Table 2: Geoarchaeology

Table 2 lists an optional major available only to students in the pre-2018 Bachelor of Science, the Bachelor of Science (Advanced) and the Bachelor of Science (Advanced Mathematics) who commenced their candidature prior to 1 January, 2018.

Students in all other award courses and combined degrees, eg, Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts, are not eligible for Table 2 majors.

Students in the pre-2018 Bachelor of Science, the Bachelor of Science (Advanced) and the Bachelor of Science (Advanced Mathematics) wishing to complete a Table 2 major are still required to complete a minimum of one Science Table 1 major.

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Geoarchaeology

For a major in Geoarchaeology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from Senior units of study comprising:
(i) ARCO3101 and GEOS3103/3803, and
(ii) two units of study taken from ARCO3404, ARCO3401, ARCO3402, SOIL3009.
Senior units of study
ARCO3101
Archaeology: History, Theory, Research
6    P 12 credit points at 2000 level in Archaeology or 6 Junior credit points of ARCA and (ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARTH1001 or HSTY1089)
N ARCA2635
Semester 1
GEOS3103
Environmental and Sedimentary Geology
6    A (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903)
P (GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924)
N GEOS3803
Semester 2
GEOS3803
Environmental and Sedimentary Geology(Adv)
6    A (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903)
P A mark of 75 or above in [(GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924)]
N GEOS3103


Students who have a credit average for all Geoscience units may enrol in this unit with the permission of the Head of School.
Semester 2
ARCO3404
Archaeological Fieldwork (Project 4)
6    P 12 credit points at 2000 level in Archaeology
Summer Main
ARCO3401
Australian Lithic Technology (Project 1)
6    P 12 credit points at 2000 level in Archaeology
Semester 2
ARCO3402
Archaeozoology (Project 2)
6    P 12 credit points at 2000 level in Archaeology
N ARCA2641
Semester 2
SOIL3009
Contemporary Field and Lab Soil Science
6    P SOIL2003
Semester 1

Geoarchaeology

For a major in Geoarchaeology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from Senior units of study comprising:
(i) ARCO3101 and GEOS3103/3803, and
(ii) two units of study taken from ARCO3404, ARCO3401, ARCO3402, SOIL3009.
Senior units of study
ARCO3101 Archaeology: History, Theory, Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Archaeology or 6 Junior credit points of ARCA and (ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARTH1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARCA2635 Assessment: 500wd equivalent Lecture Questions (10%), 1x 1500wds Seminar paper (20%), 1x 4000wds Essay (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An introduction to the history of archaeological inquiry in order to illustrate the way theory works, the key theoretical themes and issues of archaeological research and a global perspective on archaeology today.
GEOS3103 Environmental and Sedimentary Geology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dan Penny (Coordinator), Dr. Adriana Dutkiewicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical class per week Prerequisites: (GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924) Prohibitions: GEOS3803 Assumed knowledge: (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903) Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical reports and quizes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Sediments and sedimentary rocks cover most of the Earth's surface, record much of the Earth's geological and climatic history and host important resources such as petroleum, coal, water and mineral ores. The aim of this unit is to provide students with the skills required to examine, describe and interpret sediments and sedimentary rocks for a variety of different purposes. Specific foci of the unit will be the identification of the recent or ancient environment in which sedimentary materials were deposited, the environmental controls which produce sedimentary structures, and the processes that control the production, movement and storage of sediment bodies. On completion of this unit students will be familiar with the natural processes that produce and modify sediments across a range of environments at the Earth's surface, including fluvial, aeolian, lacustrine, marginal marine and deep marine environments. The various controls on the sedimentary record such as climate and sea-level change, as well as diagenesis and geochemical cycles will also be discussed. Practical exercises will require students to examine global datasets, and determine the properties and significance of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The course is relevant to students interested in petroleum or mineral exploration, environmental and engineering geology as well as marine geoscience.
Textbooks
Course notes will be available from the Copy Centre and an appropriate set of reference texts will be placed on special reserve in the library.
GEOS3803 Environmental and Sedimentary Geology(Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dan Penny (Coordinator), Dr. Adriana Dutkiewicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical class per week. Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in [(GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924)] Prohibitions: GEOS3103 Assumed knowledge: (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903) Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical, field reports and quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have a credit average for all Geoscience units may enrol in this unit with the permission of the Head of School.
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS3103 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance at the time of enrolment. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives. Specific details for this unit of study will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester.
Textbooks
Course notes will be available from the Copy Centre and appropriate set of reference texts will be placed on special reserve in the library.
ARCO3404 Archaeological Fieldwork (Project 4)

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Main Classes: 8 hours of lectures, followed by up to two weeks of fieldwork. Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Archaeology Assessment: 1x 1000 wds Research design proposal (20%), 1x 1000 wds Fieldwork log (20%), 1x 4000 wds Project (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Field experience
This unit provides practical experience in archaeology fieldwork. Students learn site discovery, recording and excavation techniques, and develop a detailed understanding of the practices involved in archaeological fieldwork.
ARCO3401 Australian Lithic Technology (Project 1)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr laboratory/ week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Archaeology Assessment: 1x 1000 wd equivalent Lab notebook (20%), 1x 1000 wd equivalent Practical test (20%), 1x 4000 wds Project (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Production of stone artefacts, lithic technology, is the oldest technology and key to cultural evolution. The unit introduces the technology, and methods and theories for its archaeological interpretation. Understandings are developed through a student project involving laboratory experimentation.
ARCO3402 Archaeozoology (Project 2)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lab/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Archaeology Prohibitions: ARCA2641 Assessment: 1x 2000 wds Research design outline (30%), 1x 4000 wds Major report (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What was the role of animals, both vertebrate and invertebrate, in past economic systems? With a principal emphasis on Australian fauna, we will examine the nature of subsistence strategies, animals as indicators of past environments, and techniques of analysis and interpretation of faunal remains.
SOIL3009 Contemporary Field and Lab Soil Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Budiman Minasny (Coordinator), Prof Balwant Singh, A/Prof. Stephen Cattle, Prof Alex McBratney, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and two practicals, or one lecture and three practicals per week, 6-day field excursion north-western NSW commencing 15 days prior to beginning of Semester 1 Prerequisites: SOIL2003 Assessment: One viva voce exam (40%), soil physics written assessments (20%), soil chemistry written assessments (20%), soil judging (12%), pedology written assessments (8%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a theoretical and empirical unit providing specialised training in three important areas of contemporary soil science, namely pedology, soil chemistry, and soil physics. The key concepts of these sub-disciplines will be outlined and strengthened by hands-on training in contemporary field and laboratory techniques. All of this is synthesized by placing it in the context of soil distribution and use in North-Western New South Wales. The unit is motivated by the teaching team's research in this locale. It builds on students, existing soil science knowledge gained in SOIL2003. After completion of the unit, students should be able to articulate the advantages and disadvantages of current field and laboratory techniques for gathering necessary soil information, and simultaneously recognise key concepts and principles that guide contemporary thought in soil science. Students will be able to synthesise soil information from a multiplicity of sources and have an appreciation of the cutting edge areas of soil management and research. By investigating the contemporary nature of key concepts, students will develop their skills in research and inquiry. Students will develop their communication skills through report writing and will also articulate an openness to new ways of thinking which augments intellectual autonomy. Teamwork and collaborative efforts are encouraged in this unit.
Textbooks
Textbooks: D. Hillel, 2004. Introduction to Environmental Soil Physics. Elsevier Science, San Diego, CA, USA.