Neuroscience Descriptions

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

The Major and Minor requirements in the table below are incorrect. They should read as follows:

A major in Neuroscience requires 48 credit points, including:

(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level units according to the following rules:
(a) 6 credit points of 2000-level ANAT coded units or
(b) 6 credit points of 2000-level MEDS coded anatomy units for students in the Medical Science stream
(iv) 18 credit points of 3000-level major core units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary project units

A minor in Neuroscience requires 36 credit points, including:

(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level units according to the following rules:
(a) 6 credit points of 2000-level ANAT coded units or
(b) 6 credit points 2000-level MEDS coded anatomy units for students in the Medical Science stream
(iv) 12 credit points of 3000-level minor core units

5/4/2019
2.

There are corrections to the table headings and units available. They should read:

2000-level Units of Study should read:
Core
PSYC2015 Brain and Behavioural Psychology
PSYC2915 Brain and Behavioural Psychology (Advanced)
ANAT coded
ANAT2010 Concepts of Neuroanatomy
ANAT2910 Concepts of Neuroanatomy (Advanced)

3000-level Units of Study should read:
Major core
NEUR3005 Functional Neuroanatomy
NEUR3905 Functional Neuroanatomy (Advanced)
NEUR3006 Neural Information Processing
NEUR3906 Neural Information Processing  (Advanced)
PCOL3022 Neuropharmacology
PCOL3922 Neuropharmacology (Advanced)

Interdisciplinary Projects
PSYC3014 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience
PSYC3914 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience Adv
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Minor core
Remains the same

5/4/2019
3.

Prohibitions for the following units have changed. They now read:

PSYC2015 Brain and Behavioural Psychology Prohibition: PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2915 or PSYC2014

PSYC2915 Brain and Behavioural Psychology (Advanced) Prohibition: PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2014

14/1/2019
4.

Prerequisites for PSYC3014 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience have been corrected for a typing error. Where is says PSYC015 it should read PSYC2015.

The prerequisites are now:
Prerequisites: [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) and PCOL2011]
21/1/2019

NEUROSCIENCE

Advanced coursework and projects will be available in 2020 for students who complete this major.

Neuroscience major

A major in Neuroscience requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 24 credit points of 3000-level core units

Neuroscience minor

A minor in Neuroscience requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 12 credit points of 3000-level core units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, presentations, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
PSYC1002 Psychology 1002

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1150 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer/
Psychology 1002 is a further general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and it is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1002 covers the following areas: neuroscience; human mental abilities; learning and motivation; visual perception; cognitive processes; abnormal psychology.
This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site:
http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/
Textbooks
Available on-line once semester commences

2000-level units of study

Major and minor core
PSYC2010 Brain and Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures and 1x1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2015 or PSYC2915 or PSYC2016 Assessment: 1x2hr examination, 1x1500 word report, 1 x quiz, 1 x oral presentation/debate (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This Unit of Study examines a range of phenomena and principles in behaviour, learning and perception, abnormal psychology and their relations to underlying neural substrates. The emphasis in learning is on instrumental conditioning and the principle of reinforcement, ranging from applications of this principle to its neural substrates. Also covered are motivational aspects of behaviour, such as punishment and avoidance. The Abnormal Psychology section will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sex and appetite, together with related neurochemical mechanisms and the effects of various psychopharmacological agents on these processes. A number of perceptual phenomena will be studied, such as motion detection, recognition of faces, identification of emotion, hearing and hearing loss, taste discrimination, and chronic pain. The practical classes are designed for students with an interest in clinical and therapeutic Psychology, and will allow students to design and implement a behaviour modification programme.
Textbooks
Bouton, M.E. (2007). Learning and Behavior: A Contemporary Synthesis. Sinauer.
PSYC2910 Brain and Behaviour (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures and 1x1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 75 in PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915 or PSYC2016 Assessment: 1x2hr examination, 1x1500 word report, 1 x quiz, 1 x oral presentation/debate (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This Unit of Study focuses on the Behavioural Sciences, Neurosciences, Abnormal Psychology and the study of perception. The lecture content is the same as PSYC2011, and examines a range of phenomena and principles in behaviour, learning and perception, and their relations to underlying neural substrates. The emphasis in learning is on instrumental conditioning and the principle of reinforcement, ranging from applications of this principle to its neural substrates. Also covered are motivational aspects of behaviour, such as punishment and avoidance. The Abnormal Psychology section will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sex and appetite, together with related neurochemical mechanisms and the effects of various psychopharmacological agents on these processes. A number of perceptual phenomena will be studied, such as motion detection, recognition of faces, identification of emotion, hearing and hearing loss, taste discrimination, and chronic pain. The practical classes differ from PSYC2011, as it is targeted for those who would like to learn more about the experimental study of behaviour and the neurosciences. Students will gain hands-on laboratory experience in how the principles and phenomena of behavioural neuroscience may be studied experimentally.
Textbooks
Bouton, M.E. (2007). Learning and Behavior: A Contemporary Synthesis. Sinauer.
ANAT2010 Concepts of Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial Prerequisites: 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: ANAT2910 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: one 2-hour theory exam, one 45 min practical exam, one mid-semester quiz, three short online quiz-style assignments, one written assignment Practical field work: Tutorials: One 2-hour practical tutorial in 5 sessions during semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function such as memory and language. In essence, the subject covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain. The laboratory practical sessions offer students the special privilege to examine human specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. Tutorial meetings will provide the opportunity to encounter topics in functional anatomy and histology of the brain using photographs, diagrams, models, animations and problem-solving. Topics in identification of central nervous system structure in typical magnetic resonance images will assist in reinforcing the theory of functional anatomy in a format students are likely to encounter in further study, in real-world situations and readings. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying anatomy and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Bear, M.F., B.W. Connors, M.A. Paradiso. Neuroscience. Exploring the Brain (4th edition) Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Recommended Atlas: Nolte and Angevine. The human brain in photographs and diagrams. 4th edition Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, 2013.
ANAT2910 Concepts in Neuroanatomy Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: ANAT2010 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: one 2-hour theory exam, one 45 min practical exam, one 1200 word critical scientific review article, one mid-semester quiz, three short online quiz-style assignments Practical field work: 1 x 1 hr practical Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function such as memory and language. In essence, the subject covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain. The laboratory practical sessions offer students the special privilege to examine human specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. Tutorial meetings will provide the opportunity to encounter topics in functional anatomy and histology of the brain using photographs, diagrams, models, animations and problem-solving. Topics in identification of central nervous system structure in typical magnetic resonance images will assist in reinforcing the theory of functional anatomy in a format students are likely to encounter in further study and in real-world situations and readings. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying anatomy and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Required text: Bear, M.F., B.W. Connors, M.A. Paradiso. Neuroscience. Exploring the Brain (4th edition) Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Recommended Atlas: Nolte and Angevine. The human brain in photographs and diagrams. 4th edition Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, 2013.
MEDS2005 Human Anatomy and Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michelle Gerke-Duncan and Dr Sean Lal Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures/wk, 2hr tutorial-practical/wk Prerequisites: 6 cp from (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) Prohibitions: ANAT2011 or BMED2402 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 Assumed knowledge: MEDS1X01 Assessment: Assessment: Online weekly Quiz (,15-20 SBA) - Formative, In-semester formative assesment (laboratory quizzes) - Formative, Laboratory Summative Assessment Week 6 (45 minutes) - 20%, Laboratory Summative Assessment Week 12 (45 minutes) - 20%, Final Exam (2 hours) - 60% Mode of delivery: Block mode
Where is your gall bladder or pineal gland? How do nine meters of intestines fit into our body? MEDS2005 is for students who are studying human anatomy and histology in the Medical Sciences stream. In laboratory classes using human cadavers and histological slides of human tissues, you will gain fundamental knowledge of the anatomy and histology of the brain and nerves; the anatomy and histology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine and digestive systems, and musculoskeletal anatomy. Lectures and laboratory classes are the forums for discussion and debate about the structure and function of the human body. Learning will be augmented with online quizzes and self-directed learning modules with additional modules to broaden your horizons in areas of interest. There will be a disease of the week related to the systems we have covered. The unit teaches the language of anatomy and histology, and knowledge and practical skills in human anatomy and histology, preparing you for many applied anatomical settings. In the hands-on laboratory sessions you will work in teams, engaging with the content, building your interpersonal skills, and fostering a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. You will consider the processes of body donation and the ethical, legal and moral frameworks around which people donate their remains for anatomical learning, teaching and research. This unit contains assumed knowledge for entry into the graduate medical program at the University of Sydney, and is also suitable for graduate programs in dentistry, nursing, physical therapies, forensic sciences and many other applied, para-clinical and clinical fields, as well as for careers in the fields of biomedical research, innovation and development.
MEDS2005 to be developed for offering in 2019 (MEDS coded units of study are only available to students in the Medical Science stream).

3000-level units of study

Major core
NEUR3005 Functional Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two one-hour lectures per week, one guest leacture, 3 three-hour seminars Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3905 Assumed knowledge: [ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Assessment: One mid-semester practical exam ( in-class), one final theory exam, one final practical exam, 'Neuroscience in the Media' 3 team-based assessment tasks during seminars and 1 individual written assignment Practical field work: Weekly 1.5 hour practical class Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of functional neuroanatomy and systems neuroscience, and an appreciation that neuroscience is a constantly evolving field. There will be a detailed exploration of the anatomical structures and pathways that underlie sensation and perception in each of the sensory modalities. The neural circuits and mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions will be explored in great detail based on current neuroscience literature. Practical classes will allow students to identify and learn the functions of critical anatomical structures in human brain and spinal cord specimens. Reading and interpreting images from functional and structural brain imaging techniques will be incorporated into the neuroanatomy practical classes, and develop an appreciation of how these technologies can be used in neuroscience research. The Neuroscience in the Media seminars will develop neuroscience literature searching skills as well as developing critical thinking and analysis of the accuracy of the media portrayal of neuroscience research. Building on these skills and working in small groups, students will re-frame and communicate neuroscience evidence through the production of a short video. Students will also learn the skills required to write an unbiased and accurate popular media article based on a recent neuroscience research paper. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science graduates as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Nolte's. The Human Brain by Todd Vanderah and Douglas Gould. 7th Ed, Elsevier, 2015
NEUR3905 Functional Neuroanatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two one-hour lectures per week, 8 one-hour seminars Prerequisites: Annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3005 Assumed knowledge: [ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Assessment: One mid-semester practical exam (in-class), one final theory exam, one final practical exam, Journal Club participation, Journal Club presentation and 1 individual written assignment Practical field work: Weekly 1.5 hour practical class Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of functional neuroanatomy and systems neuroscience, and an appreciation that neuroscience is a constantly evolving field. There will be a detailed exploration of the anatomical structures and pathways that underlie sensation and perception in each of the sensory modalities. The neural circutis and mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions will be explored in great detail based on current neuroscience literature. Practical classes will allow students to identify and learn the functions of critical anatomical structures in human brain and spinal corde specimens. Reading and interpreting images from functional ans tructural brain imaging techniques will be incorporated intot the neuroanatomy practical classes, and develop an appreciation of how these technologies can be used in neuroscience research. By undertaking the advanced unit students will participate in weekly small group seminars under the guidance of a research-active academic. The seminars will take the form of a Journal Club, a style practiced widely in research laboratories around the world. The aim of the Journal Club is to develop critical thinking and detailed knowledge in a specific area of neuroscience research through group discussions. The Journal Club will also develop the skills required to lead a discussion in a small group setting as well as research and write a scholarly neuroscience review article. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science graduates as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Nolte. Nolte's The Human Brain by Todd. Vanderah and Douglas Gould. 7th Ed, Elsevier, 2015
NEUR3006 Neural Information Processing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bill Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: two lectures, 1 two-hour research paper session (journal club, 8 weeks) Prerequisites: 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3906 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402 Assessment: one 2hr exam, 1500w essay, paper session oral presentation and participation marks, one prac report plus prac quizzes Practical field work: 1 x 3hour Prac (total of 5 such practical sessions) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction the mechanisms that drive neurons and neural circuits throughout the brain and body. The lectures explore how signal intensity is translated into nerve impulse codes and how this information is again translated through synapses to convey and interpret information about the external world, to control the body and to record information for future use (learning and memory). We also consider how sensory and motor information is integrated through neural circuits in the brain and spinal cord. Practical classes introduce some of the different ways in which the workings of the brain are studied. Each student chooses a journal club that focuses on a specific topic in neuroscience. In the weekly sessions, group members read, present and interpret original research papers, developing a deep understanding of the emerging scientific evidence in the topic area. This senior year unit of study will develop skills in critical analysis, interpretation and communication of new evidence.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3906 Neural Information Processing (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dario Protti Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 hour lectures per week Prerequisites: 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3006 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402 Assessment: One 2hr exam, prac assessment consisting of one group poster presentation and two short MCQ quizzes, one advanced prac report, one written grant proposal (up to 2,000 words) and oral presentation of grant proposal. Practical field work: 1 x 3hour Prac (total of 6 such practical sessions) with the mainstream course and 3-4 x 3 hour advanced pracs. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction into the mechanisms that drive neurons and neural circuits throughout the brain and body. The lectures explore how signal intensity is translated into nerve impulse codes and how this information is again translated through synapses to convey and interpret information about the external world, to control the body and to record information for future use. We also consider how sensory and motor information is integrated through neural circuits in the brain and spinal cord. Practical classes introduce some of the different ways in which the workings of the brain are studied. This senior year unit of study will develop skills in critical analysis, interpretation and communication of new evidence.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
PCOL3022 Neuropharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jonathon Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, five 1 hour tutorials, three 3 hour practicals, elective project (equivalent to three 4 hour practicals). Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015) Prohibitions: PCOL3921 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the 2000 level pharmacology units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Each student will conduct a capstone elective project (laboratory or literature-based) in applied pharmacology supervised by academic members of the department.
Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE Holtzman, DM and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundations for Clinical Neuroscience, 3rd ed. McGraw Hill, 2015.
PCOL3922 Neuropharmacology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jonathon Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, five 1 hour tutorials, three 3 hour practicals, elective project (equivalent to three 4 hour practicals). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015)] Prohibitions: PCOL3022 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the 2000 level pharmacology units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Each student will conduct a capstone elective project (laboratory or literature-based) in applied pharmacology supervised by academic members of the department.
Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE, Holtzman, DM and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundations for Clinical Neuroscience, 3rd ed. McGraw Hill, 2015.
PSYC3014 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) and PCOL2011] Prohibitions: PSYC3914 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one major essay/report 2000-2500 words, tutorial quizzes and participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. The implications of focal cognitive deficits in neurological patients for models of normal cognitive function will also be explored. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. In addition to lectures, a practical component will cover basic neuroanatomy and neuroscientific methods. The practical component will also introduce students to experimental and neuropsychological approaches to studying the relationahip between brain and behaviour.
PSYC3914 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience Adv

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) and PCOL2011] Prohibitions: PSYC3014 Assessment: One 2 hour exam (end of semester), one quiz (mid-semester), one presentation, one written assignment (lab report), attendance and participation in tutorial/practical exercises (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration, and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. The lecture material will be the same as for PSYC3014, however, the practical class is targeted for those who would like to learn more about the experimental study of behaviour and the neurosciences. The practical component of the advanced stream will cover basic neuroanatomy, histology and neuropharmacology and will introduce students to experimental approaches to studying brain-behaviour relationships.
Minor core
NEUR3005 Functional Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two one-hour lectures per week, one guest leacture, 3 three-hour seminars Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3905 Assumed knowledge: [ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Assessment: One mid-semester practical exam ( in-class), one final theory exam, one final practical exam, 'Neuroscience in the Media' 3 team-based assessment tasks during seminars and 1 individual written assignment Practical field work: Weekly 1.5 hour practical class Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of functional neuroanatomy and systems neuroscience, and an appreciation that neuroscience is a constantly evolving field. There will be a detailed exploration of the anatomical structures and pathways that underlie sensation and perception in each of the sensory modalities. The neural circuits and mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions will be explored in great detail based on current neuroscience literature. Practical classes will allow students to identify and learn the functions of critical anatomical structures in human brain and spinal cord specimens. Reading and interpreting images from functional and structural brain imaging techniques will be incorporated into the neuroanatomy practical classes, and develop an appreciation of how these technologies can be used in neuroscience research. The Neuroscience in the Media seminars will develop neuroscience literature searching skills as well as developing critical thinking and analysis of the accuracy of the media portrayal of neuroscience research. Building on these skills and working in small groups, students will re-frame and communicate neuroscience evidence through the production of a short video. Students will also learn the skills required to write an unbiased and accurate popular media article based on a recent neuroscience research paper. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science graduates as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Nolte's. The Human Brain by Todd Vanderah and Douglas Gould. 7th Ed, Elsevier, 2015
NEUR3905 Functional Neuroanatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two one-hour lectures per week, 8 one-hour seminars Prerequisites: Annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3005 Assumed knowledge: [ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Assessment: One mid-semester practical exam (in-class), one final theory exam, one final practical exam, Journal Club participation, Journal Club presentation and 1 individual written assignment Practical field work: Weekly 1.5 hour practical class Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of functional neuroanatomy and systems neuroscience, and an appreciation that neuroscience is a constantly evolving field. There will be a detailed exploration of the anatomical structures and pathways that underlie sensation and perception in each of the sensory modalities. The neural circutis and mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions will be explored in great detail based on current neuroscience literature. Practical classes will allow students to identify and learn the functions of critical anatomical structures in human brain and spinal corde specimens. Reading and interpreting images from functional ans tructural brain imaging techniques will be incorporated intot the neuroanatomy practical classes, and develop an appreciation of how these technologies can be used in neuroscience research. By undertaking the advanced unit students will participate in weekly small group seminars under the guidance of a research-active academic. The seminars will take the form of a Journal Club, a style practiced widely in research laboratories around the world. The aim of the Journal Club is to develop critical thinking and detailed knowledge in a specific area of neuroscience research through group discussions. The Journal Club will also develop the skills required to lead a discussion in a small group setting as well as research and write a scholarly neuroscience review article. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science graduates as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Nolte. Nolte's The Human Brain by Todd. Vanderah and Douglas Gould. 7th Ed, Elsevier, 2015
PSYC3014 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) and PCOL2011] Prohibitions: PSYC3914 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one major essay/report 2000-2500 words, tutorial quizzes and participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. The implications of focal cognitive deficits in neurological patients for models of normal cognitive function will also be explored. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. In addition to lectures, a practical component will cover basic neuroanatomy and neuroscientific methods. The practical component will also introduce students to experimental and neuropsychological approaches to studying the relationahip between brain and behaviour.
PSYC3914 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience Adv

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) and PCOL2011] Prohibitions: PSYC3014 Assessment: One 2 hour exam (end of semester), one quiz (mid-semester), one presentation, one written assignment (lab report), attendance and participation in tutorial/practical exercises (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration, and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. The lecture material will be the same as for PSYC3014, however, the practical class is targeted for those who would like to learn more about the experimental study of behaviour and the neurosciences. The practical component of the advanced stream will cover basic neuroanatomy, histology and neuropharmacology and will introduce students to experimental approaches to studying brain-behaviour relationships.