Table 1: Environmental Studies

Table 1 lists units of study available to students in the Bachelor of Science and combined degrees. The units are available to students enrolled in other degrees in accordance with their degree resolutions.

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Environmental Studies

For a major in Environmental Studies, students are required to complete a minimum of 24 credit points from Senior units of study listed below, including at least 12 credit points from Senior ENVI units
Junior units of study
Students are recommended to take GEOS1001/1901 and at least one of the following units of study:
BIOL1001/1911/1991, BIOL1002/1902, GEOS1002/1902, GEOS1003/1903
GEOS1001
Earth, Environment and Society
6    N GEOS1901, GEOG1001, GEOG1002, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOL1902, ENSY1001
Semester 1
GEOS1901
Earth, Environment and Society Advanced
6    P An ATAR above 93 is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
N GEOS1001, GEOG1001, GEOG1002, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOL1902

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
BIOL1001
Concepts in Biology
6    A HSC Biology, however, students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February).
N BIOL1911, BIOL1991
Semester 1
Summer Main
BIOL1911
Concepts in Biology (Advanced)
6    P 80+ in HSC 2-unit Biology (or equivalent) or Distinction or better in a University level Biology unit, or an ATAR of 95 or greater
N BIOL1001, BIOL1991.
Semester 1
BIOL1991
Concepts in Biology (Special Studies)
6    P ATAR of at least 99.0 OR a Band 6 result in Biology HSC OR medalist in International Biology Olympiad
N BIOL1001, BIOL1911, BIOL1993

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
BIOL1002
Living Systems
6    A HSC Biology, however, students who have not completed HSC biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February).
N BIOL1902
Semester 2
BIOL1902
Living Systems (Advanced)
6    P Distinction or better in the BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 OR HSC Biology equal to 90 or greater OR an ATAR equal to 95 or greater
N BIOL1002
Semester 2
GEOS1002
Introductory Geography
6    N GEOS1902, GEOG1001, GEOG1002
Semester 2
GEOS1902
Introductory Geography (Advanced)
6    P An ATAR equivalent) above 93 is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
N GEOS1002, GEOG1001, GEOG1002

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
GEOS1003
Introduction to Geology
6    N GEOS1903, GEOL1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501
Semester 2
Summer Late
GEOS1903
Introduction to Geology (Advanced)
6    P A UAI (or ATAR equivalent) above 93 is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
N GEOL1002, GEOL1902, GEOS1003

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
Intermediate units of study
Students are required to take GEOS2121/2921 and recommended to take at least one of the following units of study:
BIOL2009/2909, BIOL2010/2910, BIOL2022/2922, BIOL2024/2924, GEOS2111/2911, GEOS2115/2915, GEOG2321, LWSC2002*, RSEC2031*
* Note LWSC2002 and RSEC2031 are not Table 1 units of study
GEOS2121
Environmental and Resource Management
6    P 24 credit points of Junior units of study, including 6 credit points of Junior Geoscience or ECOP1001 or ECOP1002
N GEOG2421, GEOL2202, GEOS2921
Semester 2
GEOS2921
Environmental & Resource Management Adv
6    P 24 credit points of Junior units of study, including a distinction in 6 credit points of Junior Geoscience or in ECOP1001 or ECOP1002. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
N GEOG2421, GEOL2202, GEOS2121
Semester 2
BIOL2009
Intro to Terrestrial Field Ecology
6    A BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 and 12 credit points of Intermediate Biology
P 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901)
N BIOL2909, BIOL3009, BIOL3909.

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any intermediate BIOL units of study may also be considered. The unit is only available in EVEN years (2014, 2016), but students may apply for entry into an alternative intermediate field unit in ODD years.
Int August
BIOL2909
Intro to Terrestrial Field Ecology (Adv)
6    A BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 and 12 credit points of Intermediate Biology
P Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901).
N BIOL2009, BIOL3009, BIOL3909

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any intermediate BIOL units of study may also be considered. The unit is only available in EVEN years (2014, 2016), but students may apply for entry into an alternative intermediate field unit in ODD years.
Int August
BIOL2010
Intro to Tropical Wildlife Biology

This unit of study is not available in2014

6    A BIOL1002
P 12cp Junior BIOL; OR 6cp Junior BIOL and 6cp MBLG1001/1901
N BIOL2910, BIOL3010, BIOL3910

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study, based on placement availability and merit. The unit is only available in ODD years (2013, 2015..) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years.
Int February
BIOL2910
Intro to Tropical Wildlife Biology (Adv)

This unit of study is not available in2014

6    A BIOL1002
P 12cp Junior BIOL; OR 6cp Junior BIOL and 6cp MBLG1001/1901; with Distinction average. These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator.
N BIOL2010, BIOL3010, BIOL3910

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study, based on placement availability and merit. The unit is only available in ODD years (2013, 2015..) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years.
Int February
BIOL2022
Biology Experimental Design & Analysis
6    P 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901).
N BIOL3006, BIOL3906, BIOL2922
Semester 2
BIOL2922
Biol Experimental Design & Analysis Adv
6    P Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator.
N BIOL3006, BIOL3906, BIOL2022
Semester 2
BIOL2024
Ecology and Conservation
6    A BIOL1002 or BIOL1902
P 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901).
N BIOL2924
Semester 2
BIOL2924
Ecology and Conservation (Advanced)
6    A BIOL1002 or BIOL1902
P Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator.
N BIOL2024
Semester 2
GEOS2111
Natural Hazards: a GIS Approach
6    P 24 credit points of Junior Science units of study, including 6 credit points of first year Geosciences units
N GEOG2411, GEOS2911
Semester 1
GEOS2911
Natural Hazards: a GIS Approach Advanced
6    P 24 credit points of Junior Science units of study, including 6 credit points of first year Geosciences units
N GEOG2411, GEOS2111
Semester 1
GEOS2115
Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change
6    A At least one of (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501)
P 48 credit points from Junior Units of Study
N GEOS2915, MARS2006
Semester 1
GEOS2915
Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change (Adv)
6    A (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501)
P Distinction average in 48 credit points from Junior units of study.
N GEOS2115, MARS2006
Semester 1
GEOG2321
Fluvial and Groundwater Geomorphology

This unit of study is not available in2014

6    P 24 credit points of Junior units of study including 6 credit points of Junior Geoscience. Students in the BEnvSys should have ENSY1001, 12 credit points of Chemisty, 6 credit points of Biology, BIOM1003 or ENVX2001
N GEOG2002, GEOG2302, GEOG2303, MARS2002, MARS2006
Semester 2
Senior units of study
For a major in Environmental Studies, students are required to complete a minimum of 24 credit points from the Senior units of study listed here, including at least 12 credit points from Senior ENVI-coded units.
ENVI3111
Environmental Law and Ethics
6    P 12 credit points of intermediate units of study
N ENVI3911
Semester 1
ENVI3911
Environmental Law and Ethics (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average across 12 credit points of intermediate units of study
N ENVI3111
Semester 1
ENVI3112
Environmental Assessment
6    P (GEOS2121 or GEOS2921) and 6 additional credit points of intermediate units
N ENVI3002, ENVI3004, ENVI3912
Semester 2
ENVI3912
Environmental Assessment (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average in ((GEOS2121 or GEOS2921) and 6 additional credit points of intermediate units)
N ENVI3112, ENVI3002, ENVI3004
Semester 2
ENVI3114
Energy and the Environment
6    A Junior Physics
P 12 credit points of intermediate units of study
N ENVI3001, PHYS3600
Semester 2
BIOL3007
Ecology
6    P 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972).
N BIOL3907
Semester 2
BIOL3907
Ecology (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972).
N BIOL3007
Semester 2
GEOS3014
GIS in Coastal Management
6    P Either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115, GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)].
N GEOS3914, MARS3104
Semester 2
GEOS3914
GIS in Coastal Management (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115 or GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)].
N GEOS3014, MARS3104

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
A distinction average in prior Geography, Geology or Marine Science units of study is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Semester 2
GEOS3520
Urban Citizenship & Sustainability
6    P 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOILS2002, LWSC2002
N GEOS3920
Semester 1
GEOS3920
Urban Citizenship & Sustainability (Adv)
6    P Distinction average in 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOIL2002, LWSC2002
N GEOS3520
Semester 1
RSEC4132
Environmental Economics
6    A (ECON2001 or ECOS2001), (ECON2002 or ECOS2002), (AGEC3001or AGEC3101), AGEC2101, AGEC2105
P ECON2001 or ECOS2001 or AGEC2103 or AGEC2003 or RSEC2031
N ECON3013, AGEC4035
Semester 2

Environmental Studies

For a major in Environmental Studies, students are required to complete a minimum of 24 credit points from Senior units of study listed below, including at least 12 credit points from Senior ENVI units
Junior units of study
Students are recommended to take GEOS1001/1901 and at least one of the following units of study:
BIOL1001/1911/1991, BIOL1002/1902, GEOS1002/1902, GEOS1003/1903
GEOS1001 Earth, Environment and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jody Webster, A/Prof Bill Pritchard, Prof Jonathan Aitchison, Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1901, GEOG1001, GEOG1002, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOL1902, ENSY1001 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, 2000 word essay, field and prac reports (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B Agr Ec, B E, B Int S, B L W Sc, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), UG Study Abroad Program.
This is the gateway unit of study for Human Geography, Physical Geography, Environmental Studies and Geology. Its objective is to introduce the big questions relating to the origins and current state of the planet: climate change, environment, landscape formation, and the growth of the human population. During the semester you will be introduced to knowledge, theories and debates about how the world's physical and human systems operate. The first module investigates the system of global environmental change, specifically addressing climate variability and human impacts on the natural environment. The second module presents Earth as an evolving and dynamic planet, investigating how changes take place, the rate at which they occur and how they have the potential to dramatically affect the way we live. Finally, the third module, focuses on human-induced challenges to Earth's future. This part of the unit critically analyses the relationships between people and their environments, with central consideration to debates on population change, resource use and the policy contexts of climate change mitigation and adaptation.
GEOS1901 Earth, Environment and Society Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jody Webster, A/Prof Bill Pritchard, Prof Jonathan Aitchison, Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An ATAR above 93 is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator. Prohibitions: GEOS1001, GEOG1001, GEOG1002, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOL1902 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, 2000 word essay, field and prac reports (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B Agr Ec, B E, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1001, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.
BIOL1001 Concepts in Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL1911, BIOL1991 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology, however, students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February). Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments tests and lab quizzes (100%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Agr Ec, B An Vet Bio Sc, B E, B Env Sys, B Hort Sc, B L W Sc, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Nutrition), B Sc Agr, B Vet Biol, D V M, UG Study Abroad Program.
Concepts in Biology is an introduction to the major themes of modern biology. The unit covers fundamental cell biology, with a particular emphasis on cell structure and function; the foundations of molecular biology from the role of DNA in protein synthesis to the genetics of organisms; and the theory of evolution and principles of phylogenetic analysis, including how these are used to interpret the origins of the diversity of extant organisms. Practical classes focus on students designing experiments, making and recording their observations and communicating their findings. The unit emphasises how biologists carry out scientific investigations, from the molecular and cellular level to the level of ecosystems. This unit of study provides a good foundation for intermediate biology units of study.
Textbooks
Knox R B et al. Biology, An Australian Focus. 4th ed. McGraw-Hill. 2010
BIOL1911 Concepts in Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 80+ in HSC 2-unit Biology (or equivalent) or Distinction or better in a University level Biology unit, or an ATAR of 95 or greater Prohibitions: BIOL1001, BIOL1991. Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, tests, lab quizzes (100%). Associated degrees: B Env Sys, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Nutrition), B Vet Biol, D V M, UG Study Abroad Program.
Concepts in Biology (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1001 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1901 participate in alternative components, which include a separate lecture and practical stream from BIOL1001. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
As for BIOL1001.
BIOL1991 Concepts in Biology (Special Studies)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Simon Ho, Dr Nathan Lo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1911; one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: ATAR of at least 99.0 OR a Band 6 result in Biology HSC OR medalist in International Biology Olympiad Prohibitions: BIOL1001, BIOL1911, BIOL1993 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), practical reports (30%), seminar presentation (15%), laboratory note book (10%), and pre-laboratory quizzes (5%). Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics).
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Entry to Special Studies Program in Concepts in Biology is restricted to students who have done exceptionally well in their HSC and/or have shown extraordinary aptitude in Biology. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1991 is very different from that of BIOL1911 (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P., Evans, B. and Saint, R. (2010) Biology, 4th edition. (McGraw Hill: Sydney) ; Sanders MF & Bowman JL (2012) Genetic Analysis: An Integrated Approach Benjamin Cummings, Boston; Bromham, L 2008, Reading the story in DNA: a beginner's guide to molecular evolution, Oxford University Press, US.
BIOL1002 Living Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr William Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2.5-hour practical per week and tutorials every few weeks. Prohibitions: BIOL1902 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology, however, students who have not completed HSC biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February). Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, quizzes (100%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Agr Ec, B An Vet Bio Sc, B Env Sys, B Hort Sc, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Nutrition), B Sc Agr, B Vet Biol, D V M, UG Study Abroad Program.
Living Systems deals with the biology of organisms as individuals, within populations and as part of communities and ecosystems. A broad range of taxa is presented, from bacteria to large plants and animals, and emphasis is placed on understanding the ways in which they can live in different habitats. Behaviour is discussed as a key process linking organismal-level processes to population and community dynamics. The importance of energy in living systems, and how elements are used and recycled in biological communities, are introduced as the basis of ecosystems. The unit of study includes lectures and laboratory classes on the physiology and behaviour of animals and plants, the ways in which organisms control and integrate their activities and the processes controlling dynamics of populations and community. These themes are revisited within applied contexts to discuss issues such as management and conservation. This unit of study provides a good foundation for intermediate biology units of study.
Textbooks
Knox R B et al. Biology. An Australian Focus. 4th ed. McGraw-Hill. 2010.
BIOL1902 Living Systems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr William Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2.5-hour practical per week and tutorials every few weeks. Prerequisites: Distinction or better in the BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 OR HSC Biology equal to 90 or greater OR an ATAR equal to 95 or greater Prohibitions: BIOL1002 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, quizzes, independent project (100%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Agr Ec, B An Vet Bio Sc, B Env Sys, B Hort Sc, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Nutrition), B Sc Agr, B Vet Biol, D V M.
This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1002 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1902 participate in alternative components, which include a separate lecture and practical stream from BIOL1001. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
As for BIOL1002.
GEOS1002 Introductory Geography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kurt Iveson, Dr Dan Penny. Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 hour lecture per week and eight 2 hour practicals during semester. Prohibitions: GEOS1902, GEOG1001, GEOG1002 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 word essay, two online quizzes (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B Agr Ec, B E, B Int S, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study provides a geographical perspective on the ways in which people interact with each other and the physical world, focussing on the processes that generate spatial variation and difference. This unit will consider the development and characteristics of natural environments across the globe, and will explore how these environments both constrain, and are influenced by, humans. Therefore, the unit of study will consider the biophysical, political, economic, cultural and urban geographies that shape contemporary global society. Each of these themes will be discussed with reference to key examples (such as Hurricane Katrina, the Earthquake in Haiti/Dominican Republic, the conflict in Darfur, and mega-deltas in the developing world), in order to consider the ways in which the various processes (both physical and human) interact. The unit of study is designed to attract and interest students who wish to pursue geography as a major within their undergraduate degree, but also has relevance to students who wish to consider the way geographers understand the contemporary world.
GEOS1902 Introductory Geography (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kurt Iveson, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 hour lecture per week and 8 2 hour practicals per semester, plus independent group work. Prerequisites: An ATAR equivalent) above 93 is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator. Prohibitions: GEOS1002, GEOG1001, GEOG1002 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 1000 word essay, two online quizzes, one practical report (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B Agr Ec, B E, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1002, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.
GEOS1003 Introduction to Geology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tom Hubble, Prof Geoff Clarke Session: Semester 2,Summer Late Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1903, GEOL1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, quizzes, tests, practical reports, field report (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B Agr Ec, B E, B L W Sc, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), UG Study Abroad Program.
The aim of this unit of study is to examine the chemical and physical processes involved in mineral formation, the interior of the Earth, surface features, sedimentary environments, volcanoes, and metamorphism. Lectures and laboratory sessions on mountain building processes and the formation of mineral deposits will lead to an understanding of the forces controlling the geology of our planet. Processes such as weathering, erosion and nature of sedimentary environments are related to the origin of the Australian landscape. In addition to laboratory classes there is a one-day excursion to the western Blue Mountains and Lithgow to examine geological objects in their setting.
Textbooks
The recommended text is Stephen Marshak, Earth: Portrait of a Planet. W. W. Norton & Company (2007) - Paperback - 832 pages - ISBN 039393036X
GEOS1903 Introduction to Geology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tom Hubble, Prof Geoff Clarke Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical per week, field classes. Prerequisites: A UAI (or ATAR equivalent) above 93 is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator. Prohibitions: GEOL1002, GEOL1902, GEOS1003 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, tests, quizzes, practical reports, field report (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B Agr Ec, B E, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS1003 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their ATAR or UAI and/or their university performance at the time of enrolment. Students that elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives. This unit may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced).
Intermediate units of study
Students are required to take GEOS2121/2921 and recommended to take at least one of the following units of study:
BIOL2009/2909, BIOL2010/2910, BIOL2022/2922, BIOL2024/2924, GEOS2111/2911, GEOS2115/2915, GEOG2321, LWSC2002*, RSEC2031*
* Note LWSC2002 and RSEC2031 are not Table 1 units of study
GEOS2121 Environmental and Resource Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior units of study, including 6 credit points of Junior Geoscience or ECOP1001 or ECOP1002 Prohibitions: GEOG2421, GEOL2202, GEOS2921 Assessment: One exam, one essay, one research report, tutorial attendance (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Agr Ec, B E, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study explores interactions between humans and the natural environment. This encompasses cultural constructions of nature and resources, the evolution of environmental thought and the debates surrounding sustainable development. It integrates environmental, economic, cultural and social considerations in respect to natural resource management in Australia and the Asia-Pacific. The unit of study introduces students to the various conceptual tools used by social scientists to approach the contemporary challenges facing environmental and resource management. Students learn about the social, cultural and environmental considerations that must be taken into account when developing and implementing environmental and resource management policies in an increasing congested 'marketplace of ideas'.
GEOS2921 Environmental & Resource Management Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week plus a special GEOS2921 lecture associated with the advanced assessment. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior units of study, including a distinction in 6 credit points of Junior Geoscience or in ECOP1001 or ECOP1002. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator. Prohibitions: GEOG2421, GEOL2202, GEOS2121 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one report, essay, tutorial and practical attendance (100%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Agr Ec, B E, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
Advanced students will receive the same core lecture materials as for GEOS2121 but are required to complete alternative written work.
BIOL2009 Intro to Terrestrial Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Glenda Wardle Session: Int August Classes: Note: One 6-day field trip held in the pre-semester break (July 20 - July 25 inclusive) and four 4-hour practical classes during weeks 1-4 of semester 2. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) Prohibitions: BIOL2909, BIOL3009, BIOL3909. Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 and 12 credit points of Intermediate Biology Assessment: Two in-class quizzes (20%), Major research report (40%), Sampling project report (20%), Research proposal and presentation (10%), Data collection and analysis in teams (10%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B An Vet Bio Sc, B Env Sys, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any intermediate BIOL units of study may also be considered. The unit is only available in EVEN years (2014, 2016), but students may apply for entry into an alternative intermediate field unit in ODD years.
This field course provides a practical introduction in the experimental analysis of terrestrial populations and assemblages. The experience is best suited to students who will continue into senior units of study in ecology. Students learn a broad range of ecological sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments. The field work incorporates survey techniques for plants, small mammals and other fauna and thus provides a good background for ecological consulting work. Students attend a week-long field course and participate in a large-scale research project as part of a large team, as well as conducting a research project that they design with a small group of students. Invited experts contribute to the lectures and discussions on issues relating to the ecology, conservation and management of Australia's terrestrial flora and fauna. This unit will be available in EVEN years (2014, 2016...) only. You may take an alternative field unit of study when this unit is unavailable. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit, based on placement availability and merit. Contact the School of Biological Sciences Office for the Special Permission form to request enrolment.
BIOL2909 Intro to Terrestrial Field Ecology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Glenda Wardle Session: Int August Classes: Note: One 6-day field trip held in the pre-semester break (July 20 - July 25 inclusive) and four 4-hour practical classes during weeks 1-4 of semester 2. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). Prohibitions: BIOL2009, BIOL3009, BIOL3909 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 and 12 credit points of Intermediate Biology Assessment: Discussions and quiz (10%), research project proposal and brief presentation (10%), sampling project report (20%), specimen collection (10%), research project report (50%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B An Vet Bio Sc, B Env Sys, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any intermediate BIOL units of study may also be considered. The unit is only available in EVEN years (2014, 2016), but students may apply for entry into an alternative intermediate field unit in ODD years.
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL2009 Terrestrial Field Ecology, and is suitable for qualified students who wish to pursue certain aspects at a more advanced level. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be required to pursue the objectives by more independent means. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students at the beginning of the unit.
This field course provides a practical introduction in the experimental analysis of terrestrial populations and assemblages. The experience is best suited to students who will continue into senior units of study in ecology. Students learn a broad range of ecological sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments. The field work incorporates survey techniques for plants, small mammals and other fauna and thus provides a good background for ecological consulting work. Students attend a week-long field course and participate in a large-scale research project as part of a large team as well as conducting a research project that they design with a small group of students. Invited experts contribute to the lectures and discussions on issues relating to the ecology, conservation and management of Australia's terrestrial flora and fauna.
This unit will be available in EVEN years (2014, 2016...) only. You may take an alternative field unit of study when this unit is unavailable. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit, based on placement availability and merit. Contact the School of Biological Sciences Office for the Special Permission form to request enrolment.
BIOL2010 Intro to Tropical Wildlife Biology

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr M Greenlees Session: Int February Classes: One week intensive field trip plus one week intensive lecture and prac session. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; OR 6cp Junior BIOL and 6cp MBLG1001/1901 Prohibitions: BIOL2910, BIOL3010, BIOL3910 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 Assessment: Practical exam (15%), Presentation (15%), Reports (30%), Theory exam (40%) Associated degrees: B A, B Med Sc, B Sc.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study, based on placement availability and merit. The unit is only available in ODD years (2013, 2015..) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years.
Australia has a unique terrestrial vertebrate fauna. Because of Australia's unusual climate, landforms, and the rarity of many species, the management of our native wildlife presents special challenges for biologists, conservationists and land managers. This unit of study addresses the biogeography, ecology and management of Australia's terrestrial fauna, with a focus on the wet-dry tropical savannah woodlands. It comprises a one-week field trip at Mary River Park in the Northern Territory plus one week intensive lecture and prac session. The unit of study will provide students with an exciting, hands-on first experience of terrestrial field ecology. During the trip, students will learn how to carry out fauna surveys, how to identify animals, and how to track wildlife. Biologists working on a range of environmental issues in wet-dry tropical woodlands will present guest lectures to students during the field trip. Students will travel to other locations including Litchfield National Park on the last day to introduce them to the various habitats occurring in the Top End.
BIOL2910 Intro to Tropical Wildlife Biology (Adv)

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr M Greenlees Session: Int February Classes: One week intensive field trip plus one week intensive lecture and prac session. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; OR 6cp Junior BIOL and 6cp MBLG1001/1901; with Distinction average. These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator. Prohibitions: BIOL2010, BIOL3010, BIOL3910 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 Assessment: Practical exam (15%), Presentation (15%), Reports (30%), Theory exam (40%) Associated degrees: B A, B Med Sc, B Sc.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study, based on placement availability and merit. The unit is only available in ODD years (2013, 2015..) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years.
The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL2010 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. Australia has a unique terrestrial vertebrate fauna. Because of Australia's unusual climate, landforms, and the rarity of many species, the management of our native wildlife presents special challenges for biologists, conservationists and land managers. This unit of study addresses the biogeography, ecology and management of Australia's terrestrial fauna, with a focus on the wet-dry tropical savannah woodlands. It comprises a one-week field trip at Mary River Park in the Northern Territory plus one week intensive lecture and prac session. The unit of study will provide students with an exciting, hands-on first experience of terrestrial field ecology. During the trip, students will learn how to carry out fauna surveys, how to identify animals, and how to track wildlife. Biologists working on a range of environmental issues in wet-dry tropical woodlands will present guest lectures to students during the field trip. Students will travel to other locations including Litchfield National Park on the last day to introduce them to the various habitats occurring in the Top End.
BIOL2022 Biology Experimental Design & Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). Prohibitions: BIOL3006, BIOL3906, BIOL2922 Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Associated degrees: B A, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit considers how biology is practiced as a quantitative, experimental and theoretical science. It focuses on the underlying principles and practical skills required to explore questions and test hypotheses, particularly where background variation (error) is inherently high. In so doing, it provides an understanding of how biological research is designed, analysed and interpreted using statistics. Lectures focus on sound experimental and statistical principles, using examples in biology to demonstrate concepts. In the practical sessions, students design and perform, analyse (using appropriate statistical tools) and interpret their own experiments to answer research questions in topics relevant to each student's particular interest. The unit provides foundational skills essential for doing research in biology and for critically judging the research of others. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Required: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2010. Experimental design for the life sciences. 3rd Ed. Oxford
BIOL2922 Biol Experimental Design & Analysis Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator. Prohibitions: BIOL3006, BIOL3906, BIOL2022 Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Associated degrees: B A, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
The content of BIOL2922 will be based on BIOL2022 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Required: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2010. Experimental design for the life sciences. 3rd Ed. Oxford
BIOL2024 Ecology and Conservation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). Prohibitions: BIOL2924 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Associated degrees: B A, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study examines the ecological principles driving the major ecosystems of the world and ecological processes behind the world's major conservation issues. It aims to develop in students the core foundations for an understanding of Ecology and its application in conservation. Lectures will focus on the ecology of the major terrestrial and marine biomes of the world. Application of ecological theory and methods to practical conservation problems will be integrated throughout the unit of study. Practical sessions will provide hands-on experience in ecological sampling and data handling to understand the ecology of marine and terrestrial environments, as well as ecological simulations to understand processes. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 3rd edition (2008). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
BIOL2924 Ecology and Conservation (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator. Prohibitions: BIOL2024 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Associated degrees: B A, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
The content of BIOL2924 will be based on BIOL2024 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 3rd edition (2008). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
GEOS2111 Natural Hazards: a GIS Approach

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce, A/Prof Patrice Rey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two hours of lectures, two hours of practicals per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior Science units of study, including 6 credit points of first year Geosciences units Prohibitions: GEOG2411, GEOS2911 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, three reports (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Agr Ec, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
The unit provides an essential framework for understanding the environmental response to short- and long-term geologic, oceanic and atmospheric processes. This Unit of Study introduces students to a variety of natural phenomena that affect society with impact levels ranging from nuisance to disastrous. The discussion of each hazard focuses on: (1) the process mechanics, (2) hazards and risk, and (3) methods for mitigation. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used by scientists, planners, policy-makers and the insurance industry alike to address many issues relating to natural hazards. This Unit of Study will introduce students to the major concepts relating to GIS and provide practical experience in the application of GIS techniques to hazard mapping, risk assessment and mitigation.
GEOS2911 Natural Hazards: a GIS Approach Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce, A/Prof Patrice Rey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two hours of lectures, two hours of practicals per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior Science units of study, including 6 credit points of first year Geosciences units Prohibitions: GEOG2411, GEOS2111 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, three reports (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Agr Ec, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS2111 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance to date. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives.
GEOS2115 Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maria Seton, Prof Jonathan Aitchison, Dr Jody Webster Session: Semester 1 Classes: Twenty-five 1 hour lectures, three 1 hour workshops, eight 2 hour practical classes. Prerequisites: 48 credit points from Junior Units of Study Prohibitions: GEOS2915, MARS2006 Assumed knowledge: At least one of (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501) Assessment: Lab reports (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%) Associated degrees: B A, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study introduces core concepts about how the formation of ocean basins and their influence on climate govern the development of coasts and continental margins. These concepts provide a framework for understanding the geographic variation of coasts, continental shelves and sediment accumulations in the deep ocean. Ocean-basin evolution is explained in terms of movements within the Earth's interior and how these movements determine the geometry of ocean basins, and their alpine counterparts, which interact with the global circulation of the ocean and atmosphere. This interaction plays a key role in marine sedimentation and controls the environmental conditions responsible for the development of coral reefs and other ecosystems. The Unit of Study systematically outlines how these factors have played out to produce, by gradual change, the coasts we see today, as well as the less familiar deposits hidden beneath the sea and coastal lands. The Unit thereby outlines how knowledge of responses to climate change in the past allow us to predict environmental responses to accelerated climate change occurring now and in the future due to the industrial greenhouse effect, but places these responses into perspective against the geological record. Overall therefore, the Unit aims to provide familiarity with fundamental phenomena central to the study of marine geoscience and environmental impacts, introduced through process-oriented explanations. The Unit of Study is structured around GIS-based practical sessions and problem-based project work, for which lectures provide the theoretical background.
Textbooks
On line reading material provided via Fisher Library
GEOS2915 Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maria Seton, Prof Jonathan Aitchison, Dr Jody Webster Session: Semester 1 Classes: Twenty-five 1 hour lectures, three 1 hour workshops, eight 2 hour practical classes. Prerequisites: Distinction average in 48 credit points from Junior units of study. Prohibitions: GEOS2115, MARS2006 Assumed knowledge: (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501) Assessment: Lab reports (60%), one 2 hour exam (40%). Associated degrees: B A, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS2115 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance to date. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives.
Textbooks
Online reading materials are provided via Fisher Library.
GEOG2321 Fluvial and Groundwater Geomorphology

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alan Baxter, Dr Willem Vervoot Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior units of study including 6 credit points of Junior Geoscience. Students in the BEnvSys should have ENSY1001, 12 credit points of Chemisty, 6 credit points of Biology, BIOM1003 or ENVX2001 Prohibitions: GEOG2002, GEOG2302, GEOG2303, MARS2002, MARS2006 Assessment: One 2 hr exam, two quizzes, one field report, practical exercises (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Agr Ec, B Env Sys, B L W Sc, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study provides an introduction to the fundamentals of fluvial geomorphology (the study of surface water as an agent of landscape change) and groundwater hydrology. The fluvial geomorphology section of the unit will describe the movement of water in stream channels and investigate the landscape change associated with that movement. Topics to be covered will include open channel flow hydraulics, sediment transport processes and stream channel morphology. Practical work will focus on the collection and analysis of field data. The quantity and quality of the groundwater resources are closely linked to geology and fluvial geomorphology. The groundwater section of this unit is based around four common groundwater issues: contamination, extraction, dryland salinity and groundwater-surface water interaction. In the practical component, common groundwater computer models such as FLOWTUBE and MODFLOW will be used to further explore these problems.
Textbooks
Recommended Textbooks: Fetter, CW. Applied Hydrogeology. Prentice-Hall. 2001.
Senior units of study
For a major in Environmental Studies, students are required to complete a minimum of 24 credit points from the Senior units of study listed here, including at least 12 credit points from Senior ENVI-coded units.
ENVI3111 Environmental Law and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of intermediate units of study Prohibitions: ENVI3911 Assessment: Essays, tutorials (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B An Vet Bio Sc, B Env Sys, B Hort Sc, B L W Sc, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, B Sc Agr, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study is co-taught by the School of Geosciences and the Unit for the History and Philosophy of Science. The unit is divided into two parts: (1) environmental law and governance and (2) environmental ethics. Environmental regulation and governance plays an important role in regulating human impacts on the environment. The law and governance part of this unit provides an introduction and overview to environmental regulation. We look at key environmental issues through an examination of legal policies, legislation and case law at a variety of scales (international, national and state/local). This unit also highlights the ways in which environmental law and governance is increasingly interconnected to other areas of environmental studies. The ethics component helps students develop thoughtful and informed positions on issues in environmental ethics using arguments derived from traditional ethics as well as environmentally specific theories. Ethical conflicts are often inevitable and difficult to resolve but using the resources of philosophical ethics and regular reference to case studies, students can learn to recognize the values and considerations at stake in such conflicts, acknowledge differing viewpoints and defend their own well considered positions.
ENVI3911 Environmental Law and Ethics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2-hour lecture and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across 12 credit points of intermediate units of study Prohibitions: ENVI3111 Assessment: Fieldwork component (30%), essays and tutorial papers (70%). Associated degrees: B A, B An Vet Bio Sc, B Env Sys, B Hort Sc, B L W Sc, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, B Sc Agr, UG Study Abroad Program.
This advanced unit of study will cover the same core lecture material as for ENVI3111, but students will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments based on a fieldtrip activity. The fieldwork will take the form of a Land and Environment Court tour and students will be required to provide a report on environmental decision making as part of this assessment.
ENVI3112 Environmental Assessment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Phil McManus Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2-hour lecture per week and one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (GEOS2121 or GEOS2921) and 6 additional credit points of intermediate units Prohibitions: ENVI3002, ENVI3004, ENVI3912 Assessment: Literature review, individual report, presentation (100%). Associated degrees: B A, B An Vet Bio Sc, B Env Sys, B Hort Sc, B L W Sc, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, B Sc Agr, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study focuses on environmental impact assessment as part of environmental planning. It seeks to establish a critical understanding of environmental planning and the tools available to improve environmental outcomes. The unit of study addresses the theory and practice of environmental impact statements (EIS) and environmental impact assessment processes (EIA) from scientific, economic, social and cultural value perspectives. Emphasis is placed on gaining skills in group work and in writing and producing an assessment report, which contains logically ordered and tightly structured argumentation that can stand rigorous scrutiny by political processes, the judiciary, the public and the media.
ENVI3912 Environmental Assessment (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Phil McManus Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2-hour lecture per week and one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average in ((GEOS2121 or GEOS2921) and 6 additional credit points of intermediate units) Prohibitions: ENVI3112, ENVI3002, ENVI3004 Assessment: Essay, individual report, presentation (100%). Associated degrees: B A, B An Vet Bio Sc, B Env Sys, B Hort Sc, B L W Sc, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, B Sc Agr, UG Study Abroad Program.
This advanced unit of study will cover the same core lecture, tutorial and group practical material as for ENVI3112. The difference in the Advanced unit of study is that students will be required to write a 3000-word essay that is worth 40% of their semester marks, rather than writing a literature review. The essay will explore the more theoretical and conceptual debates within impact assessment.
ENVI3114 Energy and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Dey Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture and 1-hour seminar per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of intermediate units of study Prohibitions: ENVI3001, PHYS3600 Assumed knowledge: Junior Physics Assessment: Major case study/essay, tutorial presentation, and assignments (100%). Associated degrees: B A, B Med Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit covers the following aspects of energy and the environment: energy resources and use; electrical power generation including fossil fuelled and alternate methods; environmental impacts of energy use and power generation including greenhouse gas emissions; transportation and pollution; energy management in buildings; solar thermal energy, photovoltaics, wind power and nuclear energy; embodied energy and net emissions analysis and, importantly, socio-economic and political issues related to energy provision.
BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, group presentations, one essay, one project report (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B An Vet Bio Sc, B Env Sys, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.
Textbooks
Begon M, Townsend CR, Harper JL (2005) Ecology, From individuals to ecosystems. Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3907 Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: See BIOL3007 Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3007 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, presentations, one essay, one project report (100%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3007 Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be encouraged to pursue the objectives by more independent means in a series of research tutorials. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester 2. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
Textbooks
As for BIOL3007
GEOS3014 GIS in Coastal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115, GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)]. Prohibitions: GEOS3914, MARS3104 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, two project reports, quizzes (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Agr Ec, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
Coastal Management is about how scientific knowledge is used to support policy formulation and planning decisions in coastal environments. The course links coastal science to policy and practice in management of estuaries, beaches and the coastal ocean. The principles are exemplified through specific issues, such as coastal erosion, pollution, and impacts of climate-change. The issues are dealt with in terms of how things work in nature, and how the issues are handled through administrative mechanisms. These mechanisms involve planning strategies like Marine Protected Areas and setback limits on civil development in the coastal zone. The coastal environments and processes that are more relevant to coastal management including: rocky coasts; beaches, barriers and dunes; and coral reefs will also be introduced. At a practical level, the link between science and coastal management is given substance through development and use of 'decision-support models'. These models involve geocomputing methods that entail application of simulation models, remotely sensed information, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course therefore includes both principles and experience in use of these methods to address coastal-management issues. (It thus also involves extensive use of computers.) Although the focus is on the coast, the principles and methods have broader relevance to environmental management in particular, and to problem-solving in general. That is, the course has vocational relevance in examining how science can be exploited to the benefit of society and nature conservation.
GEOS3914 GIS in Coastal Management (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce, Dr Ana Vila Concejo Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two hours of lectures, one 3 hour practical per week comprising one 1 hour practical demonstration and one 2 hour practical Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115 or GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)]. Prohibitions: GEOS3014, MARS3104 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, project work, two practical-based project reports, fortnightly progress quizzes (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Agr Ec, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: A distinction average in prior Geography, Geology or Marine Science units of study is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS3014 but will carry out more challenging projects, practicals, assignments and tutorials.
GEOS3520 Urban Citizenship & Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Phil McManus, Dr Kurt Iveson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week, six 2 hours practical sessions. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOILS2002, LWSC2002 Prohibitions: GEOS3920 Assessment: One 2hr exam, one 2000w essay, one 2000w group-based prac report (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
Cities are now the predominant home for humanity. More than half of the world's population reside in cities. The contemporary growth of cities, however, is attached to profound political questions about what it means to be urban, and what 'being urban' means for the planet. This Unit of Study provides grounding to these crucial questions. In the first half of the semester, lectures address the question: are cities sustainable? Why or why not? And for whom? This focus addresses utopian visions for cities, urban history, ecological footprint analysis, bioregionalism, transport options, urban form and urban policy, with reference to sustainable futures and the role of custodianship. During the second half of the semester, lectures address the question: what does it mean to be a 'citizen', and what has this got to do with cities and different approaches to urban sustainability? This includes consideration of historical and contemporary configurations of citizenship. Case studies illustrate ways in which new forms of citizenship are produced through struggles over rights to the city and the urban environment. Through the semester a practicals program enables students to develop urban-based research projects.
GEOS3920 Urban Citizenship & Sustainability (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Phil McManus, Dr Kurt Iveson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Distinction average in 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOIL2002, LWSC2002 Prohibitions: GEOS3520 Assessment: One 2hr exam, one 2000w essay, one 2000w group-based prac report. Associated degrees: B A, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
GEOS3920 has the same thematic content as GEOS3520 however with elements taught at an Advanced level
RSEC4132 Environmental Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tihomir Ancev Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week commencing week 1, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: ECON2001 or ECOS2001 or AGEC2103 or AGEC2003 or RSEC2031 Prohibitions: ECON3013, AGEC4035 Assumed knowledge: (ECON2001 or ECOS2001), (ECON2002 or ECOS2002), (AGEC3001or AGEC3101), AGEC2101, AGEC2105 Assessment: 1xreport and presentation from the practical experience in environmental economics (20%), 1x1hr mid-term exam (30%), and 1x2hr final exam (50%) Associated degrees: B Agr Ec, B Com, B Ec, B Ec Soc Sc, B Hort Sc, B Int S, B L W Sc, B Res Ec, B Sc Agr, UG Study Abroad Program.
The unit provides theoretical and empirical background necessary for a resource economist to be able to successfully function when faced with various environmental problems. The unit investigates economic aspects of a range of environmental issues. The studied concepts are exemplified with environmental problems related to agriculture (soil salinity, algal blooms, overgrazing etc.) as well as with environmental problems typical to Australia. The guiding economic themes are: competing uses of the environment / externalities, market failure, the importance of property rights, optimal allocation of pollution abatement, and the processes for making choices relating to non-market goods. Some social issues with environmental impacts are studied through exploration of the problems of population size and distribution, economic growth, and environmental regulation.
Textbooks
Perman, R., Y. Ma, J. McGilvray and M. Common. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics. Pearson, 3rd Ed. 2003