Psychology

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

Prohibitions for the following units have changed. They now read:

PSYC2015 Brain and Behavioural Psychology Prohibition: PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2915 or PSYC2014

PSYC2915 Brain and Behavioural Psychology (Advanced) Prohibition: PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2014

PSYC2017 Personality and Social Psychology Prohibition: PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911

14/1/2019

PSYCHOLOGY

Psychology program

A program in Psychology requires 60 credit points from this table including:
(i) A 48 credit point major in Psychological Science
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level program selective units
(iii) 6 credit points of 3000-level program core units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

2000-level units of study

Program Selective
PSYC2015 Brain and Behavioural Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week x 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week x 12 weeks Prerequisites: PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2915 Assessment: In-class debate (5%), tutorial quiz (15%), scientific report proposal (10%), scientific report (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed for students who would like to learn about the core concepts of clinical and biobehavioural psychology, and their applications to therapies, organisations, and an individual's behaviour. The emphasis is on behaviour, emotions, and motivational processes. You will learn how to analyse the environmental causes of behaviours, and how to use reinforcements, punishments and incentives to modify and motivate behaviour. Clinical Psychology will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sexual disorders, and eating disorders. The way in which these processes arise and are shaped in people will be presented in the section on Developmental Psychology. Neuroscience will focus on the evolutionary, genetic, neurobiological, and pharmacological mechanisms underlying the phenomena taught in the other sections. The practical classes are designed for students with an interest in clinical and therapeutic Psychology, and will train students to design and implement a behaviour modification programme.
PSYC2915 Brain and Behavioural Psychology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week x 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week x 12 weeks Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or greater in PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2015 Assessment: Scientific written report proposal (10%) Scientific written report (20%), a tutorial quiz (15%), an in-class debate (5% participation mark), and the final exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This advanced-level course is designed for students who would like to learn about the core concepts of clinical and biobehavioural psychology. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but the practical material offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. The emphasis of the lectures is on behaviour, emotions, and motivational processes. You will learn how to analyse the environmental causes of behaviours, and how to use reinforcements, punishments and incentives to modify and motivate behaviour. Clinical Psychology will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sexual disorders, and eating disorders. The way in which these processes arise and are shaped in people will be presented in the section on Developmental Psychology. Neuroscience will focus on the evolutionary, genetic, neurobiological, and pharmacological mechanisms underlying the phenomena taught in the other sections. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in different practical exercises with a focus on research methods used to examine the links between the brain and behaviours, emotions, cognitions, and their disorders. Students will design and conduct their own neuropsychology experiment.
PSYC2016 Perception, Cognition, and Intelligence

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Barton L. Anderson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1hour lectures, 1x 1hr tutorials Prerequisites: PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 Assessment: Research report (35%), Quiz (15%), Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this Unit of Study, you will study three of the core topics of Psychology: Perception, Cognition, and Intelligence. Our sensory systems generate our experience of our bodies and what exists in the world. In the perception component, you will learn how our sensory systems influence our ability to act in the world and the conditions and consequences of perceptual errors. The cognition component of the course will focus on the theoretical and methodological issues that arise in how we attend to, remember, think, problem solve, and make decisions, and consider the consequences of how biases and heuristics influence our choices. The intelligence component will explore the historical evolution of the concept of intelligence, issues in its measurement, the relationship to concepts of creativity, emotional intelligence, and the influence of the environment. You will participate in inquiry-led tutorials that will reinforce and expand on concepts in the unit, and develop broad thinking skills to relate evidence to rational arguments and choices that can be applied to any problem solving domain.
PSYC2017 Personality and Social Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Fiona White Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week for 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week for 12 weeks, commencing in Week 2 Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 Assessment: Final exam (50%), report (30%), Tutorial Quiz (15%), Research participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All of us observe our social worlds and try to understand why people behave, think, and feel as they do. In this unit you will study a number of influential theories, philosophical and empirical approaches in Personality and Social Psychology. You will examine key topics in the scientific assessment of personality, attitudes and emotions, including an introduction to psychometric testing (e. g. , validity and reliability) in Personality and Social Psychology. Specifically, in the Personality component you will be exposed to conceptual analysis and will be expected to examine critically theories from the Psychodynamic, Behaviourist, Humanist, Social Cognitive and Psychometric traditions. In the Social Psychology component you will examine salient social constructs such as social influence, the causes of prejudice and possible reduction strategies, and explore how cognitive processes affect social judgment and behaviour. In this unit you will develop a broad understanding of the leading theories and research in the areas of Personality and Social Psychology.

3000-level units of study

Program Core
PSYC3010 Advanced Statistics for Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2012 plus at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit of Study from PSYC2010; PSYC2910; PSYC2011; PSYC2911; PSYC2013; PSYC2014; PSYC2015, PSYC2915, PSYC2016; PSYC2017 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, class tests, practical exercises (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study expands upon students' knowledge of the general linear model and its applications in the analysis of data from psychological research. The first half of the course introduces students to contrast analysis and interaction analyses as an extension of ANOVA, which allows for more focused analysis of data where group comparisons are the primary interest. The second half focuses on multiple regression and its extensions, which are used when the primary interest is to predict or explain a particular variable based on a set of other variables.
Textbooks
Keith, Z. T. (2006). Multiple Regression and Beyond. New York: Pearson Education, Inc.