Table 1: Marine Science

Table 1 lists units of study available to students in the Bachelor of Science and combined degrees. The units are available to students enrolled in other degrees in accordance with their degree resolutions.

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Marine Science

For a major in Marine Science, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points of senior units listed below. This must include at least 6 credit points of GEOS3XXX, and BIOL3013/3913 Marine Biology as a compulsory core unit of study.
The Intermediate units listed below provide recommended pathways to the senior units in the Marine Science major.
Intermediate units of study
BIOL2024
Ecology and Conservation
6    A BIOL1002 or BIOL1902
P 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901).
N BIOL2924
Semester 2
BIOL2924
Ecology and Conservation (Advanced)
6    A BIOL1002 or BIOL1902
P Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator.
N BIOL2024
Semester 2
GEOS2115
Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change
6    A At least one of (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501)
P 48 credit points from Junior Units of Study
N MARS2006, GEOS2915
Semester 1
GEOS2915
Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change (Adv)
6    A (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501)
P Distinction average in 48 credit points from Junior units of study.
N GEOS2115, MARS2006
Semester 1
Senior units of study
BIOL3007
Ecology
6    P 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972).
N BIOL3907
Semester 2
BIOL3907
Ecology (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972).
N BIOL3007
Semester 2
BIOL3008
Marine Field Ecology
6    P 12cp Intermediate BIOL; or 6cp Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972).
N BIOL2028, BIOL3908, BIOL2928


This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. The unit is only available in ODD years (2015, 2017Â…) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years.
Intensive July
BIOL3908
Marine Field Ecology (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average in either 12cp Intermediate BIOL; or 6cp Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972).
N BIOL2028, BIOL3008, BIOL2928


This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. The unit is only available in ODD years (2015, 2017Â…) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years.
Intensive July
BIOL3013
Marine Biology
6    P 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)
N BIOL3913
Semester 2
BIOL3913
Marine Biology (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)
N BIOL3013
Semester 2
BIOL3016
Coral Reef Biology

This unit of study is not available in 2015

6    P 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972).
N BIOL2020, NTMP3001, BIOL2920, BIOL3916

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit of study is only available in EVEN numbered years only (e.g. 2014, 2016...), but students are offered alternative Senior field units in ODD numbered years.
Intensive July
BIOL3916
Coral Reef Biology (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2015

6    P Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972).
N BIOL2920, BIOL2020, BIOL3016, NTMP3001

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit of study is only available in EVEN numbered years only (e.g. 2014, 2016...), but students are offered alternative Senior field units in ODD numbered years.
Intensive July
BIOL3045
Animal Ecological Physiology
6    P 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972).
N BIOL3945, BIOL3912, BIOL3911, BIOL3012, BIOL3011
Semester 1
BIOL3945
Animal Ecological Physiology (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average across either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972).
N BIOL3912, BIOL3012, BIOL3045, BIOL3011, BIOL3911
Semester 1
BIOL3046
Animal Behaviour
6    P 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972).
N BIOL3925, BIOL3025, BIOL3946

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
BIOL3946
Animal Behaviour (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average across either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972).
N BIOL3025, BIOL3046, BIOL3925

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
GEOS3009
Coastal Environments and Processes
6    P (6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units) and (6 further credit points of Intermediate Geoscience or 6 credit points of Physics or Mathematics or Information Technology or Engineering units) or ((MARS2005 or MARS2905) and (MARS2006 or MARS2906))
N MARS3003, MARS3105, GEOS3909
Semester 1
GEOS3909
Coastal Environments and Processes (Adv)
6    P Distinction average in ((6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience* units) and (6 further credit points of Intermediate Geoscience or 6 credit points of Physics, Mathematics, Information Technology or Engineering units) or ((MARS2005 or MARS2905) and (MARS2006 or MARS2906)))
N MARS3105, GEOS3009, MARS3003


A distinction average in prior Geography or Geology units is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Semester 1
GEOS3014
GIS in Coastal Management
6    P Either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115, GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)].
N MARS3104, GEOS3914
Semester 2
GEOS3914
GIS in Coastal Management (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115 or GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)].
N GEOS3014, MARS3104

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
A distinction average in prior Geography, Geology or Marine Science units of study is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Semester 2
GEOS3103
Environmental and Sedimentary Geology
6    A GEOS1003, GEOS2124
P (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924) and (GEOS2111 or (GEOS2911) or (GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) or (GEOS2113 or GEOS2913); or (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903) and 24 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study with permission of the Head of School.
N GEOS3803
Semester 2
GEOS3803
Environmental & Sedimentary Geology(Adv)
6    A GEOS1003, GEOS2124
P Distinctions in (GEOS2114 or (GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or (GEOS2924); Students who have a credit average for all Geoscience units may enrol in this unit with permission of the Head of School.
N GEOS3103
Semester 2
GEOS3104
Geophysical Methods
6    P 24 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study or ((GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924))
N GEOS3906, GEOS3804, GEOS3917, GEOS3003, GEOS3004, GEOS3006, GEOS3916, GEOS3903, GEOS3017, GEOS3016
Semester 2
GEOS3804
Geophysical Methods (Advanced)
6    P Distinction in GEOS2114 or GEOS2914 and GEOS2124 or GEOS2924; Students who have a credit average for all Geoscience units may enrol in this unit with the permission of the Head of School
N GEOS3006, GEOS3104, GEOS3016, GEOS3917, GEOS3903, GEOS3017, GEOS3916, GEOS3003, GEOS3906
Semester 2

Note: BIOL3016/3916 runs in EVEN years only. It is not offered in 2015.

Marine Science

For a major in Marine Science, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points of senior units listed below. This must include at least 6 credit points of GEOS3XXX, and BIOL3013/3913 Marine Biology as a compulsory core unit of study.
The Intermediate units listed below provide recommended pathways to the senior units in the Marine Science major.
Intermediate units of study
BIOL2024 Ecology and Conservation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). Prohibitions: BIOL2924 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the ecological principles driving the major ecosystems of the world and ecological processes behind the world's major conservation issues. It aims to develop in students the core foundations for an understanding of Ecology and its application in conservation. Lectures will focus on the ecology of the major terrestrial and marine biomes of the world. Application of ecological theory and methods to practical conservation problems will be integrated throughout the unit of study. Practical sessions will provide hands-on experience in ecological sampling and data handling to understand the ecology of marine and terrestrial environments, as well as ecological simulations to understand processes. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 3rd edition (2008). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
BIOL2924 Ecology and Conservation (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator. Prohibitions: BIOL2024 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content of BIOL2924 will be based on BIOL2024 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 3rd edition (2008). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
GEOS2115 Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maria Seton, Prof Jonathan Aitchison, A/Prof Tom Hubble, A/Prof Jody Webster Session: Semester 1 Classes: Twenty-five 1 hour lectures, three 1 hour workshops, eight 2 hour practical classes. Prerequisites: 48 credit points from Junior Units of Study Prohibitions: MARS2006, GEOS2915 Assumed knowledge: At least one of (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501) Assessment: Lab reports (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces core concepts about how the formation of ocean basins and their influence on climate govern the development of coasts and continental margins. These concepts provide a framework for understanding the geographic variation of coasts, continental shelves and sediment accumulations in the deep ocean. Ocean-basin evolution is explained in terms of movements within the Earth's interior and how these movements determine the geometry of ocean basins, and their alpine counterparts, which interact with the global circulation of the ocean and atmosphere. This interaction plays a key role in marine sedimentation and controls the environmental conditions responsible for the development of coral reefs and other ecosystems. The Unit of Study systematically outlines how these factors have played out to produce, by gradual change, the coasts we see today, as well as the less familiar deposits hidden beneath the sea and coastal lands. The Unit thereby outlines how knowledge of responses to climate change in the past allow us to predict environmental responses to accelerated climate change occurring now and in the future due to the industrial greenhouse effect, but places these responses into perspective against the geological record. Overall therefore, the Unit aims to provide familiarity with fundamental phenomena central to the study of marine geoscience and environmental impacts, introduced through process-oriented explanations. The Unit of Study is structured around GIS-based practical sessions and problem-based project work, for which lectures provide the theoretical background.
Textbooks
On line reading material provided via Fisher Library
GEOS2915 Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maria Seton, Prof Jonathan Aitchison, A/Prof Tom Hubble, A/Prof Jody Webster Session: Semester 1 Classes: Twenty-five 1 hour lectures, three 1 hour workshops, eight 2 hour practical classes. Prerequisites: Distinction average in 48 credit points from Junior units of study. Prohibitions: GEOS2115, MARS2006 Assumed knowledge: (GEOG1001, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOS1003, GEOS1903, ENVI1002, GEOL1902, GEOL1501) Assessment: Lab reports (60%), one 2 hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS2115 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance to date. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives.
Textbooks
Online reading materials are provided via Fisher Library.
Senior units of study
BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, group presentations, one essay, one project report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.
Textbooks
Begon M, Townsend CR, Harper JL (2005) Ecology, From individuals to ecosystems. Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3907 Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: See BIOL3007 Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3007 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, presentations, one essay, one project report (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3007 Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be encouraged to pursue the objectives by more independent means in a series of research tutorials. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester 2. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
Textbooks
As for BIOL3007
BIOL3008 Marine Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman Session: Intensive July Classes: Intensive 8-day field course held in the pre-semester break. Prerequisites: 12cp Intermediate BIOL; or 6cp Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL2028, BIOL3908, BIOL2928 Assessment: Discussion groups, research project proposal, biodiversity survey report, data analysis and checking, research project report (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. The unit is only available in ODD years (2015, 2017…) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years.
This field course provides a practical introduction to the experimental analysis of marine populations and assemblages. Students gain experience using a range of intertidal sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments. No particular mathematical or statistical skills are required for this subject. Group experimental research projects in the field are the focus of the unit during the day, with lectures and discussion groups about the analysis of experimental data and current issues in experimental marine ecology occurring in the evening.
Textbooks
No textbook is prescribed but Coastal Marine Ecology of Temperate Australia. Eds. Underwood, A.J. & Chapman, M.G. 1995. University of New South Wales Press, provides useful background reading.
BIOL3908 Marine Field Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman. Session: Intensive July Classes: One 8-day field course held in the pre-semester break, plus four 1-hour tutorials during semester 2. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12cp Intermediate BIOL; or 6cp Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL2028, BIOL3008, BIOL2928 Assessment: Discussion groups, research project proposal, biodiversity report, data analysis and checking, research project report (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. The unit is only available in ODD years (2015, 2017…) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years.
This unit has the same objectives as Marine Field Ecology BIOL3008, and is suitable for students wishing to pursue certain aspects of marine field ecology in a greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from applicants on the basis of past performance. Students taking this unit of study will be expected to take part in a number of additional tutorials after the field course on advanced aspects of experimental design and analysis and will be expected to incorporate these advanced skills into their analyses and project reports. This unit may be taken as part of the BSc(Advanced).
Textbooks
As for BIOL 3008.
BIOL3013 Marine Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) Prohibitions: BIOL3913 Assessment: Practical reports, data exercises and exams (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We will examine in detail processes that are important for the establishment and maintenance of marine communities. Lectures will expose students to the key ideas, researchers and methodologies within selected fields of marine biology. Laboratory sessions and field excursions will complement the lectures by providing students with hands-on experience with the organisms and the processes that affect them. Students will develop critical analysis and scientific writing skills while examining the current literature.
BIOL3913 Marine Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: See BIOL3013. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) Prohibitions: BIOL3013 Assessment: Practical reports, data exercises and exams (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of the BIOL3013 Marine Biology unit. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
BIOL3016 Coral Reef Biology

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Maria Byrne Session: Intensive July Classes: Fieldwork 80 hours block mode (21-27 July inclusive). Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL2020, NTMP3001, BIOL2920, BIOL3916 Assessment: Participation in field work, essay, project report and an exam (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit of study is only available in EVEN numbered years only (e.g. 2014, 2016...), but students are offered alternative Senior field units in ODD numbered years.
Coral Reef Biology is an intensive unit held at a research station on the Great Barrier Reef. The unit focuses on the dominant taxa in coral reef environments and the linkages between them. Emphasis is placed on the biological adaptations for life in tropical waters and the ecological, oceanographic and physiological processes involved. Aspects covered include: processes influencing the distribution of coral reefs, symbiosis, reef connectivity, lagoon systems, nutrient cycling and the impacts of climate change and other anthropogenic pressures on the world's corals reefs.
BIOL3916 Coral Reef Biology (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Maria Byrne Session: Intensive July Classes: Fieldwork 80 hours block mode (21-27 July inclusive). Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL2920, BIOL2020, BIOL3016, NTMP3001 Assessment: Participation in field work, essay, project report and exam (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit of study is only available in EVEN numbered years only (e.g. 2014, 2016...), but students are offered alternative Senior field units in ODD numbered years.
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3016, Coral Reef Biology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects of tropical marine biology in greater depth, with a focus on the GBR. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will pursue individual projects in consultation with, and under the guidance of, the course coordinator. The aim is to design a project relating to the particular interests of the student. The nature of these projects will vary from year to year. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
BIOL3045 Animal Ecological Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Seebacher Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and three practicals per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3945, BIOL3912, BIOL3911, BIOL3012, BIOL3011 Assessment: Two practical reports (35% and 30% of total marks, respectively), one 1.5-hour exam (35%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Animal Ecological Physiology is a conceptually based unit of study that covers physiological interactions between organisms and their environments. The unit explores evolutionary processes that allow animals to persist in variable environments. These concepts are essential to understanding biodiversity and ecological function of animal populations, and how these are likely to change under future climate change. The unit will be suitable for those with an interest in zoology, as well as students with a particular interest in ecology and evolution. There is a strong focus on experimental biology and incorporating theory into practical classes, during which students design their own experiments. The unit provides essential skills for conducting and presenting research, and for critical evaluation of published research.
BIOL3945 Animal Ecological Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Seebacher Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and three practicals per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3912, BIOL3012, BIOL3045, BIOL3011, BIOL3911 Assessment: One practical report (35%) and one advanced report (30%), one 1.5-hour exam (35%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3045 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. Animal Ecological Physiology is a conceptually based unit of study that covers physiological interactions between organisms and their environments. The unit explores evolutionary processes that allow animals to persist in variable environments. These concepts are essential to understanding biodiversity and ecological function of animal populations, and how these are likely to change under future climate change. The unit will be suitable for those with an interest in zoology, as well as students with a particular interest in ecology and evolution. There is a strong focus on experimental biology and incorporating theory into practical classes, during which students design their own experiments. The unit provides essential skills for conducting and presenting research, and for critical evaluation of published research.
BIOL3046 Animal Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ashley Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3925, BIOL3025, BIOL3946 Assessment: Practical reports, one 2-hour exam (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The unit will provide a broad overview of the scientific study of animal behaviour. It will consider mechanistic and functional explanations of animal behaviour across contexts including kin selection and altruism, sociality, foraging, aggression and competition, sexual selection and mate choice, the behaviour of predators and prey, and communication and signalling. The information presented and discussed in this unit will reflect the most up-to-date research in each aspect of the field of animal behaviour. Practical sessions are closely aligned with the lecture material and will foster the development of key skills by providing hands-on experience of experimental design, data collection and analysis.
Textbooks
Davies, Krebs, West: An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3946 Animal Behaviour (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ashley Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3025, BIOL3046, BIOL3925 Assessment: Practical reports, one 2-hour exam (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3046 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The unit will provide a broad overview of the scientific study of animal behaviour. It will consider mechanistic and functional explanations of animal behaviour across contexts including kin selection and altruism, sociality, foraging, aggression and competition, sexual selection and mate choice, the behaviour of predators and prey, and communication and signalling. The information presented and discussed in this unit will reflect the most up-to-date research in each aspect of the field of animal behaviour. Practical sessions are closely aligned with the lecture material and will foster the development of key skills by providing hands-on experience of experimental design, data collection and analysis.
Textbooks
Davies, Krebs, West: An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell.
GEOS3009 Coastal Environments and Processes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jody Webster, Dr Ana Vila-Concejo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week; weekend excursion. Prerequisites: (6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units) and (6 further credit points of Intermediate Geoscience or 6 credit points of Physics or Mathematics or Information Technology or Engineering units) or ((MARS2005 or MARS2905) and (MARS2006 or MARS2906)) Prohibitions: MARS3003, MARS3105, GEOS3909 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, research reports and an online quiz (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this course is to introduce students to a variety of Coastal Environments and the major physical and chemical processes which control the morphodynamic evolution of these systems. The course offers a unique opportunity of learning the full spectrum of marine sedimentary environments from siliciclastic, temperate, highly urbanised and impacted estuarine ecosytems to carbonate, tropical, pristine and undeveloped/protected coastal and continental margin environments. The course may include field work in temperate environments and at One Tree Island on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The two parts of the course comprise physical processes in siliciclastic (temperate) and carbonate-dominated (tropical) coastal and continental margin environments. The first part of the course covers basic coastal environments and processes in estuarine and open coast environments and focuses on the morphodynamics of those environments, a fieldtrip to an open beach within Sydney is envisaged where students will learn basic skills for beach monitoring. The second part of the course covers the basic morphodynamics and processes impacting carbonate-dominated coastal and continental margin environments. The focus is on carbonate reefal and margin systems and their geologic and biologic responses to past, present and future environmental changes. These systems may also be studied in the field at The University of Sydney One Tree Island Research Station in the GBR and in some practicals Students who are unable participate in the GBR field trip will be given an alternative assignment.
Textbooks
Recommended:
GEOS3909 Coastal Environments and Processes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ana Vila Concejo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, two 3 hour practicals per week, fieldwork. Prerequisites: Distinction average in ((6 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience* units) and (6 further credit points of Intermediate Geoscience or 6 credit points of Physics, Mathematics, Information Technology or Engineering units) or ((MARS2005 or MARS2905) and (MARS2006 or MARS2906))) Prohibitions: MARS3105, GEOS3009, MARS3003 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, two 1500 word reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: A distinction average in prior Geography or Geology units is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS3009 but will carry out more challenging projects, practicals, assignments and tutorials.
GEOS3014 GIS in Coastal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115, GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)]. Prohibitions: MARS3104, GEOS3914 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, two project reports, quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Coastal Management is about how scientific knowledge is used to support policy formulation and planning decisions in coastal environments. The course links coastal science to policy and practice in management of estuaries, beaches and the coastal ocean. The principles are exemplified through specific issues, such as coastal erosion, pollution, and impacts of climate-change. The issues are dealt with in terms of how things work in nature, and how the issues are handled through administrative mechanisms. These mechanisms involve planning strategies like Marine Protected Areas and setback limits on civil development in the coastal zone. The coastal environments and processes that are more relevant to coastal management including: rocky coasts; beaches, barriers and dunes; and coral reefs will also be introduced. At a practical level, the link between science and coastal management is given substance through development and use of 'decision-support models'. These models involve geocomputing methods that entail application of simulation models, remotely sensed information, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course therefore includes both principles and experience in use of these methods to address coastal-management issues. (It thus also involves extensive use of computers.) Although the focus is on the coast, the principles and methods have broader relevance to environmental management in particular, and to problem-solving in general. That is, the course has vocational relevance in examining how science can be exploited to the benefit of society and nature conservation.
GEOS3914 GIS in Coastal Management (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce, Dr Ana Vila Concejo Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two hours of lectures, one 3 hour practical per week comprising one 1 hour practical demonstration and one 2 hour practical Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115 or GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)]. Prohibitions: GEOS3014, MARS3104 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, project work, two practical-based project reports, fortnightly progress quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: A distinction average in prior Geography, Geology or Marine Science units of study is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS3014 but will carry out more challenging projects, practicals, assignments and tutorials.
GEOS3103 Environmental and Sedimentary Geology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dan Penny (Coordinator), Dr. Adriana Dutkiewicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical class per week Prerequisites: (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924) and (GEOS2111 or (GEOS2911) or (GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) or (GEOS2113 or GEOS2913); or (GEOS1003 or GEOS1903) and 24 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study with permission of the Head of School. Prohibitions: GEOS3803 Assumed knowledge: GEOS1003, GEOS2124 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical reports and quizes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Sediments and sedimentary rocks cover most of the Earth's surface, record much of the Earth's geological and climatic history and host important resources such as petroleum, coal, water and mineral ores. The aim of this unit is to provide students with the skills required to examine, describe and interpret sediments and sedimentary rocks for a variety of different purposes. Specific foci of the unit will be the identification of the recent or ancient environment in which sedimentary materials were deposited, the environmental controls which produce sedimentary structures, and the processes that control the production, movement and storage of sediment bodies. On completion of this unit students will be familiar with the natural processes that produce and modify sediments across a range of environments at the Earth's surface, including fluvial, aeolian, lacustrine, marginal marine and deep marine environments. The various controls on the sedimentary record such as climate and sea-level change, as well as diagenesis and geochemical cycles will also be discussed. Practical exercises will require students to examine global datasets, and determine the properties and significance of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The course is relevant to students interested in petroleum or mineral exploration, environmental and engineering geology as well as marine geoscience.
Textbooks
Course notes will be available from the Copy Centre and an appropriate set of reference texts will be placed on special reserve in the library.
GEOS3803 Environmental & Sedimentary Geology(Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dan Penny (Coordinator), Dr. Adriana Dutkiewicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical class per week. Prerequisites: Distinctions in (GEOS2114 or (GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or (GEOS2924); Students who have a credit average for all Geoscience units may enrol in this unit with permission of the Head of School. Prohibitions: GEOS3103 Assumed knowledge: GEOS1003, GEOS2124 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical, field reports and quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS3103 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance at the time of enrolment. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives. Specific details for this unit of study will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester.
Textbooks
Course notes will be available from the Copy Centre and appropriate set of reference texts will be placed on special reserve in the library.
GEOS3104 Geophysical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dietmar Muller (co-ordinator), A/Prof Patrice Rey, Dr Nicolas Flament Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical class per week. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study or ((GEOS2114 or GEOS2914) and (GEOS2124 or GEOS2924)) Prohibitions: GEOS3906, GEOS3804, GEOS3917, GEOS3003, GEOS3004, GEOS3006, GEOS3916, GEOS3903, GEOS3017, GEOS3016 Assessment: One 2 hour exam (50%), practical work (50%) Practical field work: Geophysical Field Prac (details to be announced) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the common geophysical methods used to investigate the interior and dynamics of the Earth and focuses on the techniques used for mineral and hydrocarbon exploration. On completion of this unit students will have developed a thorough understanding of the common geophysical methods utilised in academia, the environmental resource exploration industry. They will be able to evaluate and critically assess most forms of geophysical data as well as actively participate in geophysical explorations. Furthermore the course will provide the students with the computational skills to process different geophysical data in an applied, resource exploration-centred perspective. The unit is aimed at students with interests in land-based and marine resource exploration, plate tectonics, internal earth structure/dynamics, and near-surface investigations of groundwater resources and environmental pollution. Students wishing to specialise in the field and become professional geophysicists will normally need to expand upon the geophysics knowledge gained from this unit and either complete an honours project or progress to postgraduate coursework in this field. In 2013 a geophysical field prac will be run, taking the students out to an area to be determined to undergo practical experience in geophysical data acquisition (gravity, ground penetrating radar, magnetics), and subsequent processing and interpretation of the data.
GEOS3804 Geophysical Methods (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dietmar Müller (co-ordinator), A/Prof Patrice Rey, Dr Nicolas Flament Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour practical class per week. Prerequisites: Distinction in GEOS2114 or GEOS2914 and GEOS2124 or GEOS2924; Students who have a credit average for all Geoscience units may enrol in this unit with the permission of the Head of School Prohibitions: GEOS3006, GEOS3104, GEOS3016, GEOS3917, GEOS3903, GEOS3017, GEOS3916, GEOS3003, GEOS3906 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, practical work (100%) Practical field work: Geophysical Field Prac (details to be announced) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS3104 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance at the time of enrolment. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independant work to meet unit objectives. Specific details for this unit of study will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester.