Psychology

PSYCHOLOGY

Psychology program

A program in Psychology requires 60 credit points from this table including:
(i) A 48 credit point major in Psychological Science
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level program core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 3000-level program core units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

2000-level units of study

Program Core
PSYC2015 Brain and Behavioural Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week x 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week x 12 weeks Prerequisites: PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2915 Assessment: In-class debate (5%), tutorial quiz (15%), scientific report proposal (10%), scientific report (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed for students who would like to learn about the core concepts of clinical and biobehavioural psychology, and their applications to therapies, organisations, and an individual's behaviour. The emphasis is on behaviour, emotions, and motivational processes. You will learn how to analyse the environmental cause of behaviours, and how to use reinforcements, punishments and incentives to modify and motivate behaviour. Clinical Psychology will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sexual disorders, and eating disorders. The way in which these processes arise and are shaped in people will be presented in the section on Developmental Psychology. Neuroscience will focus on the evolutionary, genetic, neurobiological, and pharmacological mechanisms underlying the phenomena taught in the other sections. The practical classes are designed for students with an interest in clinical and therapeutic Psychology, and will train students to design and implement a behaviour modification programme.
PSYC2915 Brain and Behavioural Psychology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week x 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week x 12 weeks Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or greater in PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2015 Assessment: Scientific written report proposal (10%) Scientific written report (20%), a tutorial quiz (15%), an in-class debate (5% participation mark), and the final exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This advanced-level course is designed for students who would like to learn about the core concepts of clinical and biobehavioural psychology. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but the practical material offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. The emphasis of the lectures is on behaviour, emotions, and motivational processes. You will learn how to analyse the environmental causes of behaviours, and how to use reinforcements, punishments and incentives to modify and motivate behaviour. Clinical Psychology will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sexual disorders, and eating disorders. The way in which these processes arise and are shaped in people will be presented in the section on Developmental Psychology. Neuroscience will focus on the evolutionary, genetic, neurobiological, and pharmacological mechanisms underlying the phenomena taught in the other sections. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in different practical exercises with a focus on research methods used to examine the links between the brain and behaviours, emotions, cognitions, and their disorders. Students will design and conduct their own neuropsychology experiment.

3000-level units of study

Program Core
PSYC3010 Advanced Statistics for Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sabina Kleitman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2012 plus at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit of Study from PSYC2010 and PSYC2910 and PSYC2011 and PSYC2911 and PSYC2013 and PSYC2014 and PSYC2015 and PSYC2915 and PSYC2016 and PSYC2017 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, class tests, practical exercises (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study expands upon students' knowledge of the general linear model and its applications in the analysis of data from psychological research. One half of the unit introduces students to contrast analysis and interaction analyses as an extension of ANOVA, which allows for more focused analysis of data where group comparisons are the primary interest. Another half focuses on multiple regression and its extensions, which are used when the primary interest is to predict or explain a particular variable based on a set of other variables.
Textbooks
Keith, Z. T. (2006). Multiple Regression and Beyond. New York: Pearson Education, Inc.