Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience Majors

Animal and Veterinary Bioscience

Core

All students undertake the following:
AVBS3000 Professional Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sabrina Lomax Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Six preparatory workshops/seminars (throughout years 1-3), four 1-hour industry seminars for case studies (year 3) Assessment: Professional experience reports (65%), case studies (20%), essay on current animal issues (15%) Practical field work: 60 days of professional work experience to be completed by the commencement of fourth year Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Students are required to undertake professional development in University vacations as an integral and essential part of their overall training in the degree of Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience. Students will complete 60 days of professional work experience throughout their program by the commencement of fourth year, including a minimum of 20 days spent on commercial animal production enterprises. Students will visit at least two different farming enterprises in the major and emerging animal production industries. The remaining 40 days will include at least one placement with an animal-related business or service provider, and experience in either a scientific research organisation or short scientific volunteer position. Students will undertake additional placements at relevant animal or animal-related businesses, farms or organisations as required to complete 60 days. A professional consultant-style report must be submitted after each placement. Seminars to promote awareness of career options and current issues in animal science will be provided on a regular basis by past graduates and other professionals working in the animal industries. Students are encouraged to attend as many of these as possible throughout their degree program, and are required to submit four case studies based on material presented in these seminars. Attendance at seminars is compulsory during third year. Students will also submit an essay on a current issue in the animal science area of their choice.
Textbooks
On-line resource material will be available
Students must complete the relevent core units of study from the associated major list below.
Additional Years 3 and 4 electives may be selected from the Elective List.

Table 1: Animal Genetics and Biotechnology major

Comprises 24 credit points, of which ANSC3105 and (GEGE3004 or GEGE3904) are compulsory.
ANSC3105 Animal Biotechnology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Prof. Peter Williamson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 3 hours per week, tutorials 1 hour per week, practicals 2-3 hours for seven weeks Prerequisites: GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or AVBS2005 or MBLG2X72 Assessment: Practicals and quizzes (30%), essay and seminars (30%), exam (40%) Practical field work: laboratory practical classes Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Lectures, tutorials, laboratories, seminars and supervised reading and directed learning instruction will cover the application of biotechnology to animal health, animal production and veterinary biosciences. The course is organised around modules that consider the methodologies, ethical and technical issues in application veterinary regenerative technology (gene therapy; stem cell therapy), transgenic technologies, antibody and antigen receptor engineering, molecular diagnostics, and mining molecular bioactives, all discussed in contexts relevant to domestic animals. The course also integrates an introduction to the emerging field of animal biosystems, which covers the application of big data in animal biotechnology.
GEGE3004 Applied Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Claire Wade Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 4 hours per week during standard semester. Prerequisites: 6cp of (GEGE2X01 or QBIO2XXX or DATA2X01 or GENE2XXX or MBLG2X72 or ENVX2001 or DATA2X02) Prohibitions: ANSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Genetics at 2000 level, Biology at 1000 level, algebra Assessment: The assessment will consist of one intra-semester examination (20%), group work assignment (30%)[ including assessment both of a project report (20%) and the team process (10%)], individual assignment (10%) and final examination (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit must be taken by all students in the Genetics and Genomics major.
The average mammalian genome is 3 billion nucleotides long and some other organisms have genomes that are even larger. Working with DNA at the nucleotide level on an organismal scale is impossible without the assistance of high performance computing. This unit will investigate strategies to manipulate genomic data on a whole organism scale. You will learn how scientists use high performance computing and web-based resources to compare and assemble genomes, map genes that cause specific phenotypes, and uncover mutations that cause phenotypic changes in organisms that influence health, external characteristics, production and disease. By doing this unit you will develop skills in the analysis of big data, you will gain familiarity with high performance computing worktop environments and learn to use bioinformatics tools that are commonly applied in research.
and at least two of the following:
AVBS4003 Wildlife and Evolutionary Genetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jaime Gongora Session: Semester 2 Classes: On average 6 hours per week of lectures, tutorials, computer simulations and practical classes. This unit will be taught at the Camperdown campus with also a fieldtrip to a park in the Sydney or NSW areas. Prerequisites: 48cp of 2000-level or 3000-level units Prohibitions: AVBS3004 Assumed knowledge: Expected background in genetics, genomics and wildlife. Assessment: Written and oral assignment (30%), practical reports/class contribution (20%), final written exam (50%) Practical field work: Laboratory practicals, bioinformatic analyses and fieldtrip to a park in the Sydney or NSW areas Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on the role and animal and veterinary biosciences in the field of wildlife management management and diseases using project-based, open learning space and research-led teaching approaches. The unit encourages an approach that spans management, wildlife biology and laboratory sciences. In recognition of the power of genetics as a tool in wildlife management and research, a large component of this course reviews fundamental genetic, genomic and immunogenetic principals and their application to understanding, managing and conserving wildlife. This unit also covers themes in Indigenous knowledges related to animal management and conservation as well as cultural competence. At the end of this unit of study, students will demonstrate an understanding of: important issues in wildlife management in Australia and the Asia-pacific region; project management as it applies to multifaceted wildlife research and management issues; application of a range of genetic and physiological methods to the study of ecological issues; the use of appropriate analytical methods and molecular markers in wildlife conservation and management; the underlying genetic structural design of the natural world and how this reflects and influences evolutionary processes in healthy and diseased populations; the use of molecular information to test hypotheses about evolutionary, ecological and social structure of species; how to critically review the ways in which genetic principals are applied to the management and conservation of species; the use of appropriate analytical methods and molecular markers in wildlife conservation and management; how to conduct an investigation into a management problem in wildlife including project design and management recommendations. Students are expected to immerse themselves into the field of conservation, evolutionary genetics and wildlife to develop the ability to critically evaluate the subject. There will be a substantial amount of reading required for the course. There is no formal text; students will be directed to a recommended reading list of both primary and secondary literature.
Textbooks
Readings to be advised in the Unit of Study outline.
BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MEDS2003) Prohibitions: BIOL3918 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the regulation, impact and implications of genetic engineering and genomics. Topics include biological sequence data and databases, comparative genomics, the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, and the genetic engineering of animals and plants. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.
BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X72 or GENE2002) and a mark of 75 or above in (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or MEDS2003) Prohibitions: BIOL3018 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
GENE4015 Cytogenetics

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Sharp (animal component coordinator), A/Prof Jaime Gongora Session: Intensive July Classes: Equivalent of two lectures/tutorials and three practicals per week Prerequisites: (BIOM2001 or ENVX2001) and (GENE2001 or GENE2002) Assessment: One 1500wd essay (25%), one 750wd practical report (10%) and one 1000wd fact sheet (15%), one 1200wd laboratory report (20%), one 2000wd assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a final year elective in the two degrees, BScAgr, and BAnVetBiosci. Approximately a half of the face-to-face contact hours will be given as an intensive, and this section of the unit will be held during the mid-year break before semester 2. Lecture and practical work in cytogenetics, especially of plant and animal species of applied interest in plant agriculture, animal agriculture and other applied interest in animal genetics, such as companion, native and endangered species. The lecture component covers the molecular nature of chromosomes and their transmission, variation in chromosome behaviour, both normal and disease related. In addition, the uses of chromosome engineering to produce variation in plants and animals will also be covered. The practical component covers the technologies used to study chromosomes or both plants and animals, both mitotic and meiotic chromosomes, and molecular techniques such as in situ hybridisation, gene activity and chromosomal protein localisation. On completion, students will be able to apply cytogenetic knowledge and technologies to species of eukaryotes of economic significance, and know how cytogenetic processes have affected the development of these species.

Table 2: Animal Health and Disease Major

Comprises 24 credit points:
AVBS3001 Agents of Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gary Muscatello Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 3 hours per week, laboratories/tutorials 2 hours per week, group work 1 hour per week Prerequisites: AVBS2001 Assessment: 1500wd individual review (25%), 1000wd scenario-based group assignment (15%), 2 hour exam (50%), MCQ (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Various microscopic and macroscopic organism can be seen to interact and adapt to the animal host, many of these interactions can lead to deleterious effects on animal health. The aim of this unit is to examine and appreciate the diversity of various disease causing agents (microbiological and parasitological) of significance to animal industries and the various strategies employed by those agents in the host-pathogen-environment interaction. This study is based on an understanding of the physical, chemical and genetic characteristics of infectious agents of disease and builds on the fundamental knowledge of pathological and immunological processes taught in 2000 level units of the Animal Health, Disesae and Welfare major. A scenario/case based approach will be used whenever possible to enable the students to develop problem solving approaches and skills in critical thinking. Cases selected will be those that best illustrate particular concepts and/or are of particular significance to the animal/veterinary industry. Research and industry focus activities will infuse the subject content and student learning outcomes of this unit. At the completion of the unit you will have acquired detail knowledge of relevant veterinary pathogens and an appreciation of how mangements strategies can impact upon disesae risk in animal populations. You will also gain practical skills in the laboratory diagnosis of many of these infectious agents. This unit is located at the Camperdown campus.
Textbooks
A Unit of Study outline and LMS will contain detailed information and notes for this unit.
AVBS3002 Laboratory Disease Investigation

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jan Slapeta and A/Prof Damien Higgins Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 hours per week, laboratories/tutorials 4 hours per week (note these will vary depending upon the week) Prerequisites: AVBS2001 and AVBS3001 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XXX and BIOL1XXX and ANSC3103 and ANSC3104 and (ENVX2001 or BIOM2001) Assessment: Assignments (60%), quiz (15%), theory exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to develop an investigative approach and familiarity with laboratory techniques, ethics and safety in preparation for honours or postgraduate training in disease research or disease investigation. Students will work through actual disease research or investigation scenarios via directed and self-directed, individual and group tasks.
Textbooks
There is no set text for this unit. Students will use primary literature and source various library texts as required for their investigations.
AVBS4001 Animal Health and Disease

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Muir Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3.5 hours per week lectures, tutorials 0.5 hours per week, practicals 2 hours per week (on average), two day overnight field trip to Arthursleigh, University of Sydney property Prerequisites: AVBS2001 and AVBS3001 Assessment: Participation in field trips (pass/fail), assignments (60%), 2-hour exam (40%) Practical field work: Two day overnight field trip to Arthursleigh, University of Sydney property Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study extends your understanding of animal health from knowledge gained in units completed in earlier years, including AVBS2001 Introduction to Veterinary Pathogenesis and AVBS3001 Agents of disease. In particular we look at general aspects of animal health and disease in terms of epidemiology, exotic/emergency diseases of risk to Australia and principles of vaccines and vaccinations. Health and disease issues relevant to various species, including sheep, cattle, poultry, fish and wildlife are presented by experts in these fields. A range of management and interventional strategies that are currently in use to minimise the impact of disease are also discussed. After completing this Unit of Study, students will demonstrate an understanding of:
the principles of animal management that are implemented to optimise health and to reduce the incidence and severity of disease; the fundamental principles of disease in animal populations; specific infectious diseases of consequence for growth, reproduction and for the production of meat, wool, milk and eggs; approaches to their control and prevention through environmental and nutritional management, and interventional techniques such as vaccination programmes. These are considered in the context of commercial animal production and the health of wildlife animals. A two day field trip to Arthursleigh farm which focuses on the management of sheep and cattle, and a visit to the research and development field station of an international animal health company reiterates many key aspects of the unit of study.
Textbooks
Students are advised to consult lecturers for recommended texts
AVBS4004 Food Safety Assessment and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gary Muscatello Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 3 hours per week, tutorial/practicals 2 hours per week, two field trips (compulsory - 16 hours total) Prerequisites: AVBS3001 and AVBS4001 Assessment: 1000wd individual report (20%), 1000wd group assignment (20%), 2-hour exam (50%), MCQ (10%) Practical field work: Two field trips (compulsory) 16 hours total Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study focuses on the issues and practices in the animal industry relevant to food safety and zoonotic disease. This unit will cover general food safety issues, including risk assessment and hazard analysis of microbes and chemicals. Food-borne diseases of animal origin and their impact on public heath will be explored through the examination of zoonotic diseases in scenario-based learning activities. In these processes diagnostic and strategic methods of investigating, controlling and preventing food-borne disease outbreaks will be explored. Students will be introduced to national and international animal and human health policy pertaining to food safety regulations and surveillance initiatives and strategies that underpin these policies. Students in this unit will be introduced to the issues regarding emerging food-borne pathogens and current industry driven topics. By the end of the unit, students should have global and local perspective on the major food-borne diseases, surveillance and control programs. This unit is located at the Camden Campus.
Textbooks
Torrence ME and Isaacson RE (eds) 2003, Microbial food safety in animal agriculture current topics, Iowa State Press, Ames, Iowa

Table 3: Animal Production Systems Major

Comprises 30 credit points:
AVBS2004 Animal Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Alex V. Chaves Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures; 1x2h computer practical session; 1-2h online learning session on a weekly basis Prerequisites: BIOL1XX7 or AVBS1002 Prohibitions: ANSC3101 Assessment: problem-based learning report (30%), video (30%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Computer-based where students get familiarized with diet formulation software reports/outcomes and identifying limitation of the diet in each scenario. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Access afterhours to IBM-PC compatible computers that have Microsoft Windows XP or later are advisable. Most of the diet formulation software are Windows Compatible only.
One of the greatest limiting factors to the health and wellbeing of animals under our care is the nutritional value of their feed. Whether provided by nature or manufactured to meet the production and health needs of farmed animals, being able to provide suitable nutrition to animals in our care is fundamental to good animal health management. This Unit is broadly divided into three sections, namely: estimating the nutritive value of feeds; estimating the nutrient requirements of animals and diet formulation. The focus is on building up knowledge on animal nutrition by assessments of nutritional adequacy and solving of nutritional problems, with a particular emphasis on wildlife and animals used in agricultural production systems. The principles discussed in this course will be expanded in third year, in which species-specific systems will be described within the animal production major.
In this unit you will develop the skills to create diets based on sound science, to meet animal requirements for a variety of purposes and under a variety of constraints and identify deficiencies, excesses and imbalances in diets and optimising nutritional health and minimising disease risk.
Textbooks
There is no required text for the course. A number of textbooks are available on reserve at the library. Detail information is provided in this Unit of Study guide.
ANSC3102 Animal Reproduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Simon de Graaf Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hours per week, tutorials 1 hour per week, practicals 3 hours per week; there will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus Prerequisites: AVBS1002 and AVBS2XXX Assumed knowledge: A background in animal anatomy and physiology Assessment: Written and oral assignments (30%), mid-semester practical exam (15%), end of semester written exam (55%) Practical field work: There will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a comprehensive programme on basic and applied aspects of male and female reproductive biology, with particular emphasis on livestock and domestic animals. The fundamental topics include reproductive cycles, sexual differentiation, gametogenesis, fertilization, embryo development, gestation and parturition. An understanding of the applications of advanced reproductive technologies is developed through lectures, tutorials and the assignments. In addition, practical instruction is given on semen collection and processing, manipulation of the reproductive cycle, artificial insemination, and pregnancy diagnosis in sheep and pigs. Classes are held at the Camperdown Campus in Sydney and at the Camden Campus Animal Reproduction Unit and Mayfarm piggery.
Textbooks
Senger, PL 2013, Pathways to pregnancy and parturition 3rd ed., Current Conceptions Inc
ANSC3105 Animal Biotechnology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Prof. Peter Williamson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 3 hours per week, tutorials 1 hour per week, practicals 2-3 hours for seven weeks Prerequisites: GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or AVBS2005 or MBLG2X72 Assessment: Practicals and quizzes (30%), essay and seminars (30%), exam (40%) Practical field work: laboratory practical classes Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Lectures, tutorials, laboratories, seminars and supervised reading and directed learning instruction will cover the application of biotechnology to animal health, animal production and veterinary biosciences. The course is organised around modules that consider the methodologies, ethical and technical issues in application veterinary regenerative technology (gene therapy; stem cell therapy), transgenic technologies, antibody and antigen receptor engineering, molecular diagnostics, and mining molecular bioactives, all discussed in contexts relevant to domestic animals. The course also integrates an introduction to the emerging field of animal biosystems, which covers the application of big data in animal biotechnology.
ANSC3106 Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sabrina Lomax Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours per week (including lectures, demonstrations, discussions and practical activities); classes will be held at the Camden campus; practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Prerequisites: AVBS1002 or BIOL1XX6 Assessment: Assignments/presentations (50%), theory exam (50%) Practical field work: Practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science 3, the behavioural and physiological responses of mammals, birds and fish to stressors related to husbandry, housing, transport and slaughter are explored in some detail. This Unit enables students to develop an appreciation of the responses of animals to common interventions that arise in the context of interacting with humans, including the domestication of livestock species and the management of wildlife. The principles of animal responses to stress are illustrated with production species as the main examples. Contemporary approaches to the scientific measurement of animal stress and welfare, based on an appropriate selection of scientific disciplines including ethology, psychology, physiology and neuroscience, are assessed with an emphasis on farmed livestock species. Genetic, environmental and evolutionary determinants of pain, stress and fear responses in animals are considered in the light of what is known about cognition and motivation in animals. Methods for assessing and enhancing animal environments and husbandry systems are examined and the impact on animal behaviour and welfare of stockmanship is explored in the context of human-animal interactions. Finally, the design and conduct of scientific experiments are assessed with a focus on animal ethics and current welfare issues.
Textbooks
Broom, DM and Fraser, AF 2007, Domestic animal behaviour and welfare, 4th edition, CAB International, Cambridge Uni Press, Cambridge
GEGE3004 Applied Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Claire Wade Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 4 hours per week during standard semester. Prerequisites: 6cp of (GEGE2X01 or QBIO2XXX or DATA2X01 or GENE2XXX or MBLG2X72 or ENVX2001 or DATA2X02) Prohibitions: ANSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Genetics at 2000 level, Biology at 1000 level, algebra Assessment: The assessment will consist of one intra-semester examination (20%), group work assignment (30%)[ including assessment both of a project report (20%) and the team process (10%)], individual assignment (10%) and final examination (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit must be taken by all students in the Genetics and Genomics major.
The average mammalian genome is 3 billion nucleotides long and some other organisms have genomes that are even larger. Working with DNA at the nucleotide level on an organismal scale is impossible without the assistance of high performance computing. This unit will investigate strategies to manipulate genomic data on a whole organism scale. You will learn how scientists use high performance computing and web-based resources to compare and assemble genomes, map genes that cause specific phenotypes, and uncover mutations that cause phenotypic changes in organisms that influence health, external characteristics, production and disease. By doing this unit you will develop skills in the analysis of big data, you will gain familiarity with high performance computing worktop environments and learn to use bioinformatics tools that are commonly applied in research.

Table 4: Wildlife Conservation and Management Major

Comprises 24 credit points, of which AVBS3003 and BIOL3007 are compulsory.
AVBS3003 Wildlife Management

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Herbert Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 3 hours per week, tutorials 2 hours per week on average (consult timetable), up to two days of field excursions Prerequisites: BIOL2032 or BIOL2X2X Assessment: Group assignment (20%), individual assignments and tutorial participation (40%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Up to two days of field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study describes and evaluates key contemporary challenges faced by wildlife management professionals and conservation biologists. A key component of the course is to give students an appreciation of different stakeholder perspectives in wildlife management and how rigorous scientific method can be used to inform wildlife management decisions, using contemporary examples. This unit of study also explores the techniques and methods for undertaking wildlife research, with an emphasis on terrestrial vertebrate species. On completion of this unit, students will have experience in articulating and acknowledging various stakeholder views, both orally and in written form, and understand the processes involved in formulating an evidence-based management approach to contentious wildlife management scenarios.
Textbooks
Students should consult lecturers for recommended reading
BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, group presentations, one essay, one project report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.
Textbooks
Begon M, Townsend CR, Harper JL (2005) Ecology, From individuals to ecosystems. Wiley-Blackwell.
and at least two of the following:
AVBS2004 Animal Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Alex V. Chaves Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures; 1x2h computer practical session; 1-2h online learning session on a weekly basis Prerequisites: BIOL1XX7 or AVBS1002 Prohibitions: ANSC3101 Assessment: problem-based learning report (30%), video (30%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Computer-based where students get familiarized with diet formulation software reports/outcomes and identifying limitation of the diet in each scenario. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Access afterhours to IBM-PC compatible computers that have Microsoft Windows XP or later are advisable. Most of the diet formulation software are Windows Compatible only.
One of the greatest limiting factors to the health and wellbeing of animals under our care is the nutritional value of their feed. Whether provided by nature or manufactured to meet the production and health needs of farmed animals, being able to provide suitable nutrition to animals in our care is fundamental to good animal health management. This Unit is broadly divided into three sections, namely: estimating the nutritive value of feeds; estimating the nutrient requirements of animals and diet formulation. The focus is on building up knowledge on animal nutrition by assessments of nutritional adequacy and solving of nutritional problems, with a particular emphasis on wildlife and animals used in agricultural production systems. The principles discussed in this course will be expanded in third year, in which species-specific systems will be described within the animal production major.
In this unit you will develop the skills to create diets based on sound science, to meet animal requirements for a variety of purposes and under a variety of constraints and identify deficiencies, excesses and imbalances in diets and optimising nutritional health and minimising disease risk.
Textbooks
There is no required text for the course. A number of textbooks are available on reserve at the library. Detail information is provided in this Unit of Study guide.
ANSC3102 Animal Reproduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Simon de Graaf Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hours per week, tutorials 1 hour per week, practicals 3 hours per week; there will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus Prerequisites: AVBS1002 and AVBS2XXX Assumed knowledge: A background in animal anatomy and physiology Assessment: Written and oral assignments (30%), mid-semester practical exam (15%), end of semester written exam (55%) Practical field work: There will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a comprehensive programme on basic and applied aspects of male and female reproductive biology, with particular emphasis on livestock and domestic animals. The fundamental topics include reproductive cycles, sexual differentiation, gametogenesis, fertilization, embryo development, gestation and parturition. An understanding of the applications of advanced reproductive technologies is developed through lectures, tutorials and the assignments. In addition, practical instruction is given on semen collection and processing, manipulation of the reproductive cycle, artificial insemination, and pregnancy diagnosis in sheep and pigs. Classes are held at the Camperdown Campus in Sydney and at the Camden Campus Animal Reproduction Unit and Mayfarm piggery.
Textbooks
Senger, PL 2013, Pathways to pregnancy and parturition 3rd ed., Current Conceptions Inc
ANSC3106 Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sabrina Lomax Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours per week (including lectures, demonstrations, discussions and practical activities); classes will be held at the Camden campus; practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Prerequisites: AVBS1002 or BIOL1XX6 Assessment: Assignments/presentations (50%), theory exam (50%) Practical field work: Practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science 3, the behavioural and physiological responses of mammals, birds and fish to stressors related to husbandry, housing, transport and slaughter are explored in some detail. This Unit enables students to develop an appreciation of the responses of animals to common interventions that arise in the context of interacting with humans, including the domestication of livestock species and the management of wildlife. The principles of animal responses to stress are illustrated with production species as the main examples. Contemporary approaches to the scientific measurement of animal stress and welfare, based on an appropriate selection of scientific disciplines including ethology, psychology, physiology and neuroscience, are assessed with an emphasis on farmed livestock species. Genetic, environmental and evolutionary determinants of pain, stress and fear responses in animals are considered in the light of what is known about cognition and motivation in animals. Methods for assessing and enhancing animal environments and husbandry systems are examined and the impact on animal behaviour and welfare of stockmanship is explored in the context of human-animal interactions. Finally, the design and conduct of scientific experiments are assessed with a focus on animal ethics and current welfare issues.
Textbooks
Broom, DM and Fraser, AF 2007, Domestic animal behaviour and welfare, 4th edition, CAB International, Cambridge Uni Press, Cambridge
GEGE3004 Applied Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Claire Wade Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 4 hours per week during standard semester. Prerequisites: 6cp of (GEGE2X01 or QBIO2XXX or DATA2X01 or GENE2XXX or MBLG2X72 or ENVX2001 or DATA2X02) Prohibitions: ANSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Genetics at 2000 level, Biology at 1000 level, algebra Assessment: The assessment will consist of one intra-semester examination (20%), group work assignment (30%)[ including assessment both of a project report (20%) and the team process (10%)], individual assignment (10%) and final examination (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit must be taken by all students in the Genetics and Genomics major.
The average mammalian genome is 3 billion nucleotides long and some other organisms have genomes that are even larger. Working with DNA at the nucleotide level on an organismal scale is impossible without the assistance of high performance computing. This unit will investigate strategies to manipulate genomic data on a whole organism scale. You will learn how scientists use high performance computing and web-based resources to compare and assemble genomes, map genes that cause specific phenotypes, and uncover mutations that cause phenotypic changes in organisms that influence health, external characteristics, production and disease. By doing this unit you will develop skills in the analysis of big data, you will gain familiarity with high performance computing worktop environments and learn to use bioinformatics tools that are commonly applied in research.
AVBS3001 Agents of Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gary Muscatello Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 3 hours per week, laboratories/tutorials 2 hours per week, group work 1 hour per week Prerequisites: AVBS2001 Assessment: 1500wd individual review (25%), 1000wd scenario-based group assignment (15%), 2 hour exam (50%), MCQ (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Various microscopic and macroscopic organism can be seen to interact and adapt to the animal host, many of these interactions can lead to deleterious effects on animal health. The aim of this unit is to examine and appreciate the diversity of various disease causing agents (microbiological and parasitological) of significance to animal industries and the various strategies employed by those agents in the host-pathogen-environment interaction. This study is based on an understanding of the physical, chemical and genetic characteristics of infectious agents of disease and builds on the fundamental knowledge of pathological and immunological processes taught in 2000 level units of the Animal Health, Disesae and Welfare major. A scenario/case based approach will be used whenever possible to enable the students to develop problem solving approaches and skills in critical thinking. Cases selected will be those that best illustrate particular concepts and/or are of particular significance to the animal/veterinary industry. Research and industry focus activities will infuse the subject content and student learning outcomes of this unit. At the completion of the unit you will have acquired detail knowledge of relevant veterinary pathogens and an appreciation of how mangements strategies can impact upon disesae risk in animal populations. You will also gain practical skills in the laboratory diagnosis of many of these infectious agents. This unit is located at the Camperdown campus.
Textbooks
A Unit of Study outline and LMS will contain detailed information and notes for this unit.
AVBS4003 Wildlife and Evolutionary Genetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jaime Gongora Session: Semester 2 Classes: On average 6 hours per week of lectures, tutorials, computer simulations and practical classes. This unit will be taught at the Camperdown campus with also a fieldtrip to a park in the Sydney or NSW areas. Prerequisites: 48cp of 2000-level or 3000-level units Prohibitions: AVBS3004 Assumed knowledge: Expected background in genetics, genomics and wildlife. Assessment: Written and oral assignment (30%), practical reports/class contribution (20%), final written exam (50%) Practical field work: Laboratory practicals, bioinformatic analyses and fieldtrip to a park in the Sydney or NSW areas Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on the role and animal and veterinary biosciences in the field of wildlife management management and diseases using project-based, open learning space and research-led teaching approaches. The unit encourages an approach that spans management, wildlife biology and laboratory sciences. In recognition of the power of genetics as a tool in wildlife management and research, a large component of this course reviews fundamental genetic, genomic and immunogenetic principals and their application to understanding, managing and conserving wildlife. This unit also covers themes in Indigenous knowledges related to animal management and conservation as well as cultural competence. At the end of this unit of study, students will demonstrate an understanding of: important issues in wildlife management in Australia and the Asia-pacific region; project management as it applies to multifaceted wildlife research and management issues; application of a range of genetic and physiological methods to the study of ecological issues; the use of appropriate analytical methods and molecular markers in wildlife conservation and management; the underlying genetic structural design of the natural world and how this reflects and influences evolutionary processes in healthy and diseased populations; the use of molecular information to test hypotheses about evolutionary, ecological and social structure of species; how to critically review the ways in which genetic principals are applied to the management and conservation of species; the use of appropriate analytical methods and molecular markers in wildlife conservation and management; how to conduct an investigation into a management problem in wildlife including project design and management recommendations. Students are expected to immerse themselves into the field of conservation, evolutionary genetics and wildlife to develop the ability to critically evaluate the subject. There will be a substantial amount of reading required for the course. There is no formal text; students will be directed to a recommended reading list of both primary and secondary literature.
Textbooks
Readings to be advised in the Unit of Study outline.