Table 1: Cell Pathology

Errata
Item Errata Date
1. Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
20/2/2019
2.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins  Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

11/3/2019

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Cell Pathology

For a major in Cell Pathology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from:
(i) CPAT3201/CPAT3901 and CPAT3202/CPAT3902; and
(ii) any two units of study in the Senior list below
CPAT3201
Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1
6    A Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites
P 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [(BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or (BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)]
N CPAT3901
Semester 1
CPAT3901
Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1 (Advanced)
6    A A working knowledge of biology
P A mark of 70 or above in 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) or BCHM2081 or BCHM2981) or BCHM2082 or BCHM2982)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)]
N CPAT3201

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
CPAT3202
Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2
6    A Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites
P 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [(BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or (BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)]
C CPAT3201
N CPAT3901
Semester 2
CPAT3902
Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2 (Advanced)
6    A A working knowledge of biology
P A mark of 70 or above in 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) or BCHM2081 or BCHM2981) or BCHM2082 or BCHM2982)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)]
N CPAT3202

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
Senior units of study
The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended.
AMED3001
Cancer
6    P 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]
N AMED3901
Semester 1
AMED3002
Interrogating Biomedical and Health Data
6    A Exploratory data analysis, sampling, simple linear regression, t-tests, confidence intervals and chi-squared goodness of fit tests, familiar with basic coding, basic linear algebra.
Semester 1
AMED3003
Diagnostics and Biomarkers
6    P 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PHSI2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]
N AMED3903
Semester 2
AMED3888
Clinical Science
6    P 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]
N AMED3004
Semester 2
HSTO3001
Microscopy and Histochemistry Theory
6    P ANAT2008 or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402, BMED2405, BMED2406)]


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
HSTO3902
Microscopy and Histochemistry Adv Prac
6    P A mark of 70 or above in ANAT2008 or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] or MEDS2005
C HSTO3001
N HSTO3002

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Departmental Permission required for enrolment. BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
HSTO3003
Cells and Development: Theory
6    A (ANAT2008 or BMED2401 or MEDS2005) and Human biology; BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01
P 72cp of 1000 to 3000 level units


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
HSTO3004
Cells and Development: Practical (Adv)
6    A (ANAT2008 or BMED2401 or MEDS2005) and Human biology; BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01
P An annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year and 72cp of 1000 to 3000 level units
Semester 2
BCHM3071
Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes
6    P [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3971


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
BCHM3971
Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3071


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
BCHM3072
Human Molecular Cell Biology
6    P [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3972


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
BCHM3972
Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3072


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
BCHM3081
Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins
6    P [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3981


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
BCHM3981
Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3081


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
BCHM3082
Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry
6    P [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3982


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
BCHM3982
Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3082
Semester 2
MICR3011
Microbes in Infection
6    A MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31
P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404]
N MICR3911


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
MICR3911
Microbes in Infection (Advanced)
6    A MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31
P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and a mark of 70 or above in (MICR2X22 or MIMI2X02)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 70 or above in BMED2404]
N MICR3011
Semester 1
MICR3032
Cellular and Molecular Microbiology
6    A MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31
P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and MICR2X22] OR (BMED2401 and BMED2404) OR [12cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N MICR3932


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
MICR3932
Cellular and Molecular Microbiology (Adv)
6    A MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31
P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 70 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [6cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31) and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N MICR3032


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
MICR3042
Microbiology Research Skills
6    A MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31
P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and MICR2X22] OR (BMED2401 and BMED2404) OR [12cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N MICR3942


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
MICR3942
Microbiology Research Skills (Adv)
6    A MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31
P 6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [6cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N MICR3022 or MICR3922 or MICR3042


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
PHSI3009
Frontiers in Cellular Physiology
6    P (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]
N PHSI3905 or PHSI3906 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3909


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3909
Frontiers in Cellular Physiology (Adv)
6    P A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]}
N PHSI3009 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3906
Semester 1
PHSI3010
Reproduction, Development and Disease
6    P (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]
N PHSI3905 or PHSI3906 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3910
Semester 1
PHSI3910
Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv
6    P A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]}
N PHSI3010 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3906
Semester 1

Cell Pathology

For a major in Cell Pathology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from:
(i) CPAT3201/CPAT3901 and CPAT3202/CPAT3902; and
(ii) any two units of study in the Senior list below
CPAT3201 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour research tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [(BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or (BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Prohibitions: CPAT3901 Assumed knowledge: Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), one major research essay (1500w) (20%), two 0.5-hour in-semester exams (20%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1 unit of study modules will provide a theoretical background to the scientific basis of the pathogenesis of disease. Areas covered in theoretical modules include: tissue responses to exogenous factors, adaptive responses to foreign agents, cardiovascular/pulmonary/gut responses to disease, forensic science, neuropathology and cancer. The aims of the course are: - To give students an overall understanding of the fundamental biological mechanisms governing disease pathogenesis in human beings. - To introduce to students basic concepts of the pathogenesis, natural history and complications of common human diseases. - To demonstrate and exemplify differences between normality and disease. - To explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes. Together with CPAT3202, the unit of study would be appropriate for those who intend to proceed to Honours research, to postgraduate studies such as Medicine or to careers in biomedical areas such as hospital science. Enquires should be directed to anthea.matsimanis@sydney.edu.au
Textbooks
Kumar, Abbas and Aster. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th edition. Saunders. 2012.
CPAT3901 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1 (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures (2 h/wk) and online lecturettes (3 x 20 min/wk); group focus tutorial (3 x 2 h over 2-3 weeks); guided museum session (1 h/wk); and preparation of online research notebooks (1 h/wk). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) or BCHM2081 or BCHM2981) or BCHM2082 or BCHM2982)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Prohibitions: CPAT3201 Assumed knowledge: A working knowledge of biology Assessment: Week 2 in-semester quiz 1 - 5% (12 MCQ)?Museum tour and report (module 1) - 5%Week 6 in-semester quiz 2 - 5% (12 MCQ)Museum tour and report (module 2) - 5%Week 8 in-semester quiz 3 - 5% (12 MCQ)Museum tour and report (module 3) - 5%Week 9 in-semester quiz 4 - 5% (12 MCQ)Museum tour and report (module 4) - 5% Week 10-12 Group focus learning module that precedes assignment of the pathogenesis essays to each group; students will then work in small groups to build short oral presentations (5 min) on the assigned topics. These presentations will be delivered within the groups and in the presence of a content expert that will provide feed back together with group feed back for each presentation. This will be a formative task.Week 13 Pathogenesis report - 20%Exam period final exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
A deep understanding of pathological mechanisms for disease progression leads to improved human health outcomes. As human populations across the world are ageing, the increasing burden of age-related disease will become one of the greatest challenges facing modern medical science. To equip students with skills appropriate for job-ready careers in the biomedical sciences specialising in pathology it is necessary to provide an integrated understanding of how to evaluate and analyse crucial pathological mechanisms governing disease progression in humans. You will participate in inquiry-led learning modules focused on the systems theory of disease and the underlying mechanisms that promote disease progression in humans. To demonstrate disease you will review high-resolution imagery of pathological specimens using innovative online tools combined with in-depth description of immunological, molecular and biochemical process that underpin the pathogenesis of disease in a range of major body organs. You will undertake investigations to gain an advanced understanding of the health complications of common human diseases. You will learn to use a process of high-level deduction to identify key differences between normality and disease in order to explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes. Through undertaking this unit you will develop the necessary skill set to define and strategically assess how different organ systems react to injury/insult and how to apply basic concepts of disease processes, which ultimately improve the capacity to manage and intervene in fundamental and clinical aspects of health and disease.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site and the Pathology museum website. Robbins Basic Pathology; 9th Edition, Eds Kumar, Abbas, Fausto and Mitchell
CPAT3202 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 2 Classes: Practical Module Prerequisites: 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [(BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or (BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Corequisites: CPAT3201 Prohibitions: CPAT3901 Assumed knowledge: Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), Museum Practical Reports (40%). Practical field work: One 2-hour microscopic practical and one 2-hour museum practical per week. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2 unit of study modules will provide a practical background to the scientific basis of the pathogenesis of disease. Areas covered in practical modules include disease specimen evaluation on a macroscopic and microscopic basis. The aims of the course are: - To enable students to gain an understanding of how different organ systems react to injury and to apply basic concepts of disease processes. - To equip students with skills appropriate for careers in the biomedical sciences and for further training in research or professional degrees. At the end of the course students will: - Have acquired practical skills in the use of a light microscope. - Have an understanding of basic investigative techniques for disease detection in pathology. - Be able to evaluate diseased tissue at the macroscopic and microscopic level. - Have the ability to describe, synthesise and present information on disease pathogenesis. - Transfer problem-solving skills to novel situations related to disease pathogenesis. This unit of study would be appropriate for those who intend to proceed to Honours research, to postgraduate studies such as Medicine or to careers in biomedical areas such as hospital science. Enquiries should be directed to anthea.matsimanis@sydney.edu.au.
Textbooks
Kumar, Abbas and Aster. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th edition. Saunders. 2012.
CPAT3902 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2 (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures (2h/wk) and online lecturettes (3 x 20 min/wk); Microscopy tutorial (1.5 h); guided museum session (1 h/wk); and preparation of online research notebooks (1 h/wk). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) or BCHM2081 or BCHM2981) or BCHM2082 or BCHM2982)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Prohibitions: CPAT3202 Assumed knowledge: A working knowledge of biology Assessment: Week 2 pre-quiz 1 - 5% (10 MCQ)?Week 4 pre-quiz 2 - 5% (10 MCQ)Week 6 Electronic notebook 1 - 10% (Narrative Plan document that is to be populated with data obtained by the student)?Week 8 pre-quiz 3 - 5% (10 MCQ)Week 10 pre-quiz 4 - 5% (10 MCQ)Week 12 Electronic notebook 1 - 10% (Narrative Plan document that is to be populated with data obtained by the student)?Week 13 or 14 Practical exam - 20% (Specimen and micrograph-based practical exam) followed by final exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Understanding the underlying mechanisms of disease and disease progression, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity on individual health outcomes are some of the great challenges facing modern medical sciences in the 21st century. To equip students with skills appropriate for careers in the biomedical sciences and for further training in research or professional degrees it is necessary to provide an integrated understanding of how to evaluate and analyse crucial pathological mechanisms governing disease progression in humans. You will participate in inquiry-led museum and practical class sessions that review human pathological specimens using innovative online tools combined with high-resolution microscopy to crystallise and reinforce concepts developed in the unit. You will undertake investigations to gain an advanced understanding of the pathogenesis, natural history and related health complications of common human diseases. You will learn to use methodologies to exemplify key differences between normality and disease in order to explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes. Through undertaking this unit you will develop the necessary practical skills required to employ advanced imaging technologies that are increasingly used to define and strategically assess how different organ systems react to injury/insult, which ultimately improve the capacity to manage and intervene in fundamental and clinical aspects of health and disease.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site; through electronic notebooks and the Pathology museum website. Robbins Basic Pathology; 9th Edition, Eds Kumar, Abbas, Fausto and Mitchell
Senior units of study
The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended.
AMED3001 Cancer

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Geraldine O'Neill Session: Semester 1 Classes: interactive face to face activities 4 hrs/week; online 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3901 Assessment: in-semester exam, assignments, quiz, presentation Campus: Westmead, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What does it mean when someone tells you: "you have cancer"? Initially you're probably consumed with questions like: "how did this happen?" and "will this cancer kill me?". In this unit, we will explore all aspects of the "cancer problem" from the underlying biomedical and environmental causes, through to emerging approaches to cancer diagnosis and treatment. You will integrate medical science knowledge from a diverse range of disciplines and apply this to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer both at the individual and community level. Together we will explore the epidemiology, aetiology and pathophysiology of cancer. You will be able to define problems and formulate solutions related to the study, prevention and treatment of cancer with consideration throughout for the economic, social and psychological costs of a disease that affects billions. Face-to-face and online learning activities will allow you to work effectively in individual and collaborative contexts. You will acquire the skills to interpret and communicate observations and experimental findings related to the "cancer problem" to diverse audiences. Upon completion, you will have developed the foundations that will allow you to follow a career in cancer research, clinical and diagnostic cancer services and/or the corporate system that supports the health care system.
Textbooks
Recommended Textbook: 1.,Weinberg (2013) The Biology of Cancer. 2nd edition. Garland Science Recommended reading: 1.,Hanahan and Weinberg (2000). The hallmarks of cancer. Cell 100, 57-70. 2.,Hanahan and Weinberg (2011). Hallmarks of cancer: the next generation. Cell 144, 646-74
AMED3002 Interrogating Biomedical and Health Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jean Yang Session: Semester 1 Classes: face to face 5 hrs/week; online 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Assumed knowledge: Exploratory data analysis, sampling, simple linear regression, t-tests, confidence intervals and chi-squared goodness of fit tests, familiar with basic coding, basic linear algebra. Assessment: in-semester exam, assignments, presentation Campus: Westmead, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biotechnological advances have given rise to an explosion of original and shared public data relevant to human health. These data, including the monitoring of expression levels for thousands of genes and proteins simultaneously, together with multiple databases on biological systems, now promise exciting, ground-breaking discoveries in complex diseases. Critical to these discoveries will be our ability to unravel and extract information from these data. In this unit, you will develop analytical skills required to work with data obtained in the medical and diagnostic sciences. You will explore clinical data using powerful, state of the art methods and tools. Using real data sets, you will be guided in the application of modern data science techniques to interrogate, analyse and represent the data, both graphically and numerically. By analysing your own real data, as well as that from large public resources you will learn and apply the methods needed to find information on the relationship between genes and disease. Leveraging expertise from multiple sources by working in team-based collaborative learning environments, you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play an active role in finding meaningful solutions to difficult problems, creating an important impact on our lives.
AMED3003 Diagnostics and Biomarkers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fabienne Brilot-Turville Session: Semester 2 Classes: interactive face to face 4 hrs/week; online activities 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PHSI2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3903 Assessment: in-semester exam, skill based assessments, presentation Campus: Westmead, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Diagnostic sciences have evolved at a rapid pace and provide the cornerstone of our health care system. Effective diagnostic assays enable the identification of people who have, or are at risk of, a disease, and guide their treatment. Research into the pathophysiology of disease underpins the discovery of novel biomarkers and in turn, the development of revolutionary diagnostic assays that make use of state-of-the-art molecular and cellular methods. In this unit you will explore a diverse range of diagnostic tests and gain valuable practical experience in a number of core diagnostic methodologies, many of which are currently used in hospital laboratories. Together we will also cover the regulatory, social, and ethical aspects of the use of biomarkers and diagnostic tests and explore the pathways to their translation into clinical practice. By undertaking this unit, you will develop your understanding of diagnostic assays and biomarkers and acquire the skills needed to embark on a career in diagnostic sciences.
AMED3888 Clinical Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Gold Session: Semester 2 Classes: interactive face to face 4 hrs/week; online activities 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week; capstone placement (upto 8h total) Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3004 Assessment: Interdisciplinary creation (30%), written assignment on interdisciplinary project (25%), in-semester exam (30%), practical assessment (10%), capstone oral presentation (5%) Campus: Westmead, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Clinical science is a multidisciplinary science that combines the principles of experimental science with translational medicine. As a clinical scientist, you will have the capacity to interpret test results, isolate causes of disease, and ultimately develop new treatments that will save lives. Clinical Science will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills that will give you a broad foundation of knowledge and open up a range of career opportunities in clinical sciences, including medical research, pharmaceutical development and clinical diagnostics. You will learn the language of the clinical world as you develop expertise in literature searching, study design, data interrogation and interpretation, evidence-based decision-making, and current knowledge in medical research. You will explore how discoveries in the medical sciences are translated into clinical practice, and pose your own clinical questions for investigation. You will study important medical conditions from the areas of infectious and genetic diseases and immunity. The interdisciplinary capstone experience of your study in Clinical Science will be a short placement in a sector of the clinical sciences of your interest, such as a diagnostic lab, a research lab or a clinical trials centre. Consequently, at the end of this unit you will have experienced what it is like to work in interdisciplinary clinical teams, which is essential for both professional and research pathways in the future.
HSTO3001 Microscopy and Histochemistry Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold; Prof Christopher Murphy Session: Semester 1 Classes: Usually four 1-hour lectures per week plus a few tutorials Prerequisites: ANAT2008 or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402, BMED2405, BMED2406)] Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam, essay, mid semester quiz (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
The aims of this unit of study are to provide a theoretical understanding of why biological tissues need to be specifically prepared for microscopic examination, how differing methods yield different types of morphological information; to allow students to study the theory of different types and modalities of microscopes, how they function and the differing information they provide; to develop an understanding of the theory of why biological material needs to be stained for microscopic examination; to allow students to understand how biological material becomes stained; to develop an understanding of the chemical information provided by biological staining - dyes, enzymes and antibodies.
Textbooks
Keirnan, J.A. Histological and Histochemical Methods. 4th edition. Scion. 2008.
HSTO3902 Microscopy and Histochemistry Adv Prac

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr tutorials Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in ANAT2008 or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] or MEDS2005 Corequisites: HSTO3001 Prohibitions: HSTO3002 Assessment: one 1.5 hour practical exam, 1 practical report, mid semester quiz Practical field work: 1 x 4hr practicals Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Departmental Permission required for enrolment. BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
The aims of this unit of study are to provide a practical understanding of why biological tissues need to be specifically prepared for microscopic examination, how differing methods yield different types of morphological information; to allow students to study the theory of different types and modalities of microscopes, how they function and the differing information they provide; to develop an practical understanding of why biological material needs to be stained for microscopic examination; to allow students to understand how biological material becomes stained; to develop an understanding of the chemical information provided by biological staining - dyes, enzymes and antibodies.
Textbooks
Keirnan, JA. Histological and Histochemical Methods 3rd Edition. Butterworth-Heinmann. 1999
HSTO3003 Cells and Development: Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Lovicu Session: Semester 2 Classes: Four to five 1-hour theory lectures and/or one 1-hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 72cp of 1000 to 3000 level units Assumed knowledge: (ANAT2008 or BMED2401 or MEDS2005) and Human biology; BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, tutorial research papers and Seminar (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
The main emphasis of this unit of study concerns the mechanisms that control animal development. Early developmental processes including fertilisation, cleavage, and gastrulation leading to the formation of the primary germ layers and subsequent body organs are described in a range of animals, mainly vertebrates. Stem cells of both embryonic and adult origin will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the parts played by inductive cell and tissue interactions in cell and tissue differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation. This will be studied at both cellular and molecular levels.
Textbooks
Gilbert, SF. Developmental Biology. 11th edition. Sinauer Associates Inc. 2016.
HSTO3004 Cells and Development: Practical (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Fraser Session: Semester 2 Prerequisites: An annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year and 72cp of 1000 to 3000 level units Assumed knowledge: (ANAT2008 or BMED2401 or MEDS2005) and Human biology; BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01 Assessment: Practical class reports and Seminars (100%) Practical field work: Two 3-hour practicals per week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This advanced unit of study complements HSTO3003 (Cells and Development: Theory) and is catered to provide students with laboratory research experience leading to Honours and higher degrees. It will primarily cover the design and application of experimental procedures involved in cell and developmental biology, using appropriate molecular and cellular techniques to answer developmental questions raised in HSTO3003. This unit of study will promote hands on experience, allowing students to observe and examine developing and differentiating tissues at the macroscopic and microscopic level. The main emphasis of this unit of study will concentrate on practical approaches to understanding the mechanisms that control animal development. Some projects may examine early developmental processes such as fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and the formation of the primary germ layers and tissues. The parts played by stem cells and inductive cell and tissue interactions in differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation can also be examined at cellular and molecular levels.
Textbooks
Gilbert, SF. Developmental Biology. 11th edition. Sinauer Associates Inc. 2016.
BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester practical work and assignments (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3071. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in gene expression and manipulation will be covered.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3072 Human Molecular Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3972 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3972 Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3072 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3072. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in modern molecular cell biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3981 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3081 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3081. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in protein biochemistry will be covered.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3982 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with molecular biology methods and studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry.
BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3082 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with new methods, including magnetic resonance techniques and molecular biology methods, as well as studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry. Qualified students will attend some lectures/practical classes in common with BCHM3082 and some separate lectures/ practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in metabolic biochemistry will be covered.
MICR3011 Microbes in Infection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Helen Agus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week. Eight 3-hour practical sessions and three 2-hour clinical tutorials per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404] Prohibitions: MICR3911 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 2-hour exam; Practical (40%): case study: worksheet, lab work, presentation; one quiz; one 1-hour theory of prac exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit is designed to further develop an interest in, and understanding of, medical microbiology from the introduction in Intermediate Microbiology. Through an examination of microbial structure, virulence, body defences and pathogenesis, the process of acquisition and establishment of disease is covered. The unit is divided into three themes: 1. Clinical Microbiology: host defences, infections, virulence mechanisms; 2. Public health microbiology: epidemiology, international public health, transmission, water and food borne outbreaks; 3. Emerging and re-emerging diseases: the impact of societal change with respect to triggering new diseases and causing the re-emergence of past problems, which are illustrated using case studies. The practical component is designed to enhance students' practical skills and to complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Clinical tutorial sessions underpin and investigate the application of the material covered in the practical classes.
Textbooks
Murray PR et al. Medical Microbiology. 8th edition. Mosby. 2016.
MICR3911 Microbes in Infection (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Helen Agus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week including six 1-hour advanced sessions. Eight 3-hour practical sessions and three 2-hour clinical tutorials per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and a mark of 70 or above in (MICR2X22 or MIMI2X02)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 70 or above in BMED2404] Prohibitions: MICR3011 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 1.5-hour exam (45%), one essay, one in-semester exam; Practical (40%): case study: worksheet, lab work, presentation; quiz; one 1-hour theory of prac exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Intermediate Microbiology. This unit is designed to further develop an interest in, and understanding of, medical microbiology from the introduction in Intermediate Microbiology. Through an examination of microbial structure, virulence, body defences and pathogenesis, the process of acquisition and establishment of disease is covered. The unit is divided into three themes: 1. Clinical Microbiology: host defences, infections, virulence mechanisms; 2. Public health microbiology: epidemiology, international public health, transmission, water and food borne outbreaks; 3. Emerging and re-emerging diseases: the impact of societal change with respect to triggering new diseases and causing the re-emergence of past problems, which are illustrated using case studies. The unique aspect of this advanced unit that differentiates it from the mainstream unit is six tutorial style sessions that replace six mainstream lectures in the theme 'Emerging and re-emerging diseases'. These dedicated research-led interactive advanced sessions support self-directed learning and involve discussion around specific topics that will vary from year to year. Nominated research papers and reviews in the topic area will be explored with supported discussion of the relevance to and impact of the work on current thinking around emergence of microbial disease. The focus will be on microbial change that lies critically at the centre of understanding the reasons for the emergence of new diseases and challenges in an era of significant scientific ability to diagnose and treat infection. The practical component is identical to the mainstream unit and is designed to enhance students' practical skills and to complement the lectures. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Clinical tutorial sessions underpin and investigate the application of the material covered in the practical classes.
Textbooks
Murray PR.et al. Medical Microbiology. 8th ed., Mosby, 2016
MICR3032 Cellular and Molecular Microbiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three lectures per week and one 2-hour practical or tutorial per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and MICR2X22] OR (BMED2401 and BMED2404) OR [12cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: MICR3932 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 1-hour exam (mid semester); one 2-hour exam (end of semester); Prac (40%): One 2-hour exam (open book, mid-semester), one oral presentation (end of semester); one in-prac bioinformatics assessment task, one 1.5 hr bioinformatics prac exam (end of semester) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This Unit of Study introduces students to key concepts in cellular and molecular microbiology. The lectures explore areas of microbial evolution, pathogenesis, physiology, ecology, biotechnology and genetics, with each key theme explored with a series of 6 lectures led by an expert in the field. Lectures will be complemented with practical/tutorial sessions that explore recent research in these areas. The first set of practical/tutorial sessions are small-group sessions led by demonstrators, that are focused on critical interpretation of the scientific literature in the area of host-microbe interactions. The focus is on experimental design, and analysis of the raw data. The second set of pracs are bioinformatics labs, which introduce software such as ORF Finder, BLAST, ClustalX, and TreeView and databases such as NCBI-Nucleotide and KEGG; the aim is to figure out the identity, functions, and biotechnological applications of a mystery piece of microbial DNA. It is recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study MICR3042 or MICR3942.
MICR3932 Cellular and Molecular Microbiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three lectures per week and one 2-hour prac/tute per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 70 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [6cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31) and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: MICR3032 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 1-hour theory exam (mid semester); one 2-hour exam (end of semester); Prac (40%): one written assessment task, assessment of website. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study introduces students to key concepts in cellular and molecular microbiology. The lectures explore areas of microbial evolution, pathogenesis, physiology, ecology, biotechnology and genetics, with each key theme explored with a series of 6 lectures led by an expert in the field.The first set of practical/tutorial sessions are small-group sessions led by an academic, which are focused on critical interpretation of the scientific literature in the area of host-microbe interactions. The focus is on evaluating the scientific significance of published papers, and determining the level of experimental support for key conclusions. The second set of prac sessions teaches the creative presentation of science to both fellow scientists and the public by designing a website around an area of interest in microbiology. It is recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study, MICR3042 or MICR3942.
Textbooks
None
MICR3042 Microbiology Research Skills

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dee Carter Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week from week 1-7, one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and MICR2X22] OR (BMED2401 and BMED2404) OR [12cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: MICR3942 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Two 40-min in-semester theory exams (20% each). One 1-hour theory of prac exam (20%). In-lab continuous assessment, two prac reports, one short video presentation (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Research in molecular microbiology is needed to tackle problems in medicine, agriculture, environmental science, and biotechnology. This Unit of Study focuses on developing practical skills and training in experimental approaches and that are essential for laboratory research in molecular microbiology, together with knowledge of the underlying theoretical concepts. We will focus on key areas of modern microbiology including Bioremediation, where micro-organisms are used to break down harmful substrates in the environment; Microbial biotechnology, which explores how microbes can be used as cellular factories to produce useful products; Medical microbiology, where molecular epidemiology is used to track a disease outbreak, and Yeast genetics, where we explore genes and protein interaction networks that cells regulate in their response to antibiotic agents. It is strongly recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study MICR3032 or MICR3932.
MICR3942 Microbiology Research Skills (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dee Carter Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week from Week 1-7. Project work equivalent to 4 hours per week. Research project in an academic microbiology lab, 48 hours total, at times decided between student and supervisor. Research projects will be announced at the start of semester. Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [6cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: MICR3022 or MICR3922 or MICR3042 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Two 40-min in-semester theory of prac exams (20% each). Two reports, presentation of research via short video, supervisor mark based on performance in research project (60%). Practical field work: Research project in an academic microbiology lab, 48 hours total, at times decided between student and supervisor. Research projects will be announced at the start of semester. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Research in molecular microbiology is needed to tackle problems in medicine, agriculture, environmental science, and biotechnology. This Unit of Study focuses on developing practical skills and training in experimental approaches that are essential for laboratory research in molecular microbiology, together with knowledge of the underlying theoretical concepts. In this Unit the practical component is entirely replaced by a research project undertaken in an academic microbiology lab. The lecture material in MICR3942 focuses on the areas of microbial biotechnology and bioremediation, and the genetic and molecular diversity of medically important eukaryotic microbes. It is strongly recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study, MICR3032 or MICR3932.
PHSI3009 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Cook Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr/ week lectures and 6 x 2 hr large class tutorials (CBL) per semester Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: PHSI3905 or PHSI3906 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3909 Assessment: one mid-semester exam (MCQ), one 2 hr final exam (MCQ), two presentations for challenge-based learning and 1 practical class report Practical field work: 3 x 2-4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Challenge-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techniques for investigating cell signalling and the biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for a science graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3909 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Cook Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr/ week lectures and 3 x 2 hrs large class tutorials (CBL) per semester Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]} Prohibitions: PHSI3009 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3906 Assessment: one mid-semester exam (MCQ), one 2hr final exam (MCQ), one presentation for challenge-based learning and one Advanced research report Practical field work: 3 x 2-4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Challenge-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techiques for investigating cell signalling and biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science a graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3010 Reproduction, Development and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Stephen Assinder Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures per week; 1 guest lecture/problem-based learning class introduction/organisation session per week. 2 x 3 hour problem-based learning classes per semester. Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: PHSI3905 or PHSI3906 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3910 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 3 x 3 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and re-activation of developmental processes in adult disease. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating reproductive physiology, sexual dimorphism and human pathophysiology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3910 Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Stephen Assinder Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures per week; 1 guest lecture/problem-based learning class introduction/organisation session per week; 2 x 3 hour stem cell laboratory presentations per semester. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]} Prohibitions: PHSI3010 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3906 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam,stem cell labortory class (2 presentations), 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 4 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating reproductive physiology, sexual dimorphism and human pathophysiology. Students enrolling in PHSI3910 complete a separate laboratory class centered on stem cell differentiation to replace the problem-based learning exercises in PHSI3010.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science