Bachelor of Food and Agribusiness

Food and Agribusiness

All students complete an Agribusiness major and a Food Science major.

Year 1

Year 1 will have a minimum of 48 credit points comprised of:
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 2 field excursions. Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 2 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
or
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 3 field excursions Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 3 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in an authentic urban biodiversity management research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
or
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BUSS1000 Future of Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1.5 hour lecture every week (13), 1.5 hr tutorial each week, guided learning material (e.g. videos, podcasts, contemporary case studies etc.). 8x 1.5 hr workshops: Students who are identified as benefiting from additional academic support (a written diagnostic is administered during week 1 of the BUSS1000 tutorials) will be required to attend a 1.5 hour weekly workshop from Week 3 on Business Communication and Academic Writing (BCAC). Prohibitions: BUSS1001 Assessment: Case study (25%), team presentation (25%), tutorial attendance and participation (15%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit must be completed in the first semester in the first year of study for all students enrolled in the Bachelor of Commerce (including combined degrees).
This compulsory first year unit is designed to provide commencing undergraduate students with insights into the study and the practice of business. Students gain foundational knowledge in relation to business stakeholders, business challenges and the ways in which business leaders might approach responding to these challenges. Key stakeholders within and external to organisations are identified and their interests are analysed. Critical business challenges such as climate change and sustainability, the future of work and workforce diversity are investigated. The way that these challenges affect different types of business, sectors and stakeholders is analysed and responses constructed to them. The unit is delivered in a blended format, with face-to-face lectures, seminars, and interactive online modules. Success in this unit is determined by strong application of critical, strategic and cross-disciplinary thinking, as well as the ability to demonstrate business knowledge and problem-solving skills through effective written and oral communication.
BUSS1000 is scheduled for Semester 1
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
ENVX1002 Introduction to Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Bishop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours per week of lectures; 2 hours per week of computer tutorials Prohibitions: ENVX1001 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or MATH1115 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 or BUSS1020 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness, and Taronga Wildlife Conservation streams
This is an introductory data science unit for students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It provides the foundation for statistics and data science skills that are needed for a career in science and for further study in applied statistics and data science. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. It has 4 modules; exploring data, modelling data, sampling data and making decisions with data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology, ENVX1002 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data.
Textbooks
Statistics, Fourth Edition, Freedman Pisani Purves
AGEC1006 Economic Environment of Agriculture

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: AGEC1003 or AGEC1004 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Assessment: 1x2hr exam (55%) and 1x50 min mid-semester exam (25%) and workshop papers (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to give an understanding of some basic economic principles and to introduce the characteristics of the economic environment in which Australian agriculture operates. Topics to be covered include the structure, nature and history of the agricultural industries in Australia; agricultural adjustment in the world economy; introductory principles of production economics and farm management; elementary price theory and the factors affecting the demand, supply and prices of agricultural commodities.
Textbooks
HE Drummond and JW Goodwin, Agricultural Economics, 3rd edn (Prentice-Hall, 2011)
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes (15%), communication assessments (35%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: quizzes (14%), communication assessments (36%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week; online material; and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
CHEM1012 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1112 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr lecture; 1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviours, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do we develop lotions that don't burn us, how do we measure UV absorption by sunscreens, how can we measure and alter soil pH, how are sticky things made, and how do we determine the concentration of vitamin C in juice? Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1112 is scheduled for Semester 2
or
CHEM1912 Chemistry 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101) or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Advanced units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B (Advanced) is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A (Advanced). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
ENVI1003 Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, 2-hour computer lab per week, two-day weekend field trip Prohibitions: AGEN1002 Assessment: 2-hour exam (45%), field trip report (20%), group work presentation (25%), GIS reports (10%) Practical field work: Computer practicals and two-day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 21st century the population of the world will increase both in size and its expectation in terms of food, energy and consumer demands. Against this demand we have a planet in crisis where natural resources are degraded, biodiversity is diminishing and planetary cycles related to climate are reaching points of irreversible change. Management of our precious natural resources is a balancing act between production and conservation as always, but now we have to do this against a background of potential large scale changes in climate. In this unit students will gain an understanding of the key environmental challenges of the 21st century; namely food security, climate change, water security, biodiversity protection, ecosystems services and soil security. In the second half, using Australian case studies, we will explore how we manage different agro-ecosystems within their physical constraints around water, climate and soil, while considering linkages with the global environmental challenges. Management now, in the past and the future will be considered, with an emphasis on food production. This unit is recommended unit for students interested in gaining a broad overview of the environmental challenges of the 21st century, both globally and within Australia.

Year 2

Year 2 will have a minimum of 48 credit points comprised of:
MKTG1001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: project (20%), presentation (15%), participation (7%), mid-semester exam (28%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The Intensive January and July sessions of this unit are only available to Study Abroad students. All other students should enrol in Semester 1 and Semester 2 sessions.
This unit examines the relationships among marketing organisations and final consumers in terms of production-distribution channels or value chains. It focuses on consumer responses to various marketing decisions (product mixes, price levels, distribution channels, promotions, etc.) made by private and public organisations to create, develop, defend, and sometimes eliminate, product markets. Emphasis is placed on identifying new ways of satisfying the needs and wants and creating value for consumers. While this unit is heavily based on theory, practical application of the concepts to "real world" situations is also essential. Specific topics of study include: market segmentation strategies; market planning; product decisions; new product development; branding strategies; channels of distribution; promotion and advertising; pricing strategies; and customer database management.
MKTG1001 is scheduled for Semester 1
BIOL2030 Botany

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lecture/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or BIOL2930 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), anatomy project report and presentation (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to enhance biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes, and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frame works in plant identification, plant physiology, plant anatomy, and plant morphology. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by self-instructional audio-visual sessions and by small group discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. Successful completion of Botany will allow you to contribute to a range of disciplines including: ecology, bioinformatics, molecular and cell biology, genetics and biotechnology, environmental law, agriculture, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
FOOD2000 Principles of Food Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalind Deaker Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/week; guest lectures 2 x 1 h, 12 x 3 h practicals Prerequisites: BIOL1XXX or AGEN1004 or MBLG1XX1 Prohibitions: AGEN2002 Assessment: 3 x online quizzes (10%), 2 x practical assignments (30%), 1 x oral presentation (10%), exam (50%) Practical field work: 1 site visit Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Managing safety and quality of food is critical to health, social, environmental and economic security. In this unit of study, you will examine the structural and functional properties of foods, and the science underpinning their production and management. Different categories of food will be described on the basis of physiology and biochemistry and how this underpins quality, organoleptic and nutritional properties. Typical spoilage processes in different foods, quality deterioration during the postharvest period, and the industry practices and technology used to prolong shelf-life will be covered. The main food safety challenges for the food industry and their control will be introduced. The unit focuses on core skills in assessment of food quality and safety, and the understanding of management practices and technology used to ensure these meet market or regulatory requirements. Case study examples will be drawn from grain, fruit and vegetable, meat, eggs, dairy and seafood products. Food standards, food safety systems and government regulations will also be covered. Students are introduced to basic chemistry and microbiology techniques used in food science as well as common industrial methods for food quality assessment.
BUSS1030 Accounting, Business and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ACCT1001 or ACCT1002 or ACCT1003 or ACCT1004 or ACCT1005 Assessment: tutorial contribution (10%), assignment (15%), mid-semester test (25%), final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students enrolled in the Bachelor of Commerce, the Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Advanced Studies, and the Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Laws must complete this core unit within the first year of study (full-time students) or within in the first two years of study (part-time students).
This unit investigates the fundamentals of accounting and aims to provide a broad understanding of the role of accounting in the context of business and society. The format of the unit is designed to show that there are many uses of accounting data. The focus moves from accountability to decision making; both functions are explained through examples such as the 'double entry equation', and from an output (financial statements) perspective. Some more technical aspects of accounting are outlined, including the elements of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses within simple, familiar scenarios. Besides developing an understanding of the role of accounting via conventional financial reports, recent developments including the discharge of accountability by companies through the release of corporate social and environmental reports and the global financial crisis, are explored through an accounting lens.
BUSS1030 is scheduled for Semester 2
ITLS2000 Managing Food and Beverage Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hr seminar/tutorial per week Prohibitions: AGEN2003 or AGEN1005 Assessment: tutorial quiz (10%), individual assignment (35%), group project report (15%), group project presentation (10%), final 2hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The food and beverage sector is one of the key economic activities in virtually all countries in the world today. When it comes to logistics and supply chain management within this sector, there is a level of complexity, not frequently found in other industries. This includes the need to consider products bulkiness, perishability and seasonality, coupled with potential additional infrastructure requirements in respect of temperature-controlled storage and transport. As a consequence, there is a higher imperative to have a well-designed end-to-end supply chain. Equally, it is important to understand issues from the perspectives of the various actors in food and beverage supply chains including farms, processing units, wholesalers / distributors, and retailers. Overarching the structuring of any food and beverage supply chain will be consideration of issues such as perishability, quality and risk. Further, for a supply chain to be effective and efficient consideration also needs to be given to the support functions of information management, use of technology, and financial reporting. In today's world, companies compete on supply chains. Those who have the ability to establish a distinctive supply chain and create it as a strategic asset will, therefore, emerge as industry leaders.
AVBS1002 Concepts of Animal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Cameron Clark Session: Semester 2 Classes: On average 6 hours per week (lectures and practicals); there will be several whole-day practical classes at the Camden campus Prohibitions: AGEN2006 Assumed knowledge: AGEN1004 or BIOL1XXX or AVBS1003 Assessment: Participation, written assignments, quizzes and end of semester examination Practical field work: There will be several whole day practical classes at the Camden campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the management of animals in natural and man-made environments. At the end of this unit of study, students will understand: the characteristics of the management systems of the major domestic species used for production in Australia and in a world wide context; the characteristics and principles underpinning sustainable management of native animals in natural and man-made environments; an appreciation of the dependence of living organisms upon their environment; an appreciation of indigenous land management and the husbandry practices and innovations that have been adopted by the production industries to retain their competitive advantage; a demonstrated capability in handling and husbandry of the major domestic production animal species, and an appreciation of the application of these skills to non-domestic species; a demonstrated understanding of the importance of high standards of animal welfare practice in the management of animals.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the unit content and for this reason no formal text is required. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course.
MICR2031 Microbiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2931 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: written assignment (10%), group oral presentation (20%) and online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the earth's trees. This unit of study will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require if you specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology or science education.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
or
MICR2931 Microbiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2031 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: two written assignments (10%, 20%), and online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the Earth's trees. In this unit of study you will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Detailed aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require to specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology, or science education. As an Advanced unit, MICR2931 provides increased challenge and academic rigour to develop a greater understanding and depth of disciplinary expertise. You will actively participate in a series of small group tutorials investigating the molecular detail of microbial communication and function, which will culminate in you creating a scientific research report that communicates your understanding of recent research in microbiology.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
And one elective unit from Table FA1.

Year 3

Year 3 will have a minimum of 48 credit points comprised of:
FOOD3002 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Foods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Roberts Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 2x1 hr/week for 13 weeks; pre-lab 1x1 hr/week for 6 weeks; practical class 1x3 hr/week for 6 weeks Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Prohibitions: AGCH3025 or AFNR5102 or AGCH3024 Assumed knowledge: Equivalent to 1st-year Biology plus 2nd-year chemistry/biochemistry: -biology, chemistry, biochemistry -Carbohydrates, proteins (including enzymes), lipids -Principles of cellular metabolism Assessment: 6 x short answer assignment (30%), 3 x lab reports (15%), 2 x short answer lab exercises (10%), video presentation (5%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The molecular basis of foods is a critical aspect of food science. FOOD3002 investigates the (bio)chemical properties of food constituents, as well as the interactions between these constituents during food processing, storage, cooking and digestion. You will develop an understanding of the relationship between form and functionality of food constituents and the concept of quality in converting agricultural products into foods. You will gain an appreciation of the relationship between chemical composition and properties of macro-constituents (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids) and micro-constituents (vitamins, minerals, flavour and antinutritional chemicals) and their functions in plant- and animal-based foods. FOOD3002 will enable you to develop research and inquiry skills and an analytical approach to understand the (bio)chemistry of foods and food processing. You will gain experience in laboratory techniques used in industry and research for the analysis of a range of food products, as well as developing information literacy and communication skills, through the preparation of written and in-lab assignments, practical reports and the creation of a short video. On completing this unit, you will be able to describe the (bio)chemical properties of food constituents and demonstrate an understanding of the functionality of these constituents in food processing and nutrition.
FOOD3001 Food Processing and Value Adding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week; practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Prohibitions: AGEN3004 Assumed knowledge: 6cp of (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of CHEM1XXX Assessment: Structure and food quality lab report (10%), QC investigation lab report (20%), Processingcase study report (20%), Processing case study presentation (10%), Final exam(40%) Practical field work: A few optional site visits Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit needs to be available as a non-award course so that students seeking admission to the MND have an option to fulfil the 6 cp Food Science prerequisite, if their previous study does not fulfil this requirement already.
All of the food that we produce and consume is processed in some way. The manufacture of composite food products, which have distinct properties to their constituent ingredients, requires a complex series of processing operations. However, even ready-to-eat fresh foods undergo processing to facilitate distribution to consumers, maximise shelf-life, and ensure food safety. This unit will examine the biochemical and physicochemical transformations that occur in food materials during processing and how processing parameters affect the fulfilment of food quality, shelf-life, and safety objectives. The unit is divided into modules on (1) processing to modify food structure; (2) processing for preservation; and value-adding, focused on (3) healthier food and (4) fermentation as interesting case studies in food processing. You will learn methods of food analysis and apply a scientific approach to investigating the relationships between food composition, functionality, processing conditions, and end-product properties. By doing this unit, you will develop a sound understanding of the scientific principles underpinning food processing decisions and outcomes. This is well-regarded in the food industry, particularly FMCG and manufacturing, as the ability to systematically characterise, analyse, and troubleshoot processes can be applied to a wide range of industrial situations.
FOOD3888 Food Product Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien Session: Semester 2 Classes: See schedule. Prerequisites: 12cp from (AGEN2002 or FOOD2000 or FOOD3XXX or BCMB2X0X or BCHM2XXX or MEDS2003) Prohibitions: AGEN3001 Assumed knowledge: 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX Assessment: Assignments and reflective task (15%), Project report (70%), Project oral presentation (10%), Team work participation and evaluation (5%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Our ever-changing world requires knowledge that extends across multiple disciplines. The ability to identify and explore interdisciplinary links is a crucial skill for emerging professionals and researchers alike. This unit presents the opportunity to bring together the concepts and skills you have learnt in your discipline and apply them to a real-world problem. New product development is an important example of interdisciplinary research in the food industry. Product development teams may comprise food scientists and technologists, process engineers, market researchers, nutritionists, project managers, financial analysts and lawyers at different stages of the project. In FOOD3888, you will gain a theoretical and practical understanding of food product development through a group design project that will require application of disciplinary knowledge as well as collaboration with students from other disciplines to ideate and refine product concepts, develop design specifications, optimize prototypes, and evaluate aspects of product performance. The unit will develop your skills in problem-solving, data collection, analysis and communication. All of these skills are highly valued by employers. This unit will foster the ability to work in interdisciplinary teams, and this is essential for both professional and research pathways in the future.
FOOD3000 Food Quality and Safety

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Robyn McConchie Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week and 12 lab sessions for 12 weeks Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Assumed knowledge: Equivalent to 1st-year Biology plus 2nd-year chemistry/biochemistry: -biology, chemistry, biochemistry -Carbohydrates, proteins (including enzymes), lipids -Principles of cellular metabolism -6cp of BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or FOOD2000 Assessment: Product Quality Assurance Project Written Group Assignment (2500 words) 20%, Product Quality Assurance Project Group Presentation (10 mins) 10%, Laboratory Reports(Six Individual Reports approx 300 words each) 20%, Final exam 50% Mode of delivery: Block mode
Food is essential for health and wellbeing and has a key role in the economy. Food system dynamics have become increasingly complex due to changing consumer demands, increased global trade, and advanced technologies now used in the food industry. In this unit, you will develop a comprehensive understanding of the monitoring and control of quality and safety of foods during the food production process and its distribution. The content is aimed at ensuring that the consumer receives food products that are safe to consume and with the desired level of quality, both in terms of their sensory attributes and nutritional composition. You will examine techniques for the monitoring and control of food quality and food safety. On completion of this unit, you will be better able to: 1) Understand the roles of quality control, quality assurance and quality management systems in controlling the quality and safety of food; 2) Outline key issues in food legislation and its implementation in control and management of food quality and safety. You will develop a sound underpinning of the scientific concepts of food safety and quality management for a range of fresh and processed foods.
Textbooks
Text Books Food Quality Management; Technological and managerial principles and practices.Pieternal Luning and Willem Marcelis Wageningen Academic Publishers 2015 Microbial Food Safety: An Introduction Eds. O.A. Oyarzabal, S. Backert Springer Publishing 2010 A Canvas site will be created with on-line references and articles of interest to each weeks theme.
FOOD4001 Industry Internship

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Malcom Possell Session: Intensive July Classes: 1x 2 hr information sessions for 2 weeks, 1x 2 hr training tutorials for 2 weeks, 1x 2 hr seminar for 1 week, 1x 2 day pre-placement workshop. One six week industry placement. Prerequisites: 12cp from (FOOD3000 or FOOD3001 or FOOD3002 or FOOD3888) Assessment: professional competency (50%), internship research/analytical report (2500 words) (40%), seminar presentation (10%) Practical field work: 6 weeks for internship placement Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This is a compulsory unit for all students undertaking the Food and Agribusiness stream and is for those students only. Students must enrol in the unit prior to Semester 1 to undertake an internship in the subsequent Intensive July session.
The Food and Agribusiness sector is an important part of the Australian economy and makes a significant contribution to employment, business and service opportunities. This unit of study offers you work-integrated learning in this sector through an industry placement. Here, you will consolidate and contextualise the knowledge and skills in applied science and business that you have gained in the food and agribusiness stream in an authentic practical setting. Businesses and organisations that have agreed to host you include small-medium enterprises (SMEs), large national and multinational companies, and government and non-government organisations with roles in the production, processing, distribution, marketing, research and development, policy-making or regulation of agri-food products. Your student learning outcomes will be achieved in several ways. First, pre-placement training on 'soft skills' including inter-personal, communication and self-management skills will improve your work-readiness and build your confidence. Throughout the industry placement, you will be offered mentoring by an assigned academic mentor in addition to your workplace supervisor. Finally, the assessment tasks have been designed to ensure that the internship is accompanied by continued development of your research skills, reflective practice, critical thinking, analytical perspectives, and reporting skills.
And three elective units from Table FA1.

Year 4

Year 4 will have a minimum of 48 credit points comprised of:
AFNR4101 Research Project A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Budiman Minasny Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: No formal classes, approximately 18 hours per week Prerequisites: 144 credit points of level 1000-3000 units of study Assessment: Research proposal presentation, critical literature review and written proposal. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop a student's ability to undertake a major research project in an area of specialization. The unit builds on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. This unit is a corequisite with AFNR4102 and each student will work with an academic supervisor in an area of specialization and develop a well-defined research project to be executed. The research project is undertaken to advance the students ability to build well-developed research skills, a strong analytical capacity, and the ability to provide high quality research results demonstrating a sound grasp of the research question. Working with an academic supervisor, students will develop their ability to define a research project including the producing of testable hypotheses, identifying existing knowledge from reviewing the literature, and the design and execution of a research strategy towards solving the research question. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem. They will enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the development of experimental programs. Students will experience presenting a project proposal. They will improve their written and planning skills by composing a research project proposal and the writing of a critical literature review.
and 12 credit points of electives from Table FA1 and FA2.
AFNR4102 Research Project B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Budiman Minasny Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: No formal classes, approximately 18 hours per week Prerequisites: AFNR4101 Assessment: Poster, oral presentation and research paper. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a continuation of the major research project initiated in AFNR4101 and continues to build on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. Working with their academic supervisor in the area of specialization the student will continue to pursue the defined research project towards presenting final results and conclusions. The research results will be communicated as a poster, an oral presentation, and a research paper. The research paper is to be formatted as an article of a scientific journal. Students will continue to build their research skills, develop strong analytical capacity, demonstrate a sound grasp of the topic, and an ability to interpret results in a broad framework. Working with an academic supervisor, students will develop their ability to produce results of high quality, draw reliable conclusions, and identify future areas of research. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem.The project will enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the managing the research program. Students will improve their communication skills through oral presentation of their research findings, the production of a poster detailing their research findings and the writing of a research paper.
and 12 credit points of electives from Table FA1 and FA2.

Elective unit of study descriptions

Food and Agribusiness

Table FA1

School of Economics units
Students may take units of study from the Agricultural and Resource Economics subject area (these are AREC-coded units).
Notes: Prerequisites and/or co-requisites apply for most units. See Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (Undergraduate) Handbook
Business School units
Students may take units of study from the following subject areas in the Business School: Accounting; Business Analytics; Banking; Business Information Systems; Commercial Law; Finance; Industrial Relations and Human Resources Management; International Business; Management; Marketing
Notes: Prerequisites and/or co-requisites apply for most units. See the Business School (Undergraduate) Handbook

Food and Agribusiness

Table FA2

Students may only select two 2000 level units of study from Tables FA1 and FA2 to fulfil part of the requirements for Year 4.
AFNR3001 Agro-ecosystems in Developing Countries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 18 days fieldtrip before the start of semester 1, online tutorials Assessment: Participation (20%), research topic proposal (20%), oral presentation (20%), major report (40%) Practical field work: One 18 day field school Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
AGEN3008 Indigenous Land and Food Knowledge

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Ampt (Coordinator), A/Prof Tina Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Application process, pre-trip orientation - 1 day, field trip - 10 days + travel time = 70 hours, post-trip workshop - 1 day. (Student financial contribution $2000-$2500) Assessment: Assessment during field trip: field trip activities recorded,in booklet (20%), journal - personal/reflective (20%), participation peer and self-assessment (10%); assessment post-field trip: one 3000wd feasibility study, funding application and essay due week 7 Semester 2 (50%); Out of class prescribed student workload: application process - Kinship module 1-hour, written application 2-hours. Prepare report - five hours for seven weeks Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students must attend pre-trip briefing session (one day in S1 exam period), field trip (approximately two weeks in mid-year break) and post-trip workshop (one day in S2).
Textbooks
No prescribed textbook but recommended reading includes: Gammage B (2011) The Biggest Estate on Earth: How Aborigines made Australia, Allen and Unwin, Crows Nest, Sydney, Australia; Svieby K, Skuthorpe T (2006) Treading Lightly: The Hidden Wisdom of the World's Oldest People, Allen and Unwin, Crows nest, Sydney, Australia; Bird Rose D (2000) Dingo Makes us Human: Life and Land in an Australian Aboriginal Culture, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK
AVBS4002 Dairy Production and Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Sergio (Yani) Garcia Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures up to 3 hours per week, practicals 3 hours per week, at least two half day field trips and one or two full day trips/excursions including commercial farms and a milk processing plant Prerequisites: 48cp of 2000-level or 3000-level units Assumed knowledge: Enrolled students are expected to have some understanding of key components of the dairy production system, including basic knowledge of animal physiology and nutrition. Assessment: Assignment (report or lit review) (40%), pracs assessments, (30%), 1-hour exam (30%) Practical field work: At least two half day field trips and one or two full day trips/excursions including commercial farms and a milk processing plant Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Textbooks
Students are advised to consult lecturers for recommended text, scientific and professional articles, technotes for advisors and industry-generated information for farmers
AVBS4004 Food Safety Assessment and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gary Muscatello Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 3 hours per week, tutorial/practicals 2 hours per week, two field trips (compulsory - 16 hours total) Prerequisites: AVBS3001 and AVBS4001 Assessment: 1000wd individual report (20%), 1000wd group assignment (20%), 2-hour exam (50%), MCQ (10%) Practical field work: Two field trips (compulsory) 16 hours total Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Textbooks
Torrence ME and Isaacson RE (eds) 2003, Microbial food safety in animal agriculture current topics, Iowa State Press, Ames, Iowa
AVBS3010 Livestock Production Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Luciano Gonzalez Session: Semester 1 Classes: averaged as lecture 4hrs/week for 10 weeks, tutorials 1hr/week for 5 weeks, seminars 7 hrs/week for 1 week, practical 8 hrs/week for 1 week and 2 hrs/week for 1 week, site visit 4hrs/week for 1 week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (AVBS2XXX or ANSC3101 or BIOL2XXX or FOOD2000 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2001 or GENE2002 or ITLS2000) Prohibitions: AGRO4005 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with data analysis and animal handling. Assessment: 4 x practical reports (5%, 20% total), group-based farm system enterprise report (20%), group-based oral presentation (20%), final exam (40% ) Practical field work: 2 days of farm practical classes Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit requires three days of practicals at the Camden campus and field trip to commercial farms .
AGRO4006 New and Emerging Tech in Animal Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Luciano Gonzalez Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 3-hour lecture followed by one 3-hour practical per week at Camden Campus (practicals include demonstration and hands-on with remote sensing, GIS and ICT technologies) Prerequisites: 6cp from BIOL1XXX Assessment: Final Assignment presentation (10%) and document (40%), video proposal for major assignment (10%) and practical reports (computer labs and field classes, 40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Textbooks
No prescribed text but referral to references listed from library
AVBS3008 Intensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sonia Liu Session: Semester 2 Classes: approximately 6 hrs/week: lecture 2-3 hrs/week, tutorial or MCQ 2hr/fortnight Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (ANSC3101 or AVBS2XXX or BIOL2XXX or FOOD2000 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2001 or GENE2002 or ITLS2000) Prohibitions: AVBS4008 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with data analysis and animal handling. Assessment: in-class MCQs x 4 (20%), efficacy and welfare written report (20%), group assignment virtual piggery (10%), final exam (50%) Practical field work: Approximately 6 afternoons at Mayfarm Piggery and Poultry Unit. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
AVBS4012 Extensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Russell Bush Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 3 hours per week, practicals 3 hours per week, five-day study tour to the Riverina Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 or {144 credit points of units of study including a minimum of 12 credit points from [ANSC3106 and (ANSC3888 or AVBS3888 or SCPU3001)]} Assessment: Case study (10%), practical report (20%), meat grading (15%), excursion report (15%) and written exam (40%) Practical field work: Five-day study tour to the Riverina Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 3-hour computer practical per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 or MATH1015 or DATA1001 or DATA1901)] OR [3cp from (MATH1XX1 or MATH1906 or MATH1XX3 or MATH1907) and an additional 3cp from (MATH1XX5)] Assessment: final exam (55%), reports (2 x 10%), ten online quizzes (5% total), group work presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, Food and Agribusiness and Taronga Wildlife Conservation streams
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are: Mead R, Curnow RN, Hasted AM (2002) 'Statistical methods in agriculture and experimental biology.' (Chapman and Hall: Boca Raton). Quinn GP, Keough MJ (2002) 'Experimental design and data analysis for biologists.' (Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK).
HORT3005 Production Horticulture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 3-hour practical/workshop per week Prerequisites: 72cp of 1000-3000 level units Assessment: One 3-hour exam (55%), three assignments (45%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Louis Glowinski (2008) The complete book of fruit growing in Australia. Lothian Books, Westwood, M.N. (1993) Temperate-zone pomology. Timber Press Inc. Jackson, J.E (2003) Biology of apples and pears. Cambridge University Press. Gopinadhan Paliyath et al. (Ed.) (2008) Postharvest biology and technology of fruits, vegetables, and flowers. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Decoteau, D/. R (2000). Vegetable Crops. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall
HORT4005 Research and Practice in Horticulture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Brian Jones Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2-hour lecture/workshop/practical per week; one 1-week excursion Prerequisites: HORT3005 Assessment: Industry report (40%), field trip industry report (20%), end of semester exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
PHYS5031 Ecological Econ and Sustainable Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arunima Malik Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1.5-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week, and 1 hour tutorial/seminar per week. Assessment: Essay, presentation and critical writing task (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
PHYS5033 Environmental Footprints and IO Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arunima Malik and Prof Manfred Lenzen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Comprehensive diary/notes from lectures, including a quantitative example, and in class tests (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
PHYS5034 Life Cycle Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arunima Malik Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2.5-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Essay, presentation and comprehensive diary/notes from lectures (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.

Food and Agribusiness

All students complete an Agribusiness Major and a Food Science Major

Table 1A - Agribusiness Major

Year 1
BUSS1000 Future of Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1.5 hour lecture every week (13), 1.5 hr tutorial each week, guided learning material (e.g. videos, podcasts, contemporary case studies etc.). 8x 1.5 hr workshops: Students who are identified as benefiting from additional academic support (a written diagnostic is administered during week 1 of the BUSS1000 tutorials) will be required to attend a 1.5 hour weekly workshop from Week 3 on Business Communication and Academic Writing (BCAC). Prohibitions: BUSS1001 Assessment: Case study (25%), team presentation (25%), tutorial attendance and participation (15%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit must be completed in the first semester in the first year of study for all students enrolled in the Bachelor of Commerce (including combined degrees).
This compulsory first year unit is designed to provide commencing undergraduate students with insights into the study and the practice of business. Students gain foundational knowledge in relation to business stakeholders, business challenges and the ways in which business leaders might approach responding to these challenges. Key stakeholders within and external to organisations are identified and their interests are analysed. Critical business challenges such as climate change and sustainability, the future of work and workforce diversity are investigated. The way that these challenges affect different types of business, sectors and stakeholders is analysed and responses constructed to them. The unit is delivered in a blended format, with face-to-face lectures, seminars, and interactive online modules. Success in this unit is determined by strong application of critical, strategic and cross-disciplinary thinking, as well as the ability to demonstrate business knowledge and problem-solving skills through effective written and oral communication.
ENVX1002 Introduction to Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Bishop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours per week of lectures; 2 hours per week of computer tutorials Prohibitions: ENVX1001 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or MATH1115 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 or BUSS1020 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness, and Taronga Wildlife Conservation streams
This is an introductory data science unit for students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It provides the foundation for statistics and data science skills that are needed for a career in science and for further study in applied statistics and data science. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. It has 4 modules; exploring data, modelling data, sampling data and making decisions with data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology, ENVX1002 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data.
Textbooks
Statistics, Fourth Edition, Freedman Pisani Purves
ENVI1003 Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, 2-hour computer lab per week, two-day weekend field trip Prohibitions: AGEN1002 Assessment: 2-hour exam (45%), field trip report (20%), group work presentation (25%), GIS reports (10%) Practical field work: Computer practicals and two-day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 21st century the population of the world will increase both in size and its expectation in terms of food, energy and consumer demands. Against this demand we have a planet in crisis where natural resources are degraded, biodiversity is diminishing and planetary cycles related to climate are reaching points of irreversible change. Management of our precious natural resources is a balancing act between production and conservation as always, but now we have to do this against a background of potential large scale changes in climate. In this unit students will gain an understanding of the key environmental challenges of the 21st century; namely food security, climate change, water security, biodiversity protection, ecosystems services and soil security. In the second half, using Australian case studies, we will explore how we manage different agro-ecosystems within their physical constraints around water, climate and soil, while considering linkages with the global environmental challenges. Management now, in the past and the future will be considered, with an emphasis on food production. This unit is recommended unit for students interested in gaining a broad overview of the environmental challenges of the 21st century, both globally and within Australia.
Year 2 and 3 Units
BUSS1030 Accounting, Business and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ACCT1001 or ACCT1002 or ACCT1003 or ACCT1004 or ACCT1005 Assessment: tutorial contribution (10%), assignment (15%), mid-semester test (25%), final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students enrolled in the Bachelor of Commerce, the Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Advanced Studies, and the Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Laws must complete this core unit within the first year of study (full-time students) or within in the first two years of study (part-time students).
This unit investigates the fundamentals of accounting and aims to provide a broad understanding of the role of accounting in the context of business and society. The format of the unit is designed to show that there are many uses of accounting data. The focus moves from accountability to decision making; both functions are explained through examples such as the 'double entry equation', and from an output (financial statements) perspective. Some more technical aspects of accounting are outlined, including the elements of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses within simple, familiar scenarios. Besides developing an understanding of the role of accounting via conventional financial reports, recent developments including the discharge of accountability by companies through the release of corporate social and environmental reports and the global financial crisis, are explored through an accounting lens.
MKTG1001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: project (20%), presentation (15%), participation (7%), mid-semester exam (28%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The Intensive January and July sessions of this unit are only available to Study Abroad students. All other students should enrol in Semester 1 and Semester 2 sessions.
This unit examines the relationships among marketing organisations and final consumers in terms of production-distribution channels or value chains. It focuses on consumer responses to various marketing decisions (product mixes, price levels, distribution channels, promotions, etc.) made by private and public organisations to create, develop, defend, and sometimes eliminate, product markets. Emphasis is placed on identifying new ways of satisfying the needs and wants and creating value for consumers. While this unit is heavily based on theory, practical application of the concepts to "real world" situations is also essential. Specific topics of study include: market segmentation strategies; market planning; product decisions; new product development; branding strategies; channels of distribution; promotion and advertising; pricing strategies; and customer database management.
ITLS2000 Managing Food and Beverage Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hr seminar/tutorial per week Prohibitions: AGEN2003 or AGEN1005 Assessment: tutorial quiz (10%), individual assignment (35%), group project report (15%), group project presentation (10%), final 2hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The food and beverage sector is one of the key economic activities in virtually all countries in the world today. When it comes to logistics and supply chain management within this sector, there is a level of complexity, not frequently found in other industries. This includes the need to consider products bulkiness, perishability and seasonality, coupled with potential additional infrastructure requirements in respect of temperature-controlled storage and transport. As a consequence, there is a higher imperative to have a well-designed end-to-end supply chain. Equally, it is important to understand issues from the perspectives of the various actors in food and beverage supply chains including farms, processing units, wholesalers / distributors, and retailers. Overarching the structuring of any food and beverage supply chain will be consideration of issues such as perishability, quality and risk. Further, for a supply chain to be effective and efficient consideration also needs to be given to the support functions of information management, use of technology, and financial reporting. In today's world, companies compete on supply chains. Those who have the ability to establish a distinctive supply chain and create it as a strategic asset will, therefore, emerge as industry leaders.
Students are also required to complete 24 credit points of elective units from Table FA1 for the Agribusiness Major.

Table 1B - Food Science Major

BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 2 field excursions. Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 2 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
or
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 3 field excursions Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 3 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in an authentic urban biodiversity management research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
or
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes (15%), communication assessments (35%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: quizzes (14%), communication assessments (36%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week; online material; and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
CHEM1012 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1112 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr lecture; 1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviours, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do we develop lotions that don't burn us, how do we measure UV absorption by sunscreens, how can we measure and alter soil pH, how are sticky things made, and how do we determine the concentration of vitamin C in juice? Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1912 Chemistry 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101) or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Advanced units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B (Advanced) is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A (Advanced). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
Year 2 and 3 units
BIOL2030 Botany

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lecture/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or BIOL2930 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), anatomy project report and presentation (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to enhance biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes, and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frame works in plant identification, plant physiology, plant anatomy, and plant morphology. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by self-instructional audio-visual sessions and by small group discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. Successful completion of Botany will allow you to contribute to a range of disciplines including: ecology, bioinformatics, molecular and cell biology, genetics and biotechnology, environmental law, agriculture, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
FOOD2000 Principles of Food Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalind Deaker Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/week; guest lectures 2 x 1 h, 12 x 3 h practicals Prerequisites: BIOL1XXX or AGEN1004 or MBLG1XX1 Prohibitions: AGEN2002 Assessment: 3 x online quizzes (10%), 2 x practical assignments (30%), 1 x oral presentation (10%), exam (50%) Practical field work: 1 site visit Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Managing safety and quality of food is critical to health, social, environmental and economic security. In this unit of study, you will examine the structural and functional properties of foods, and the science underpinning their production and management. Different categories of food will be described on the basis of physiology and biochemistry and how this underpins quality, organoleptic and nutritional properties. Typical spoilage processes in different foods, quality deterioration during the postharvest period, and the industry practices and technology used to prolong shelf-life will be covered. The main food safety challenges for the food industry and their control will be introduced. The unit focuses on core skills in assessment of food quality and safety, and the understanding of management practices and technology used to ensure these meet market or regulatory requirements. Case study examples will be drawn from grain, fruit and vegetable, meat, eggs, dairy and seafood products. Food standards, food safety systems and government regulations will also be covered. Students are introduced to basic chemistry and microbiology techniques used in food science as well as common industrial methods for food quality assessment.
AVBS1002 Concepts of Animal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Cameron Clark Session: Semester 2 Classes: On average 6 hours per week (lectures and practicals); there will be several whole-day practical classes at the Camden campus Prohibitions: AGEN2006 Assumed knowledge: AGEN1004 or BIOL1XXX or AVBS1003 Assessment: Participation, written assignments, quizzes and end of semester examination Practical field work: There will be several whole day practical classes at the Camden campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the management of animals in natural and man-made environments. At the end of this unit of study, students will understand: the characteristics of the management systems of the major domestic species used for production in Australia and in a world wide context; the characteristics and principles underpinning sustainable management of native animals in natural and man-made environments; an appreciation of the dependence of living organisms upon their environment; an appreciation of indigenous land management and the husbandry practices and innovations that have been adopted by the production industries to retain their competitive advantage; a demonstrated capability in handling and husbandry of the major domestic production animal species, and an appreciation of the application of these skills to non-domestic species; a demonstrated understanding of the importance of high standards of animal welfare practice in the management of animals.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the unit content and for this reason no formal text is required. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course.
MICR2031 Microbiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2931 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: written assignment (10%), group oral presentation (20%) and online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the earth's trees. This unit of study will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require if you specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology or science education.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
or
MICR2931 Microbiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2031 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: two written assignments (10%, 20%), and online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the Earth's trees. In this unit of study you will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Detailed aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require to specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology, or science education. As an Advanced unit, MICR2931 provides increased challenge and academic rigour to develop a greater understanding and depth of disciplinary expertise. You will actively participate in a series of small group tutorials investigating the molecular detail of microbial communication and function, which will culminate in you creating a scientific research report that communicates your understanding of recent research in microbiology.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
FOOD3002 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Foods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Roberts Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 2x1 hr/week for 13 weeks; pre-lab 1x1 hr/week for 6 weeks; practical class 1x3 hr/week for 6 weeks Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Prohibitions: AGCH3025 or AFNR5102 or AGCH3024 Assumed knowledge: Equivalent to 1st-year Biology plus 2nd-year chemistry/biochemistry: -biology, chemistry, biochemistry -Carbohydrates, proteins (including enzymes), lipids -Principles of cellular metabolism Assessment: 6 x short answer assignment (30%), 3 x lab reports (15%), 2 x short answer lab exercises (10%), video presentation (5%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The molecular basis of foods is a critical aspect of food science. FOOD3002 investigates the (bio)chemical properties of food constituents, as well as the interactions between these constituents during food processing, storage, cooking and digestion. You will develop an understanding of the relationship between form and functionality of food constituents and the concept of quality in converting agricultural products into foods. You will gain an appreciation of the relationship between chemical composition and properties of macro-constituents (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids) and micro-constituents (vitamins, minerals, flavour and antinutritional chemicals) and their functions in plant- and animal-based foods. FOOD3002 will enable you to develop research and inquiry skills and an analytical approach to understand the (bio)chemistry of foods and food processing. You will gain experience in laboratory techniques used in industry and research for the analysis of a range of food products, as well as developing information literacy and communication skills, through the preparation of written and in-lab assignments, practical reports and the creation of a short video. On completing this unit, you will be able to describe the (bio)chemical properties of food constituents and demonstrate an understanding of the functionality of these constituents in food processing and nutrition.
FOOD3888 Food Product Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien Session: Semester 2 Classes: See schedule. Prerequisites: 12cp from (AGEN2002 or FOOD2000 or FOOD3XXX or BCMB2X0X or BCHM2XXX or MEDS2003) Prohibitions: AGEN3001 Assumed knowledge: 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX Assessment: Assignments and reflective task (15%), Project report (70%), Project oral presentation (10%), Team work participation and evaluation (5%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Our ever-changing world requires knowledge that extends across multiple disciplines. The ability to identify and explore interdisciplinary links is a crucial skill for emerging professionals and researchers alike. This unit presents the opportunity to bring together the concepts and skills you have learnt in your discipline and apply them to a real-world problem. New product development is an important example of interdisciplinary research in the food industry. Product development teams may comprise food scientists and technologists, process engineers, market researchers, nutritionists, project managers, financial analysts and lawyers at different stages of the project. In FOOD3888, you will gain a theoretical and practical understanding of food product development through a group design project that will require application of disciplinary knowledge as well as collaboration with students from other disciplines to ideate and refine product concepts, develop design specifications, optimize prototypes, and evaluate aspects of product performance. The unit will develop your skills in problem-solving, data collection, analysis and communication. All of these skills are highly valued by employers. This unit will foster the ability to work in interdisciplinary teams, and this is essential for both professional and research pathways in the future.
FOOD3001 Food Processing and Value Adding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week; practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Prohibitions: AGEN3004 Assumed knowledge: 6cp of (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of CHEM1XXX Assessment: Structure and food quality lab report (10%), QC investigation lab report (20%), Processingcase study report (20%), Processing case study presentation (10%), Final exam(40%) Practical field work: A few optional site visits Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit needs to be available as a non-award course so that students seeking admission to the MND have an option to fulfil the 6 cp Food Science prerequisite, if their previous study does not fulfil this requirement already.
All of the food that we produce and consume is processed in some way. The manufacture of composite food products, which have distinct properties to their constituent ingredients, requires a complex series of processing operations. However, even ready-to-eat fresh foods undergo processing to facilitate distribution to consumers, maximise shelf-life, and ensure food safety. This unit will examine the biochemical and physicochemical transformations that occur in food materials during processing and how processing parameters affect the fulfilment of food quality, shelf-life, and safety objectives. The unit is divided into modules on (1) processing to modify food structure; (2) processing for preservation; and value-adding, focused on (3) healthier food and (4) fermentation as interesting case studies in food processing. You will learn methods of food analysis and apply a scientific approach to investigating the relationships between food composition, functionality, processing conditions, and end-product properties. By doing this unit, you will develop a sound understanding of the scientific principles underpinning food processing decisions and outcomes. This is well-regarded in the food industry, particularly FMCG and manufacturing, as the ability to systematically characterise, analyse, and troubleshoot processes can be applied to a wide range of industrial situations.