Table 1: Immunobiology

Table 1 lists units of study available to students in the Bachelor of Science and combined degrees. The units are available to students enrolled in other degrees in accordance with their degree resolutions.

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Immunobiology

For a major in Immunobiology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points comprising:
(i) IMMU3102/3902 Cellular and Molecular Immunology and IMMU3202/3903 Immunology in Human Disease; and
(ii) a minimum of 12 credit points from the following senior elective units of study: BCHM3071/3971, BCHM3081/3981, BCHM3072/3972, BCHM3082/3982, BIOL3018/3918, BIOL3026/3926, CPAT3201, CPAT3202, MICR3011/3911, PHSI3009/3909, PHSI3010/3910, VIRO3001/3901, VIRO3002/3902
Intermediate units of study
IMMU2101
Introductory Immunology
6    P (6 credit points of CHEM1XXX) and (6 credit points of BIOL1XXX and/or MBLG1XXX)
N IMMU2001 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808


This is a prerequisite unit of study for IMMU3102, IMMU3202, IMMU3902 and IMMU3903. The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended.
Semester 1
Senior core units of study
Students must complete both IMMU3102/3902 and IMMU3202/3903.
IMMU3102
Molecular and Cellular Immunology
6    P [(IMMU2101) and (6 credit points of BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MICR2XXX or MBLG2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X]
N IMMU3002 or IMMU3902 or BMED3003


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended. Concurrent study of IMMU3202 Immunology in Human Disease is very strongly recommended.
Semester 2
IMMU3902
Molecular and Cellular Immunology (Advanced)
6    P [(A mark of 75 in IMMU2101) and (6 credit points of BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MICR2XXX or MBLG2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2404) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X)]
N IMMU3002 or IMMU3102 or BMED3003


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended. Concurrent study of IMMU3903 Immunology in Human Disease (Advanced) is very strongly recommended.
Semester 2
IMMU3202
Immunology in Human Disease
6    P [(IMMU2101) and (6 credit points of BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MICR2XXX or MBLG2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X]
N IMMU3002 or IMMU3903 or BMED3003


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended. Concurrent study of IMMU3102 Molecular and Cellular Immunology is very strongly recommended.
Semester 2
IMMU3903
Immunology in Human Disease (Advanced)
6    P [(A mark of 75 in IMMU2101) and (6 credit points of BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MICR2XXX or MBLG2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2404) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X)]
N BMED3003 or IMMU3002 or IMMU3202


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended. Concurrent study of IMMU3902 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (Advanced) is very strongly recommended.
Semester 2
Senior elective units of study
BCHM3071
Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes
6    P [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3001 or BCHM3901 or BCHM3971
Semester 1
BCHM3971
Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points from BMED240X) and (a mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3901 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3071
Semester 1
BCHM3081
Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins
6    P [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3981 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3901
Semester 1
BCHM3981
Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (an average mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3901 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3081
Semester 1
BCHM3072
Human Molecular Cell Biology
6    P [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3972 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3002 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904
Semester 2
BCHM3972
Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (a mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3072 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904 or BCHM3002
Semester 2
BCHM3082
Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry
6    P [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3002 or BCHM3982 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904
Semester 2
BCHM3982
Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (an average mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3082 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3904 or BCHM3002
Semester 2
BIOL3018
Gene Technology and Genomics
6    P (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6 credit points from (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BIOL2XXX)
N BIOL3918
Semester 1
BIOL3918
Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv)
6    P An average mark of 75 in (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and (6 credit points from MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BIOL2XXX).
N BIOL3018
Semester 1
BIOL3026
Developmental Genetics
6    P (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6 credit points from (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BIOL2XXX)
N BIOL3926 or BIOL3929
Semester 2
BIOL3926
Developmental Genetics (Advanced)
6    P An average mark of 75 in (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and (6 credit points from MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BIOL2XXX).
N BIOL3929 or BIOL3026
Semester 2
CPAT3201
Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1
6    A Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites
P (12 credit points of ANAT2XXX or BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MBLG2XXX or MICR2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX) OR ( BMED2401 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X)
C CPAT3202
Semester 2
CPAT3202
Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2
6    A Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites
P CPAT3201 AND (12 credit points of ANAT2XXX or BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MBLG2XXX or MICR2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX) OR ( BMED2401 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X)
C CPAT3201
Semester 2
MICR3011
Microbes in Infection
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp from BMED240X] OR [GENE2002 and 6cp from MICR2X22]
N MICR3001 or MICR3911 or MICR3901
Semester 1
MICR3911
Microbes in Infection (Advanced)
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED240X and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2404] OR [6cp from (GENE2002, MICR2X22) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (GENE2002, MICR2X22)]
N MICR3001 or MICR3011 or MICR3901
Semester 1
PHSI3009
Frontiers in Cellular Physiology
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X]
N PHSI3905, PHSI3906, PHSI3005, PHSI3006, PHSI3909


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3909
Frontiers in Cellular Physiology (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in (6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X)]
N PHSI3009, PHSI3005, PHSI3905, PHSI3006, PHSI3906


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3010
Reproduction, Development and Disease
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X]
N PHSI3905, PHSI3906, PHSI3005, PHSI3006, PHSI3910


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3910
Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv
6    P [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X]
N PHSI3010, PHSI3005, PHSI3905, PHSI3006, PHSI3906


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
VIRO3001
Virology
6    A Intermediate Microbiology
P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from (MICR2XXX, BCHM2XXX, BIOL2XXX, IMMU2XXX, PCOL2XXX, PHSI2XXX, GENE2XXX)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp from BMED240X] OR [GENE2002 and MICR2024]
N VIRO3901


Students are very strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902.
Semester 1
VIRO3901
Virology (Advanced)
6    A Intermediate Microbiology
P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (MICR2XXX, BCHM2XXX, BIOL2XXX, IMMU2XXX, PCOL2XXX, PHSI2XXX, GENE2XXX)] OR [BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED240X and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from BMED2404] OR [GENE2002 and MICR2024 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (GENE2002, MICR2024)]
N VIRO3001


Students are very strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902.
Semester 1
VIRO3002
Medical and Applied Virology
6    A Intermediate microbiology, immunology, molecular biology and genetics.
P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from (MICR2XXX, BCHM2XXX, BIOL2XXX, IMMU2XXX, PCOL2XXX, PHSI2XXX, GENE2XXX)] OR [ BMED2401 and BMED2404 and (6cp from BMED240X)] OR [GENE2002 and MICR2024]
N VIRO3902


Students are strongly encouraged to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002.
Semester 2
VIRO3902
Medical and Applied Virology (Advanced)
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (MICR2XXX, BCHM2XXX, BIOL2XXX, IMMU2XXX, PCOL2XXX, PHSI2XXX or GENE2XXX)] OR [ BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 or above in BMED2404) and (6cp from BMED240X)]
N VIRO3002


Students are strongly encouraged to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3902.
Semester 2

Immunobiology

For a major in Immunobiology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points comprising:
(i) IMMU3102/3902 Cellular and Molecular Immunology and IMMU3202/3903 Immunology in Human Disease; and
(ii) a minimum of 12 credit points from the following senior elective units of study: BCHM3071/3971, BCHM3081/3981, BCHM3072/3972, BCHM3082/3982, BIOL3018/3918, BIOL3026/3926, CPAT3201, CPAT3202, MICR3011/3911, PHSI3009/3909, PHSI3010/3910, VIRO3001/3901, VIRO3002/3902
Intermediate units of study
IMMU2101 Introductory Immunology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Scott Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, one 2-3 hour tutorial or practical per week. Prerequisites: (6 credit points of CHEM1XXX) and (6 credit points of BIOL1XXX and/or MBLG1XXX) Prohibitions: IMMU2001 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: Progressive assessment: includes written, practical, oral and online based assessments (50%); Formal assessment: one 2 hour examination (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a prerequisite unit of study for IMMU3102, IMMU3202, IMMU3902 and IMMU3903. The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended.
Our immune system not only protects us from viruses, bacteria, and parasites, it can prevent the growth of tumours. Sometimes our immune system can be the cause of diseases like multiple sclerosis, Type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. If you are interested in studying how our immune system works to keep us alive, then Introductory Immunology is for you. This unit of study will provide an overview of the immune system and the essential features of immune responses. You will be treated to a lecture course delivered by cutting edge immunologists that begins with a study of immunology as a basic research science. This includes an introduction to the nature of the cells and molecules involved in the immune response. We build on this foundation by introducing the immunological principles underlying the eradication of infectious diseases, successful vaccination strategies, organ transplantation, combatting autoimmune diseases and treating cancer. The integrated tutorials will build on the lecture material as well as provide you with instructions on how to successfully locate and critically analyse scientific literature. The practical sessions will further illustrate particular concepts introduced in the lecture program and provide you with valuable exposure to a variety of very important immunological techniques.
Textbooks
Abul K Abbas, Andrew H Lichtman & Shiv Pillai. Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of the Immune System. 5th Ed. 2016
Senior core units of study
Students must complete both IMMU3102/3902 and IMMU3202/3903.
IMMU3102 Molecular and Cellular Immunology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Carl Feng Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one tutorial and one 4-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: [(IMMU2101) and (6 credit points of BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MICR2XXX or MBLG2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X] Prohibitions: IMMU3002 or IMMU3902 or BMED3003 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended. Concurrent study of IMMU3202 Immunology in Human Disease is very strongly recommended.
This study unit builds on the series of lectures that outlined the general properties of the immune system, effector lymphocytes and their functions, delivered in the core courses, IMMU2101 - Introductory Immunology and BMED2404 - Microbes, Infection and Immunity (formerly IMMU2001 and BMED2807). In this unit the molecular and cellular aspects of the immune system are investigated in detail. We emphasise fundamental concepts to provide a scientific basis for studies of the coordinated and regulated immune responses that lead to elimination of infectious organisms. Guest lectures from research scientists eminent in particular branches of immunological research are a special feature of the course. These provide challenging information from the forefront of research that will enable the student to become aware of the many components that come under the broad heading 'Immunology'. Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week, for the duration of the course. This unit directly complements the unit 'Immunology in Human Disease IMMU3202' and students are very strongly advised to undertake these study units concurrently.
Textbooks
Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier.
IMMU3902 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Carl Feng and A/Prof Scott Byrne Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 lectures, 1 special seminar/tutorial (2 hours), 1 practical (4 hours) every 2 weeks. Prerequisites: [(A mark of 75 in IMMU2101) and (6 credit points of BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MICR2XXX or MBLG2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2404) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X)] Prohibitions: IMMU3002 or IMMU3102 or BMED3003 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended. Concurrent study of IMMU3903 Immunology in Human Disease (Advanced) is very strongly recommended.
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Introductory Immunology (IMMU2101). Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as students in IMMU3102 but carry out advanced level practical work and a series of specialized seminar based tutorial classes.
Textbooks
Textbooks Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier.
IMMU3202 Immunology in Human Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Allison Abendroth Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one tutorial and one 4 hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: [(IMMU2101) and (6 credit points of BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MICR2XXX or MBLG2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X] Prohibitions: IMMU3002 or IMMU3903 or BMED3003 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended. Concurrent study of IMMU3102 Molecular and Cellular Immunology is very strongly recommended.
This study unit builds on the series of lectures that outlined the general properties of the immune system, effector lymphocytes and their functions, delivered in the core courses, IMMU2101 - Introductory Immunology and BMED2404 - Microbes, Infection and Immunity (formerly IMMU2001 and BMED2807). We emphasise fundamental concepts to provide a scientific basis for studies in clinical immunology; dysfunctions of the immune system e.g. autoimmune disease, immunodeficiencies, and allergy, and immunity in terms of host - pathogen interactions. This unit has a strong focus on significant clinical problems in immunology and the scientific background to these problems. The unit includes lectures from research scientists and clinicians covering areas such as allergy, immunodeficiency, autoimmune disease and transplantation. This course provides challenging information from the forefront of clinical immunology and helps the student develop an understanding of immune responses in human health and disease. Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week, for the duration of the course. This unit directly complements the unit 'Molecular and Cellular Immunology IMMU3102' and students are very strongly advised to undertake these study units concurrently.
Textbooks
Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier
IMMU3903 Immunology in Human Disease (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Allison Abendroth and A/Prof Scott Byrne Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 lectures,1 seminar/tutorial (2 hours) and1 practical (4 hours) every 2 weeks. Prerequisites: [(A mark of 75 in IMMU2101) and (6 credit points of BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MICR2XXX or MBLG2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2404) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X)] Prohibitions: BMED3003 or IMMU3002 or IMMU3202 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended. Concurrent study of IMMU3902 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (Advanced) is very strongly recommended.
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Introductory Immunology (IMMU2101). Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as students in IMMU3202 but carry out advanced level practical work and a series of specialized seminar based tutorial classes.
Textbooks
Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier
Senior elective units of study
BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell. Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3001 or BCHM3901 or BCHM3971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones & Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell. Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points from BMED240X) and (a mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3901 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3071. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in gene expression and manipulation will be covered.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones & Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Joel Mackay Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3981 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3901 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Joel Mackay Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (an average mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3901 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3081 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3081. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in protein biochemistry will be covered.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3072 Human Molecular Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3972 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3002 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3972 Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (a mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3072 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904 or BCHM3002 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3072. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in modern molecular cell biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3002 or BCHM3982 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with molecular biology methods and studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry.
BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (an average mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3082 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3904 or BCHM3002 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with new methods, including magnetic resonance techniques and molecular biology methods, as well as studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry. Qualified students will attend some lectures/practical classes in common with BCHM3082 and some separate lectures/ practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in metabolic biochemistry will be covered.
BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6 credit points from (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BIOL2XXX) Prohibitions: BIOL3918 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the regulation, impact and implications of genetic engineering and genomics. Topics include biological sequence data and databases, comparative genomics, the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, and the genetic engineering of animals and plants. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.
BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 in (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and (6 credit points from MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BIOL2XXX). Prohibitions: BIOL3018 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: Twenty-four 1 hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6 credit points from (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BIOL2XXX) Prohibitions: BIOL3926 or BIOL3929 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Developmental genetics discusses major concepts and our current understanding of developmental biology with an emphasis on molecular genetics. The developmental genetics of animal and plant systems will be investigated, along with approaches used to determine gene function in relation to development of complex multicellular organisms. Topics include the features and resources for model organisms; the generation of mutants for forward and reverse genetics; the application of mutants to the study gene function and gene networks; spatial and temporal gene expression in pattern formation; quantitative trait loci analysis; utility of genome wide association studies; epigenetics in relation to inheritance; genome information in the study of human genetics. Reference will be made to the use of modern techniques in developmental biology such as transgenics, recombinant DNA technology, tissue-specific expression analysis. Various methods of genetic mapping will be covered. Practical work complements the theoretical aspects of the course and develops important skills in genetics.
BIOL3926 Developmental Genetics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: Twenty-four 1 hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 in (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and (6 credit points from MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BIOL2XXX). Prohibitions: BIOL3929 or BIOL3026 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components to BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year. Some assessment will be in an alternative format to components of BIOL3026.
CPAT3201 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour research tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (12 credit points of ANAT2XXX or BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MBLG2XXX or MICR2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX) OR ( BMED2401 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) Corequisites: CPAT3202 Assumed knowledge: Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), one major research essay (1500w) (20%), two 0.5-hour in-semester exams (20%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1 unit of study modules will provide a theoretical background to the scientific basis of the pathogenesis of disease. Areas covered in theoretical modules include: tissue responses to exogenous factors, adaptive responses to foreign agents, cardiovascular/pulmonary/gut responses to disease, forensic science, neuropathology and cancer. The aims of the course are: - To give students an overall understanding of the fundamental biological mechanisms governing disease pathogenesis in human beings. - To introduce to students basic concepts of the pathogenesis, natural history and complications of common human diseases. - To demonstrate and exemplify differences between normality and disease. - To explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes. Together with CPAT3202, the unit of study would be appropriate for those who intend to proceed to Honours research, to postgraduate studies such as Medicine or to careers in biomedical areas such as hospital science. Enquires should be directed to anthea.matsimanis@sydney.edu.au
Textbooks
Kumar, Abbas & Aster. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th edition. Saunders. 2012.
CPAT3202 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 2 Classes: Practical Module Prerequisites: CPAT3201 AND (12 credit points of ANAT2XXX or BCHM2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MBLG2XXX or MICR2XXX or PCOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX) OR ( BMED2401 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) Corequisites: CPAT3201 Assumed knowledge: Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), Museum Practical Reports (40%). Practical field work: One 2-hour microscopic practical and one 2-hour museum practical per week. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2 unit of study modules will provide a practical background to the scientific basis of the pathogenesis of disease. Areas covered in practical modules include disease specimen evaluation on a macroscopic and microscopic basis. The aims of the course are: - To enable students to gain an understanding of how different organ systems react to injury and to apply basic concepts of disease processes. - To equip students with skills appropriate for careers in the biomedical sciences and for further training in research or professional degrees. At the end of the course students will: - Have acquired practical skills in the use of a light microscope. - Have an understanding of basic investigative techniques for disease detection in pathology. - Be able to evaluate diseased tissue at the macroscopic and microscopic level. - Have the ability to describe, synthesise and present information on disease pathogenesis. - Transfer problem-solving skills to novel situations related to disease pathogenesis. This unit of study would be appropriate for those who intend to proceed to Honours research, to postgraduate studies such as Medicine or to careers in biomedical areas such as hospital science. Enquiries should be directed to anthea.matsimanis@sydney.edu.au.
Textbooks
Kumar, Abbas & Aster. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th edition. Saunders. 2012.
MICR3011 Microbes in Infection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Helen Agus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, eight 3-hour practical sessions and three 2-hour clinical tutorials per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp from BMED240X] OR [GENE2002 and 6cp from MICR2X22] Prohibitions: MICR3001 or MICR3911 or MICR3901 Assessment: Theory: One 2-hour exam (60%) and formative assessment; In-semester: presentations, discussion facilitation, quiz, prac assessment (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to further develop an interest in, and understanding of, medical microbiology from the introduction in Intermediate Microbiology. Through an examination of microbial structure, virulence, body defences and pathogenesis, the process of acquisition and establishment of disease is covered. The unit is divided into three themes: 1. Clinical Microbiology: host defences, infections, virulence mechanisms; 2. Public health microbiology: epidemiology, international public health, transmission, water and food borne outbreaks; 3. Emerging and re-emerging diseases: the impact of societal change with respect to triggering new diseases and causing the re-emergence of past problems, which are illustrated using case studies. The practical component is designed to enhance students' practical skills and to complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Clinical tutorial sessions underpin and investigate the application of the material covered in the practical classes.
Textbooks
Murray PR et al. Medical Microbiology. 7th edition. Mosby. 2013.
MICR3911 Microbes in Infection (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Helen Agus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week including six 1-hour tutorials, eight 3-hour practical sessions and three 2-hour clinical tutorials per semester. Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED240X and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2404] OR [6cp from (GENE2002, MICR2X22) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (GENE2002, MICR2X22)] Prohibitions: MICR3001 or MICR3011 or MICR3901 Assessment: Theory: One 2-hour exam (60%), formative assessment; Practical assessment: presentations, discussion facilitation, quiz, prac assessment (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Intermediate Microbiology. This unit is designed to further develop an interest in, and understanding of, medical microbiology from the introduction in Intermediate Microbiology. Through an examination of microbial structure, virulence, body defences and pathogenesis, the process of acquisition and establishment of disease is covered. The unit is divided into three themes: 1. Clinical Microbiology: host defences, infections, virulence mechanisms; 2. Public health microbiology: epidemiology, international public health, transmission, water and food borne outbreaks; 3. Emerging and re-emerging diseases: the impact of societal change with respect to triggering new diseases and causing the re-emergence of past problems, which are illustrated using case studies. The unique aspect of this advanced unit that differentiates it from the mainstream unit is six tutorial style sessions that replace six mainstream lectures in the theme 'Emerging and re-emerging diseases'. These dedicated research-led interactive advanced sessions support self-directed learning and involve discussion around specific topics that will vary from year to year. Nominated research papers and reviews in the topic area will be explored with supported discussion of the relevance to and impact of the work on current thinking around emergence of microbial disease. The focus will be on microbial change that lies critically at the centre of understanding the reasons for the emergence of new diseases and challenges in an era of significant scientific ability to diagnose and treat infection. The practical component is identical to the mainstream unit and is designed to enhance students' practical skills and to complement the lectures. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Clinical tutorial sessions underpin and investigate the application of the material covered in the practical classes.
Textbooks
Murray PR.et al. Medical Microbiology. 7th ed., Mosby, 2013
PHSI3009 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Anuwat Dinudom Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr/ week lectures and 6 x 2 hr large class tutorials (PBL) per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X] Prohibitions: PHSI3905, PHSI3906, PHSI3005, PHSI3006, PHSI3909 Assessment: four in-class quizzes, one mid-semester exam, one 2hr final exam, two presentations for problem-based learning and 1 practical class report Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Problem-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techniques for investigating cell signalling and the biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for a science graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3909 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Anuwat Dinudom Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr/ week lectures and 3 x 2 hrs large class tutorials (PBL) per semester Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in (6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X)] Prohibitions: PHSI3009, PHSI3005, PHSI3905, PHSI3006, PHSI3906 Assessment: four in-class quizzes, one mid-semester exam, one 2hr final exam, one presentations for problem-based learning and one Advanced research report Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Problem-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techiques for investigating cell signalling and biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science a graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3010 Reproduction, Development and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Fraser Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 4 x 1 hr large class tutorials per semester, 12 x 1hr tutorials (weeks 3-6 and 7-10 only) Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X] Prohibitions: PHSI3905, PHSI3906, PHSI3005, PHSI3006, PHSI3910 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Reprogramming and tissue regeneration will also feature in the lecture content. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and regeneration. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating sperm function, embryogenesis and stem cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3910 Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Fraser Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 4 x 1 hr large class tutorials per semester, 12 x 1hr tutorials (weeks 3-6 and 7-10 only) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X] Prohibitions: PHSI3010, PHSI3005, PHSI3905, PHSI3006, PHSI3906 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Reprogramming and tissue regeneration will also feature in the lecture content. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and regeneration. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating sperm function, embryogenesis and stem cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
VIRO3001 Virology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Newsome Session: Semester 1 Classes: 26 x 1-hour lectures, 7 x 4-hour practical classes, 1 x 2-hour tutorial Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from (MICR2XXX, BCHM2XXX, BIOL2XXX, IMMU2XXX, PCOL2XXX, PHSI2XXX, GENE2XXX)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and 6cp from BMED240X] OR [GENE2002 and MICR2024] Prohibitions: VIRO3901 Assumed knowledge: Intermediate Microbiology Assessment: Pre-class assessment for practical classes: (5 x 1%), continuous assessment for practical classes: (3 x 2%), project assessment for practical classes: (7%), presentation on virology-themed research literature: (7%), theory of practical exam: (15%) (30 minutes), theory exam (60%) (120 minutes). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students are very strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902.
Viruses are some of the simplest biological machinery known yet they are also the etiological agents for some of the most important human diseases. New technologies that have revolutionised the discovery of viruses are also revealing a hitherto unappreciated abundance and diversity in the ecosphere, and a wider role in human health and disease. Developing new gene technologies have enabled the use of viruses as therapeutic agents, in novel vaccine approaches, gene delivery and in the treatment of cancer. This unit of study is designed to introduce students who have a basic understanding of molecular biology to the rapidly evolving field of virology. Viral infection in plant and animal cells and bacteria is covered by an examination of virus structure, genomes, gene expression and replication. Building upon these foundations, this unit progresses to examine host-virus interactions, pathogenesis, cell injury, the immune response and the prevention and control of infection and outbreaks. The structure and replication of sub-viral agents: viroids and prions, and their role in disease are also covered. The practical component provides hands-on experience in current diagnostic and research techniques such as molecular biology, cell culture, serological techniques, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses and is designed to enhance the students' practical skills and complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Tutorials cover a range of topical issues and provide a forum for students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills. The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Microbiology within the School of Molecular Bioscience with the involvement of the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
VIRO3901 Virology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Newsome Session: Semester 1 Classes: 29 x 1-hour lectures, 7 x 4-hour practical classes, 4 x 1-hour tutorials Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (MICR2XXX, BCHM2XXX, BIOL2XXX, IMMU2XXX, PCOL2XXX, PHSI2XXX, GENE2XXX)] OR [BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED240X and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from BMED2404] OR [GENE2002 and MICR2024 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (GENE2002, MICR2024)] Prohibitions: VIRO3001 Assumed knowledge: Intermediate Microbiology Assessment: Pre-class assessment for practical classes: (5 x 1%), continuous assessment for practical classes: (3 x 2%), project assessment for practical classes: (7%), individual presentation on virology-themed research literature: (7%), theory of practical exam: (15%) (30 minutes), theory exam: (60%) (120 minutes) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students are very strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902.
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Intermediate Microbiology and is based on VIRO3001 with additional lectures related to the research interests in the Discipline. Consequently, the unit of study content may change from year to year. Viruses are some of the simplest biological machinery known yet they are also the etiological agents for some of the most important human diseases. New technologies that have revolutionised the discovery of viruses are also revealing a hitherto unappreciated abundance and diversity in the ecosphere, and a wider role in human health and disease. Developing new gene technologies have enabled the use of viruses as therapeutic agents, in novle vaccine approaches, gene delivery and in the treatment of cancer. This unit of study is designed to introduce students who have a basic understanding of molecular biology to the rapidly evolving field of virology. Viral infection in plant and animal cells and bacteria is covered by an examination of virus structure, genomes, gene expression and replication. Building upon these foundations, this unit progresses to examine host-virus interactions, pathogenesis, cell injury, the immune response and the prevention and control of infection and outbreaks. The structure and replication of sub-viral agents: viroids and prions, and their role in disease are also covered. The practical component provides hands-on experience in current diagnostic and research techniques such as molecular biology, cell culture, serological techniques, immunofluroescence and immunoblot analyses and is designed to enhance the students' practical skills and complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Advanced lectures cover cutting-edge research in the field of virology in small group discussions and presentations that provide a forum for students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills. The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Microbiology within the School of Molecular Bioscience with the involvement of the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
VIRO3002 Medical and Applied Virology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Barry Slobedman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 4-hour practical session per week. Practical session slots are also used for oral presentations. Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from (MICR2XXX, BCHM2XXX, BIOL2XXX, IMMU2XXX, PCOL2XXX, PHSI2XXX, GENE2XXX)] OR [ BMED2401 and BMED2404 and (6cp from BMED240X)] OR [GENE2002 and MICR2024] Prohibitions: VIRO3902 Assumed knowledge: Intermediate microbiology, immunology, molecular biology and genetics. Assessment: One 2-hour exam covering lecture material, one 2-hour theory of practical exam, written assignment and oral presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students are strongly encouraged to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002.
This unit of study explores diseases in human caused by viruses, with focus on the way viruses infect individual patients and spread in the community, and how virus infections are diagnosed, treated and/or prevented. Host/Virus interactions will also be described with a focus on the viral mechanisms that have evolved to combat and/or evade host defence systems. These features will be used to explain the symptoms, spread and control of the most medically important viruses that cause serious disease in humans . The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School with the involvement of associated clinical and research experts who will contribute lectures on their own special interests and with contributions from the Discipline of Microbiology. In the practical classes students will have the opportunity to develop their skills in performing methods currently used in diagnostic and research laboratories such as molecular analysis of viral genomes, immunofluorescent staining of viral antigens, cell culture and the culture of viruses.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
VIRO3902 Medical and Applied Virology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Barry Slobedman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 4 hour practical session per week (as per VIRO3002), and interactive 2-hour tutorials (approx 6 in total, including for oral presentations) Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (MICR2XXX, BCHM2XXX, BIOL2XXX, IMMU2XXX, PCOL2XXX, PHSI2XXX or GENE2XXX)] OR [ BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 or above in BMED2404) and (6cp from BMED240X)] Prohibitions: VIRO3002 Assessment: One 2-hour exam covering lecture material, one 2-hour theory of practical exam, written assignment and oral presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students are strongly encouraged to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3902.
This unit is based on the VIRO3002 course with inclusion of tutorials, including with leading research medical virologists, enabling students to gain additional experience with cutting edge virology research. The content of this unit may change from year to year based on research interests within the department.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.