Table 1: Anatomy and Histology

Table 1 lists units of study available to students in the Bachelor of Science and combined degrees. The units are available to students enrolled in other degrees in accordance with their degree resolutions.

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Anatomy and Histology

For a major in Anatomy and Histology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from any ANAT, HSTO, EMHU or NEUR Senior units of study.
Intermediate units of study
The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended
ANAT2008
Principles of Histology
6    A General concepts in human biology
P 6 credit points of Junior biology or psychology or molecular biology
N All intermediate BMED units, MECH2901, ANAT2001


This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 1
ANAT2009
Comparative Primate Anatomy
6    A Knowledge of basic vertebrate biology
P 36 credit points, including (12 credit points of Junior Biology (not including MBLG) OR 12 credit points of Junior Psychology OR 12 credit points of Junior Archaeology.)
N ANAT2002
Semester 2
ANAT2010
Concepts of Neuroanatomy
6    A Background in basic cell biology and basic mammalian biology.
P Students must have a grade of credit in at least one of the prerequisite units (BIOL1003, BIOL1903, ANAT2008, BIOL1002, BIOL1902, MBLG1001, MBLG1901, MBLG2071, MBLG2971, PSYC1001, PSYC1002, BIOL1993).
N MECH2901, ANAT2003, All intermediate BMED units


This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 2
Senior units of study
ANAT3006
Forensic Osteology
6    A An understanding of basic musculoskeletal anatomy.
P ANAT2008 and a credit in ANAT2009.


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG is highly recommended. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 1
ANAT3007
Visceral Anatomy
6    A General knowledge of biology.
P ANAT2009 or ANAT2010.


This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 1
HSTO3001
Microscopy & Histochemistry Theory
6    P Credit or better grade in ANAT2008. For BMedSc: Credit average in (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or Credit average in (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806 and BMED2804).
C HSTO3002
Semester 1
HSTO3002
Microscopy & Histochemistry Practical
6    P Credit grade or better in ANAT2008. For BMedSc: Credit average in (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or Credit average in (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806 and BMED2804).
C HSTO3001
Semester 1
NEUR3001
Neuroscience: Special Senses
6    A (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and ANAT2010 are assumed knowledge.
P For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG.
N PHSI3001, NEUR3901


IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED THAT STUDENTS ALSO TAKE (NEUR3002 or NEUR3902).
Semester 1
NEUR3901
Neuroscience: Special Senses (Advanced)
6    A (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and ANAT2010
P Students enrolling in this unit should have a WAM of at least 75. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG.
N NEUR3001, PHSI3901, PHSI3001


It is strongly recommended that students also take unit (NEUR3002 or NEUR3902).
Semester 1
NEUR3002
Neuroscience: Motor Systems & Behaviour
6    A ANAT2010 and (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) are assumed knowledge.
P For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG.
N NEUR3902, PHSI3001


IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED THAT STUDENTS ALSO TAKE (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901).
Semester 1
NEUR3902
Neuroscience: Motor Systems & Behav. Adv
6    A ANAT2010 and (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) are assumed knowledge.
P Students enrolling in this unit should have a WAM of at least 75. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including in (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG.
N NEUR3002, PHSI3001


It is strongly recommended that students also take (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901).
Semester 1
ANAT3004
Cranial and Cervical Anatomy
6    A General knowledge of biology.
P ANAT2009 or ANAT2010. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED at Credit average including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806)
N ANAT3904, ANAT3005


Students having taken and ANAT2010 (Concepts in Neuroanatomy) and/or NEUR3001 and NEUR3002 (Neuroscience) will find ANAT3004 enhances their understanding and knowledge of the peripheral distribution of the cranial nerves.
Semester 2
ANAT3904
Cranial & Cervical Anatomy (Advanced)
6    P Available to BSc students only. By invitation only. Requires a credit average in ANAT3007 plus a demonstrated aptitude for practical work. Emphasis in selecting for invitation is placed on results in practical performance, marks and quizzes in ANAT3007.
N ANAT3004

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Course is subject to availability of donor material for dissection.
Semester 2
ANAT3008
Musculoskeletal Anatomy
6    A A knowledge of the subject of anatomy, including practical class experience, and some knowledge of basic mammalian biology.
P ANAT2009. For BMedSc: either (BMED2402, BMED2403, BMED2405 and BMED2406) or (BMED2803, BMED2804, BMED2805 and BMED2806)
N ANAT3005
Semester 2
EMHU3001
Electron Microscopy and Imaging/Theory
6    A General concepts in Biology, and in Biochemistry or in Chemistry.
P At least 12 cp of Intermediate Science units from any of the following: Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology & Genetics, Pharmacology, Physics, Physiology or Statistics. For BMedSc: (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) OR (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806 and BMED2804).
Semester 2
EMHU3002
Electron Microscopy and Imaging/Prac
6    A General concepts in Biology, Histology and in Biochemistry or in Chemistry.
P 12 cp of Intermediate Science units of study including ANAT2008. For BMedSc: (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) OR (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806 and BMED2804).
C EMHU3001
Semester 2
HSTO3003
Cells and Development: Theory
6    A (i) An understanding of the basic structure of vertebrates; (ii) An understanding of elementary biochemistry and genetics.
P For BSc students: ANAT2008 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and at least two from BMED2402 and BMED2403 and BMED2406) OR (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2803).
Semester 2
HSTO3004
Cells and Development: Practical (Adv)
6    P Unless special permission is granted from the course coordinator, this advanced unit of study is only available to select students who have achieved one of the following: For BSc students: Credit or better in either ANAT2008 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including a Credit in (BMED2401 and at least two from BMED2402 and BMED2403 and BMED2406) OR Credit average in (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2803).
C HSTO3003
Semester 2
NEUR3003
Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience
6    A Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain.
P For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For others: 18 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study from Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Physiology, Psychology or Statistics.
N PHSI3902, PHSI3002, NEUR3903


Enrolment in (NEUR3004 or NEUR3904) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
Semester 2
NEUR3903
Cellular & Developmental Neurosci. (Adv)
6    A Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain.
P Students must have a CREDIT or better in (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901)
N PHSI3002, PHSI3902, NEUR3003

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Enrolment in (NEUR3004 or NEUR3904) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
Semester 2
NEUR3004
Integrative Neuroscience
6    A Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain.
P For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802). For others: 18 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study from Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Physiology, Psychology or Statistics.
N PHSI3002, PHSI3902, NEUR3904


Enrolment in (NEUR3003 or NEUR3903) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
Semester 2
NEUR3904
Integrative Neuroscience (Advanced)
6    A Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain.
P Students must have a CREDIT or better in (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901)
N NEUR3004, PHSI3902, PHSI3002

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Enrolment in (NEUR3003 or NEUR3903) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
Semester 2
for other NEUR units, see the Physiology subject area entry in this table

Anatomy and Histology

For a major in Anatomy and Histology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from any ANAT, HSTO, EMHU or NEUR Senior units of study.
Intermediate units of study
The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended
ANAT2008 Principles of Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Lindsay Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour practical per week (4 hours per week total) Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior biology or psychology or molecular biology Prohibitions: All intermediate BMED units, MECH2901, ANAT2001 Assumed knowledge: General concepts in human biology Assessment: One 1-hour theory exam, two 30-minute practical exams, three online theory quizzes, two practical quizzes (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
This unit of study covers the principles of cell biology and study of the structure of cells, tissues and organ systems at the light and electron microscopic levels. The focus is on human systems. Extension exercises introduce students to the connection between histology and anatomy. Modern practical applications of histological techniques and analysis for research are also presented.
Textbooks
Ross, MH, Paulina, W. Histology - A Text and Atlas. 6th Edition, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 2011.
ANAT2009 Comparative Primate Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Denise Donlon Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 36 credit points, including (12 credit points of Junior Biology (not including MBLG) OR 12 credit points of Junior Psychology OR 12 credit points of Junior Archaeology.) Prohibitions: ANAT2002 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of basic vertebrate biology Assessment: Three quizzes (15%), theory exam (55%), practical exam (30%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of student covers the musculo-skeletal anatomy of the human body with particular emphasis on human evolution and comparisons with apes and fossil hominids. The topics covered include the versatility of the human hand, in manipulation and locomotion, bipedalism, climbing and brachiation in apes, and the change in pelvic anatomy associated with bipedalism and obstetric consequences.
Textbooks
Kapit, W and Elson, LM 2014 The Anatomy Coloring Book. Addison-Wesley. 4th edition.
ANAT2010 Concepts of Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Students must have a grade of credit in at least one of the prerequisite units (BIOL1003, BIOL1903, ANAT2008, BIOL1002, BIOL1902, MBLG1001, MBLG1901, MBLG2071, MBLG2971, PSYC1001, PSYC1002, BIOL1993). Prohibitions: MECH2901, ANAT2003, All intermediate BMED units Assumed knowledge: Background in basic cell biology and basic mammalian biology. Assessment: One theory exam, one practical exam, 1200 word critical scientific review article, mid-semester quiz and periodic practical reports (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function (memory). In essence, the course covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain and its different areas. The practicals offer students the unique opportunity to examine specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying science and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Bear, MF, Connors, BW, Paradiso, MA. Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. 3rd edition. Williams and Wilkins. 2006.
Senior units of study
ANAT3006 Forensic Osteology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Denise Donlon Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures, one 2-hour tutorial and one 1-hour practical per week Prerequisites: ANAT2008 and a credit in ANAT2009. Assumed knowledge: An understanding of basic musculoskeletal anatomy. Assessment: Quiz 1 (5%), Quiz 2 (5%), Critique/review of journal article (15%), Case study report (20%), Theory exam (30%) Practical exam (25%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG is highly recommended. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
This unit of study aims to introduce students to the area of forensic osteology, which is the study of human skeletal remains within the legal context. Thus the unit of study aims to help students learn about human morphology and variation through the investigation and identification of human bones. It will also help students gain skills in observation and rigorous record taking and in analysis and interpretation. Production of case reports and practice in acting as 'expert witness' will improve students written and oral skills. An additional objective will be to assist students in learning to deal with legal and ethical issues.
Textbooks
Bass, W. Human Osteology: a Laboratory and Field Manual 5th edition. Missouri Archaeological Society Columbia. 2005.
ANAT3007 Visceral Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour practicals per week. Prerequisites: ANAT2009 or ANAT2010. Assumed knowledge: General knowledge of biology. Assessment: Theory exam, prac exam, continuous assessment (6 quizzes done at intervals during semester) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the anatomy of the viscera of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Structures covered include the heart and associated great vessels, lungs, mediastinum and the abdominal viscera, the alimentary organs and the genitourinary system. The structure of anterior thoracic and abdominal walls and pelvis along with the nerve supply to the viscera and relevant endocrine structures is also covered. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of structure to function especially with respect to the important functions of breathing, digestion, excretion and reproduction. Students will be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy & histology & in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology.
The course also aims to provide both theoretical & practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi and Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.
HSTO3001 Microscopy & Histochemistry Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold; Prof Christopher Murphy Session: Semester 1 Classes: Usually four 1-hour lectures per week plus a few tutorials Prerequisites: Credit or better grade in ANAT2008. For BMedSc: Credit average in (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or Credit average in (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806 and BMED2804). Corequisites: HSTO3002 Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam, essay, mid semester quiz (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aims of this unit of study are to provide a theoretical understanding of why biological tissues need to be specifically prepared for microscopic examination, how differing methods yield different types of morphological information; to allow students to study the theory of different types & modalities of microscopes, how they function & the differing information they provide; to develop an understanding of the theory of why biological material needs to be stained for microscopic examination; to allow students to understand how biological material becomes stained; to develop an understanding of the chemical information provided by biological staining - dyes, enzymes & antibodies.
Textbooks
Keirnan, J.A. Histological & Histochemical Methods. 4th edition. Scion. 2008.
HSTO3002 Microscopy & Histochemistry Practical

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold; Prof Christopher Murphy Session: Semester 1 Classes: Usually 4 hours practical per week Prerequisites: Credit grade or better in ANAT2008. For BMedSc: Credit average in (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or Credit average in (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806 and BMED2804). Corequisites: HSTO3001 Assessment: One 1.5-hour practical exam, one practical report, mid semester quiz (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aims of this unit of study are to provide an practical understanding of why biological tissues need to be specifically prepared for microscopic examination, to apply different methods to gain different types of morphological information; to allow students to learn to use the different types & modalities of microscopes: to gain first hand experience of how they function & see for themselves the differing information they provide; to learn to stain biological material for microscopic examination; applying their theoretical knowledge & to allow students to develop practical skills in diverse histochemical staining procedures - dyes, enzymes and antibodies.
Textbooks
Keirnan, JA. Histological & Histochemical Methods. 4th edition. Scion. 2008.
NEUR3001 Neuroscience: Special Senses

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin, A/Prof Bill Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per fortnight and one 3-hour tutorial per fortnight. Prerequisites: For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG. Prohibitions: PHSI3001, NEUR3901 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and ANAT2010 are assumed knowledge. Assessment: Two 1-hour exams, one mid-semester quiz, neuroanatomy practical test, practical reports, paper discussion sessions, library essay (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED THAT STUDENTS ALSO TAKE (NEUR3002 or NEUR3902).
The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system and to the main concepts of processing of sensory information. Understanding basic sensory transduction mechanisms and the function of the sensory systems is necessary to understand how perceptual processes work in normal and disease conditions and provides a gateway to unravel the complexity of the mind. Basic aspects of low and high level sensory processing in all sense modalities will be covered, with a special emphasis in the auditory and visual systems. The relationship between sensory systems, perception and higher cognitive functions will be addressed.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000.
NEUR3901 Neuroscience: Special Senses (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dario Protti, Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per fortnight and one 3-hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students may be exempt from attending some of these classes to permit meetings with supervisor. Prerequisites: Students enrolling in this unit should have a WAM of at least 75. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG. Prohibitions: NEUR3001, PHSI3901, PHSI3001 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and ANAT2010 Assessment: Two 1-hour exams, one mid-semester quiz, practical reports, one research or library essay (research essay will replace some other assessment items from regular course) (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is strongly recommended that students also take unit (NEUR3002 or NEUR3902).
This unit of study is an extension of NEUR3001 for talented students with an interest in Neuroscience and research in this field. The lecture/practical component of the course is run in conjunction with NEUR3001. The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system and to the main concepts of processing of sensory information. Understanding basic sensory transduction mechanisms and the function of the sensory systems is necessary to understand how perceptual processes work in normal and disease conditions and provides a gateway to unravel the complexity of the mind. Basic aspects of low and high level sensory processing in all sense modalities will be covered, with a special emphasis in the auditory and visual systems. The relationship between sensory systems, perception and higher cognitive functions will be addressed.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000.
NEUR3002 Neuroscience: Motor Systems & Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bill Phillips, Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 3-hour practical and one 3-hour tutorial per fortnight. Prerequisites: For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG. Prohibitions: NEUR3902, PHSI3001 Assumed knowledge: ANAT2010 and (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) are assumed knowledge. Assessment: Two 1-hour exams, one mid-semester quiz, neuroanatomy practical test, practical report, paper discussion sessions, library essay (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED THAT STUDENTS ALSO TAKE (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901).
The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. Our current knowledge of how the brain works is based on the analysis of the normal structure of the nervous system and its pathways, the functional effects of lesions and neurological diseases in different parts of the nervous system, and the way that nerve cells work at the molecular, cellular and integrative level. This course focuses on to the neural circuits and the mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions. The lecture series addresses the different topics, each of which offers special insight into the function of the nervous system in health and disease.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000. or Bear, Connors, Paradiso. Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Williams & Wilkins. 2001.
NEUR3902 Neuroscience: Motor Systems & Behav. Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dario Protti, Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 3-hour practical and one 3-hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students may be exempt from attending some of these classes to permit meetings with supervisor. Prerequisites: Students enrolling in this unit should have a WAM of at least 75. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including in (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG. Prohibitions: NEUR3002, PHSI3001 Assumed knowledge: ANAT2010 and (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) are assumed knowledge. Assessment: Two 1-hour exams, one mid-semester quiz, neuroanatomy practical test, practical report, one research or review essay (research essay will replace some other assessment items from regular course) (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is strongly recommended that students also take (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901).
This unit of study is an extension of NEUR3002 for talented students with an interest in Neuroscience and research in this field. The lecture/practical component of the course is run in conjunction with NEUR3002. The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. Our current knowledge of how the brain works is based on the analysis of the normal structure of the nervous system and its pathways, the functional effects of lesions and neurological diseases in different parts of the nervous system, and the way that nerve cells work at the molecular, cellular and integrative level. This course focuses on to the neural circuits and the mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions. The lecture series addresses the different topics, each of which offers special insight into the function of the nervous system in health and disease.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000. or Bear, Connors, Paradiso. Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Williams & Wilkins. 2001.
ANAT3004 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour tutorials per week Prerequisites: ANAT2009 or ANAT2010. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED at Credit average including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806) Prohibitions: ANAT3904, ANAT3005 Assumed knowledge: General knowledge of biology. Assessment: Theory exam, prac exam, continuous assessment (6 quizzes done at intervals during semester) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students having taken and ANAT2010 (Concepts in Neuroanatomy) and/or NEUR3001 and NEUR3002 (Neuroscience) will find ANAT3004 enhances their understanding and knowledge of the peripheral distribution of the cranial nerves.
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves.
This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections & in medical images especially X Rays & CT scans & to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy & histology & in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology.
The course also aims to provide both theoretical & practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3904 Cranial & Cervical Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, one 2-hour tutorial per week, one 3-hour dissection per week. Prerequisites: Available to BSc students only. By invitation only. Requires a credit average in ANAT3007 plus a demonstrated aptitude for practical work. Emphasis in selecting for invitation is placed on results in practical performance, marks and quizzes in ANAT3007. Prohibitions: ANAT3004 Assessment: Theory exam, prac exam, continuous assessment (6 quizzes done at intervals during semester) Practical field work: One 3-hour dissection per week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Course is subject to availability of donor material for dissection.
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves.
This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections & in medical images especially X Rays & to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy & histology & in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology.
The course also aims to provide both theoretical & practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Colour Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3008 Musculoskeletal Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures, two 2-hour practical classes per week. Prerequisites: ANAT2009. For BMedSc: either (BMED2402, BMED2403, BMED2405 and BMED2406) or (BMED2803, BMED2804, BMED2805 and BMED2806) Prohibitions: ANAT3005 Assumed knowledge: A knowledge of the subject of anatomy, including practical class experience, and some knowledge of basic mammalian biology. Assessment: One 30 min prac exam (30%). One 90 min theory exam (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides an opportunity for students to study the topographical and systems anatomy of the upper limb, lower limb and the back regions. Emphasis is placed upon the identification and description of structures and the correlation of structure with function. This includes for the upper limb, its role in manipulation, for the lower limb standing and walking and for the back flexible support and protection. Emphasis is also given to the innervation of the limbs. The unit also aims to develop the general skills of observation, description, drawing, writing and discussion as applying to biological structure.
EMHU3001 Electron Microscopy and Imaging/Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Suzanne Ollerenshaw Session: Semester 2 Classes: Four 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: At least 12 cp of Intermediate Science units from any of the following: Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology & Genetics, Pharmacology, Physics, Physiology or Statistics. For BMedSc: (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) OR (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806 and BMED2804). Assumed knowledge: General concepts in Biology, and in Biochemistry or in Chemistry. Assessment: One 2hr exam (60%) and two in semester assessments (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course is run conjointly by the Department of Anatomy and Histology and the Australian Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis (ACMM). The course will focus on the theoretical aspects of transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the preparation of biological samples for electron microscopy, digital imaging, MicroCT and CryoEM. Students will receive theoretical training in laser scanning confocal microscopy including the use of fluorescent probes to visualize cellular organelles and cellular processes. Immunological and other techniques required in modern research and hospital electron microscope laboratories will also be covered. Students will undertake a theoretical research project of their choice which is of relevance to the course.
Textbooks
Bozzola, JJ, Russell LD. Electron Microscopy. 2nd edition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers. 1999.
EMHU3002 Electron Microscopy and Imaging/Prac

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Suzanne Ollerenshaw Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 2-hour practicals and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 12 cp of Intermediate Science units of study including ANAT2008. For BMedSc: (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) OR (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806 and BMED2804). Corequisites: EMHU3001 Assumed knowledge: General concepts in Biology, Histology and in Biochemistry or in Chemistry. Assessment: One 2hr exam (60%) and in-semester assessment of practical book exercises, practical report, practical project assignment by powerpoint submission and oral presentation (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course is run conjointly by the Department of Anatomy & Histology and the Australian Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis (ACMM). The course will provide hands-on training in the operation of transmission and scanning electron microscopes, processing biological samples for electron microscopy, ultrathin sectioning, cryo-ultramicrotomy, electron diffraction, digital imaging, immunological and other techniques required in modern research and hospital electron microscope laboratories. Students will also learn the operation of laser scanning confocal microscopes, including the use of fluorescent probes to visualise cellular organelles and cellular processes. Students will apply their knowledge to complete a project of their choice on electron microscopy of a biological sample, from fixation of the sample to interpretation of the resulting electron micrographs.
Textbooks
Bozzola, JJ and Russell, LD. Electron Microscopy. 2nd edition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers. 1999.
HSTO3003 Cells and Development: Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Lovicu Session: Semester 2 Classes: Four 1-hour theory lectures and one 1-hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: For BSc students: ANAT2008 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and at least two from BMED2402 and BMED2403 and BMED2406) OR (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2803). Assumed knowledge: (i) An understanding of the basic structure of vertebrates; (ii) An understanding of elementary biochemistry and genetics. Assessment: One 2-hour exam, tutorial research papers and Seminar (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The main emphasis of this unit of study concerns the mechanisms that control animal development. Early developmental processes including fertilisation, cleavage, and gastrulation leading to the formation of the primary germ layers and subsequent body organs are described in a range of animals, mainly vertebrates. Stem cells of both embryonic and adult origin will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the parts played by inductive cell and tissue interactions in cell and tissue differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation. This will be studied at both cellular and molecular levels.
Textbooks
Gilbert, SF. Developmental Biology. 10th edition. Sinauer Associates Inc. 2013.
HSTO3004 Cells and Development: Practical (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Fraser Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1-hour tutorial and two 2-hour practicals per week Prerequisites: Unless special permission is granted from the course coordinator, this advanced unit of study is only available to select students who have achieved one of the following: For BSc students: Credit or better in either ANAT2008 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including a Credit in (BMED2401 and at least two from BMED2402 and BMED2403 and BMED2406) OR Credit average in (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2803). Corequisites: HSTO3003 Assessment: One 90 minute exam and/or Practical class reports and Seminars (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This advanced unit of study complements HSTO3003 (Cells and Development: Theory) and is catered to provide students with laboratory research experience leading to Honours and higher degrees. It will primarily cover the design and application of experimental procedures involved in cell and developmental biology, using appropriate molecular and cellular techniques to answer developmental questions raised in HSTO3003. This unit of study will promote hands on experience, allowing students to observe and examine developing and differentiating tissues at the macroscopic and microscopic level. The main emphasis of this unit of study will concentrate on practical approaches to understanding the mechanisms that control animal development. Some projects may examine early developmental processes such as fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and the formation of the primary germ layers and tissues. The parts played by stem cells and inductive cell and tissue interactions in differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation can also be examined at cellular and molecular levels.
Textbooks
Gilbert SF. Developmental Biology. 10th edition. Sinauer Associates Inc. 2013.
NEUR3003 Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, Dr Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures plus one 1-hour tutorial or one 2-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For others: 18 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study from Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Physiology, Psychology or Statistics. Prohibitions: PHSI3902, PHSI3002, NEUR3903 Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Assessment: One 1-hour exam. Mid-semester exam, Major essay/report (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Enrolment in (NEUR3004 or NEUR3904) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences. This course is a combination of small lectures on current issues in cellular and developmental neuroscience and a research-based library project. Suitably qualified students may have the option of replacing the library project with a laboratory project. Issues covered in the lecture series will include the role of glial on cerebral blood flow and neural transmission, neurochemistry and psychiatric disorders and the development of central and peripheral nervous system.
Textbooks
Kandell, Schwartz and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000.
NEUR3903 Cellular & Developmental Neurosci. (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, Dr Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour tutorial or one 2-hour lab session per week. Prerequisites: Students must have a CREDIT or better in (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901) Prohibitions: PHSI3002, PHSI3902, NEUR3003 Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Assessment: One 1-hour exam. Mid-semester exam, Major essay/report, Mini-lecture (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrolment in (NEUR3004 or NEUR3904) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3003. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience.
Textbooks
Kandell, Schwartz and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000.
NEUR3004 Integrative Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, Dr Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial plus 1-2 hours small meeting/laboratory session per week. Prerequisites: For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802). For others: 18 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study from Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Physiology, Psychology or Statistics. Prohibitions: PHSI3002, PHSI3902, NEUR3904 Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Assessment: Mid-semester exam, 1-hour final exam, Major essay/report, Tutorial participation (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Enrolment in (NEUR3003 or NEUR3903) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences and to be taken in conjunction with NEUR3003. This course is a combination of small group lectures on current issues in neuroscience, seminar groups and a research-based library project. Suitably qualified students may have the option of replacing the library project with a laboratory project. Seminars will be held on topics including imaging pain, emotions, cortical development & plasticity, colour vision, stroke and hypertension, long-term regulation of blood pressure, auditory hallucinations and the "cocktail party effect".
Textbooks
Kandell, Schwartz and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition.
NEUR3904 Integrative Neuroscience (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, Dr Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial and 1-2 hour small meeting/laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Students must have a CREDIT or better in (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901) Prohibitions: NEUR3004, PHSI3902, PHSI3002 Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Assessment: Mid-semester exam, 1-hour final exam, Major essay/report, Tutorial participation, Mini lecture (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrolment in (NEUR3003 or NEUR3903) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3004. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience research.
Textbooks
Kandell, Schwartz and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition.
for other NEUR units, see the Physiology subject area entry in this table