Table 1: Neuroscience

Table 1 lists units of study available to students in the Bachelor of Science and combined degrees. The units are available to students enrolled in other degrees in accordance with their degree resolutions.

Errata
Item Change Section Date

1.

ANAT2010 Concepts of Neuroanatomy

Assumed Knowledge: Background in basic cell biology and basic mammalian biology.

Prerequisites: (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) and one of ANAT2008 or BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 or MBLG1001 or MBLG1901 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or PSYC1001 or PSYC1002. Students must have a grade of credit in at least one of the prerequisite units.

Table 1 - Neuroscience

11/12/2014

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Neuroscience

For a major in Neuroscience, students are required to complete at least 24 credit points of senior units of study from PCOL3022/3922, NEUR3001/3901, NEUR3002/3902, NEUR3003/3903, NEUR3004/3904, PSYC3011, PSYC3012, PSYC3013, PSYC3014/3914.
At least two subject areas must be chosen from NEUR, PSYC and PCOL.
Intermediate units of study
The following intermediate units are recommended:
ANAT2010, MBLG2071/2971 or MBLG2072/2972, PCOL2011, PCOL2012, PHSI2005/2905, PHSI2006/2906, PSYC2011/2911, PSYC2013
ANAT2010
Concepts of Neuroanatomy
6    A Background in basic cell biology and basic mammalian biology.
P Students must have a grade of credit in at least one of the prerequisite units (BIOL1003, BIOL1903, ANAT2008, BIOL1002, BIOL1902, MBLG1001, MBLG1901, MBLG2071, MBLG2971, PSYC1001, PSYC1002, BIOL1993).
N MECH2901, ANAT2003, All intermediate BMED units


This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 2
MBLG2071
Molecular Biology and Genomics
6    P (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 CP of Junior Chemistry
N BCHM2001, MBLG2111, MBLG2871, BCHM2901, AGCH2001, MBLG2901, BCHM2101, MBLG2101, MBLG2971, MBLG2771, MBLG2001


Recommended concurrent units of study: (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) and (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
Semester 1
MBLG2971
Molecular Biology and Genomics (Adv)
6    P Distinction in either (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry
N MBLG2901, MBLG2001, BCHM2001, AGCH2001, MBLG2101, MBLG2871, MBLG2111, MBLG2771, BCHM2101, MBLG2071, BCHM2901
Semester 1
MBLG2072
Genetics and Genomics
6    A 12cp of Junior Chemistry
P 6cp of Junior Biology and (one of MBLG1001 and MBLG1901) and 6cp of Junior Chemistry
N MBLG2002, MBLG2972, MBLG2102, MBLG2902


For students planning a Molecular Biology and Genetics major, 12cp of Junior Chemistry is required.
Semester 2
MBLG2972
Genetics and Genomics (Adv)
6    A 12cp of Junior Chemistry
P Distinction average across 6cp of Junior Biology, 6cp of (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 6cp of Junior Chemistry.
N MBLG2002, MBLG2072, MBLG2102, MBLG2902


For students planning for a Molecular Biology and Genetics major, 12cp of Junior Chemistry is required.
Semester 2
PCOL2011
Pharmacology Fundamentals
6    P (6 credit points of Junior Chemistry) and (6 credit points of Junior Biology or MBLG1001 or MBLG1901)
N PCOL2555


This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 1
PCOL2012
Pharmacology: Drugs and People
6    A PCOL2011
P (6 credit points of Junior Chemistry) and (6 credit points of Junior Biology or (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901).
N PCOL2555
Semester 2
PHSI2005
Integrated Physiology A
6    P Except for BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Science units of study. For BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus ATHK1001 and 18 credit points from any Junior Science. For all students: 3 credit points from MATH1005, MATH1905 or MATH1015.
N PHSI2901, MECH2901, PHSI2905, PHSI2101, PHSI2001


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 1
PHSI2905
Integrated Physiology A (Advanced)
6    P 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Biology, Psychology units of study. 3 credit points drawn from MATH1005, MATH1905 or MATH1015. Approval of Coordinator.
N PHSI2001, PHSI2901, MECH2901, PHSI2101, PHSI2005

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Permission from the coordinators is required for entry into this course. It is available only to selected students who have achieved a WAM of 75 (or higher) in their Junior units of study. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 1
PHSI2006
Integrated Physiology B
6    P Except for BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Science units of study. For BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus ATHK1001 and 18 credit points from any Junior Sciences. For all students: 3 credit points from (MATH1005, MATH1905, MATH1015).
N MECH2901, PHSI2902, PHSI2906, PHSI2102, PHSI2002


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study and 3 credit points of Statistics units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 2
PHSI2906
Integrated Physiology B (Advanced)
6    P 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Biology, Psychology units of study. 3 credit points from (MATH1005, MATH1905, MATH1015). Approval of coordinator.
N PHSI2102, PHSI2902, PHSI2002, PHSI2006, MECH2901

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Permission from the coordinators is required for entry into this course. It is available only to selected students who have achieved a WAM of 75 (or higher) in their Junior units of study. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. The completion of MBLG1001 or MBLG1901 is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 2
PSYC2011
Brain and Behaviour
6    P PSYC1001 and PSYC1002.
N PSYC2911, PSYC2111
Semester 1
PSYC2911
Brain and Behaviour (Advanced)
6    P A distinction average in PSYC1001 and PSYC1002
N PSYC2111, PSYC2011
Semester 1
PSYC2013
Cognitive and Social Psychology
6    P PSYC1001 and PSYC1002.
N PSYC2113
Semester 2
Senior units of study
For a major in Neuroscience, 24 credit points must be chosen from any of the following units: PCOL3022/3922, NEUR3001/3901, NEUR3002/3902, NEUR3003/3903, NEUR3004/3904, PSYC3011, PSYC3012, PSYC3013, PSYC3014/3914.
At least two subject areas must be chosen from NEUR, PSYC and PCOL.
NEUR3001
Neuroscience: Special Senses
6    A (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and ANAT2010 are assumed knowledge.
P For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG.
N PHSI3001, NEUR3901


IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED THAT STUDENTS ALSO TAKE (NEUR3002 or NEUR3902).
Semester 1
NEUR3901
Neuroscience: Special Senses (Advanced)
6    A (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and ANAT2010
P Students enrolling in this unit should have a WAM of at least 75. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG.
N NEUR3001, PHSI3901, PHSI3001


It is strongly recommended that students also take unit (NEUR3002 or NEUR3902).
Semester 1
NEUR3002
Neuroscience: Motor Systems & Behaviour
6    A ANAT2010 and (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) are assumed knowledge.
P For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG.
N NEUR3902, PHSI3001


IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED THAT STUDENTS ALSO TAKE (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901).
Semester 1
NEUR3902
Neuroscience: Motor Systems & Behav. Adv
6    A ANAT2010 and (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) are assumed knowledge.
P Students enrolling in this unit should have a WAM of at least 75. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including in (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG.
N NEUR3002, PHSI3001


It is strongly recommended that students also take (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901).
Semester 1
NEUR3003
Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience
6    A Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain.
P For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For others: 18 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study from Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Physiology, Psychology or Statistics.
N PHSI3902, PHSI3002, NEUR3903


Enrolment in (NEUR3004 or NEUR3904) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
Semester 2
NEUR3903
Cellular & Developmental Neurosci. (Adv)
6    A Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain.
P Students must have a CREDIT or better in (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901)
N PHSI3002, PHSI3902, NEUR3003

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Enrolment in (NEUR3004 or NEUR3904) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
Semester 2
NEUR3004
Integrative Neuroscience
6    A Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain.
P For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802). For others: 18 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study from Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Physiology, Psychology or Statistics.
N PHSI3002, PHSI3902, NEUR3904


Enrolment in (NEUR3003 or NEUR3903) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
Semester 2
NEUR3904
Integrative Neuroscience (Advanced)
6    A Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain.
P Students must have a CREDIT or better in (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901)
N NEUR3004, PHSI3902, PHSI3002

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Enrolment in (NEUR3003 or NEUR3903) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
Semester 2
PCOL3022
Neuropharmacology
6    P PCOL2011 and PCOL2012. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802).
N PCOL3902, PCOL3002, PCOL3922
Semester 2
PCOL3922
Neuropharmacology (Advanced)
6    P Average grade Distinction in PCOL2011 and PCOL2012. For BMedSc: Distinction average in 18 credit points of BMED units including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802).
N PCOL3022, PCOL3902, PCOL3002
Semester 2
PSYC3011
Learning and Behaviour
6    A PSYC2012 or PSYC2112
P (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111) and at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit from PSYC2012, PSYC2112, PSYC2013, PSYC2113, PSYC2014 or PSYC2114.
N PSYC3209
Semester 1
PSYC3012
Cognition, Language and Thought
6    A PSYC2012 or PSYC2112
P (PSYC2013 or PSYC2113) and at least one other Intermediate Psychology unit from PSYC2011, PSYC2911, PSYC2111, PSYC2012, PSYC2112, PSYC2014 or PSYC2114.
N PSYC3205
Semester 1
PSYC3013
Perceptual Systems
6    A PSYC2012
P (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111) and at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit from PSYC2012, PSYC2112, PSYC2013, PSYC2113, PSYC2014, PSYC2114 or ANAT2010
N PSYC3210
Semester 2
PSYC3014
Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience
6    A PSYC2113 or PSYC2013
P Either ((PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111) and at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2112), (PSYC2013 or PSYC2113), (PSYC2014 or PSYC2114)) OR ((PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111 or PSYC2013) and ANAT2010 and PCOL2011)
N PSYC3215, PSYC3204, PSYC3914
Semester 2
PSYC3914
Behavioural & Cognitive Neuroscience Adv
6    A PSYC2113 or PSYC2013
P Distinction or above across (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111)
N PSYC3215, PSYC3014, PSYC3204
Semester 2

Neuroscience

For a major in Neuroscience, students are required to complete at least 24 credit points of senior units of study from PCOL3022/3922, NEUR3001/3901, NEUR3002/3902, NEUR3003/3903, NEUR3004/3904, PSYC3011, PSYC3012, PSYC3013, PSYC3014/3914.
At least two subject areas must be chosen from NEUR, PSYC and PCOL.
Intermediate units of study
The following intermediate units are recommended:
ANAT2010, MBLG2071/2971 or MBLG2072/2972, PCOL2011, PCOL2012, PHSI2005/2905, PHSI2006/2906, PSYC2011/2911, PSYC2013
ANAT2010 Concepts of Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Students must have a grade of credit in at least one of the prerequisite units (BIOL1003, BIOL1903, ANAT2008, BIOL1002, BIOL1902, MBLG1001, MBLG1901, MBLG2071, MBLG2971, PSYC1001, PSYC1002, BIOL1993). Prohibitions: MECH2901, ANAT2003, All intermediate BMED units Assumed knowledge: Background in basic cell biology and basic mammalian biology. Assessment: One theory exam, one practical exam, 1200 word critical scientific review article, mid-semester quiz and periodic practical reports (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function (memory). In essence, the course covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain and its different areas. The practicals offer students the unique opportunity to examine specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying science and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Bear, MF, Connors, BW, Paradiso, MA. Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. 3rd edition. Williams and Wilkins. 2006.
MBLG2071 Molecular Biology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Holfer Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 4-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 CP of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: BCHM2001, MBLG2111, MBLG2871, BCHM2901, AGCH2001, MBLG2901, BCHM2101, MBLG2101, MBLG2971, MBLG2771, MBLG2001 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work, laboratory reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Recommended concurrent units of study: (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) and (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
The flow of genetic information determines the characteristics and fate of every cell. In this course, we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, covering key processes such as replication, transcription and translation. We will investigate how these fundamental processes can be studied and manipulated in the laboratory. This course will introduce classical tools of molecular biology such as polymerase chain reaction, as well as more recent advances such as gene expression microarrays and novel sequencing technologies. We will discuss how model organisms, ranging from worms to transgenic mice, have changed our understanding of gene expression. In the practical component of the course, we will explore gene regulation and expression using model system as well as perform plasmid isolation and DNA fingerprinting. This unit of study extends the basic concepts introduced in MBLG1001/1901 and provides a firm foundation for students wishing to continue in molecular biology or apply molecular techniques to other fields.
Textbooks
Watson, J et al. Molecular Biology of the Gene. Pearson 7th edition, 2013.
MBLG2971 Molecular Biology and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: Distinction in either (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: MBLG2901, MBLG2001, BCHM2001, AGCH2001, MBLG2101, MBLG2871, MBLG2111, MBLG2771, BCHM2101, MBLG2071, BCHM2901 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work, laboratory reports. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content will be based on the standard unit MBLG2071 but certain aspects will be investigated in greater depth and at a more advanced level. The flow of genetic information determines the characteristics and fate of every cell. In this course, we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, covering key processes such as replication, transcription and translation. We will investigate how these fundamental processes can be studied and manipulated in the laboratory. This course will introduce classical tools of molecular biology such as polymerase chain reaction, as well as more recent advances such as gene expression microarrays and novel sequencing technologies. We will discuss how model organisms, ranging from worms to transgenic mice, have changed our understanding of gene expression. In the practical component of the course, we will explore gene regulation and expression using model system as well as perform plasmid isolation and DNA fingerprinting. This unit of study extends the basic concepts introduced in MBLG1001/1901 and provides a firm foundation for students wishing to continue in molecular biology or apply molecular techniques to other fields.
Textbooks
Watson, J et al. Molecular Biology of the Gene. Pearson 7th edition, 2013.
MBLG2072 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Penny Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 2-3 hour practical per week, one tutorial every second week. Prerequisites: 6cp of Junior Biology and (one of MBLG1001 and MBLG1901) and 6cp of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: MBLG2002, MBLG2972, MBLG2102, MBLG2902 Assumed knowledge: 12cp of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2 hour exam (50%), laboratory reports and quizzes (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: For students planning a Molecular Biology and Genetics major, 12cp of Junior Chemistry is required.
This unit of study brings together traditional genetic analysis and modern molecular biology to study genetics of all life forms from humans and other complex multicellular organisms through to single celled organisms such as bacteria. Students will be introduced to complex modes of Mendelian inheritance, including those involved in human diseases. The molecular basis for different patterns of inheritance will be discussed. The interaction of genes and gene products will be illustrated by the examination of the molecular genetics of development. The application of genomics to the study of genetic variation, molecular evolution and gene function in humans and model organisms will also be described. In the practical sessions students will investigate the genetics of a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in order to illustrate concepts covered in the lecture material. Students will develop familiarity and competence with equipment used in molecular genetic analysis, bioinformatics, microscopy and statistical tests. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study, which can lead to a major in Biology, and successful completion of this unit of study is required in order to progress in the Molecular Biology and Genetics major.
MBLG2972 Genetics and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Penny Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 2-3 hour practical per week, one tutorial every second week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across 6cp of Junior Biology, 6cp of (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 6cp of Junior Chemistry. Prohibitions: MBLG2002, MBLG2072, MBLG2102, MBLG2902 Assumed knowledge: 12cp of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), laboratory reports and quizzes (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: For students planning for a Molecular Biology and Genetics major, 12cp of Junior Chemistry is required.
The content of MBLG2972 will be based on MBLG2072 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year but includes a practical project in the laboratory to improve molecular biology skills
PCOL2011 Pharmacology Fundamentals

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brent McParland Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 one hour lectures per week; 5 workshops (4 at two hours and 1 at four hours) and 4 four hourly laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: (6 credit points of Junior Chemistry) and (6 credit points of Junior Biology or MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) Prohibitions: PCOL2555 Assessment: One 2 hour exam (50%), 4 in semester quizzes (10%) and reports (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
This unit of study provides the fundamental grounding in four basic areas in Pharmacology: (1) principles of drug action (2) pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism (3) experimental design and autonomic pharmacology, and (4) drug design. The delivery of material involves lectures, practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. Practical classes provide students with the opportunity of acquiring technical experience and teamwork skills. Problem-based workshops are based on real-life scenarios of drug use in the community. These workshops require students to integrate information obtained in lectures in order to provide solutions to the problems. Online quizzes accompany each module and are to encourage continued learning throughout the semester.
Textbooks
Rang & Dale's Pharmacology, 7th edn; Drs. Humphrey P. Rang, Maureen M. Dale, James M. Ritter, Rod Flower, and Graeme Henderson (Churchill Livingstone).
PCOL2012 Pharmacology: Drugs and People

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hilary Lloyd Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week; workshops and laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: (6 credit points of Junior Chemistry) and (6 credit points of Junior Biology or (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). Prohibitions: PCOL2555 Assumed knowledge: PCOL2011 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, in-semester quizzes, reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines four important areas of Pharmacology: (1) drug action in the nervous system (2) drug discovery and development (3) pharmacotherapy of inflammation, allergy and gut disorders, and (4) drugs of recreation, dependence and addiction. The delivery of material involves lectures, practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. Practical classes provide students with the opportunity of acquiring technical experience and teamwork. Problem-based workshops are based on real-life scenarios of drug use in the community. These workshops require students to integrate information obtained in lectures in order to provide solutions to the problems. Online quizzes accompany each module.
Textbooks
Rang & Dale's Pharmacology, 7th edn; Drs. Humphrey P. Rang, Maureen M. Dale, James M. Ritter, Rod Flower, and Graeme Henderson (Churchill Livingstone).
PHSI2005 Integrated Physiology A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Morris Session: Semester 1 Classes: Six 1 hour lectures, one 3 hour practical or one 3 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: Except for BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Science units of study. For BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus ATHK1001 and 18 credit points from any Junior Science. For all students: 3 credit points from MATH1005, MATH1905 or MATH1015. Prohibitions: PHSI2901, MECH2901, PHSI2905, PHSI2101, PHSI2001 Assessment: Two written exams; group and individual written and oral presentations (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
This unit of study offers a basic introduction to the functions of the nervous system, excitable cell (nerve and muscle) physiology, sensory and motor systems, and central processing. It also incorporates haematology and cardiovascular physiology. The practical component involves experiments on humans and isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Inquiry-based learning sessions develop critical thinking and generic skills while demonstrating the integrative nature of physiology. Oral and written communication skills are emphasized, as well as group learning and team work.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2012. ISBN-10: 0321750071. ISBN-13: 978-0321750075.
PHSI2905 Integrated Physiology A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Atomu Sawatari Session: Semester 1 Classes: Five 1 hour lectures, one 3 hour practical and one 3 hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students will be required to attend the designated Advanced Practical and Tutorial sessions. Students will also be exempt from all Inquiry-based learning tutorials. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Biology, Psychology units of study. 3 credit points drawn from MATH1005, MATH1905 or MATH1015. Approval of Coordinator. Prohibitions: PHSI2001, PHSI2901, MECH2901, PHSI2101, PHSI2005 Assessment: One written exam; individual and group oral presentations, 2 practical reports (reports will replace some other assessment items from regular course) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission from the coordinators is required for entry into this course. It is available only to selected students who have achieved a WAM of 75 (or higher) in their Junior units of study. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
This unit of study is an extension of PHSI2005 for talented students with an interest in Physiology and Physiological research. The lecture component of the course is run in conjunction with PHSI2005. This unit of study offers a basic introduction to the functions of the nervous system, excitable cell (nerve and muscle) physiology, sensory and motor systems, and central processing. It also incorporates haematology and cardiovascular physiology. The practical component involves experiments on humans and isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Inquiry-based learning sessions develop critical thinking and generic skills while demonstrating the integrative nature of physiology. Oral and written communication skills are emphasized, as well as group learning and team work. The course will provide an opportunity for students to apply and extend their understanding of physiological concepts by designing and conducting actual experiments. Small class sizes will provide a chance for students to interact directly with faculty members mentoring the practical sessions. Assessment for this stream will be based on oral group presentations and two practical reports. These items will replace some other assessable activities from the regular course.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2010. ISBN 10:0-321-1750071; ISBN 13:978-0-321-750075 (International Edition).
PHSI2006 Integrated Physiology B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Meloni Muir Session: Semester 2 Classes: Five one-hour lectures, one 3-hour practical and one 3-hour tutorial per fortnight. Prerequisites: Except for BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Science units of study. For BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus ATHK1001 and 18 credit points from any Junior Sciences. For all students: 3 credit points from (MATH1005, MATH1905, MATH1015). Prohibitions: MECH2901, PHSI2902, PHSI2906, PHSI2102, PHSI2002 Assessment: Two written exams; group and individual written and oral presentations (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study and 3 credit points of Statistics units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
This unit of study offers a basic introduction to the functions of the remaining body systems: gastrointestinal, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive and renal. The practical component involves experiments on humans and computer simulations, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Inquiry-based learning tutorial sessions develop critical thinking and graduate attributes while demonstrating the integrative nature of physiology. Oral and written communication skills are emphasized, as well as group learning and team work.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2012. ISBN 10:0-321750071; ISBN 13:978-0-321-750075 (International Edition)
PHSI2906 Integrated Physiology B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Atomu Sawatari Session: Semester 2 Classes: Five 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour practical and one 3-hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students will be required to attend the designated Advanced Practical and Tutorial sessions. Students will also be exempt from all Inquiry-based learning tutorials. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Biology, Psychology units of study. 3 credit points from (MATH1005, MATH1905, MATH1015). Approval of coordinator. Prohibitions: PHSI2102, PHSI2902, PHSI2002, PHSI2006, MECH2901 Assessment: One written exam; individual and group oral presentations, 2 practical reports (reports will replace some other assessment items from regular course) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission from the coordinators is required for entry into this course. It is available only to selected students who have achieved a WAM of 75 (or higher) in their Junior units of study. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. The completion of MBLG1001 or MBLG1901 is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
This unit of study is an extension of PHSI2006 for talented students with an interest in Physiology and Physiological research. The lecture component of the course is run in conjunction with PHSI2006. This unit of study gives a basic introduction to the remaining of the body systems: gastrointestinal, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive and renal. The practical component involves simple experiments on humans, isolated tissues, and computer simulations, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Both oral and written communication skills are emphasised, as well as group learning. The course will provide an opportunity for students to apply and extend their understanding of physiological concepts by designing and conducting actual experiments. Small class sizes will provide a chance for students to interact directly with faculty members mentoring the practical sessions. Assessment for this stream will be based on oral group presentations and two practical reports. These items will replace some other assessable activities from the regular course.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2012. ISBN 10:0-321-750071; ISBN 13:978-0-321-750075 (International Edition).
PSYC2011 Brain and Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002. Prohibitions: PSYC2911, PSYC2111 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, major assignment (1500-2000 word essay/report), minor assignment (short written practical exercise and/ or tutorial quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study examines a range of phenomena and principles in behaviour, learning and perception, and their relations to underlying neural substrates. The emphasis in learning is on instrumental conditioning and the principle of reinforcement, ranging from applications of this principle to its neural substrates. Also covered are motivational aspects of behaviour, such as punishment and avoidance, anxiety and depression, addiction, sex and appetite, together with related neurochemical mechanisms and the effects of various psychopharmacological agents on these processes. A number of perceptual phenomena will be studied, such as motion detection, recognition of faces, identification of emotion, hearing and hearing loss, taste discrimination, and chronic pain. The practical classes are designed for students with an interest in clinical and therapeutic Psychology, and will allow students to design and implement a behaviour modification programme.
PSYC2911 Brain and Behaviour (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: A distinction average in PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2111, PSYC2011 Assessment: 1 x 2 hour examination, 1 x 1500 word report, 1 x quiz, 1 x oral presentation/debate (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study focuses on the Behavioural Sciences, Neurosciences, and the study of perception. The lecture content is the same as PSYC2011, and examines a range of phenomena and principles in behaviour, learning and perception, and their relations to underlying neural substrates. The emphasis in learning is on instrumental conditioning and the principle of reinforcement, ranging from applications of this principle to its neural substrates. Also covered are motivational aspects of behaviour, such as punishment and avoidance, anxiety and depression, addiction, sex and appetite, together with related neurochemical mechanisms and the effects of various psychopharmacological agents on these processes. A number of perceptual phenomena will be studied, such as motion detection, recognition of faces, identification of emotion, hearing and hearing loss, taste discrimination, and chronic pain. The practical classes differ from PSYC2011, as it is targeted for those who would like to learn more about the experimental study of behaviour and the neurosciences. Students will gain hands-on laboratory experience in how the principles and phenomena of behavioural neuroscience may be studied experimentally.
PSYC2013 Cognitive and Social Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Fiona White Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002. Prohibitions: PSYC2113 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, major assignment (1500-2000 word essay/report), minor assignment (short written practical exercise and/or tutorial quiz) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit expands the depth and range of topics introduced in the first year lectures on Cognitive Processes, Developmental Psychology and Social Psychology. The section on Cognitive Processes focuses on current theories of memory, attention, problem solving and decision making and discusses the methods and issues involved in investigating these processes in both healthy individuals and people with cognitive disorders. The section on Developmental Psychology discusses early social and cognitive development. The section on Social Psychology examines salient topics in social psychology, such as impression management, social cognition, and prejudice.
Senior units of study
For a major in Neuroscience, 24 credit points must be chosen from any of the following units: PCOL3022/3922, NEUR3001/3901, NEUR3002/3902, NEUR3003/3903, NEUR3004/3904, PSYC3011, PSYC3012, PSYC3013, PSYC3014/3914.
At least two subject areas must be chosen from NEUR, PSYC and PCOL.
NEUR3001 Neuroscience: Special Senses

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin, A/Prof Bill Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per fortnight and one 3-hour tutorial per fortnight. Prerequisites: For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG. Prohibitions: PHSI3001, NEUR3901 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and ANAT2010 are assumed knowledge. Assessment: Two 1-hour exams, one mid-semester quiz, neuroanatomy practical test, practical reports, paper discussion sessions, library essay (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED THAT STUDENTS ALSO TAKE (NEUR3002 or NEUR3902).
The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system and to the main concepts of processing of sensory information. Understanding basic sensory transduction mechanisms and the function of the sensory systems is necessary to understand how perceptual processes work in normal and disease conditions and provides a gateway to unravel the complexity of the mind. Basic aspects of low and high level sensory processing in all sense modalities will be covered, with a special emphasis in the auditory and visual systems. The relationship between sensory systems, perception and higher cognitive functions will be addressed.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000.
NEUR3901 Neuroscience: Special Senses (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dario Protti, Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per fortnight and one 3-hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students may be exempt from attending some of these classes to permit meetings with supervisor. Prerequisites: Students enrolling in this unit should have a WAM of at least 75. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG. Prohibitions: NEUR3001, PHSI3901, PHSI3001 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and ANAT2010 Assessment: Two 1-hour exams, one mid-semester quiz, practical reports, one research or library essay (research essay will replace some other assessment items from regular course) (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is strongly recommended that students also take unit (NEUR3002 or NEUR3902).
This unit of study is an extension of NEUR3001 for talented students with an interest in Neuroscience and research in this field. The lecture/practical component of the course is run in conjunction with NEUR3001. The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system and to the main concepts of processing of sensory information. Understanding basic sensory transduction mechanisms and the function of the sensory systems is necessary to understand how perceptual processes work in normal and disease conditions and provides a gateway to unravel the complexity of the mind. Basic aspects of low and high level sensory processing in all sense modalities will be covered, with a special emphasis in the auditory and visual systems. The relationship between sensory systems, perception and higher cognitive functions will be addressed.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000.
NEUR3002 Neuroscience: Motor Systems & Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bill Phillips, Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 3-hour practical and one 3-hour tutorial per fortnight. Prerequisites: For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG. Prohibitions: NEUR3902, PHSI3001 Assumed knowledge: ANAT2010 and (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) are assumed knowledge. Assessment: Two 1-hour exams, one mid-semester quiz, neuroanatomy practical test, practical report, paper discussion sessions, library essay (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED THAT STUDENTS ALSO TAKE (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901).
The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. Our current knowledge of how the brain works is based on the analysis of the normal structure of the nervous system and its pathways, the functional effects of lesions and neurological diseases in different parts of the nervous system, and the way that nerve cells work at the molecular, cellular and integrative level. This course focuses on to the neural circuits and the mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions. The lecture series addresses the different topics, each of which offers special insight into the function of the nervous system in health and disease.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000. or Bear, Connors, Paradiso. Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Williams & Wilkins. 2001.
NEUR3902 Neuroscience: Motor Systems & Behav. Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dario Protti, Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 3-hour practical and one 3-hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students may be exempt from attending some of these classes to permit meetings with supervisor. Prerequisites: Students enrolling in this unit should have a WAM of at least 75. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including in (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For other students: [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or ANAT2010] and 6 credit points of MBLG. Prohibitions: NEUR3002, PHSI3001 Assumed knowledge: ANAT2010 and (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) are assumed knowledge. Assessment: Two 1-hour exams, one mid-semester quiz, neuroanatomy practical test, practical report, one research or review essay (research essay will replace some other assessment items from regular course) (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is strongly recommended that students also take (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901).
This unit of study is an extension of NEUR3002 for talented students with an interest in Neuroscience and research in this field. The lecture/practical component of the course is run in conjunction with NEUR3002. The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. Our current knowledge of how the brain works is based on the analysis of the normal structure of the nervous system and its pathways, the functional effects of lesions and neurological diseases in different parts of the nervous system, and the way that nerve cells work at the molecular, cellular and integrative level. This course focuses on to the neural circuits and the mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions. The lecture series addresses the different topics, each of which offers special insight into the function of the nervous system in health and disease.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000. or Bear, Connors, Paradiso. Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Williams & Wilkins. 2001.
NEUR3003 Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, Dr Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures plus one 1-hour tutorial or one 2-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). For others: 18 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study from Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Physiology, Psychology or Statistics. Prohibitions: PHSI3902, PHSI3002, NEUR3903 Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Assessment: One 1-hour exam. Mid-semester exam, Major essay/report (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Enrolment in (NEUR3004 or NEUR3904) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences. This course is a combination of small lectures on current issues in cellular and developmental neuroscience and a research-based library project. Suitably qualified students may have the option of replacing the library project with a laboratory project. Issues covered in the lecture series will include the role of glial on cerebral blood flow and neural transmission, neurochemistry and psychiatric disorders and the development of central and peripheral nervous system.
Textbooks
Kandell, Schwartz and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000.
NEUR3903 Cellular & Developmental Neurosci. (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, Dr Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour tutorial or one 2-hour lab session per week. Prerequisites: Students must have a CREDIT or better in (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901) Prohibitions: PHSI3002, PHSI3902, NEUR3003 Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Assessment: One 1-hour exam. Mid-semester exam, Major essay/report, Mini-lecture (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrolment in (NEUR3004 or NEUR3904) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3003. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience.
Textbooks
Kandell, Schwartz and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000.
NEUR3004 Integrative Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, Dr Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial plus 1-2 hours small meeting/laboratory session per week. Prerequisites: For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802). For others: 18 credit points of Intermediate Science units of study from Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Physiology, Psychology or Statistics. Prohibitions: PHSI3002, PHSI3902, NEUR3904 Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Assessment: Mid-semester exam, 1-hour final exam, Major essay/report, Tutorial participation (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Enrolment in (NEUR3003 or NEUR3903) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences and to be taken in conjunction with NEUR3003. This course is a combination of small group lectures on current issues in neuroscience, seminar groups and a research-based library project. Suitably qualified students may have the option of replacing the library project with a laboratory project. Seminars will be held on topics including imaging pain, emotions, cortical development & plasticity, colour vision, stroke and hypertension, long-term regulation of blood pressure, auditory hallucinations and the "cocktail party effect".
Textbooks
Kandell, Schwartz and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition.
NEUR3904 Integrative Neuroscience (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, Dr Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial and 1-2 hour small meeting/laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Students must have a CREDIT or better in (NEUR3001 or NEUR3901) Prohibitions: NEUR3004, PHSI3902, PHSI3002 Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Assessment: Mid-semester exam, 1-hour final exam, Major essay/report, Tutorial participation, Mini lecture (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrolment in (NEUR3003 or NEUR3903) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3004. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience research.
Textbooks
Kandell, Schwartz and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition.
PCOL3022 Neuropharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tina Hinton Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, five 1 hour tutorials, three 3 hour practicals, elective project (equivalent to three 4 hour practicals). Prerequisites: PCOL2011 and PCOL2012. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802). Prohibitions: PCOL3902, PCOL3002, PCOL3922 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the intermediate PCOL and BMED units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Elective projects relate to current research areas in Pharmacology.
Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundations for Clinical Neuroscience, 2nd ed. McGraw Hill, 2009.
PCOL3922 Neuropharmacology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tina Hinton Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, five 1 hour tutorials, three 3 hour practicals, elective project (equivalent to three 4 hour practicals). Prerequisites: Average grade Distinction in PCOL2011 and PCOL2012. For BMedSc: Distinction average in 18 credit points of BMED units including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802). Prohibitions: PCOL3022, PCOL3902, PCOL3002 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the intermediate PCOL and BMED units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Elective projects relate to current research areas in Pharmacology.
Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundations for Clinical Neuroscience, 2nd ed. McGraw Hill, 2009.
PSYC3011 Learning and Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Evan Livesey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111) and at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit from PSYC2012, PSYC2112, PSYC2013, PSYC2113, PSYC2014 or PSYC2114. Prohibitions: PSYC3209 Assumed knowledge: PSYC2012 or PSYC2112 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 word prac report, tutorial quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit addresses the fundamental concepts and more important research findings related to contemporary theories of associative learning in animals and humans. It examines the application of such fundamental research to issues such as drug use and food choice. It is designed to foster skills in reading primary sources in this area, and provide the opportunity for hands-on experience in carrying out a research project.
Textbooks
Bouton, M. E. (2007). Learning and Behavior: A contemporary synthesis. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer.
PSYC3012 Cognition, Language and Thought

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Sally Andrews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2013 or PSYC2113) and at least one other Intermediate Psychology unit from PSYC2011, PSYC2911, PSYC2111, PSYC2012, PSYC2112, PSYC2014 or PSYC2114. Prohibitions: PSYC3205 Assumed knowledge: PSYC2012 or PSYC2112 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, 2000 word prac report, practical exercise(s) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit extends the theories and methods of investigating memory and attentional processes discussed in PSYC2013 to consider a number of domains of higher cognitive processing. One strand of the course will focus on the cognitive processes involved in speech perception, language comprehension, language production, and reading. The remainder of the course will deal with the cognitive processes involved in reasoning and skill acquisition. The practical program will expose students to a variety of the research methods used to investigate higher cognitive processes, develop their understanding of how these methods can be used to investigate hypotheses about mental processes and consider applications of cognitive research to real-world problems and issues.
PSYC3013 Perceptual Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Alais Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111) and at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit from PSYC2012, PSYC2112, PSYC2013, PSYC2113, PSYC2014, PSYC2114 or ANAT2010 Prohibitions: PSYC3210 Assumed knowledge: PSYC2012 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, one 2000 word report, tutorial quiz, group presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Perception poses many challenges: how do we see colour and movement? How do we perceive surfaces and materials? How does combining information from multiple senses improve our perception? This unit draws on behavioural and neurophysiological perspectives to deepen understanding of current research topics in perception. The emphasis is on how visual information is processed to accomplish functions such as perceiving a single edge, extracting the contours that form a face, or the spatial relations needed to call offside on the sports field. Students also gain conceptual tools for evaluating the empirical and theoretical worth of recent research in perception. During the tutorial component of the course students will develop a practical experiment in which they formulate and test a hypothesis. In this way students gain important research experience that gives them valuable insight into the scientific process as it exists both in professional work and in the empirical research project required for the Honours degree.
Textbooks
Sensation & Perception, Third Edition
PSYC3014 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Corbit Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Either ((PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111) and at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2112), (PSYC2013 or PSYC2113), (PSYC2014 or PSYC2114)) OR ((PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111 or PSYC2013) and ANAT2010 and PCOL2011) Prohibitions: PSYC3215, PSYC3204, PSYC3914 Assumed knowledge: PSYC2113 or PSYC2013 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one major essay/report 2000-2500 words, tutorial quiz and participation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. The implications of focal cognitive deficits in neurological patients for models of normal cognitive function will also be explored. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration, and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. In addition to lectures, a practical component will cover basic neuroanatomy, histology and neuropharmacology, and will introduce students to experimental and case-study approaches to studying neurosciences.
PSYC3914 Behavioural & Cognitive Neuroscience Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Corbit Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction or above across (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111) Prohibitions: PSYC3215, PSYC3014, PSYC3204 Assumed knowledge: PSYC2113 or PSYC2013 Assessment: 1 x 2 hour exam (end of semester), 1 x 1 hour quiz (mid-semester), 1 x presentation, 1 written assignment (lab report), attendance and participation in tutorial/practical exercises (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. The implications of focal cognitive deficits in neurological patients for models of normal cognitive function will also be explored. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration, and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. The lecture material will be the same as for PSYC3014, however, the practical class is targeted for those who would like to learn more about the experimental study of behaviour and the neurosciences. The practical component of the advanced stream will cover basic neuroanatomy, histology and neuropharmacology and will introduce students to experimental approaches to studying brain-behaviour relationships in a group-run, in-class experiment that will be conducted over the course of the semester.