Table 1: Cell Pathology

Table 1 lists units of study available to students in the Bachelor of Science and combined degrees. The units are available to students enrolled in other degrees in accordance with their degree resolutions.

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Cell Pathology

For a major in Cell Pathology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from:
(i) CPAT3201 and CPAT3202; and
(ii) any two of the listed senior units of study
Senior units of study
The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended.
CPAT3201
Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1
6    A Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites
P (12 credit points of ANAT2XXX or BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MBLG2XXX or MICR2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX) OR ( BMED2401 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X)
C CPAT3202
Semester 2
CPAT3202
Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2
6    A Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites
P CPAT3201 AND (12 credit points of ANAT2XXX or BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MBLG2XXX or MICR2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX) OR ( BMED2401 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X)
C CPAT3201
Semester 2
HSTO3001
Microscopy and Histochemistry Theory
6    P [a mark of 65 or above in (ANAT2008)] or [an average mark of 65 or above in(BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405)]
Semester 1
HSTO3902
Microscopy and Histochemistry Adv Prac
6    P [A mark of 65 in (ANAT2008)] or [An average mark of 65 in (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405)]
C HSTO3001
N HSTO3002
Semester 1
HSTO3003
Cells and Development: Theory
6    P (ANAT2008 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905) OR (BMED2401 and 12 additional credit points of BMED240X)
Semester 2
HSTO3004
Cells and Development: Practical (Adv)
6    P A mark of 65 in (ANAT2008 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905) OR [(a mark of 65 in BMED2401) and at least two from (BMED2402 and BMED2403 and BMED2406)].
C HSTO3003
Semester 2
BCHM3071
Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes
6    P [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3001 or BCHM3901 or BCHM3971
Semester 1
BCHM3971
Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points from BMED240X) and (a mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3901 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3071
Semester 1
BCHM3072
Human Molecular Cell Biology
6    P [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3972 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3002 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904
Semester 2
BCHM3972
Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (a mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3072 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904 or BCHM3002
Semester 2
BCHM3081
Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins
6    P [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3981 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3901
Semester 1
BCHM3981
Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (an average mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3901 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3081
Semester 1
BCHM3082
Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry
6    P [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3002 or BCHM3982 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904
Semester 2
BCHM3982
Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (an average mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3082 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3904 or BCHM3002
Semester 2
MICR3011
Microbes in Infection
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp from BMED240X] OR [GENE2002 and 6cp from MICR2X22]
N MICR3001 or MICR3911 or MICR3901
Semester 1
MICR3911
Microbes in Infection (Advanced)
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED240X and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2404] OR [6cp from (GENE2002, MICR2X22) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (GENE2002, MICR2X22)]
N MICR3001 or MICR3011 or MICR3901
Semester 1
MICR3032
Cellular and Molecular Microbiology
6    A MICR2021
P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp from BMED240X] OR [MICR2024 and GENE2002]
N MICR3932
Semester 2
MICR3932
Cellular and Molecular Microbiology (Adv)
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp from BMED240X and (a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [MICR2024 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from GENE2002]
N MICR3032
Semester 2
MICR3042
Microbiology Research Skills
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp of BMED240X] OR [MICR2024 and GENE2002]
N MICR3942 or MICR3022 or MICR3922
Semester 2
MICR3942
Microbiology Research Skills (Adv)
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from MICR2X22 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (MICR2X21, MICR2X22, MICR3X11)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp from BMED240X and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [MICR2024 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from GENE2002].
N MICR3022 or MICR3922 or MICR3042
Semester 2
PHSI3009
Frontiers in Cellular Physiology
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X]
N PHSI3905, PHSI3906, PHSI3005, PHSI3006, PHSI3909


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3909
Frontiers in Cellular Physiology (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in (6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X)]
N PHSI3009, PHSI3005, PHSI3905, PHSI3006, PHSI3906


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3010
Reproduction, Development and Disease
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X]
N PHSI3905, PHSI3906, PHSI3005, PHSI3006, PHSI3910


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3910
Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv
6    P [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X]
N PHSI3010, PHSI3005, PHSI3905, PHSI3006, PHSI3906


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
Information on the above units may be found under the relevant teaching department entries.

Cell Pathology

For a major in Cell Pathology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from:
(i) CPAT3201 and CPAT3202; and
(ii) any two of the listed senior units of study
Senior units of study
The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended.
CPAT3201 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour research tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (12 credit points of ANAT2XXX or BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MBLG2XXX or MICR2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX) OR ( BMED2401 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) Corequisites: CPAT3202 Assumed knowledge: Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), one major research essay (1500w) (20%), two 0.5-hour in-semester exams (20%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1 unit of study modules will provide a theoretical background to the scientific basis of the pathogenesis of disease. Areas covered in theoretical modules include: tissue responses to exogenous factors, adaptive responses to foreign agents, cardiovascular/pulmonary/gut responses to disease, forensic science, neuropathology and cancer. The aims of the course are: - To give students an overall understanding of the fundamental biological mechanisms governing disease pathogenesis in human beings. - To introduce to students basic concepts of the pathogenesis, natural history and complications of common human diseases. - To demonstrate and exemplify differences between normality and disease. - To explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes. Together with CPAT3202, the unit of study would be appropriate for those who intend to proceed to Honours research, to postgraduate studies such as Medicine or to careers in biomedical areas such as hospital science. Enquires should be directed to anthea.matsimanis@sydney.edu.au
Textbooks
Kumar, Abbas & Aster. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th edition. Saunders. 2012.
CPAT3202 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 2 Classes: Practical Module Prerequisites: CPAT3201 AND (12 credit points of ANAT2XXX or BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MBLG2XXX or MICR2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX) OR ( BMED2401 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) Corequisites: CPAT3201 Assumed knowledge: Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), Museum Practical Reports (40%). Practical field work: One 2-hour microscopic practical and one 2-hour museum practical per week. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2 unit of study modules will provide a practical background to the scientific basis of the pathogenesis of disease. Areas covered in practical modules include disease specimen evaluation on a macroscopic and microscopic basis. The aims of the course are: - To enable students to gain an understanding of how different organ systems react to injury and to apply basic concepts of disease processes. - To equip students with skills appropriate for careers in the biomedical sciences and for further training in research or professional degrees. At the end of the course students will: - Have acquired practical skills in the use of a light microscope. - Have an understanding of basic investigative techniques for disease detection in pathology. - Be able to evaluate diseased tissue at the macroscopic and microscopic level. - Have the ability to describe, synthesise and present information on disease pathogenesis. - Transfer problem-solving skills to novel situations related to disease pathogenesis. This unit of study would be appropriate for those who intend to proceed to Honours research, to postgraduate studies such as Medicine or to careers in biomedical areas such as hospital science. Enquiries should be directed to anthea.matsimanis@sydney.edu.au.
Textbooks
Kumar, Abbas & Aster. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th edition. Saunders. 2012.
HSTO3001 Microscopy and Histochemistry Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold; Prof Christopher Murphy Session: Semester 1 Classes: Usually four 1-hour lectures per week plus a few tutorials Prerequisites: [a mark of 65 or above in (ANAT2008)] or [an average mark of 65 or above in(BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405)] Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam, essay, mid semester quiz (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aims of this unit of study are to provide a theoretical understanding of why biological tissues need to be specifically prepared for microscopic examination, how differing methods yield different types of morphological information; to allow students to study the theory of different types and modalities of microscopes, how they function and the differing information they provide; to develop an understanding of the theory of why biological material needs to be stained for microscopic examination; to allow students to understand how biological material becomes stained; to develop an understanding of the chemical information provided by biological staining - dyes, enzymes and antibodies.
Textbooks
Keirnan, J.A. Histological & Histochemical Methods. 4th edition. Scion. 2008.
HSTO3902 Microscopy and Histochemistry Adv Prac

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr tutorials Prerequisites: [A mark of 65 in (ANAT2008)] or [An average mark of 65 in (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405)] Corequisites: HSTO3001 Prohibitions: HSTO3002 Assessment: one 1.5 hour practical exam, 1 practical report, mid semester quiz Practical field work: 1 x 4hr practicals Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aims of this unit of study are to provide a practical understanding of why biological tissues need to be specifically prepared for microscopic examination, how differing methods yield different types of morphological information; to allow students to study the theory of different types and modalities of microscopes, how they function and the differing information they provide; to develop an practical understanding of why biological material needs to be stained for microscopic examination; to allow students to understand how biological material becomes stained; to develop an understanding of the chemical information provided by biological staining - dyes, enzymes and antibodies.
Textbooks
Keirnan, JA. Histological & Histochemical Methods 3rd Edition. Butterworth-Heinmann. 1999
HSTO3003 Cells and Development: Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Lovicu Session: Semester 2 Classes: Four 1-hour theory lectures and one 1-hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: (ANAT2008 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905) OR (BMED2401 and 12 additional credit points of BMED240X) Assessment: One 2-hour exam, tutorial research papers and Seminar (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The main emphasis of this unit of study concerns the mechanisms that control animal development. Early developmental processes including fertilisation, cleavage, and gastrulation leading to the formation of the primary germ layers and subsequent body organs are described in a range of animals, mainly vertebrates. Stem cells of both embryonic and adult origin will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the parts played by inductive cell and tissue interactions in cell and tissue differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation. This will be studied at both cellular and molecular levels.
Textbooks
Gilbert, SF. Developmental Biology. 10th edition. Sinauer Associates Inc. 2013.
HSTO3004 Cells and Development: Practical (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Fraser Session: Semester 2 Prerequisites: A mark of 65 in (ANAT2008 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905) OR [(a mark of 65 in BMED2401) and at least two from (BMED2402 and BMED2403 and BMED2406)]. Corequisites: HSTO3003 Assessment: Practical class reports and Seminars (100%) Practical field work: Two 3-hour practicals per week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This advanced unit of study complements HSTO3003 (Cells and Development: Theory) and is catered to provide students with laboratory research experience leading to Honours and higher degrees. It will primarily cover the design and application of experimental procedures involved in cell and developmental biology, using appropriate molecular and cellular techniques to answer developmental questions raised in HSTO3003. This unit of study will promote hands on experience, allowing students to observe and examine developing and differentiating tissues at the macroscopic and microscopic level. The main emphasis of this unit of study will concentrate on practical approaches to understanding the mechanisms that control animal development. Some projects may examine early developmental processes such as fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and the formation of the primary germ layers and tissues. The parts played by stem cells and inductive cell and tissue interactions in differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation can also be examined at cellular and molecular levels.
Textbooks
Gilbert SF. Developmental Biology. 10th edition. Sinauer Associates Inc. 2013.
BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell. Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3001 or BCHM3901 or BCHM3971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones & Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell. Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points from BMED240X) and (a mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3901 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3071. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in gene expression and manipulation will be covered.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones & Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3072 Human Molecular Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3972 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3002 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3972 Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (a mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3072 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904 or BCHM3002 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3072. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in modern molecular cell biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Joel Mackay Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3981 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3901 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Joel Mackay Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (an average mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3901 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3081 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3081. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in protein biochemistry will be covered.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3002 or BCHM3982 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with molecular biology methods and studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry.
BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (an average mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3082 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3904 or BCHM3002 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with new methods, including magnetic resonance techniques and molecular biology methods, as well as studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry. Qualified students will attend some lectures/practical classes in common with BCHM3082 and some separate lectures/ practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in metabolic biochemistry will be covered.
MICR3011 Microbes in Infection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Helen Agus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, eight 3-hour practical sessions and three 2-hour clinical tutorials per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp from BMED240X] OR [GENE2002 and 6cp from MICR2X22] Prohibitions: MICR3001 or MICR3911 or MICR3901 Assessment: Theory: One 2-hour exam (60%) and formative assessment; In-semester: presentations, discussion facilitation, quiz, prac assessment (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to further develop an interest in, and understanding of, medical microbiology from the introduction in Intermediate Microbiology. Through an examination of microbial structure, virulence, body defences and pathogenesis, the process of acquisition and establishment of disease is covered. The unit is divided into three themes: 1. Clinical Microbiology: host defences, infections, virulence mechanisms; 2. Public health microbiology: epidemiology, international public health, transmission, water and food borne outbreaks; 3. Emerging and re-emerging diseases: the impact of societal change with respect to triggering new diseases and causing the re-emergence of past problems, which are illustrated using case studies. The practical component is designed to enhance students' practical skills and to complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Clinical tutorial sessions underpin and investigate the application of the material covered in the practical classes.
Textbooks
Murray PR et al. Medical Microbiology. 7th edition. Mosby. 2013.
MICR3911 Microbes in Infection (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Helen Agus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week including six 1-hour tutorials, eight 3-hour practical sessions and three 2-hour clinical tutorials per semester. Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED240X and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2404] OR [6cp from (GENE2002, MICR2X22) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (GENE2002, MICR2X22)] Prohibitions: MICR3001 or MICR3011 or MICR3901 Assessment: Theory: One 2-hour exam (60%), formative assessment; Practical assessment: presentations, discussion facilitation, quiz, prac assessment (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Intermediate Microbiology. This unit is designed to further develop an interest in, and understanding of, medical microbiology from the introduction in Intermediate Microbiology. Through an examination of microbial structure, virulence, body defences and pathogenesis, the process of acquisition and establishment of disease is covered. The unit is divided into three themes: 1. Clinical Microbiology: host defences, infections, virulence mechanisms; 2. Public health microbiology: epidemiology, international public health, transmission, water and food borne outbreaks; 3. Emerging and re-emerging diseases: the impact of societal change with respect to triggering new diseases and causing the re-emergence of past problems, which are illustrated using case studies. The unique aspect of this advanced unit that differentiates it from the mainstream unit is six tutorial style sessions that replace six mainstream lectures in the theme 'Emerging and re-emerging diseases'. These dedicated research-led interactive advanced sessions support self-directed learning and involve discussion around specific topics that will vary from year to year. Nominated research papers and reviews in the topic area will be explored with supported discussion of the relevance to and impact of the work on current thinking around emergence of microbial disease. The focus will be on microbial change that lies critically at the centre of understanding the reasons for the emergence of new diseases and challenges in an era of significant scientific ability to diagnose and treat infection. The practical component is identical to the mainstream unit and is designed to enhance students' practical skills and to complement the lectures. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Clinical tutorial sessions underpin and investigate the application of the material covered in the practical classes.
Textbooks
Murray PR.et al. Medical Microbiology. 7th ed., Mosby, 2013
MICR3032 Cellular and Molecular Microbiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three lectures per week and one 2-hour prac/tute per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp from BMED240X] OR [MICR2024 and GENE2002] Prohibitions: MICR3932 Assumed knowledge: MICR2021 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 1-hour exam (mid semester); one 2-hour exam (end of semester); Prac (40%): One 2-hour exam (open book, mid-semester), one oral presentation (end of semester); one in-prac bioinformatics assessment task, one 1.5 hr bioinformatics prac exam (end of semester) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study introduces students to key concepts in cellular and molecular microbiology. Building on knowledge gained in MICR2021 and MICR2022, as well as MBLG1001, the lectures explore areas of microbial evolution, pathogenesis, physiology, ecology, biotechnology and genetics, with each key theme explored with a series of 6 lectures led by an expert in the field. Lectures will be complemented with practical/tutorial sessions that explore recent research in these areas. The first set of practical/tutorial sessions are small-group sessions led by demonstrators, that are focused on critical interpretation of the scientific literature in the area of host-microbe interactions. The focus is on experimental design, and analysis of the raw data. The second set of pracs are bioinformatics labs, which introduce software such as ORF Finder, BLAST, ClustalX, and TreeView and databases such as NCBI-Nucleotide and KEGG; the aim is to figure out the identity, functions, and biotechnological applications of a mystery piece of microbial DNA. It is recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study MICR3042 or MICR3942.
MICR3932 Cellular and Molecular Microbiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three lectures per week and one 2-hour prac/tute per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp from BMED240X and (a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [MICR2024 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from GENE2002] Prohibitions: MICR3032 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 1-hour theory exam (mid semester); one 2-hour exam (end of semester); Prac (40%): one written assessment task, assessment of website. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to key concepts in cellular and molecular microbiology. Building on knowledge gained in MICR2021 and MICR2022, as well as MBLG1001, the lectures explore areas of microbial evolution, pathogenesis, physiology, ecology, biotechnology and genetics, with each key theme explored with a series of 6 lectures led by an expert in the field.The first set of practical/tutorial sessions are small-group sessions led by an academic, which are focused on critical interpretation of the scientific literature in the area of host-microbe interactions. The focus is on evaluating the scientific significance of published papers, and determining the level of experimental support for key conclusions. The second set of prac sessions teaches the creative presentation of science to both fellow scientists and the public by designing a website around an area of interest in microbiology. It is recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study, MICR3042 or MICR3942.
Textbooks
None
MICR3042 Microbiology Research Skills

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dee Carter Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week from week 1-7. One 4-hour prac per week. Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp of BMED240X] OR [MICR2024 and GENE2002] Prohibitions: MICR3942 or MICR3022 or MICR3922 Assessment: One 1-hour theory exam (40%). One 1-hour theory of prac exam, one 2-hour practical exam, in-lab continuous assessment, one prac report, one short video presentation, one quiz (60%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Research in molecular microbiology is needed to tackle problems in medicine, agriculture, environmental science, and biotechnology. This Unit of Study focuses on developing practical skills and training in experimental approaches and that are essential for laboratory research in molecular microbiology, together with knowledge of the underlying theoretical concepts. We will focus on key areas of modern microbiology including Bioremediation, where micro-organisms are used to break down harmful substrates in the environment; Microbial biotechnology, which explores how microbes can be used as cellular factories to produce useful products; Medical microbiology, where molecular epidemiology is used to track a disease outbreak, and Yeast genetics, where we explore genes and protein interaction networks that cells regulate in their response to antibiotic agents. It is strongly recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study MICR3032 or MICR3932.
MICR3942 Microbiology Research Skills (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dee Carter Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week from Week 1¿7. Project work equivalent to 4 hours per week. Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from MICR2X22 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (MICR2X21, MICR2X22, MICR3X11)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp from BMED240X and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [MICR2024 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from GENE2002]. Prohibitions: MICR3022 or MICR3922 or MICR3042 Assessment: One 1-hour theory exam (40%). One 2-hour practical exam, presentation of research via short video, lab book mark and supervisor mark based on performance in research project (60%). Practical field work: Research project in an academic microbiology lab, 48 hours total, at times decided between student and supervisor. Research projects will be announced at the start of semester. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Research in molecular microbiology is needed to tackle problems in medicine, agriculture, environmental science, and biotechnology. This Unit of Study focuses on developing practical skills and training in experimental approaches that are essential for laboratory research in molecular microbiology, together with knowledge of the underlying theoretical concepts. In this Unit the practical component is entirely replaced by a research project undertaken in an academic microbiology lab. The lecture material in MICR3942 focuses on the areas of microbial biotechnology and bioremediation, and the genetic and molecular diversity of medically important eukaryotic microbes. It is strongly recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study, MICR3032 or MICR3932.
PHSI3009 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Anuwat Dinudom Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr/ week lectures and 6 x 2 hr large class tutorials (PBL) per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X] Prohibitions: PHSI3905, PHSI3906, PHSI3005, PHSI3006, PHSI3909 Assessment: four in-class quizzes, one mid-semester exam, one 2hr final exam, two presentations for problem-based learning and 1 practical class report Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Problem-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techniques for investigating cell signalling and the biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for a science graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3909 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Anuwat Dinudom Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr/ week lectures and 3 x 2 hrs large class tutorials (PBL) per semester Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in (6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X)] Prohibitions: PHSI3009, PHSI3005, PHSI3905, PHSI3006, PHSI3906 Assessment: four in-class quizzes, one mid-semester exam, one 2hr final exam, one presentations for problem-based learning and one Advanced research report Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Problem-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techiques for investigating cell signalling and biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science a graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3010 Reproduction, Development and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Fraser Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 4 x 1 hr large class tutorials per semester, 12 x 1hr tutorials (weeks 3-6 and 7-10 only) Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X] Prohibitions: PHSI3905, PHSI3906, PHSI3005, PHSI3006, PHSI3910 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Reprogramming and tissue regeneration will also feature in the lecture content. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and regeneration. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating sperm function, embryogenesis and stem cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3910 Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Fraser Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 4 x 1 hr large class tutorials per semester, 12 x 1hr tutorials (weeks 3-6 and 7-10 only) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X] Prohibitions: PHSI3010, PHSI3005, PHSI3905, PHSI3006, PHSI3906 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Reprogramming and tissue regeneration will also feature in the lecture content. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and regeneration. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating sperm function, embryogenesis and stem cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
Information on the above units may be found under the relevant teaching department entries.