments 10%, 1 x overarching problem assignment 10%, Experimental physics logbook 10%, Experimental physics report 15%, Final exam 55% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Condensed matter physics is the science behind semiconductors and all modern electronics, while particle physics describes the very fabric of our Universe. Surprisingly these two seemingly separate aspects of physics use in part very similar formalisms. This selective unit in the physics major will provide an introduction to both these fields, complemented with experimental labs. You will study the basic constituents of matter, such as quarks and leptons, examining their fundamental properties and interactions. You will gain understanding of extensions to the currently accepted Standard Model of particle physics, and on the relationships between high energy particle physics, cosmology and the early Universe. You will study condensed matter systems, specifically the physics that underlies the electromagnetic, thermal, and optical properties of solids. You will discuss recent discoveries and new developments in semiconductors, nanostructures, magnetism, and superconductivity. You will learn and apply new experimental and data analysis techniques by carrying out in-depth experimental investigations on selected topics in physics, with expert tutoring. In completing this unit you will gain understanding of the foundations of modern physics and develop skills in experimental physics, measurement, and data analysis.
PHYS3936 Condensed Matter and Particle Phys (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 1 Prerequisites: Average of 70 or above in [(PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)] Corequisites: (PHYS3034 OR PHYS3934) Prohibitions: PHYS3099, PHYS3999, PHYS3036, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3069, PHYS3969, PHYS3074, PHYS3974, PHYS3080, PHYS3980 Assumed knowledge: Students will need to have some knowledge of special relativity, for example from prior study of PHYS2013 or PHYS2913, or from studying Chapter 12 of Introduction to Electrodynamics by D.J. Griffith. (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: 2x topical assignments (10%), 1 x overarching problem assignment (10%), Experimental physics logbook (10%), Experimental physics report (15%), Final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, experimental lab 18h/semester
Condensed matter physics is the science behind semiconductors and all modern electronics, while particle physics describes the very fabric of our Universe. Surprisingly these two seemingly separate aspects of physics use in part very similar formalisms. This selective unit in the physics major will provide an introduction to both these fields, complemented with experimental labs. You will study the basic constituents of matter, such as quarks and leptons, examining their fundamental properties and interactions. You will gain understanding of extensions to the currently accepted Standard Model of particle physics, and on the relationships between high energy particle physics, cosmology and the early Universe. You will study condensed matter systems, specifically the physics that underlies the electromagnetic, thermal, and optical properties of solids. You will discuss recent discoveries and new developments in semiconductors, nanostructures, magnetism, and superconductivity. The advanced stream has several separate lectures and more open-ended experimental physics projects: You will learn and apply new experimental and data analysis techniques by designing and carrying out in-depth experimental investigations on selected topics in physics, with expert tutoring. In completing this unit you will gain understanding of the foundations of modern physics and develop skills in experimental physics, measurement, and data analysis.
PHYS3037 Plasma and Astrophysics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/fortnight, experimental lab 18h/semester Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922) Prohibitions: PHYS3937 or PHYS3042 or PHYS3043 or PHYS3044 or PHYS3942 or PHYS3943 or PHYS3944 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: 2x topical assignments (11%), 1 x overarching problem assignment (10%), Experimental physics logbook (10%), Experimental physics report (15%), Online quizzes (4%), Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Looking at the sky it is easy to forget our Sun and the stars are continuous giant nuclear explosions, or that nebulas are vast fields of ionized gases, all obeying the same laws of physics as anything else in the universe. Astrophysics gives us great insight in the larger structures of the universe, and plasma physics is key to understanding matter in space, but also in fusion reactors or for advanced material processing. This selective unit in the physics major will provide an introduction to astrophysics and plasma physics, complemented with experimental labs. You will study three key concepts in astrophysics: the physics of radiation processes, stellar evolution, and binary stars. You will gain understanding of the physics of fundamental phenomena in plasmas and apply basic methods of theoretical and experimental plasma physics. Examples will be given, where appropriate, of the application of these concepts to naturally occurring and man-made plasmas. You will learn and apply new experimental and data analysis techniques by carrying out in-depth experimental investigations on selected topics in physics, with expert tutoring. In completing this unit you will gain understanding of the foundations of modern physics and develop skills in experimental physics, measurement, and data analysis.
PHYS3937 Plasma and Astrophysics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/fortnight, experimental lab 18h/semester Prerequisites: [An average mark of 70 or above in (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912 or PHYS2922)] Corequisites: PHYS3035 OR PHYS3935 Prohibitions: PHYS3037 or PHYS3042 or PHYS3043 or PHYS3044 or PHYS3942 or PHYS3943 or PHYS3944 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: 2x topical assignments (11%), 1 x overarching problem assignment (10%), Experimental physics logbook (10%), Experimental physics report(15%), Online quizzes: (4%), Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Looking at the sky it is easy to forget our Sun and the stars are continuous giant nuclear explosions, or that nebulas are vast fields of ionized gases, all obeying the same laws of physics as anything else in the universe. Astrophysics gives us great insight in the larger structures of the universe, and plasma physics is key to understanding matter in space, but also in fusion reactors or for advanced material processing. This selective unit in the physics major will provide an introduction to astrophysics and plasma physics, complemented with experimental labs. You will study three key concepts in astrophysics: the physics of radiation processes, stellar evolution, and binary stars. You will gain understanding of the physics of fundamental phenomena in plasmas and apply basic methods of theoretical and experimental plasma physics. The advanced stream has several separate, more in-depth lectures and more open-ended experimental physics projects: You will learn and apply new experimental and data analysis techniques by designing and carrying out in-depth experimental investigations on selected topics in physics, with expert tutoring. In completing this unit you will gain understanding of the foundations of modern physics and develop skills in experimental physics, measurement, and data analysis.
Psychology
1000-level units of study
PSYC1001 Psychology 1001

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1150 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer/
Psychology 1001 is a general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1001 covers the following areas: science and statistics in psychology; applied psychology; themes in the history of psychology; social psychology; personality theory; human development. This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/
Textbooks
Available on-line once semester commences
PSYC1002 Psychology 1002

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1150 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer/
Psychology 1002 is a further general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and it is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1002 covers the following areas: neuroscience; human mental abilities; learning and motivation; visual perception; cognitive processes; abnormal psychology.
This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site:
http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/
Textbooks
Available on-line once semester commences
2000-level units of study
PSYC2015 Brain and Behavioural Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week x 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week x 12 weeks Prerequisites: PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2915 Assessment: In-class debate (5%), tutorial quiz (15%), scientific report proposal (10%), scientific report (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This course is designed for students who would like to learn about the core concepts of clinical and biobehavioural psychology, and their applications to therapies, organisations, and an individual's behaviour. The emphasis is on behaviour, emotions, and motivational processes. You will learn how to analyse the environmental causes of behaviours, and how to use reinforcements, punishments and incentives to modify and motivate behaviour. Clinical Psychology will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sexual disorders, and eating disorders. The way in which these processes arise and are shaped in people will be presented in the section on Developmental Psychology. Neuroscience will focus on the evolutionary, genetic, neurobiological, and pharmacological mechanisms underlying the phenomena taught in the other sections. The practical classes are designed for students with an interest in clinical and therapeutic Psychology, and will train students to design and implement a behaviour modification programme.
PSYC2915 Brain and Behavioural Psychology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week x 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week x 12 weeks Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or greater in PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2015 Assessment: Scientific written report proposal (10%) Scientific written report (20%), a tutorial quiz (15%), an in-class debate (5% participation mark), and the final exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This advanced-level course is designed for students who would like to learn about the core concepts of clinical and biobehavioural psychology. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but the practical material offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. The emphasis of the lectures is on behaviour, emotions, and motivational processes. You will learn how to analyse the environmental causes of behaviours, and how to use reinforcements, punishments and incentives to modify and motivate behaviour. Clinical Psychology will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sexual disorders, and eating disorders. The way in which these processes arise and are shaped in people will be presented in the section on Developmental Psychology. Neuroscience will focus on the evolutionary, genetic, neurobiological, and pharmacological mechanisms underlying the phenomena taught in the other sections. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in different practical exercises with a focus on research methods used to examine the links between the brain and behaviours, emotions, cognitions, and their disorders. Students will design and conduct their own neuropsychology experiment.
PSYC2016 Perception, Cognition, and Intelligence

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Barton L. Anderson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1hour lectures, 1x 1hr tutorials Prerequisites: PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 Assessment: Research report (35%), Quiz (15%), Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
In this Unit of Study, you will study three of the core topics of Psychology: Perception, Cognition, and Intelligence. Our sensory systems generate our experience of our bodies and what exists in the world. In the perception component, you will learn how our sensory systems influence our ability to act in the world and the conditions and consequences of perceptual errors. The cognition component of the course will focus on the theoretical and methodological issues that arise in how we attend to, remember, think, problem solve, and make decisions, and consider the consequences of how biases and heuristics influence our choices. The intelligence component will explore the historical evolution of the concept of intelligence, issues in its measurement, the relationship to concepts of creativity, emotional intelligence, and the influence of the environment. You will participate in inquiry-led tutorials that will reinforce and expand on concepts in the unit, and develop broad thinking skills to relate evidence to rational arguments and choices that can be applied to any problem solving domain.
PSYC2017 Personality and Social Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Fiona White Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week for 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week for 12 weeks, commencing in Week 2 Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 Assessment: Final exam (50%), report (30%), Tutorial Quiz (15%), Research participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
All of us observe our social worlds and try to understand why people behave, think, and feel as they do. In this unit you will study a number of influential theories, philosophical and empirical approaches in Personality and Social Psychology. You will examine key topics in the scientific assessment of personality, attitudes and emotions, including an introduction to psychometric testing (e. g. , validity and reliability) in Personality and Social Psychology. Specifically, in the Personality component you will be exposed to conceptual analysis and will be expected to examine critically theories from the Psychodynamic, Behaviourist, Humanist, Social Cognitive and Psychometric traditions. In the Social Psychology component you will examine salient social constructs such as social influence, the causes of prejudice and possible reduction strategies, and explore how cognitive processes affect social judgment and behaviour. In this unit you will develop a broad understanding of the leading theories and research in the areas of Personality and Social Psychology.
3000-level units of study
PSYC3010 Advanced Statistics for Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2012 plus at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit of Study from PSYC2010; PSYC2910; PSYC2011; PSYC2911; PSYC2013; PSYC2014; PSYC2015, PSYC2915, PSYC2016; PSYC2017 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, class tests, practical exercises (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study expands upon students' knowledge of the general linear model and its applications in the analysis of data from psychological research. The first half of the course introduces students to contrast analysis and interaction analyses as an extension of ANOVA, which allows for more focused analysis of data where group comparisons are the primary interest. The second half focuses on multiple regression and its extensions, which are used when the primary interest is to predict or explain a particular variable based on a set of other variables.
Textbooks
Keith, Z. T. (2006). Multiple Regression and Beyond. New York: Pearson Education, Inc.
PSYC3011 Learning and Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and PSYC2012 Prohibitions: PSYC3911 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 word prac report, tutorial quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit addresses the fundamental concepts and more important research findings related to contemporary theories of associative learning in animals and humans. It examines the application of such fundamental research to issues such as drug use and food choice. It is designed to foster skills in reading primary sources in this area, and provide the opportunity for hands-on experience in carrying out a research project.
Textbooks
Bouton, M. E. (2016). Learning and Behavior: A contemporary synthesis, 2nd edition. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer.
PSYC3911 Learning and Behaviour (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x 1-hr lectures and 1x 2-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: (A mark of 75 or above in PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and PSYC2012 Prohibitions: PSYC3011 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2500 word prac report, tutorial quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit addresses the fundamental concepts and more important research findings related to contemporary theories of associative learning in animals and humans. It examines the application of such fundamental research to issues such as drug use and food choice. It is designed to foster skills in reading primary sources in this area, and provide the opportunity for hands-on experience in carrying out a research project. In the advanced unit of study students will learn techniques to model learning and behaviour, and independently apply these skills to experimental data that they have collected.
Textbooks
Bouton, M. E. (2016). Learning and Behavior: A contemporary synthesis, 2nd edition. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer.
PSYC3012 Cognition, Language and Thought

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2012 and (PSYC2013 or PSYC2016) Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one major essay/research report (2000-2500 words), practical exercise(s) (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit extends the theories and methods of investigating memory and attentional processes discussed in PSYC2013/PSYC2016 to consider a number of domains of higher cognitive processing. One strand of the course will focus on the cognitive processes involved in speech perception, language comprehension, language production, and reading. The remainder of the course will deal with the cognitive processes involved in reasoning and skilled behaviour across a range of domains. The practical program will expose students to a variety of the research methods used to investigate higher cognitive processes, develop their understanding of how these methods can be used to investigate hypotheses about mental processes and consider applications of cognitive research to real-world problems and issues.
PSYC3013 Perceptual Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2016) and PSYC2012 Prohibitions: PSYC3913 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, one 2000 word report, tutorial quiz, group presentation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Perception poses many challenges: how do we see colour and movement? How do we perceive surfaces and materials? How does combining information from multiple senses improve our perception? This unit draws on behavioural and neurophysiological perspectives to deepen understanding of current research topics in perception. The emphasis is on how visual information is processed to accomplish functions such as perceiving a single edge, extracting the contours that form a face, or the spatial relations needed to call offside on the sports field. Students also gain conceptual tools for evaluating the empirical and theoretical worth of recent research in perception. During the tutorial component of the course students will develop a practical experiment in which they formulate and test a hypothesis. In this way students gain important research experience that gives them valuable insight into the scientific process as it exists both in professional work and in the empirical research project required for the Honours degree.
Textbooks
Sensation and Perception, Third Edition
PSYC3913 Perceptual Systems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x 1-hr lectures and 1x 2-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: (A mark of 75 or above in PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2016) and PSYC2012 Prohibitions: PSYC3013 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, one 2000 word report, laboratory participation, group presentation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Perception poses many challenges: how do we see colour and movement? How do we perceive surfaces and materials? How does combining information from multiple senses improve our perception? This unit draws on behavioural and neurophysiological perspectives to deepen understanding of current research topics in perception. The emphasis is on how visual information is processed to accomplish functions such as perceiving a single edge, extracting the contours that form a face, or the spatial relations needed to call offside on the sports field. Students also gain conceptual tools for evaluating the empirical and theoretical worth of recent research in perception. During the tutorial component of the course students will develop a practical experiment in which they formulate and test a hypothesis. In this way students gain important research experience that gives them valuable insight into the scientific process as it exists both in professional work and in the empirical research project required for the Honours degree. In the advanced unit of study students will be placed in laboratories and will learn research techniques while helping conduct experiments in these laboratories.
Textbooks
Sensation and Perception, Third Edition
PSYC3014 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) and PCOL2011] Prohibitions: PSYC3914 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one major essay/report 2000-2500 words, tutorial quizzes and participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. The implications of focal cognitive deficits in neurological patients for models of normal cognitive function will also be explored. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. In addition to lectures, a practical component will cover basic neuroanatomy and neuroscientific methods. The practical component will also introduce students to experimental and neuropsychological approaches to studying the relationahip between brain and behaviour.
PSYC3914 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience Adv

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) and PCOL2011] Prohibitions: PSYC3014 Assessment: One 2 hour exam (end of semester), one quiz (mid-semester), one presentation, one written assignment (lab report), attendance and participation in tutorial/practical exercises (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration, and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. The lecture material will be the same as for PSYC3014, however, the practical class is targeted for those who would like to learn more about the experimental study of behaviour and the neurosciences. The practical component of the advanced stream will cover basic neuroanatomy, histology and neuropharmacology and will introduce students to experimental approaches to studying brain-behaviour relationships.
PSYC3015 Personality and Psychology Assessment 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2012 and (PSYC2014 or PSYC2017) Assessment: One 2 hour exam; one 2000-2500 word major essay/report, and in-class activities (e.g., tutorial presentations, in-class quizzes) (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study addresses current issues in personality, psychological testing, intelligence, and individual differences. Students are introduced to different theoretical models used in personality, intelligence, emotional intelligence, and metacognition and expected to critically evaluate these theories based on the supporting research evidence. This unit also presents different psychological testing techniques and methods.
PSYC3016 Developmental Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2013 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915 Prohibitions: PSYC3916 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, 2000 word prac report, practical exercise(s) (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit examines our understanding of human psychological development, focusing on selected issues and empirical traditions within the discipline of Developmental Psychology. Students are expected to gain an understanding of the theoretical influences that have come to dominate developmental research, and students will also be introduced to a range of theoretical and research approaches in contemporary Developmental Science. These include: sense of identity, conceptual development, children's thinking, social cognition, moral reasoning and behaviour, and the role of genetic and environmental influences on development. The course will also consider applications of developmental research and theory in developmental psychopathology and in educational contexts, as well as exploring children's experience of art, literature and drama. Students are expected to gain knowledge of, and develop a critical approach to, the analysis of current research and theoretical issues in these areas.
PSYC3916 Developmental Psychology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x 1-hr lectures and 1x 2-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2013 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) Prohibitions: PSYC3016 Assessment: one 2 hour exam, 2000 word prac report, practical exercise(s) (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit examines our understanding of human psychological development, focusing on selected issues and empirical traditions within the discipline of Developmental Psychology. Students are expected to gain an understanding of the theoretical influences that have come to dominate developmental research, and students will also be introduced to a range of theoretical and research approaches in contemporary Developmental Science. These include: sense of identity and self-worth, conceptual development, children's thinking, social cognition, moral reasoning and behaviour, and the role of genetic and environmental influences on development. The course will also consider applications of developmental research and theory in developmental psychopathology and in educational contexts, as well as exploring children's experience of art, literature and drama. Students are expected to gain knowledge of, and develop a critical approach to, the analysis of current research and theoretical issues in these areas. In the advanced unit of study students will collect, score, and analyse the data from children participating in research projects in the School's Developmental Laboratories.
PSYC3017 Social Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour tutorial per most weeks. Prerequisites: PSYC2013 or PSYC2017 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, one 2500 word research report (consisting of both group work and individually-written components), and tutorial presentation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit continues the coverage of topics in Social Psychology begun in PSYC1001 and PSYC2013. The unit is divided into topic areas, where the emphasis is on evaluating theories and the relevant evidence. Topics areas include among others: antisocial behaviours, discrimination, the self, emotion, cultural psychology, evolutionary psychology, and existential social psychology. Tutorials provide first-hand experience of research by involving students in a small group research project based on topics covered in the lectures. The tutorials also provide an opportunity to discuss issues pertaining to each step of the research process (e.g., ethical issues that underlie social psychological research, proper practice when collecting and handling data, how to communicate research findings in written and verbal form).
PSYC3018 Abnormal Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (PSYC2014 or PSYC2017) Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 word essay, and tutorial quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study critically examines core issues in abnormal psychology, concerning the description, explanation and treatment of psychological disorders. The unit of study will include topics such as:
(a) Adult abnormal psychology: Anxiety and related disorders (specific phobias, panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, OCD, PTSD); Substance-related and Addictive disorders (drug, alcohol, gambling); Eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa); Depressive disorders, Bipolar disorders; Schizophrenia, Personality disorders.
(b) Child abnormal psychology: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Conduct disorder; Anxiety disorders, Depression.
Textbooks
Rieger, E. (Ed.) (2014) Abnormal Psychology: Leading researcher perspectives. Sydney: McGraw-Hill Education. (3rd Ed).
PSYC3020 Applied Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of 1000-level psychology units and 12 credit points of 2000-level Psychology units Prohibitions: PSYC3019 Assessment: One 2 hour examination (50%), one 2500 word written assignment (30%), class quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The aim of this unit is to introduce students to various ways in which psychological theory and research can be applied in the real world. In particular, this unit will focus on Health Psychology, Forensic Psychology, and Organisational Psychology. The Health Psychology component of this course may include investigation into why we engage in risky health behaviours including smoking, overeating and alcohol use; inequalities in health including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island health; dealing with chronic illness including death and dying, and survivorship. The Forensic Psychology component of the course may include investigation into lie detection, criminal offenders, victims of crime, and eyewitness memory. The Organisational Psychology component of the course may focus on personnel selection, training in organisations, performance measurement, workplace motivation, leadership and aspects of positive psychology.
HPSC3023 Psychology and Psychiatry: History and Phil

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Hans Pols and Dr Fiona Hibberd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (12 credit points of Intermediate HPSC units) OR (Credit or greater in an HPSC Intermediate unit) OR (12 Intermediate credit points in Psychology units) Assumed knowledge: HPSC2100 and HPSC2101 Assessment: 1x 2500wd essay (45%) and 1x2hr exam (45%) class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Across the unit we examine one of the most interesting aspects of the history and philosophy of science. viz., the scientific practices and assumptions involved in making human beings an object of study. We will examine the ways in which psychologists and psychiatrists have investigated human nature, the kinds of experimental approaches they have developed to that end, the major controversies in this field, and the basic philosophical assumptions that have been made in the sciences of human nature. We investigate the developments of psychological theories and investigative methods as well as the development of psychiatric theory, treatment methods, and institutions.

Table S Electives - Sydney Medical School

Units of study

2000-level units of study
ANAT2008 Principles of Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Samson Dowland and Dr Katie Dixon Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures Prohibitions: BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 Assessment: One 1-hour theory exam,one 1-hour practical exam, mid-semester exam, theory and practical quizzes (100%) Practical field work: One 2-hour practical per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: Due to the independent nature of this course, it is recommended that students have successfully completed 48 credit points of junior units of study before enrolling in ANAT2008.
This 2000 level unit of study covers the principles of cell biology and study of the structure of cells, tissues and organ systems at the light and electron microscopic levels. The focus is on human systems. Modern practical applications of histological techniques and analysis for research are also presented.
Textbooks
Paulina, W. Histology - A Text and Atlas. 7th Edition, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 2015.
ANAT2009 Comparative Primate Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Coordinator: Dr Denise Donlon Associate Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures Prerequisites: 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX OR MEDS1X01 OR PSYC1XXX OR ARCA1XXX Assessment: Two quizzes (10%), theory exam (60%), practical exam (30%). Practical field work: One 2-hour practical per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit of student covers the musculo-skeletal anatomy of the human body with particular emphasis on human evolution and comparisons with apes and fossil hominids. The topics covered include the versatility of the human hand, in manipulation and locomotion, bipedalism, climbing and brachiation in apes, and the change in pelvic anatomy associated with bipedalism and obstetric consequences.
Textbooks
Kapit, W and Elson, LM 2014 The Anatomy Coloring Book. Addison-Wesley. 4th edition
ANAT2010 Concepts of Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial Prerequisites: 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: ANAT2910 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: one 2-hour theory exam, one 45 min practical exam, one mid-semester quiz, three short online quiz-style assignments, one written assignment Practical field work: Tutorials: One 2-hour practical tutorial in 5 sessions during semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function such as memory and language. In essence, the subject covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain. The laboratory practical sessions offer students the special privilege to examine human specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. Tutorial meetings will provide the opportunity to encounter topics in functional anatomy and histology of the brain using photographs, diagrams, models, animations and problem-solving. Topics in identification of central nervous system structure in typical magnetic resonance images will assist in reinforcing the theory of functional anatomy in a format students are likely to encounter in further study, in real-world situations and readings. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying anatomy and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Bear, M.F., B.W. Connors, M.A. Paradiso. Neuroscience. Exploring the Brain (4th edition) Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Recommended Atlas: Nolte and Angevine. The human brain in photographs and diagrams. 4th edition Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, 2013.
ANAT2011 Fundamentals of Human Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Lal Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1hr anatomy lecture, 1hr histology lecture, 2hrs anatomy prac, 2hrs histology prac, 6hrs private study per week. Prohibitions: ANAT3007 or ANAT3907 or MEDS2005 or BMED2402 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: in-semester online quizzes (25%), practical exam (35%), theory exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Where is your pancreas? What about your pituitary gland? How do we pack nine meters of intestines into our body? ANAT2011 is designed for students who are studying human anatomy for the first time, as well as those who have been introduced to human anatomy in biological sciences. In laboratory classes using human cadavers you will gain fundamental knowledge of the anatomy of the brain and nerves; the anatomy of the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine and digestive systems, and musculoskeletal anatomy. The laboratory classes are interwoven with lectures, tutorials and discussion groups, as well as on-line quizzes and self-directed learning modules. The course teaches the language of anatomy, as well as knowledge and practical skills in human anatomy, preparing you for many applied anatomical settings. The hands-on laboratory sessions will require you to work together in teams to engage the content, building your interpersonal skills, and fostering a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. You will also consider the processes of body donation and the ethical, legal and moral frameworks around which people donate their remains for anatomical learning, teaching and research. This unit contains assumed knowledge for entry into the graduate medical program at the University of Sydney, and is also suitable for graduate programs in dentistry, nursing, physical therapies, forensic sciences.
ANAT2910 Concepts in Neuroanatomy Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: ANAT2010 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: one 2-hour theory exam, one 45 min practical exam, one 1200 word critical scientific review article, one mid-semester quiz, three short online quiz-style assignments Practical field work: 1 x 1 hr practical Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function such as memory and language. In essence, the subject covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain. The laboratory practical sessions offer students the special privilege to examine human specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. Tutorial meetings will provide the opportunity to encounter topics in functional anatomy and histology of the brain using photographs, diagrams, models, animations and problem-solving. Topics in identification of central nervous system structure in typical magnetic resonance images will assist in reinforcing the theory of functional anatomy in a format students are likely to encounter in further study and in real-world situations and readings. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying anatomy and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Required text: Bear, M.F., B.W. Connors, M.A. Paradiso. Neuroscience. Exploring the Brain (4th edition) Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Recommended Atlas: Nolte and Angevine. The human brain in photographs and diagrams. 4th edition Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, 2013.
IMMU2011 Immunobiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Umaimainthan Palendira Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lecturettes, weekly Interactive lectures, fortnightly Workshops and Practicals. ~4-5h face-to-face per week Prerequisites: BIOL1XX7 or (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) or BIOL1XX2 or MBLG1XX1 Prohibitions: IMMU2911 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), practical reports (30%), title and abstract task (15%) and final exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Immunobiology is the study of defence mechanisms that protect living organisms against life-threatening infections. In this unit of study you will explore the essential features of the host immune responses mounted by animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, plants and microbes themselves. Studies in animal and microbial immunobiology are leading to breakthroughs in veterinary and clinical medicine, including combatting infectious diseases, maximising transplant success, treating allergies, autoimmune diseases and cancer, as well as the development of new vaccines to prevent disease. Understanding the immunobiology of plants also enables us to protect crops from disease which enhances our food security. In this unit of study you will be provided with an overview of immunobiology as a basic research science. We will explore the nature of the immune cells and molecules that recognise danger and how the immune system of animals and plants respond at the cellular and molecular level. Practical and tutorial sessions are designed to illustrate particular concepts introduced in other face-to-face activities. Further self-directed learning activities, including online learning activities, will facilitate integration of fundamental information and help you apply this knowledge to the ways in which the host organism defends against disease. Upon completion, you will have developed the foundations to undertake further studies in Biology, Animal Health, Immunology and Pathology. Ultimately, this could lead you to a career in medical research, biosecurity and/or Veterinary Science.
Textbooks
Abbas, Lichtman and Pillai (2016) Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of The Immune System, 5th Edition
IMMU2911 Immunobiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Umaimainthan Palendira Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lecturettes, weekly Interactive lectures, fortnightly Workshops and Practicals . ~4-5h face-to-face per week Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in [BIOL1XX7 or (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) or BIOL1XX2 or MBLG1XX1] Prohibitions: IMMU2011 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Online quizzes (20%), practical reports (15%), journal article comprehension task (5%), title and abstract written task (10%) and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Immunobiology is the study of defence mechanisms that protect living organisms against life-threatening infections. In this unit of study you will explore the essential features of the host immune responses and how it evolved from unicellular organisms to complex multi-cellular organisms. Studies in animal and microbial immunobiology are leading to breakthroughs in veterinary and clinical medicine, including combatting infectious diseases, maximising transplant success, treating allergies, autoimmune diseases and cancer, as well as development of new vaccines to prevent disease. Understanding the immunobiology of plants also enables us to protect crops from disease which enhances our food security. In this unit of study you will be provided with a detailed overview of immunobiology as a basic research science. We will explore in detail the nature of the immune cells and molecules that recognise danger and how the immune system of animals and plants respond at the cellular and molecular level. Advanced practical and tutorial sessions are designed to illustrate particular concepts introduced in other face-to-face activities. Further self-directed learning activities, including online learning activities, will facilitate integration of fundamental information and help you apply this knowledge to the ways in which the host organism defends against disease. This advanced version of Immunobiology has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in alternative components which may for example include guest lectures from experts. The nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Abbas, Lichtman and Pillai (2016) Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of The Immune System, 5th Edition
PCOL2021 Key Concepts in Pharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brent McParland Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, multimedia module- and data analysis-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: PCOL2555 or PCOL2011 or MEDS2002 or BMED2401 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2002 Assumed knowledge: [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) Assessment: Cognitive, problem-based examination (40%), poster presentation (10%), practical exercises (20%), written research topics (10%), online quizzes (10%), and contribution to online discussion (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Pharmacology is the study of the properties and biological actions of drugs and chemicals and the keys role they play in the prevention and treatment of human diseases. In this unit of study you will be introduced to the fundamental concepts in pharmacology: a) principles of drug action, b) pharmacokinetics and precision medicine, c) drug design, and d) drug development and regulation. Additionally, you will learn the tools pharmacologists use in their investigations and develop skills in laboratory and problem-based enquiry. In both face-to-face and online learning environments you will learn the core concepts underpinning pharmacology and will have the opportunity to explore and apply these concepts through practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. By undertaking this unit you will not only learn to view health and disease through the lens of a pharmacologist, you will further develop valuable skills in critical thinking and problem solving, communication, digital literacy, teamwork and interdisciplinary effectiveness. This unit will help you to develop a coherent and connected knowledge of the medical sciences and their broad applications, while also giving you the foundations for increasing your disciplinary expertise in pharmacology.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site. Links to other learning technologies will be available via Canvas LMS. Textbooks will be available for purchase from Co-op bookshop, in hard copy and online via the library.
PCOL2022 Drugs in Contemporary Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hilary Lloyd Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, multimedia module- and data analysis-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: PCOL2555 or PCOL2012 Assumed knowledge: PCOL2021 Assessment: Online quizzes (10%), oral presentation (10%), practical exercises (20%), written research topics (10%), online discussion posts (10%), Final Exam (problem-based) (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
The prevention, control and treatment of many diseases and conditions remain major challenges within contemporary society. These challenges provide unique opportunities for pharmacologists to discover novel molecular targets for drug action. In this unit of study you will examine six major conditions that affect a range of body systems where improvements in treatment using pharmacotherapies are needed. In learning about unresolved issues, you will also evaluate the complexities of pharmacological treatment, including: ethical considerations, strength of evidence of drug efficacy, as well as safety and tolerability aspects of drug use. Using the tools of pharmacological enquiry you will further your practical and cognitive skills through laboratory- and problem-based enquiry. In both face-to-face and online learning environments you will explore a range of pharmacotherapeutic options currently available and will have the opportunity to research and apply your knowledge and understanding to unresolved health-related problems. By undertaking this unit you will develop your disciplinary expertise in pharmacology and further your skills in critical thinking, problem solving, communication, digital literacy, teamwork and interdisciplinary effectiveness.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site. Links to other learning technologies will be available via Canvas LMS. Textbooks will be available for purchase from Co-op bookshop, in hard copy and online via the library.
PHSI2007 Key Concepts in Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: 6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903] Prohibitions: PHSI2907 or BMED2402 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exam (30%), Written and other tasks: Integrated Science project task (10%) , Laboratory report writing (25%), How Physiology Works (15%), Explaining Physiology (10% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating from the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organ systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning, you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
PHSI2907 Key Concepts in Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2007 or BMED2402 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exam (30%), Video submission of cell communication (25%), Laboratory report writing (25%), Explaining Physiology (10% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will explore these concepts in four modules: compartmentalisation, cell specialisation, communication between cells and responding to the environment. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organs systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Furthermore, specialised activities in physiological research will allow small group learning and interaction with staff. Workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
PHSI2008 Integrated Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bronwyn McAllan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2908 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)] Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exam (30%), Written and other tasks (10%), Laboratory report writing (25%), How Physiology Works (15%), Explaining Physiology (10% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
The study of physiology is in essence the understanding of the integration of function and homeostasis. In this unit you will extend your learning in MEDS2001/PHSI2X07, applying your understanding of basic physiology to systems-based scenarios in three modules: muscle, sensory and disease complications. This will consolidate your conceptual understanding of physiology and how the homeostatic mechanisms change in disease. The final module on disease will consolidate your understanding by demonstrating how body systems do not act in isolation, but rather how changes in their interdependence lead to homeostatic dysregulation and pathological outcomes. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, your understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the complex systems that regulate the human body and provide the platform for undertaking a major in Physiology in third year.
PHSI2908 Integrated Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Thorn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2008 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)] Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exams (30%), Written and other tasks (25%), Laboratory report writing (25%), Explaining Physiology (10% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The study of physiology is in essence the understanding of the integration of function and homeostasis. In this unit you will extend your learning in MEDS2001/PHSI2X07 by applying your understanding of basic physiology to systems-based scenarios in three modules: muscle, sensory and disease complications. This will consolidate your conceptual understanding of physiology and how the homeostatic mechanisms change in disease. The final module on disease will consolidate your understanding by demonstrating how body systems do not act isolation, but rather how changes in their interdependence lead to homeostatic dysregulation and pathological outcomes. This unit of study will extend the PHSI2008 unit. Activities will focus on current research in the area of physiology, including examples of its relevance to disease. Students will engage with active researchers and explore the role of physiology in multidisciplinary approaches to understanding body function. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, your understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work and provide an opportunity for students to apply and extend their understanding of physiological concepts. Completion of this unit will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the complex systems that regulate the human body and provide the platform for undertaking a major in Physiology in third year.
3000-level units of study
AMED3001 Cancer

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Geraldine O'Neill Session: Semester 1 Classes: interactive face to face activities 4 hrs/week; online 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3901 Assessment: in-semester exam, assignments, quiz, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
What does it mean when someone tells you: "you have cancer"? Initially you're probably consumed with questions like: "how did this happen?" and "will this cancer kill me?". In this unit, we will explore all aspects of the "cancer problem" from the underlying biomedical and environmental causes, through to emerging approaches to cancer diagnosis and treatment. You will integrate medical science knowledge from a diverse range of disciplines and apply this to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer both at the individual and community level. Together we will explore the epidemiology, aetiology and pathophysiology of cancer. You will be able to define problems and formulate solutions related to the study, prevention and treatment of cancer with consideration throughout for the economic, social and psychological costs of a disease that affects billions. Face-to-face and online learning activities will allow you to work effectively in individual and collaborative contexts. You will acquire the skills to interpret and communicate observations and experimental findings related to the "cancer problem" to diverse audiences. Upon completion, you will have developed the foundations that will allow you to follow a career in cancer research, clinical and diagnostic cancer services and/or the corporate system that supports the health care system.
Textbooks
Recommended Textbook: 1.,Weinberg (2013) The Biology of Cancer. 2nd edition. Garland Science Recommended reading: 1.,Hanahan and Weinberg (2000). The hallmarks of cancer. Cell 100, 57-70. 2.,Hanahan and Weinberg (2011). Hallmarks of cancer: the next generation. Cell 144, 646-74
AMED3002 Interrogating Biomedical and Health Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jean Yang Session: Semester 1 Classes: face to face 5 hrs/week; online 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Assumed knowledge: Exploratory data analysis, sampling, simple linear regression, t-tests, confidence intervals and chi-squared goodness of fit tests, familiar with basic coding, basic linear algebra. Assessment: in-semester exam, assignments, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Biotechnological advances have given rise to an explosion of original and shared public data relevant to human health. These data, including the monitoring of expression levels for thousands of genes and proteins simultaneously, together with multiple databases on biological systems, now promise exciting, ground-breaking discoveries in complex diseases. Critical to these discoveries will be our ability to unravel and extract information from these data. In this unit, you will develop analytical skills required to work with data obtained in the medical and diagnostic sciences. You will explore clinical data using powerful, state of the art methods and tools. Using real data sets, you will be guided in the application of modern data science techniques to interrogate, analyse and represent the data, both graphically and numerically. By analysing your own real data, as well as that from large public resources you will learn and apply the methods needed to find information on the relationship between genes and disease. Leveraging expertise from multiple sources by working in team-based collaborative learning environments, you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play an active role in finding meaningful solutions to difficult problems, creating an important impact on our lives.
AMED3003 Diagnostics and Biomarkers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fabienne Brilot-Turville Session: Semester 2 Classes: interactive face to face 4 hrs/week; online activities 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PHSI2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3903 Assessment: in-semester exam, skill based assessments, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Diagnostic sciences have evolved at a rapid pace and provide the cornerstone of our health care system. Effective diagnostic assays enable the identification of people who have, or are at risk of, a disease, and guide their treatment. Research into the pathophysiology of disease underpins the discovery of novel biomarkers and in turn, the development of revolutionary diagnostic assays that make use of state-of-the-art molecular and cellular methods. In this unit you will explore a diverse range of diagnostic tests and gain valuable practical experience in a number of core diagnostic methodologies, many of which are currently used in hospital laboratories. Together we will also cover the regulatory, social, and ethical aspects of the use of biomarkers and diagnostic tests and explore the pathways to their translation into clinical practice. By undertaking this unit, you will develop your understanding of diagnostic assays and biomarkers and acquire the skills needed to embark on a career in diagnostic sciences.
ANAT3004 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour tutorials per week Tutorials: the first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the head and neck currently being studied. Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)] Prohibitions: ANAT3904 or ANAT3994 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; [(BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: theory exam - 55%, prac exam - 35%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and CT scans and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3904 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, two hour tutorials per week. Tutorials: the first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the head and neck currently being studied. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {12cp from rom [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)]} Prohibitions: ANAT3004or ANAT3994 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: theory exam - 50%, prac exam - 30%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10%, advanced report on one of the special topics outlined below - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy plus further studies of medical images, anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and details of development of selected head and neck structures. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: The advanced course includes studies of anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and also details of development of selected head and neck structures. Also studies of head and neck anatomy and development using ultrasound.
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy. Also further studies of anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and of details of development of selected head and neck structures.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Colour Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3994 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, one two hour tutorials per week plus three hours dissection per week Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (ANAT3007 or ANAT3907) Prohibitions: ANAT3904 or ANAT3004 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) and demonstrated evidence of manual dexterity and ethical approach Assessment: theory exam - 45%, prac exam - 30%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10%, dissection writeups - 5%, report on one of the dissection topics - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, plus 3 hours dissection per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Course is subject to availability of donor material for dissection. Course is by invitation only.
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. Dissection activities further the understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck and develop highly advanced skills in dissection and prosection of cadaveric materials.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Colour Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3007 Visceral Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour tutorials per week. The first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the trunk currently being studied. Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] Prohibitions: ANAT2011 or ANAT3907 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2005 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 Assessment: theory exam - 55%, prac exam - 35%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the anatomy of the viscera of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Structures covered include the heart and associated great vessels, lungs, mediastinum and the abdominal viscera, the alimentary organs and the genitourinary system. The structure of anterior thoracic and abdominal walls and pelvis along with the nerve supply to the viscera and relevant endocrine structures is also covered. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of structure to function especially with respect to the important functions of breathing, digestion, excretion and reproduction. Students will be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi and Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3907 Visceral Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures, 2 x 2 hr tutorials Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)]} Prohibitions: ANAT2011 or ANAT3007 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2005 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 Assessment: theory exam - 50%, prac exam - 30%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10%, advanced report on one of the special topics listed below - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy plus further studies of medical images, anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and details of development of selected head and neck structures. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the anatomy of the viscera of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Structures covered include the heart and associated great vessels, lungs, mediastinum and the abdominal viscera, the alimentary organs and the genitourinary system. The structure of anterior thoracic and abdominal walls and pelvis along with the nerve supply to the viscera and relevant endocrine structures is also covered. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of structure to function especially with respect to the important functions of breathing, digestion, excretion and reproduction. Students will be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy. Also further studies of anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and of details of development of selected head and neck structures.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi and Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy
ANAT3008 Musculoskeletal Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 2-hour tutorial per week Practical Work: One two hour practical class per week Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI12008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) Prohibitions: ANAT3908 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: One 90 minute paper (70%), one 60 minute paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
The unit provides an opportunity for students to study the topographical and systems anatomy of the upper limb, lower limb and the back regions. Emphasis is placed upon the identification and description of structures and the correlation of structure with function. This includes for the upper limb, its role in manipulation, for the lower limb standing and walking and for the back flexible support and protection. Emphasis is also given to the innervation of the limbs. The unit also aims to develop the general skills of observation, description, drawing, writing and discussion as applying to biological structure.
ANAT3908 Musculoskeletal Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures Prerequisites: An average mark of 70 or above from 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2X10 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X06 or PHSI2X07 or PHSI2X08 or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or BIOL2X21 or BIOL2X22 or BIOL2X24 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31] or [BMED2401 and BMED2402]} Prohibitions: ANAT3008 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; [(BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: One 90 minute paper(70%), one practical examination (30%) Practical field work: 2 x 2hr Anatomy Wetlab Laboratories Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit of study aims to provide an opportunity for students to study the topographical and systems anatomy of the upper limb, lower limb and the back regions. Emphasis is placed upon the identification and description of structures and the correlation of structure with function, which for the upper limb includes its role in manipulation, for the lower limb standing and walking and for the back flexible support and protection. Emphasis is also given to the innervation of the limbs and the consequences of nerve lesions for limb function. The unit also aims to develop the general skills of observation, description, drawing, writing and discussion as applying to biological structure. The unit builds upon or compliments other macroscopic anatomy units offered by the Department and provides for the development of skills, which could be relevant to a later honours project or higher degree in the field of structural biology.
ANAT3009 Functional Systems Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Lindsay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2h/wk; Practical class 3hr/wk Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)] Prohibitions: HSTO3001 or HSTO3902 or EMHU3001 or EMHU3002 or ANAT3909 Assumed knowledge: (BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996) or (BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 or BIOL1997) or (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: Mid-semester exam - 45mins (20%), Final Theory Exam -2hrs (40%), Final Practical Exam -1hr (40%), regular formative discussions and quizzes, Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Medicine and Health
ANAT3009 provides students with the theoretical knowledge of the histology of the whole body. Hands-on practical training is gained in the operation of a light microscope to examine complex human and animal histological slides. An in-depth understanding is gained about the alimentary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive systems and that knowledge is applied to current trends in research and the clinical field. Students are exposed to current research regarding implantation and placental development and the clinical field by examining IVF treatment. This encourages students to apply their knowledge to various fields and gain a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. The practical sessions ensure students apply lecture content and necessitate group work to complete practical discussion points. Students develop their written and oral communication skills in the language and conventions of the subject through regular discussions. The theoretical and practical skills gainedcan provide a basis for further studies in fields such as anatomy, histology, and pathology or in post graduate medicine or in areas of research requiring knowledge of advanced histological examination.
ANAT3909 Functional Systems Histology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Lindsay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2h/wk; Practical class 3hr/wk; Project work self-directed during semester Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) Prohibitions: HSTO3001 or HSTO3902 or EMHU3001 or EMHU3002 or ANAT3009 Assumed knowledge: (BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996) or (BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 or BIOL1997) or (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: Video presentation and script (,15-20 MCQ and SAQs) - 20%, Final Theory Exam (2 hours) - 40%, Final Practical Exam (1 hour) - 40%, Formative discussion and quizzes (During designated practical sessions) - 0% Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Medicine and Health
ANAT3909 provides students with the theoretical knowledge of the histology of the whole body. Hands-on practical training is gained in the operation of a light microscope to examine complex human and animal histological slides. An in-depth understanding is gained about the alimentary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive systems and that knowledge is applied to current trends in research and the clinical field. Students are exposed to current research regarding implantation and placental development and the clinical field by examining IVF treatment. This encourages students to apply their knowledge to various fields and gain a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. The practical sessions ensure students apply lecture content and necessitate group work to complete practical discussion points. Students develop their written and oral communication skills in the language and conventions of the subject through regular discussions, and video creation. The theoretical and practical skills gainedcan provide a basis for further studies in fields such as anatomy, histology, pathology or in post graduate medicine or in areas of research requiring knowledge of advanced histological examination.
ANAT3010 Anatomical Imaging: From Micro to Macro

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Luke Henderson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures-2h/wk; Practicals 3x 3h; Facilitated Workshops 5x 3h; Self-Directed Workshops 5x 3h; Case presentations 1x3h. Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) Prohibitions: HSTO3001 or HSTO3902 or EMHU3001 or EMHU3002 Assumed knowledge: (BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996) or (BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 or BIOL1997) or (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: Micro-Imaging Quiz (,15-20 MCQ) - Formative, In-semester Exam (Modules 1 and 2) (20%), Compare and Contrast report (~2 A4 pages) (10%), Case-study presentation (20 minutes) (20%), Project submissions (Modules 2 and 3) - Formative, Final Exam (2 hours)(50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit provides an opportunity for you to gain theoretical and practical understanding of fundamental and state of the art anatomical imaging techniques. Module 1 examines the theory, principles and practice of microscopy, in which you will gain a deeper understanding of the techniques used to describe the detailed organisation of biological tissues. Module 2 investigates X-ray imaging, CT scanning, MRIs, ultrasound and PET scans. Emphasis is placed in the first two modules on developing your ability to analyse images, compare and describe the advantages and disadvantages of each technique and to hypothesise how these techniques can be used to solve research and clinical questions. Module 3 explores the specific uses of these imaging technologies in the fields of neuroscience, cardiology, forensic osteology, pathology and surgery. You will apply the understanding gained in modules 1 and 2 to specific research and clinical studies. This integrated approach to learning will give you a broader perspective and understanding of the importance and impact of anatomical imaging. The unit provides a basis for further studies in fields such as neuroscience, or forensic science or in postgraduate medicine or in areas of research requiring knowledge of imaging techniques.
CPAT3201 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour research tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [(BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or (BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Prohibitions: CPAT3901 Assumed knowledge: Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), one major research essay (1500w) (20%), two 0.5-hour in-semester exams (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
The Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1 unit of study modules will provide a theoretical background to the scientific basis of the pathogenesis of disease. Areas covered in theoretical modules include: tissue responses to exogenous factors, adaptive responses to foreign agents, cardiovascular/pulmonary/gut responses to disease, forensic science, neuropathology and cancer. The aims of the course are: - To give students an overall understanding of the fundamental biological mechanisms governing disease pathogenesis in human beings. - To introduce to students basic concepts of the pathogenesis, natural history and complications of common human diseases. - To demonstrate and exemplify differences between normality and disease. - To explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes. Together with CPAT3202, the unit of study would be appropriate for those who intend to proceed to Honours research, to postgraduate studies such as Medicine or to careers in biomedical areas such as hospital science. Enquires should be directed to anthea.matsimanis@sydney.edu.au
Textbooks
Kumar, Abbas and Aster. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th edition. Saunders. 2012.
CPAT3901 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1 (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures (2 h/wk) and online lecturettes (3 x 20 min/wk); group focus tutorial (3 x 2 h over 2-3 weeks); guided museum session (1 h/wk); and preparation of online research notebooks (1 h/wk). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) or BCHM2081 or BCHM2981) or BCHM2082 or BCHM2982)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Prohibitions: CPAT3201 Assumed knowledge: A working knowledge of biology Assessment: Week 2 in-semester quiz 1 - 5% (12 MCQ)?Museum tour and report (module 1) - 5%Week 6 in-semester quiz 2 - 5% (12 MCQ)Museum tour and report (module 2) - 5%Week 8 in-semester quiz 3 - 5% (12 MCQ)Museum tour and report (module 3) - 5%Week 9 in-semester quiz 4 - 5% (12 MCQ)Museum tour and report (module 4) - 5% Week 10-12 Group focus learning module that precedes assignment of the pathogenesis essays to each group; students will then work in small groups to build short oral presentations (5 min) on the assigned topics. These presentations will be delivered within the groups and in the presence of a content expert that will provide feed back together with group feed back for each presentation. This will be a formative task.Week 13 Pathogenesis report - 20%Exam period final exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
A deep understanding of pathological mechanisms for disease progression leads to improved human health outcomes. As human populations across the world are ageing, the increasing burden of age-related disease will become one of the greatest challenges facing modern medical science. To equip students with skills appropriate for job-ready careers in the biomedical sciences specialising in pathology it is necessary to provide an integrated understanding of how to evaluate and analyse crucial pathological mechanisms governing disease progression in humans. You will participate in inquiry-led learning modules focused on the systems theory of disease and the underlying mechanisms that promote disease progression in humans. To demonstrate disease you will review high-resolution imagery of pathological specimens using innovative online tools combined with in-depth description of immunological, molecular and biochemical process that underpin the pathogenesis of disease in a range of major body organs. You will undertake investigations to gain an advanced understanding of the health complications of common human diseases. You will learn to use a process of high-level deduction to identify key differences between normality and disease in order to explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes. Through undertaking this unit you will develop the necessary skill set to define and strategically assess how different organ systems react to injury/insult and how to apply basic concepts of disease processes, which ultimately improve the capacity to manage and intervene in fundamental and clinical aspects of health and disease.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site and the Pathology museum website. Robbins Basic Pathology; 9th Edition, Eds Kumar, Abbas, Fausto and Mitchell
CPAT3202 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 2 Classes: Practical Module Prerequisites: 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [(BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or (BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Corequisites: CPAT3201 Prohibitions: CPAT3901 Assumed knowledge: Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), Museum Practical Reports (40%). Practical field work: One 2-hour microscopic practical and one 2-hour museum practical per week. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
The Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2 unit of study modules will provide a practical background to the scientific basis of the pathogenesis of disease. Areas covered in practical modules include disease specimen evaluation on a macroscopic and microscopic basis. The aims of the course are: - To enable students to gain an understanding of how different organ systems react to injury and to apply basic concepts of disease processes. - To equip students with skills appropriate for careers in the biomedical sciences and for further training in research or professional degrees. At the end of the course students will: - Have acquired practical skills in the use of a light microscope. - Have an understanding of basic investigative techniques for disease detection in pathology. - Be able to evaluate diseased tissue at the macroscopic and microscopic level. - Have the ability to describe, synthesise and present information on disease pathogenesis. - Transfer problem-solving skills to novel situations related to disease pathogenesis. This unit of study would be appropriate for those who intend to proceed to Honours research, to postgraduate studies such as Medicine or to careers in biomedical areas such as hospital science. Enquiries should be directed to anthea.matsimanis@sydney.edu.au.
Textbooks
Kumar, Abbas and Aster. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th edition. Saunders. 2012.
CPAT3902 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2 (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures (2h/wk) and online lecturettes (3 x 20 min/wk); Microscopy tutorial (1.5 h); guided museum session (1 h/wk); and preparation of online research notebooks (1 h/wk). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) or BCHM2081 or BCHM2981) or BCHM2082 or BCHM2982)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Prohibitions: CPAT3202 Assumed knowledge: A working knowledge of biology Assessment: Week 2 pre-quiz 1 - 5% (10 MCQ)?Week 4 pre-quiz 2 - 5% (10 MCQ)Week 6 Electronic notebook 1 - 10% (Narrative Plan document that is to be populated with data obtained by the student)?Week 8 pre-quiz 3 - 5% (10 MCQ)Week 10 pre-quiz 4 - 5% (10 MCQ)Week 12 Electronic notebook 1 - 10% (Narrative Plan document that is to be populated with data obtained by the student)?Week 13 or 14 Practical exam - 20% (Specimen and micrograph-based practical exam) followed by final exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Understanding the underlying mechanisms of disease and disease progression, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity on individual health outcomes are some of the great challenges facing modern medical sciences in the 21st century. To equip students with skills appropriate for careers in the biomedical sciences and for further training in research or professional degrees it is necessary to provide an integrated understanding of how to evaluate and analyse crucial pathological mechanisms governing disease progression in humans. You will participate in inquiry-led museum and practical class sessions that review human pathological specimens using innovative online tools combined with high-resolution microscopy to crystallise and reinforce concepts developed in the unit. You will undertake investigations to gain an advanced understanding of the pathogenesis, natural history and related health complications of common human diseases. You will learn to use methodologies to exemplify key differences between normality and disease in order to explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes. Through undertaking this unit you will develop the necessary practical skills required to employ advanced imaging technologies that are increasingly used to define and strategically assess how different organ systems react to injury/insult, which ultimately improve the capacity to manage and intervene in fundamental and clinical aspects of health and disease.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site; through electronic notebooks and the Pathology museum website. Robbins Basic Pathology; 9th Edition, Eds Kumar, Abbas, Fausto and Mitchell
HSTO3003 Cells and Development: Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Lovicu Session: Semester 2 Classes: Four to five 1-hour theory lectures and/or one 1-hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 72cp of 1000 to 3000 level units Assumed knowledge: (ANAT2008 or BMED2401 or MEDS2005) and Human biology; BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, tutorial research papers and Seminar (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
The main emphasis of this unit of study concerns the mechanisms that control animal development. Early developmental processes including fertilisation, cleavage, and gastrulation leading to the formation of the primary germ layers and subsequent body organs are described in a range of animals, mainly vertebrates. Stem cells of both embryonic and adult origin will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the parts played by inductive cell and tissue interactions in cell and tissue differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation. This will be studied at both cellular and molecular levels.
Textbooks
Gilbert, SF. Developmental Biology. 11th edition. Sinauer Associates Inc. 2016.
IMMU3102 Molecular and Cellular Immunology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Carl Feng Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one tutorial and one 4-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11 Prohibitions: IMMU3902 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This study unit builds on the series of lectures that outlined the general properties of the immune system, effector lymphocytes and their functions, delivered in the core courses, IMMU2101 - Introductory Immunology and BMED2404 - Microbes, Infection and Immunity (formerly IMMU2001 and BMED2807). In this unit the molecular and cellular aspects of the immune system are investigated in detail. We emphasise fundamental concepts to provide a scientific basis for studies of the coordinated and regulated immune responses that lead to elimination of infectious organisms. Guest lectures from research scientists eminent in particular branches of immunological research are a special feature of the course. These provide challenging information from the forefront of research that will enable the student to become aware of the many components that come under the broad heading 'Immunology'. Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week, for the duration of the course. This unit directly complements the unit 'Immunology in Human Disease IMMU3202' and students are very strongly advised to undertake these study units concurrently.
Textbooks
Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier.
IMMU3902 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Carl Feng Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 lectures, 1 special seminar/tutorial (2 hours), 1 practical (4 hours) every 2 weeks. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in (IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11) Prohibitions: IMMU3102 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Introductory Immunology (IMMU2101). Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as students in IMMU3102 but carry out advanced level practical work and a series of specialized seminar based tutorial classes.
Textbooks
Textbooks Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier.
IMMU3202 Immunology in Human Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Allison Abendroth Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one tutorial and one 4 hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11 Prohibitions: IMMU3903 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: .
This study unit builds on the series of lectures that outlined the general properties of the immune system, effector lymphocytes and their functions, delivered in the core courses, IMMU2101 - Introductory Immunology and BMED2404 - Microbes, Infection and Immunity (formerly IMMU2001 and BMED2807). We emphasise fundamental concepts to provide a scientific basis for studies in clinical immunology; dysfunctions of the immune system e.g. autoimmune disease, immunodeficiencies, and allergy, and immunity in terms of host - pathogen interactions. This unit has a strong focus on significant clinical problems in immunology and the scientific background to these problems. The unit includes lectures from research scientists and clinicians covering areas such as allergy, immunodeficiency, autoimmune disease and transplantation. This course provides challenging information from the forefront of clinical immunology and helps the student develop an understanding of immune responses in human health and disease. Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week, for the duration of the course. This unit directly complements the unit 'Molecular and Cellular Immunology IMMU3102' and students are very strongly advised to undertake these study units concurrently.
Textbooks
Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier
IMMU3903 Immunology in Human Disease (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Allison Abendroth Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 lectures,1 seminar/tutorial (2 hours) and1 practical (4 hours) every 2 weeks. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in (IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11) Prohibitions: IMMU3202 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Introductory Immunology (IMMU2101). Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as students in IMMU3202 but carry out advanced level practical work and a series of specialized seminar based tutorial classes.
Textbooks
Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier
INFD3012 Infectious Diseases

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jamie Triccas Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 4 hour practical class per week. Prerequisites: BMED2404 or IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11 Assessment: Formal examination (60%): one 2 hour exam. Progressive assessment (40%): includes tutorial case presentation, mid-semester quiz and practical assessment. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Infectious diseases occur as a result of interactions between a host and a microbial parasite. This unit of study will explain how infectious agents interact with human hosts at the molecular, cellular, individual patient and community levels to cause diseases and how the hosts attempt to combat these infections. The unit will be taught by the discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology of the Department of Medicine within the Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine with involvement of associated clinical and research experts who will contribute lectures and theme sessions on their own special interests. The unit will integrate lectures with clinical case studies and hands-on practical sessions to provide students with current knowledge of infectious diseases.
Textbooks
Infectious Diseases: Pathogenesis, Prevention and Case Studies. Edited by Shetty et al. Wiley-Blackwell 2009. ISBN 9781405135436.
NEUR3003 Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Catherine Leamey and A/Prof. Kevin Keay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures plus one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: NEUR3903 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Final exam. Mid-semester exam, Major essay/report, attendance and particpation in assessment of Advanced student presentations (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences. This course is a combination of small lectures on current issues in cellular and developmental neuroscience and a research-based library project. Issues covered in the lecture series will include the role of glial on cerebral blood flow and neural transmission, neurochemistry and psychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration and the development of central and peripheral nervous systems.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3903 Cellular and Developmental Neurosci. (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A-Prof Catherine Leamey A/Prof Kevin Keay, Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab session per week. Prerequisites: Annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3003 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Final exam. Mid-semester exam, Mini-lecture presentation and resources, Attendance at and participation in assessment of advanced student presentations (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3003. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3004 Integrative Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, A/Prof Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: NEUR3904 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Mid-semester exam, Final exam, 3 short in-semester assessments/reports, Tutorial participation, attendance and at participation in assessment of Advanced student presentations (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences and to be taken in conjunction with NEUR3003. This course is a combination of small group lectures on current issues in neuroscience, seminar groups and mini research projects. Examples of recent seminar topics include imaging pain, emotions, neural development and plasticity, vision, stroke and hypertension, mechanisms of neural degeneration and long-term regulation of blood pressure.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3904 Integrative Neuroscience (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, Dr Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Up to one 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial and one two hour laboratory session per week on average. Prerequisites: Annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3004 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Mid-semester exam, Final exam, Major essay/report, Tutorial participation, Attendance at and participation in assessment of advanced student presentations (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3004. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience research.
BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3005 Functional Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two one-hour lectures per week, one guest leacture, 3 three-hour seminars Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3905 Assumed knowledge: [ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Assessment: One mid-semester practical exam ( in-class), one final theory exam, one final practical exam, 'Neuroscience in the Media' 3 team-based assessment tasks during seminars and 1 individual written assignment Practical field work: Weekly 1.5 hour practical class Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of functional neuroanatomy and systems neuroscience, and an appreciation that neuroscience is a constantly evolving field. There will be a detailed exploration of the anatomical structures and pathways that underlie sensation and perception in each of the sensory modalities. The neural circuits and mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions will be explored in great detail based on current neuroscience literature. Practical classes will allow students to identify and learn the functions of critical anatomical structures in human brain and spinal cord specimens. Reading and interpreting images from functional and structural brain imaging techniques will be incorporated into the neuroanatomy practical classes, and develop an appreciation of how these technologies can be used in neuroscience research. The Neuroscience in the Media seminars will develop neuroscience literature searching skills as well as developing critical thinking and analysis of the accuracy of the media portrayal of neuroscience research. Building on these skills and working in small groups, students will re-frame and communicate neuroscience evidence through the production of a short video. Students will also learn the skills required to write an unbiased and accurate popular media article based on a recent neuroscience research paper. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science graduates as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Nolte's. The Human Brain by Todd Vanderah and Douglas Gould. 7th Ed, Elsevier, 2015
NEUR3905 Functional Neuroanatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two one-hour lectures per week, 8 one-hour seminars Prerequisites: Annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3005 Assumed knowledge: [ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Assessment: One mid-semester practical exam (in-class), one final theory exam, one final practical exam, Journal Club participation, Journal Club presentation and 1 individual written assignment Practical field work: Weekly 1.5 hour practical class Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of functional neuroanatomy and systems neuroscience, and an appreciation that neuroscience is a constantly evolving field. There will be a detailed exploration of the anatomical structures and pathways that underlie sensation and perception in each of the sensory modalities. The neural circutis and mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions will be explored in great detail based on current neuroscience literature. Practical classes will allow students to identify and learn the functions of critical anatomical structures in human brain and spinal corde specimens. Reading and interpreting images from functional ans tructural brain imaging techniques will be incorporated intot the neuroanatomy practical classes, and develop an appreciation of how these technologies can be used in neuroscience research. By undertaking the advanced unit students will participate in weekly small group seminars under the guidance of a research-active academic. The seminars will take the form of a Journal Club, a style practiced widely in research laboratories around the world. The aim of the Journal Club is to develop critical thinking and detailed knowledge in a specific area of neuroscience research through group discussions. The Journal Club will also develop the skills required to lead a discussion in a small group setting as well as research and write a scholarly neuroscience review article. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science graduates as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Nolte. Nolte's The Human Brain by Todd. Vanderah and Douglas Gould. 7th Ed, Elsevier, 2015
NEUR3006 Neural Information Processing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bill Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: two lectures, 1 two-hour research paper session (journal club, 8 weeks) Prerequisites: 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3906 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402 Assessment: one 2hr exam, 1500w essay, paper session oral presentation and participation marks, one prac report plus prac quizzes Practical field work: 1 x 3hour Prac (total of 5 such practical sessions) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit provides an introduction the mechanisms that drive neurons and neural circuits throughout the brain and body. The lectures explore how signal intensity is translated into nerve impulse codes and how this information is again translated through synapses to convey and interpret information about the external world, to control the body and to record information for future use (learning and memory). We also consider how sensory and motor information is integrated through neural circuits in the brain and spinal cord. Practical classes introduce some of the different ways in which the workings of the brain are studied. Each student chooses a journal club that focuses on a specific topic in neuroscience. In the weekly sessions, group members read, present and interpret original research papers, developing a deep understanding of the emerging scientific evidence in the topic area. This senior year unit of study will develop skills in critical analysis, interpretation and communication of new evidence.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3906 Neural Information Processing (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dario Protti Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 hour lectures per week Prerequisites: 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3006 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402 Assessment: One 2hr exam, prac assessment consisting of one group poster presentation and two short MCQ quizzes, one advanced prac report, one written grant proposal (up to 2,000 words) and oral presentation of grant proposal. Practical field work: 1 x 3hour Prac (total of 6 such practical sessions) with the mainstream course and 3-4 x 3 hour advanced pracs. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit provides an introduction into the mechanisms that drive neurons and neural circuits throughout the brain and body. The lectures explore how signal intensity is translated into nerve impulse codes and how this information is again translated through synapses to convey and interpret information about the external world, to control the body and to record information for future use. We also consider how sensory and motor information is integrated through neural circuits in the brain and spinal cord. Practical classes introduce some of the different ways in which the workings of the brain are studied. This senior year unit of study will develop skills in critical analysis, interpretation and communication of new evidence.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
PCOL3011 Toxicology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Slade Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week and one 3 hour tutorial/practical every 2 weeks and two practical sessions each 3 hours in length. Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2405) Prohibitions: PCOL3911 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, tutorial presentations, assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit of study is designed to introduce students with a basic understanding of pharmacology to the discipline of toxicology. The study of toxicology is central to the assessment of drug safety in drug development and in the explanation of toxicology associated with registered drugs (adverse drug reactions) and drug-drug interactions. These issues as well as the pharmacogenetic basis of adverse reactions will be considered. Environmental toxicology, particularly toxic reactions to environmental agents such as asbestos and pesticides, and target organ toxicology (lung, liver, CNS) are also covered. The diverse world of plants and animal toxins will also be explored. As a final consequence of exposure to many toxicants, the biology and causes of cancer are discussed. As part of the unit students are introduced to basic ideas about the collection and analysis of data from human and animal populations, both in the structured situation of clinical trials, forensic problems and in analysis of epidemiological data.
Textbooks
Klaasen, Curtis D. Casarett and Doull's Essentials of Toxicology 2 ed. McGraw Hill. 2010, or, by the same authors: Toxicology: The Basic Science of Poisons. 7 ed. McGraw Hill. 2008.
PCOL3911 Toxicology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Slade Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week and one 3 hour tutorial/practical every second week. and two practical sessions each 3 hours in length Prerequisites: a mark of 70 or above in [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2405)] Prohibitions: PCOL3011 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, tutorial presentations, assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit will consist of the lecture and practical components of PCOL3011. Students will be set special advanced assignments and additional practical data management activities related to the material covered in lectures and practical work. These may also involve advanced practical work or detailed investigation of a theoretical problem.
Textbooks
Klaasen, Curtis D. Casarett and Doull's Essentials of Toxicology 3rd ed. McGraw Hill. 2015.. or, by the same authors: Toxicology: The Basic Science of Poisons. 8th ed. McGraw Hill. 2013.
PCOL3012 Drug Design and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Rachel Codd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical per week. Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2405)] or 12cp from BCMB2XXX Prohibitions: PCOL3912 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, class and online quizzes, assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit of study is designed to introduce students with a basic understanding of pharmacology to the field of medicinal chemistry associated with drug design and development. The course covers the fundamental aspects of drug discovery and development with reference to the essentials of chemistry and illustrates drug development with examples that include neuraminidase inhibitors and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The role of computers in drug design is emphasised by classwork and assignments on molecular modelling and structure-activity relationships. The course also extends to a section on the design of diverse pharmacological agents which include compounds for imaging by positron emission tomography (PET), and kinase inhibitors.
Textbooks
Patrick, Graham L. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry. 5th edition. Oxford University Press. 2013.
PCOL3912 Drug Design and Development (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Rachel Codd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical per week. Prerequisites: a mark of 70 or above in {(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2405)] or 12cp from BCMB2XXX} Prohibitions: PCOL3012 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, in class and online quizzes, assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit will consist of the lecture and practical components of PCOL3012. Students will be set special advanced assignments related to the material covered in core areas. These may also involve advanced practical work or detailed investigation of a theoretical problem.
Textbooks
Patrick, Graham L. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry. 5th edition. Oxford University Press. 2013.
PCOL3022 Neuropharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jonathon Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, five 1 hour tutorials, three 3 hour practicals, elective project (equivalent to three 4 hour practicals). Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015) Prohibitions: PCOL3921 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the 2000 level pharmacology units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Each student will conduct a capstone elective project (laboratory or literature-based) in applied pharmacology supervised by academic members of the department.
Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE Holtzman, DM and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundations for Clinical Neuroscience, 3rd ed. McGraw Hill, 2015.
PCOL3922 Neuropharmacology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jonathon Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, five 1 hour tutorials, three 3 hour practicals, elective project (equivalent to three 4 hour practicals). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015)] Prohibitions: PCOL3022 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the 2000 level pharmacology units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Each student will conduct a capstone elective project (laboratory or literature-based) in applied pharmacology supervised by academic members of the department.
Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE, Holtzman, DM and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundations for Clinical Neuroscience, 3rd ed. McGraw Hill, 2015.
PHSI3009 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Cook Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr/ week lectures and 6 x 2 hr large class tutorials (CBL) per semester Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: PHSI3905 or PHSI3906 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3909 Assessment: one mid-semester exam (MCQ), one 2 hr final exam (MCQ), two presentations for challenge-based learning and 1 practical class report Practical field work: 3 x 2-4 hr practicals per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Challenge-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techniques for investigating cell signalling and the biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for a science graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3909 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Cook Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr/ week lectures and 3 x 2 hrs large class tutorials (CBL) per semester Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]} Prohibitions: PHSI3009 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3906 Assessment: one mid-semester exam (MCQ), one 2hr final exam (MCQ), one presentation for challenge-based learning and one Advanced research report Practical field work: 3 x 2-4 hr practicals per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Challenge-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techiques for investigating cell signalling and biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science a graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3010 Reproduction, Development and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Stephen Assinder Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures per week; 1 guest lecture/problem-based learning class introduction/organisation session per week. 2 x 3 hour problem-based learning classes per semester. Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: PHSI3905 or PHSI3906 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3910 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 3 x 3 hr practicals per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and re-activation of developmental processes in adult disease. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating reproductive physiology, sexual dimorphism and human pathophysiology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3910 Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Stephen Assinder Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures per week; 1 guest lecture/problem-based learning class introduction/organisation session per week; 2 x 3 hour stem cell laboratory presentations per semester. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]} Prohibitions: PHSI3010 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3906 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam,stem cell labortory class (2 presentations), 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 4 x 4 hr practicals per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating reproductive physiology, sexual dimorphism and human pathophysiology. Students enrolling in PHSI3910 complete a separate laboratory class centered on stem cell differentiation to replace the problem-based learning exercises in PHSI3010.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3012 Physiology of Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Naylor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 12 x 1hr tutorials, 1 x 6hr practical Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406) Prohibitions: PHSI3007 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3908 or PHSI3912 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 2 practical class reports Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate normal homeostasis throughout the whole body and how defects in these processes can lead to significant human disease. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. The processes leading to cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic disease will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body level. Problem-based learning will focus on cancer and cardiovascular disease and practical classes will utilise both wet lab and online resources to dissect the processes by which normal physiological processes become aberrant leading to human disease.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3912 Physiology of Disease (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Naylor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 6hr practical, advanced project attendance. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406) Prohibitions: PHSI3012 or PHSI3007 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3908 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, Advanced project report Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate normal homeostasis throughout the whole body and how defects in these processes can lead to significant human disease. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. The processes leading to cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic disease will be the specific will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body level. Students will undertake an Advanced Project Problem-based learning will focus on cancer and cardiovascular disease and Practical classes will utilise both wet lab and online resources to dissect the processes by which normal physiological processes become aberrant leading to human disease.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
VIRO3002 Medical and Applied Virology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Barry Slobedman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week Prerequisites: 6cp from (BMED2404 or IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or MICR2X22) Prohibitions: VIRO3902 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms and biomolecules Assessment: One 2-hour exam covering lecture material, one 2-hour theory of practical exam, written assignment and oral presentation (100%) Practical field work: One 4 hour practical session per week, in most weeks of semester. Practical session slots are also used for oral presentations. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit of study explores diseases in human caused by viruses, with focus on the way viruses infect individual patients and spread in the community, and how virus infections are diagnosed, treated and/or prevented. Host/Virus interactions will also be described with a focus on the viral mechanisms that have evolved to combat and/or evade host defence systems. These features will be used to explain the symptoms, spread and control of the most medically important viruses that cause serious disease in humans . The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School with the involvement of associated clinical and research experts who will contribute lectures on their own special interests and with contributions from the Discipline of Microbiology. In the practical classes students will have the opportunity to develop their skills in performing methods currently used in diagnostic and research laboratories such as molecular analysis of viral genomes, immunofluorescent staining of viral antigens, cell culture and the culture of viruses.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
VIRO3902 Medical and Applied Virology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Barry Slobedman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, and one interactive 2-hour tutorials (approx 6 in total, including for oral presentations) Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BMED2404 or IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or MICR2X22) Prohibitions: VIRO3002 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms and biomolecules Assessment: One 2-hour exam covering lecture material, one 2-hour theory of practical exam, written assignment, oral presentation and tutorial participation (100%) Practical field work: One 4 hour practical session per week, in most weeks of semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine and Health
This unit is based on the VIRO3002 course with inclusion of tutorials, including with leading research medical virologists, enabling students to gain additional experience with cutting edge virology research. The content of this unit may change from year to year based on research interests within the department.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.