Table 1: Geography

Table 1 lists units of study available to students in the Bachelor of Science and combined degrees. The units are available to students enrolled in other degrees in accordance with their degree resolutions.

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Geography

For a major in Geography, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study comprising:
(i) GEOS3333/3933 or GEOS3053/3953, and
(ii) any of GEOS3520/3920, GEOS3524/3924, GEOS3009/3909, GEOS3014/3914, GEOS3103/3803, ENVI3111/3911 and ENVI3112/3912
Junior units of study
GEOS1001
Earth, Environment and Society
6    N ENSY1001, GEOS1901, GEOL1001, GEOG1001, GEOG1002, GEOL1002, GEOL1902
Semester 1
GEOS1901
Earth, Environment and Society Advanced
6    P An ATAR above 93 is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
N GEOG1002, GEOL1002, ENSY1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1902, GEOS1001, GEOG1001

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
GEOS1002
Introductory Geography
6    N GEOG1001, GEOS1902, GEOG1002
Semester 2
GEOS1902
Introductory Geography (Advanced)
6    P An ATAR equivalent) above 93 is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
N GEOG1002, GEOS1002, GEOG1001

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
Intermediate units of study
GEOS2111
Natural Hazards: a GIS Approach
6    P 24 credit points of Junior Science units of study, including 6 credit points of first year Geosciences units
N GEOS2911, GEOG2411
Semester 1
GEOS2911
Natural Hazards: a GIS Approach Advanced
6    P 24 credit points of Junior Science units of study, including 6 credit points of first year Geosciences units
N GEOS2111, GEOG2411
Semester 1
GEOS2115
Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change
6    A At least one of (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501)
P 48 credit points from Junior Units of Study
N MARS2006, GEOS2915
Semester 1
GEOS2915
Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change (Adv)
6    A (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501)
P Distinction average in 48 credit points from Junior units of study.
N GEOS2115, MARS2006
Semester 1
GEOS2121
Environmental and Resource Management
6    P 24 credit points of Junior units of study, including 6 credit points of Junior Geoscience or ECOP1001 or ECOP1002
N GEOG2421, GEOS2921, GEOL2202
Semester 2
GEOS2921
Environmental & Resource Management Adv
6    P 6 credit points from Level 1 minimum Distinction (Geography, Geology, ECOP1001, ECOP1002, Geophysics)
N GEOL2202, GEOG2421, GEOS2121
Semester 2
GEOS2123
The Geography of Cities and Regions
6    P 24 credit points of Junior Science Units of Study, including first year geosciences or ECOP1001 or ECOP1002
N GEOS2923, GEOG2411
Semester 1
GEOS2923
The Geography of Cities & Regions (Adv)
6    P 24 credit points of Junior units of study, including a distinction in 6 credit points of Junior Geoscience or in ECOP1001 or ECOP1002. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator
N GEOG2411, GEOS2123
Semester 1
Senior core units of study
Students must complete at least one of the following core units of study:
GEOS3053
Southeast Asia Field School
6    P 6 credit points of Intermediate units of study in Geography. Department permission is required for enrolment.
N GEOS3953, GEOG3201

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students must contact the unit coordinator no later than September in the year before taking this unit.
Intensive July
GEOS3953
Southeast Asia Field School (Adv)
6    P 6 credit points of Intermediate units of study in Geography. Department permission required for enrolment.
N GEOS3053

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students must contact the unit coordinator no later than September in the year before taking this unit.
Intensive July
GEOS3333
Geographical Concepts, Skills & Methods
6    A Basic knowledge of ARC GIS software.
P 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOIL2002, LWSC2002.
N GEOS3933
Semester 2
GEOS3933
Geog. Concepts, Skills & Methods (Adv)
6    A Basic knowledge of ARC GIS software.
P Distinction average in 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOIL2002, LWSC2002.
N GEOS3333
Semester 2
Senior elective units of study
GEOS3009
Coastal Environments and Processes
6    P (6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units) and (6 further credit points of Intermediate Geoscience or 6 credit points of Physics or Mathematics or Information Technology or Engineering units) or ((MARS2005 or MARS2905) and (MARS2006 or MARS2906))
N MARS3003, MARS3105, GEOS3909
Semester 1
GEOS3909
Coastal Environments and Processes (Adv)
6    P Distinction average in ((6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience* units) and (6 further credit points of Intermediate Geoscience or 6 credit points of Physics, Mathematics, Information Technology or Engineering units) or ((MARS2005 or MARS2905) and (MARS2006 or MARS2906)))
N MARS3105, GEOS3009, MARS3003


A distinction average in prior Geography or Geology units is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Semester 1
GEOS3014
GIS in Coastal Management
6    P Either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115, GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)].
N MARS3104, GEOS3914
Semester 2
GEOS3914
GIS in Coastal Management (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115 or GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)].
N GEOS3014, MARS3104

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
A distinction average in prior Geography, Geology or Marine Science units of study is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Semester 2
GEOS3103
Environmental and Sedimentary Geology
6    A GEOS1003, GEOS2124
P (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924) and (GEOS2111 or (GEOS2911) or (GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) or (GEOS2113 or GEOS2913); or (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903) and 24 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study with permission of the Head of School.
N GEOS3803
Semester 2
GEOS3803
Environmental & Sedimentary Geology(Adv)
6    A GEOS1003, GEOS2124
P Distinctions in (GEOS2114 or (GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or (GEOS2924); Students who have a credit average for all Geoscience units may enrol in this unit with permission of the Head of School.
N GEOS3103
Semester 2
GEOS3520
Urban Citizenship & Sustainability
6    P 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOILS2002, LWSC2002
N GEOS3920
Semester 1
GEOS3920
Urban Citizenship & Sustainability (Adv)
6    P Distinction average in 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOIL2002, LWSC2002
N GEOS3520
Semester 1
GEOS3524
Global Development and Livelihoods
6    P 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience
N GEOS2112, GEOS3924, GEOS2912
Semester 1
GEOS3924
Global Development and Livelihoods (Adv)
6    P 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including a distinction in 6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience
N GEOS2912, GEOS2112, GEOS3524
Semester 1
ENVI3111
Environmental Law and Ethics
6    P 12 credit points of intermediate units of study
N ENVI3911
Semester 1
ENVI3911
Environmental Law and Ethics (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average across 12 credit points of intermediate units of study
N ENVI3111
Semester 1
ENVI3112
Environmental Assessment
6    P (GEOS2121 or GEOS2921) and 6 additional credit points of intermediate units
N ENVI3912, ENVI3004, ENVI3002
Semester 2
ENVI3912
Environmental Assessment (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average in ((GEOS2121 or GEOS2921) and 6 additional credit points of intermediate units)
N ENVI3112, ENVI3004, ENVI3002
Semester 2

Geography

For a major in Geography, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study comprising:
(i) GEOS3333/3933 or GEOS3053/3953, and
(ii) any of GEOS3520/3920, GEOS3524/3924, GEOS3009/3909, GEOS3014/3914, GEOS3103/3803, ENVI3111/3911 and ENVI3112/3912
Junior units of study
GEOS1001 Earth, Environment and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jody Webster, A/Prof Bill Pritchard, Prof Jonathan Aitchison, Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: ENSY1001, GEOS1901, GEOL1001, GEOG1001, GEOG1002, GEOL1002, GEOL1902 Assessment: Exam (50%), 1500 word essay (20%), practical reports (15%), presentation (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the gateway unit of study for Human Geography, Physical Geography, Environmental Studies and Geology. Its objective is to introduce the big questions relating to the origins and current state of the planet: climate change, environment, landscape formation, and the growth of the human population. During the semester you will be introduced to knowledge, theories and debates about how the world's physical and human systems operate. The first module investigates the system of global environmental change, specifically addressing climate variability and human impacts on the natural environment. The second module presents Earth as an evolving and dynamic planet, investigating how changes take place, the rate at which they occur and how they have the potential to dramatically affect the way we live. Finally, the third module, focuses on human-induced challenges to Earth's future. This part of the unit critically analyses the relationships between people and their environments, with central consideration to debates on population change, resource use and the policy contexts of climate change mitigation and adaptation.
GEOS1901 Earth, Environment and Society Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jody Webster, A/Prof Bill Pritchard, Prof Jonathan Aitchison, Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An ATAR above 93 is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator. Prohibitions: GEOG1002, GEOL1002, ENSY1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1902, GEOS1001, GEOG1001 Assessment: Exam (50%), 1500 word essay (20%), practical reports (15%), presentation (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1001, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.
GEOS1002 Introductory Geography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kurt Iveson, Dr Dan Penny. Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 hour lecture per week and eight 2 hour practicals during semester. Prohibitions: GEOG1001, GEOS1902, GEOG1002 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 word essay, two online quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a geographical perspective on the ways in which people interact with each other and the physical world, focussing on the processes that generate spatial variation and difference. This unit will consider the development and characteristics of natural environments across the globe, and will explore how these environments both constrain, and are influenced by, humans. Therefore, the unit of study will consider the biophysical, political, economic, cultural and urban geographies that shape contemporary global society. Each of these themes will be discussed with reference to key examples (such as Hurricane Katrina, the Earthquake in Haiti/Dominican Republic, the conflict in Darfur, and mega-deltas in the developing world), in order to consider the ways in which the various processes (both physical and human) interact. The unit of study is designed to attract and interest students who wish to pursue geography as a major within their undergraduate degree, but also has relevance to students who wish to consider the way geographers understand the contemporary world.
GEOS1902 Introductory Geography (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kurt Iveson, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 hour lecture per week and 8 2 hour practicals per semester, plus independent group work. Prerequisites: An ATAR equivalent) above 93 is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator. Prohibitions: GEOG1002, GEOS1002, GEOG1001 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 1000 word essay, two online quizzes, one practical report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1002, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.
Intermediate units of study
GEOS2111 Natural Hazards: a GIS Approach

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce, A/Prof Patrice Rey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two hours of lectures, two hours of practicals per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior Science units of study, including 6 credit points of first year Geosciences units Prohibitions: GEOS2911, GEOG2411 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, three reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides an essential framework for understanding the environmental response to short- and long-term geologic, oceanic and atmospheric processes. This Unit of Study introduces students to a variety of natural phenomena that affect society with impact levels ranging from nuisance to disastrous. The discussion of each hazard focuses on: (1) the process mechanics, (2) hazards and risk, and (3) methods for mitigation. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used by scientists, planners, policy-makers and the insurance industry alike to address many issues relating to natural hazards. This Unit of Study will introduce students to the major concepts relating to GIS and provide practical experience in the application of GIS techniques to hazard mapping, risk assessment and mitigation.
GEOS2911 Natural Hazards: a GIS Approach Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce, A/Prof Patrice Rey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two hours of lectures, two hours of practicals per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior Science units of study, including 6 credit points of first year Geosciences units Prohibitions: GEOS2111, GEOG2411 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, three reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS2111 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance to date. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives.
GEOS2115 Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maria Seton, Prof Jonathan Aitchison, A/Prof Tom Hubble, A/Prof Jody Webster Session: Semester 1 Classes: Twenty-five 1 hour lectures, three 1 hour workshops, eight 2 hour practical classes. Prerequisites: 48 credit points from Junior Units of Study Prohibitions: MARS2006, GEOS2915 Assumed knowledge: At least one of (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501) Assessment: Lab reports (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces core concepts about how the formation of ocean basins and their influence on climate govern the development of coasts and continental margins. These concepts provide a framework for understanding the geographic variation of coasts, continental shelves and sediment accumulations in the deep ocean. Ocean-basin evolution is explained in terms of movements within the Earth's interior and how these movements determine the geometry of ocean basins, and their alpine counterparts, which interact with the global circulation of the ocean and atmosphere. This interaction plays a key role in marine sedimentation and controls the environmental conditions responsible for the development of coral reefs and other ecosystems. The Unit of Study systematically outlines how these factors have played out to produce, by gradual change, the coasts we see today, as well as the less familiar deposits hidden beneath the sea and coastal lands. The Unit thereby outlines how knowledge of responses to climate change in the past allow us to predict environmental responses to accelerated climate change occurring now and in the future due to the industrial greenhouse effect, but places these responses into perspective against the geological record. Overall therefore, the Unit aims to provide familiarity with fundamental phenomena central to the study of marine geoscience and environmental impacts, introduced through process-oriented explanations. The Unit of Study is structured around GIS-based practical sessions and problem-based project work, for which lectures provide the theoretical background.
Textbooks
On line reading material provided via Fisher Library
GEOS2915 Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maria Seton, Prof Jonathan Aitchison, A/Prof Tom Hubble, A/Prof Jody Webster Session: Semester 1 Classes: Twenty-five 1 hour lectures, three 1 hour workshops, eight 2 hour practical classes. Prerequisites: Distinction average in 48 credit points from Junior units of study. Prohibitions: GEOS2115, MARS2006 Assumed knowledge: (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501) Assessment: Lab reports (60%), one 2 hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS2115 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance to date. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives.
Textbooks
Online reading materials are provided via Fisher Library.
GEOS2121 Environmental and Resource Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior units of study, including 6 credit points of Junior Geoscience or ECOP1001 or ECOP1002 Prohibitions: GEOG2421, GEOS2921, GEOL2202 Assessment: One exam, one essay, one research report, tutorial attendance (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores interactions between humans and the natural environment. This encompasses cultural constructions of nature and resources, the evolution of environmental thought and the debates surrounding sustainable development. It integrates environmental, economic, cultural and social considerations in respect to natural resource management in Australia and the Asia-Pacific. The unit of study introduces students to the various conceptual tools used by social scientists to approach the contemporary challenges facing environmental and resource management. Students learn about the social, cultural and environmental considerations that must be taken into account when developing and implementing environmental and resource management policies in an increasing congested 'marketplace of ideas'.
GEOS2921 Environmental & Resource Management Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week plus a special GEOS2921 lecture associated with the advanced assessment. Prerequisites: 6 credit points from Level 1 minimum Distinction (Geography, Geology, ECOP1001, ECOP1002, Geophysics) Prohibitions: GEOL2202, GEOG2421, GEOS2121 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one report, essay, tutorial and practical attendance (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Advanced students will receive the same core lecture materials as for GEOS2121 but are required to complete alternative written work.
GEOS2123 The Geography of Cities and Regions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Kurt Iveson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 one hour lectures per week, 12 hours of practical work per semester Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior Science Units of Study, including first year geosciences or ECOP1001 or ECOP1002 Prohibitions: GEOS2923, GEOG2411 Assessment: One 2hr exam, one 2000w fieldwork report, one 1500w prac assignment (100%) Practical field work: 16 hours of Fieldwork Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study reviews the approaches used by Geographers to examine urban and regional areas. Lectures consider how Geographers understand the concepts of 'space', 'place', 'territory' and 'region'. These concepts are then deployed to practical questions about urban and rural development, using examples from both Australia and overseas. Lecture-based delivery of these issues is complemented by field-trips and the use of GIS to analyse and map relevant socio-economic data from the Population Census and other sources.
GEOS2923 The Geography of Cities & Regions (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Kurt Iveson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 one hour lectures per week, 12 hours of practical work per semester Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior units of study, including a distinction in 6 credit points of Junior Geoscience or in ECOP1001 or ECOP1002. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator Prohibitions: GEOG2411, GEOS2123 Assessment: One 2hr exam, one 2000w fieldwork report, one 1500w prac assignment (100%) Practical field work: 16 hours of Fieldwork Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GEOS2923 has the same thematic content as GEOS2123 however with elements taught at an Advanced level.
Senior core units of study
Students must complete at least one of the following core units of study:
GEOS3053 Southeast Asia Field School

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson Session: Intensive July Classes: Five pre-departure lectures during Semester 1 2015, three weeks in-country intensive involving lectures, fieldwork and field-based methods training, readings and small group discussions. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Intermediate units of study in Geography. Department permission is required for enrolment. Prohibitions: GEOS3953, GEOG3201 Assessment: One pre-departure background report, one short field essay, group participation, one consolidation report, one exam. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must contact the unit coordinator no later than September in the year before taking this unit.
The unit of study can be taken only with prior permission from the unit of study coordinator. It constitutes a Field School run over a three-week period in July, prior to the commencement of the second semester. In 2015 the Field School will be held in Indonesia (Java, Sulawesi and Bali). In other years it may be held in mainland Southeast Asia (three of the Mekong countries China, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Viet Nam). The Field School focuses on three main themes; rural social, environmental and economic change; regional economic integration and its local effects; regional environmental change and natural resources governance. The Field School is run in close association with local universities, whose staff and students participate in some components of the course. Places are limited, and students interested in the 2014 Field School should indicate expression of interest to Dr Jeff Neilson by 26th September 2014.
GEOS3953 Southeast Asia Field School (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson Session: Intensive July Classes: Five pre-departure lectures during Semester 1 2014, three weeks in-country intensive involving lectures, fieldwork and field-based methods training, readings and small group discussions. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Intermediate units of study in Geography. Department permission required for enrolment. Prohibitions: GEOS3053 Assessment: One pre-departure project proposal, one short field essay, group participation, one field-based research report, one exam. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must contact the unit coordinator no later than September in the year before taking this unit.
The unit of study can be taken only with prior permission from the unit of study coordinator. It constitutes a Field School run over a three-week period in July, prior to the commencement of the second semester. In 2015 the Field School will be held in Indonesia (Java, Sulawesi and Bali). In other years it may be held in mainland Southeast Asia (three of the Mekong countries China, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Viet Nam). The Field School focuses on three main themes; rural social, environmental and economic change; regional economic integration and its local effects; regional environmental change and natural resources governance. The Field School is run in close association with local universities, whose staff and students participate in some components of the course. Places are limited, and students interested in the 2014 Field School should indicate expression of interest to Dr Jeff Neilson by 26th September 2014.
GEOS3333 Geographical Concepts, Skills & Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 lecture, 2 tutorials per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOIL2002, LWSC2002. Prohibitions: GEOS3933 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of ARC GIS software. Assessment: One 2hr exam, one practical report, one 2000w fieldwork report (100%) Practical field work: 24 hours of fieldwork per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GEOS3333 is designed to be the 'capstone' for a Major in Geography. Its aim is to bring together the core concepts within the discipline; connect these to methodological practices, and further develop the field-based skills associated with geographical research. Reflecting the straddle of the discipline across the natural and social sciences, this unit draws on a wide diversity of material to impart key insights about the essential qualities of 'doing Geography'. This includes (i) a weekly lecture program which addresses three thematic concerns of Geography (human-environment interactions; spatial relations; and politics, policy and practice) using examples from the natural and social science perspectives at global, national and local scales; (ii) a two-hour prac class each week which introduces key methods (relevant to both the natural and social science parts of the discipline) and which leads to a major research proposal exercise; and (iii) 24 hours fieldwork through the semester, which can take the form either of a three-day field trip to rural NSW or three separate day-trips within Sydney. GEOS3333 is one of two compulsory units for the Geography Major (the other is GEOS3053) and is highly recommended for students contemplating Honours in Geography.
GEOS3933 Geog. Concepts, Skills & Methods (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 lecture, 2 tutorials per week Prerequisites: Distinction average in 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOIL2002, LWSC2002. Prohibitions: GEOS3333 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of ARC GIS software. Assessment: One 2hr exam, one practical report, one 2000w fieldwork report (100%) Practical field work: 24 hours of fieldwork per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GEOS3933 has the same thematic content as GEOS3333 however with elements taught at an Advanced level.
Senior elective units of study
GEOS3009 Coastal Environments and Processes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jody Webster, Dr Ana Vila-Concejo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week; weekend excursion. Prerequisites: (6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units) and (6 further credit points of Intermediate Geoscience or 6 credit points of Physics or Mathematics or Information Technology or Engineering units) or ((MARS2005 or MARS2905) and (MARS2006 or MARS2906)) Prohibitions: MARS3003, MARS3105, GEOS3909 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, research reports and an online quiz (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this course is to introduce students to a variety of Coastal Environments and the major physical and chemical processes which control the morphodynamic evolution of these systems. The course offers a unique opportunity of learning the full spectrum of marine sedimentary environments from siliciclastic, temperate, highly urbanised and impacted estuarine ecosytems to carbonate, tropical, pristine and undeveloped/protected coastal and continental margin environments. The course may include field work in temperate environments and at One Tree Island on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The two parts of the course comprise physical processes in siliciclastic (temperate) and carbonate-dominated (tropical) coastal and continental margin environments. The first part of the course covers basic coastal environments and processes in estuarine and open coast environments and focuses on the morphodynamics of those environments, a fieldtrip to an open beach within Sydney is envisaged where students will learn basic skills for beach monitoring. The second part of the course covers the basic morphodynamics and processes impacting carbonate-dominated coastal and continental margin environments. The focus is on carbonate reefal and margin systems and their geologic and biologic responses to past, present and future environmental changes. These systems may also be studied in the field at The University of Sydney One Tree Island Research Station in the GBR and in some practicals Students who are unable participate in the GBR field trip will be given an alternative assignment.
Textbooks
Recommended:
GEOS3909 Coastal Environments and Processes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ana Vila Concejo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, two 3 hour practicals per week, fieldwork. Prerequisites: Distinction average in ((6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience* units) and (6 further credit points of Intermediate Geoscience or 6 credit points of Physics, Mathematics, Information Technology or Engineering units) or ((MARS2005 or MARS2905) and (MARS2006 or MARS2906))) Prohibitions: MARS3105, GEOS3009, MARS3003 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, two 1500 word reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: A distinction average in prior Geography or Geology units is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS3009 but will carry out more challenging projects, practicals, assignments and tutorials.
GEOS3014 GIS in Coastal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115, GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)]. Prohibitions: MARS3104, GEOS3914 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, two project reports, quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Coastal Management is about how scientific knowledge is used to support policy formulation and planning decisions in coastal environments. The course links coastal science to policy and practice in management of estuaries, beaches and the coastal ocean. The principles are exemplified through specific issues, such as coastal erosion, pollution, and impacts of climate-change. The issues are dealt with in terms of how things work in nature, and how the issues are handled through administrative mechanisms. These mechanisms involve planning strategies like Marine Protected Areas and setback limits on civil development in the coastal zone. The coastal environments and processes that are more relevant to coastal management including: rocky coasts; beaches, barriers and dunes; and coral reefs will also be introduced. At a practical level, the link between science and coastal management is given substance through development and use of 'decision-support models'. These models involve geocomputing methods that entail application of simulation models, remotely sensed information, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course therefore includes both principles and experience in use of these methods to address coastal-management issues. (It thus also involves extensive use of computers.) Although the focus is on the coast, the principles and methods have broader relevance to environmental management in particular, and to problem-solving in general. That is, the course has vocational relevance in examining how science can be exploited to the benefit of society and nature conservation.
GEOS3914 GIS in Coastal Management (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce, Dr Ana Vila Concejo Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two hours of lectures, one 3 hour practical per week comprising one 1 hour practical demonstration and one 2 hour practical Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115 or GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)]. Prohibitions: GEOS3014, MARS3104 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, project work, two practical-based project reports, fortnightly progress quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: A distinction average in prior Geography, Geology or Marine Science units of study is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS3014 but will carry out more challenging projects, practicals, assignments and tutorials.
GEOS3103 Environmental and Sedimentary Geology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dan Penny (Coordinator), Dr. Adriana Dutkiewicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical class per week Prerequisites: (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924) and (GEOS2111 or (GEOS2911) or (GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) or (GEOS2113 or GEOS2913); or (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903) and 24 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study with permission of the Head of School. Prohibitions: GEOS3803 Assumed knowledge: GEOS1003, GEOS2124 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical reports and quizes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Sediments and sedimentary rocks cover most of the Earth's surface, record much of the Earth's geological and climatic history and host important resources such as petroleum, coal, water and mineral ores. The aim of this unit is to provide students with the skills required to examine, describe and interpret sediments and sedimentary rocks for a variety of different purposes. Specific foci of the unit will be the identification of the recent or ancient environment in which sedimentary materials were deposited, the environmental controls which produce sedimentary structures, and the processes that control the production, movement and storage of sediment bodies. On completion of this unit students will be familiar with the natural processes that produce and modify sediments across a range of environments at the Earth's surface, including fluvial, aeolian, lacustrine, marginal marine and deep marine environments. The various controls on the sedimentary record such as climate and sea-level change, as well as diagenesis and geochemical cycles will also be discussed. Practical exercises will require students to examine global datasets, and determine the properties and significance of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The course is relevant to students interested in petroleum or mineral exploration, environmental and engineering geology as well as marine geoscience.
Textbooks
Course notes will be available from the Copy Centre and an appropriate set of reference texts will be placed on special reserve in the library.
GEOS3803 Environmental & Sedimentary Geology(Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dan Penny (Coordinator), Dr. Adriana Dutkiewicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical class per week. Prerequisites: Distinctions in (GEOS2114 or (GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or (GEOS2924); Students who have a credit average for all Geoscience units may enrol in this unit with permission of the Head of School. Prohibitions: GEOS3103 Assumed knowledge: GEOS1003, GEOS2124 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical, field reports and quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS3103 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance at the time of enrolment. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives. Specific details for this unit of study will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester.
Textbooks
Course notes will be available from the Copy Centre and appropriate set of reference texts will be placed on special reserve in the library.
GEOS3520 Urban Citizenship & Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Phil McManus, Dr Kurt Iveson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week, six 2 hours practical sessions. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOILS2002, LWSC2002 Prohibitions: GEOS3920 Assessment: One 2hr exam, one 2000w essay, one 2000w group-based prac report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cities are now the predominant home for humanity. More than half of the world's population reside in cities. The contemporary growth of cities, however, is attached to profound political questions about what it means to be urban, and what 'being urban' means for the planet. This Unit of Study provides grounding to these crucial questions. In the first half of the semester, lectures address the question: are cities sustainable? Why or why not? And for whom? This focus addresses utopian visions for cities, urban history, ecological footprint analysis, bioregionalism, transport options, urban form and urban policy, with reference to sustainable futures and the role of custodianship. During the second half of the semester, lectures address the question: what does it mean to be a 'citizen', and what has this got to do with cities and different approaches to urban sustainability? This includes consideration of historical and contemporary configurations of citizenship. Case studies illustrate ways in which new forms of citizenship are produced through struggles over rights to the city and the urban environment. Through the semester a practicals program enables students to develop urban-based research projects.
GEOS3920 Urban Citizenship & Sustainability (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Phil McManus, Dr Kurt Iveson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Distinction average in 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOIL2002, LWSC2002 Prohibitions: GEOS3520 Assessment: One 2hr exam, one 2000w essay, one 2000w group-based prac report. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GEOS3920 has the same thematic content as GEOS3520 however with elements taught at an Advanced level
GEOS3524 Global Development and Livelihoods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson, Dr Yayoi Lagerqvist Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures, 1 tutorial per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience Prohibitions: GEOS2112, GEOS3924, GEOS2912 Assessment: One 2hr exam, one practical report, one 2000w essay, tutorial papers (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides students with grounding in core theories and frameworks used in Geography to account for the social, spatial and environmental unevenness in global development. During the first half of the semester, we focus on questions relating to who are the winners and losers from contemporary patterns of global economic change. This includes the analysis of relevant conceptual approaches to these questions (including comparative advantage, global value chain theory, regionalism, economic governance, development and post-development), plus 'hands-on' examination of the key institutions (such as the WTO and World Bank) and policy approaches that drive these changes. Then, in the second half of the semester, we adopt a livelihoods approach to assess these processes. In general, issues are tailored to themes being played out in Asia-Pacific countries. Students are expected to participate in a variety of practical class exercises throughout the semester. This unit provides a feeder-unit into the Asia-Pacific Field School.
GEOS3924 Global Development and Livelihoods (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures, 1 tutorial per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including a distinction in 6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience Prohibitions: GEOS2912, GEOS2112, GEOS3524 Assessment: One 2hr exam, one practical report, one 2000w essay, tutorial papers (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GEOS3924 has the same thematic content as GEOS3524 however with elements taught at an Advanced level.
ENVI3111 Environmental Law and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of intermediate units of study Prohibitions: ENVI3911 Assessment: Exam (40%) Essays (40%, 20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Shared Teaching Arrangements: This unit of study is co-taught by the School of Geosciences (75%) and the Unit for the History and Philosophy of Science (25%). The unit is divided into two parts: (1) environmental law and governance (weeks 1-9) and (2) environmental ethics (weeks 10-13). Environmental regulation and governance plays an important role in regulating human impacts on the environment. The law and governance part of this unit provides an introduction and overview to environmental regulation. We investigate key environmental issues through an examination of legal policies, legislation and case law at a variety of scales (international, national and state/local). This unit also highlights the ways in which environmental law and governance is increasingly interconnected to other areas of environmental studies. The ethics component helps students develop thoughtful and informed positions on issues in environmental ethics using arguments derived from traditional ethics as well as environmentally specific theories. Ethical conflicts are often inevitable and difficult to resolve but using the resources of philosophical ethics and regular reference to case studies, students can learn to recognize the values and considerations at stake in such conflicts, acknowledge differing viewpoints and defend their own well considered positions.
ENVI3911 Environmental Law and Ethics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across 12 credit points of intermediate units of study Prohibitions: ENVI3111 Assessment: Fieldwork component (40%), essay (20%) and exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Shared Teaching Arrangements: This unit of study is co-taught by the School of Geosciences (75%) and the Unit for the History and Philosophy of Science (25%). The unit is divided into two parts: (1) environmental law and governance (weeks 1-9) and (2) environmental ethics (weeks 10-13). This advanced unit of study will cover the same core lecture material as for ENVI3111, but students will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments based on a fieldtrip activity. The fieldwork will take the form of a Land and Environment Court visit and students will be required to provide a report on environmental decision making as part of this assessment.
ENVI3112 Environmental Assessment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Phil McManus Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2-hour lecture per week and one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (GEOS2121 or GEOS2921) and 6 additional credit points of intermediate units Prohibitions: ENVI3912, ENVI3004, ENVI3002 Assessment: Literature review, individual report, presentation (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on environmental impact assessment as part of environmental planning. It seeks to establish a critical understanding of environmental planning and the tools available to improve environmental outcomes. The unit of study addresses the theory and practice of environmental impact statements (EIS) and environmental impact assessment processes (EIA) from scientific, economic, social and cultural value perspectives. Emphasis is placed on gaining skills in group work and in writing and producing an assessment report, which contains logically ordered and tightly structured argumentation that can stand rigorous scrutiny by political processes, the judiciary, the public and the media.
ENVI3912 Environmental Assessment (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Phil McManus Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2-hour lecture per week and one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average in ((GEOS2121 or GEOS2921) and 6 additional credit points of intermediate units) Prohibitions: ENVI3112, ENVI3004, ENVI3002 Assessment: Essay, individual report, presentation (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This advanced unit of study will cover the same core lecture, tutorial and group practical material as for ENVI3112. The difference in the Advanced unit of study is that students will be required to write a 3000-word essay that is worth 40% of their semester marks, rather than writing a literature review. The essay will explore the more theoretical and conceptual debates within impact assessment.