Table 1: Nutrition and Metabolism

Table 1 lists units of study available to students in the Bachelor of Science and combined degrees. The units are available to students enrolled in other degrees in accordance with their degree resolutions.

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Nutrition and Metabolism

For a major in Nutrition and Metabolism, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area which must include NUTM3001 and NUTM3002.
Junior units of study
MBLG1001
Molecular Biology and Genetics (Intro)
6    A 6 credit points of Junior Biology and 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry
N MBLG1901
Semester 2
MBLG1901
Molecular Biology and Genetics (Adv)
6    A HSC Chemistry and Biology OR 6 credit points of Junior Biology and 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry
P UAI (or ATAR equivalent) of 95 or minimum Band 5 in HSC chemistry and biology or by invitation
N MBLG1001
Semester 2
Intermediate units of study
MBLG2071
Molecular Biology and Genomics
6    P (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 CP of Junior Chemistry
N MBLG2971


Recommended concurrent units of study: (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) and (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
Semester 1
MBLG2971
Molecular Biology and Genomics (Adv)
6    P (Distinction in either (MBLG1001 or MBLG901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry
N MBLG2071
Semester 1
BCHM2072
Human Biochemistry
6    P (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry
N BCHM2972. All intermediate BMED units.


This unit is not available to BMedSc students. Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and BCHM2071 for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
Semester 1
BCHM2972
Human Biochemistry (Advanced)
6    P (Distinction in (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry
N BCHM2072. All intermediate BMED units.


This unit is not available to BMedSc students. Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
Semester 1
PHSI2005
Integrated Physiology A
6    P Except for BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Science units of study. For BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus ATHK1001 and 18 credit points from any Junior Science. For all students: 3 credit points from MATH1005, MATH1905 or MATH1015.
N PHSI2905, MECH2901, All intermediate BMED units.


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 1
PHSI2905
Integrated Physiology A (Advanced)
6    P 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Biology, Psychology units of study. 3 credit points drawn from MATH1005, MATH1905 or MATH1015. Approval of Coordinator.
N PHSI2005, MECH2901, All intermediate BMED units.

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Permission from the coordinators is required for entry into this course. It is available only to selected students who have achieved a WAM of 75 (or higher) in their Junior units of study. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 1
PHSI2006
Integrated Physiology B
6    P Except for BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Science units of study. For BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus ATHK1001 and 18 credit points from any Junior Sciences. For all students: 3 credit points from (MATH1005, MATH1905, MATH1015).
N PHSI2906, MECH2901, All intermediate BMED units.


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study and 3 credit points of Statistics units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 2
PHSI2906
Integrated Physiology B (Advanced)
6    P 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Biology, Psychology units of study. 3 credit points from (MATH1005, MATH1905, MATH1015). Approval of coordinator.
N PHSI2006, MECH2901, All intermediate BMED units.

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Permission from the coordinators is required for entry into this course. It is available only to selected students who have achieved a WAM of 75 (or higher) in their Junior units of study. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. The completion of MBLG1001 or MBLG1901 is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
Semester 2
Senior units of study
NUTM3001
Introductory Nutrition and Metabolism
6    A Intermediate level Physiology
P (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) and 6 credit points from (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971). For BMedSc students: 6 credit points from (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971) and 18 credit points of BMED units of study, including (BMED2401 and BMED2405) or (BMED2801, BMED2802 and BMED2804)
Semester 1
NUTM3002
Nutrition & Metabolism Advanced Concepts
6    A Intermediate level Physiology
P (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) and 6 credit points from (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971). For BMedSc students: 6 credit points from (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971) and 18 credit points of BMED units of study, including (BMED2401 and BMED2405) or (BMED2801, BMED2802 and BMED2804).


Students are strongly advised to complete NUTM3001 before enrolling in NUTM3002 in Session 2.
Semester 2
BCHM3071
Molecular Biology & Biochemistry- Genes
6    P (MBLG 1001/1901) and 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401, BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804).
N BCHM3971
Semester 1
BCHM3971
Molecular Biology & Biochem- Genes (Adv)
6    P (MBLG1001/1901) and Distinction in 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and Distinction in BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (Distinction average in BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804)
N BCHM3071
Semester 1
BCHM3081
Mol Biology & Biochemistry- Proteins
6    P (MBLG1001/1901) and 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804).
N BCHM3981
Semester 1
BCHM3981
Mol Biology & Biochemistry- Proteins Adv
6    P (MBLG1001/1901) and Distinction in 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and Distinction in BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (Distinction average in BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804).
N BCHM3081
Semester 1
BCHM3072
Human Molecular Cell Biology
6    P (MBLG1001/1901) and 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and 2804)
N BCHM3972
Semester 2
BCHM3972
Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)
6    P (MBLG1001/1901) and Distinction in 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and Distinction in BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (Distinction average in BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804).
N BCHM3072
Semester 2
BCHM3082
Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry
6    P (MBLG1001/1901) and 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804).
N BCHM3982
Semester 2
BCHM3982
Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)
6    P (MBLG1001/1901) and Distinction in 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and Distinction in BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (Distinction average in BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804)
N BCHM3082
Semester 2
PHSI3005
Human Cellular Physiology: Theory
6    A 6 credit points of MBLG
P Except for BMedSc students: (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906). For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806)
N PHSI3905


It is recommended that this unit of study be taken in conjunction with (PHSI3006 or PHSI3906).
Semester 1
PHSI3905
Human Cellular Physiology (Adv): Theory
6    A 6 credit points of MBLG
P Students enrolling in this unit should have a WAM of at least 70. Except for BMedSc students: Credit average in (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906). For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED at Credit average including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806).
N PHSI3005

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
It is highly recommended that this unit of study ONLY be taken in combination with (PHSI3006 or PHSI3906).
Semester 1
PHSI3006
Human Cellular Physiology: Research
6    P Except for BMedSc students: (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906). For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806).
C PHSI3005
N PHSI3906
Semester 1
PHSI3906
Human Cellular Physiology (Ad): Research
6    A 6 credit points of MBLG
P Students enrolling in this unit should have a WAM of at least 70. Except for BMedSc students: (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906). For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED at Credit average including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806).
C PHSI3905
N PHSI3006

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1

Nutrition and Metabolism

For a major in Nutrition and Metabolism, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area which must include NUTM3001 and NUTM3002.
Junior units of study
MBLG1001 Molecular Biology and Genetics (Intro)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 1-hour tutorial and one 4-hour practical per fortnight Prohibitions: MBLG1901 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Junior Biology and 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, in-semester skills test and assignments (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), M Nutr Diet, B E, B Med Sc, B Pharm, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
The lectures in this unit of study introduce the "Central Dogma" of molecular biology and genetics -i.e., the molecular basis of life. The course begins with the information macromolecules in living cells: DNA, RNA and protein, and explores how their structures allow them to fulfill their various biological roles. This is followed by a review of how DNA is organised into genes leading to discussion of replication and gene expression (transcription and translation). The unit concludes with an introduction to the techniques of molecular biology and, in particular, how these techniques have led to an explosion of interest and research in Molecular Biology. The practical component complements the lectures by exposing students to experiments which explore the measurement of enzyme activity, the isolation of DNA and the 'cutting' of DNA using restriction enzymes. However, a key aim of the practicals is to give students higher level generic skills in computing, communication, criticism, data analysis/evaluation and experimental design.
Textbooks
Introduction to Molecular Biology MBLG1001 & MBLG1901, 3rd edition compiled by D. Hancock, G. Denyer and B. Lyon, Pearson ISBN 978 1 4860 0039 5
MBLG1901 Molecular Biology and Genetics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 1-hour tutorial and one 4-hour practical per fortnight; four 1-hour seminars per semester. Prerequisites: UAI (or ATAR equivalent) of 95 or minimum Band 5 in HSC chemistry and biology or by invitation Prohibitions: MBLG1001 Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and Biology OR 6 credit points of Junior Biology and 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, in-semester skills test and assignments (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B E, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
The lectures in this unit of study introduce the "Central Dogma" of molecular biology and genetics, i.e., the molecular basis of life. The course begins with the information macro-molecules in living cells: DNA,RNA and protein, and explores how their structures allow them to fulfill their various biological roles. This is followed by a review of how DNA is organised into genes leading to discussion of replication and gene expression (transcription and translation). The unit concludes with an introduction to the techniques of molecular biology and, in particular, how these techniques have led to an explosion of interest and research in Molecular Biology. The practical component complements the lectures by exposing students to experiments which explore the measurement of enzyme activity, the isolation of DNA and the 'cutting' of DNA using restriction enzymes. However,a key aim of the practicals is to give students higher level generic skills in computing, communication, criticism, data analysis/evaluation and experimental design. The advanced component is designed for students interested in continuing in molecular biology. It consists of 7 advanced lectures (replacing 7 regular lectures) and 3 advanced laboratory sessions (replacing 3 regular practical classes). The advanced lectures will focus on the experiments which led to key discoveries in molecular biology. The advanced practical sessions will give students the opportunity to explore alternative molecular biology experimental techniques. Attendance at MBLG1999 seminars is strongly encouraged.
Textbooks
Introduction to Molecular Biology MBLG1001 & MBLG1901, 3rd edition compiled by D. Hancock, G. Denyer and B. Lyon, Pearson ISBN 978 1 4860 0039 5
Intermediate units of study
MBLG2071 Molecular Biology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Vanessa Gysbers Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 4-hour practical per fortnight and five 1-hour tutorials. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 CP of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: MBLG2971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work, laboratory reports (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex, S S & Nut), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), M Nutr Diet, B E, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study.
Note: Recommended concurrent units of study: (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) and (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
This unit of study extends the basic concepts introduced in MBLG1001/1901 and provides a firm foundation for students wishing to continue in the molecular biosciences as well as for those students who intend to apply molecular techniques to other biological or medical questions. The unit explores the regulation of the flow of genetic information in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The central focus is on the control of replication, transcription and translation and how these processes can be studied and manipulated in the laboratory. The processes of DNA mutation and repair are also discussed. Experiments in model organisms are presented to illustrate current advancements in the field, together with discussion of work carried out in human systems and the relevance to human genetic diseases. Tools of molecular biology are taught within the context of recombinant DNA cloning - with an emphasis on essential knowledge required to use plasmid vectors. The methods of gene introduction (examples of transgenic animals) are also discussed along with recent developments in stem cell biology. Other techniques include the separation and analysis of macromolecules, like DNA, RNA and proteins, by gel electrophoresis and Southern, Northern & Western blotting. Analysis of gene expression by microarrays is also discussed. In the genomics section, topics include structure, packaging and complexity of the genome: assigning genes to specific chromosomes, physical mapping of genomes as well as DNA and genome sequencing methods and international projects in genome mapping. The practical course complements the theory and builds on the skills learnt in MBLG1001. Specifically students will: use spectrophotometry for the identification and quantification of nucleic acids, explore the lac operon system for the investigation of gene expression control, perform plasmid isolation, and complete a PCR analysis for detection of polymorphisms. As with MBLG1001, strong emphasis is placed on the acquisition of generic and fundamental technical skills.
Textbooks
Watson, J et al. Molecular Biology of the Gene. Pearson 7th edition, 2013.
MBLG2971 Molecular Biology and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Vanessa Gysbers Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical per fortnight and five 1-hour tutorials. Prerequisites: (Distinction in either (MBLG1001 or MBLG901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: MBLG2071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work, laboratory reports (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex, S S & Nut), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B E, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
Extension of concepts presented in MBLG2071 which will be taught in the context of practical laboratory experiments.
Textbooks
Watson, J et al. Molecular Biology of the Gene. Pearson 7th edition, 2013.
BCHM2072 Human Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week, one tutorial per fortnight, and 2-3 hours per week of practical Prerequisites: (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: BCHM2972. All intermediate BMED units. Assessment: One 3-hour exam (65%), practical work (25%), in semester assignments (10%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex, S S & Nut), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), M Nutr Diet, B E, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: This unit is not available to BMedSc students. Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and BCHM2071 for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
This unit of study aims to describe how cells work at the molecular level, with a special emphasis on human biochemistry. The chemical reactions that occur inside cells are described in the first series of lectures, Cellular Metabolism. Aspects of the molecular architecture of cells that enable them to transduce messages and communicate with each other are described in the second half of the unit of study, Signal Transduction. At every stage there is emphasis on the 'whole body' consequences of reactions, pathways and processes. Cellular Metabolism describes how cells extract energy from fuel molecules like fatty acids and carbohydrates, how the body controls the rate of fuel utilisation and how the mix of fuels is regulated (especially under different physiological circumstances such as starvation and exercise). The metabolic inter-relationships of the muscle, brain, adipose tissue and liver and the role of hormones in coordinating tissue metabolic relationships is discussed. The unit also discusses how the body lays down and stores vital fuel reserves such as fat and glycogen, how hormones modulate fuel partitioning between tissues and the strategies involved in digestion and absorption and transport of nutrients. Signal Transduction covers how communication across membranes occurs (i.e. via surface receptors and signaling cascades). This allows detailed molecular discussion of the mechanism of hormone action and intracellular process targeting. The practical component complements the lectures by exposing students to experiments that investigate the measurement of glucose utilisation using radioactive tracers and the design of biochemical assay systems. During the unit of study, generic skills are nurtured by frequent use of analytical and problem solving activities. Opportunities are provided to redesign and repeat experiments so as to provide a genuine research experience. Student exposure to generic skills will be extended by the introduction of exercises designed to teach oral communication, instruction writing and planning skills.
BCHM2972 Human Biochemistry (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week, one tutorial per fortnight, and 2-3 hours per week of practical. Prerequisites: (Distinction in (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: BCHM2072. All intermediate BMED units. Assessment: One 3-hour exam (65%), practical work (25%), in semester assignments (10%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: This unit is not available to BMedSc students. Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
This advanced unit aims to describe how cells work at the molecular level, with a special emphasis on human biochemistry. The chemical reactions that occur inside cells are described in the first series of lectures, Cellular Metabolism. Aspects of the molecular architecture of cells that enable them to transduce messages and communicate with each other are described in the second half of the unit of study, Signal Transduction. At every stage there is emphasis on the 'whole body' consequences of reactions, pathways and processes. Cellular Metabolism describes how cells extract energy from fuel molecules like fatty acids and carbohydrates, how the body controls the rate of fuel utilization and how the mix of fuels is regulated (especially under different physiological circumstances such as starvation and exercise). The metabolic inter-relationships of the muscle, brain, adipose tissue and liver and the role of hormones in coordinating tissue metabolic relationships is discussed. The unit also discusses how the body lays down and stores vital fuel reserves such as fat and glycogen, how hormones modulate fuel partitioning between tissues and the strategies involved in digestion and absorption and transport of nutrients. Signal Transduction covers how communication across membranes occurs (i.e., via surface receptors and signaling cascades). This allows detailed molecular discussion of the mechanism of hormone action and intracellular process targeting. The practical component complements the lectures by exposing students to experiments that investigate the measurement of glucose utilisation using radioactive tracers and the design of biochemical assay systems. During the unit of study, generic skills are nurtured by frequent use of analytical and problem solving activities. Opportunities are provided to redesign and repeat experiments so as to provide a genuine research experience. Student exposure to generic skills will be extended by the introduction of exercise designed to teach oral communication, instruction writing and planning skills.
The differences between the advanced and regular versions of this Unit of Study is in the in-semester assignments and some of the practical sessions.
PHSI2005 Integrated Physiology A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Morris Session: Semester 1 Classes: Six 1 hour lectures, one 3 hour practical or one 3 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: Except for BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Science units of study. For BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus ATHK1001 and 18 credit points from any Junior Science. For all students: 3 credit points from MATH1005, MATH1905 or MATH1015. Prohibitions: PHSI2905, MECH2901, All intermediate BMED units. Assessment: Two written exams; group and individual written and oral presentations (100%) Associated degrees: B Sc, B Sc (Nutrition).
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
This unit of study offers a basic introduction to the functions of the nervous system, excitable cell (nerve and muscle) physiology, sensory and motor systems, and central processing. It also incorporates haematology and cardiovascular physiology. The practical component involves experiments on humans and isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Inquiry-based learning sessions develop critical thinking and generic skills while demonstrating the integrative nature of physiology. Oral and written communication skills are emphasized, as well as group learning and team work.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2012. ISBN-10: 0321750071. ISBN-13: 978-0321750075.
PHSI2905 Integrated Physiology A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Atomu Sawatari Session: Semester 1 Classes: Five 1 hour lectures, one 3 hour practical and one 3 hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students will be required to attend the designated Advanced Practical and Tutorial sessions. Students will also be exempt from all Inquiry-based learning tutorials. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Biology, Psychology units of study. 3 credit points drawn from MATH1005, MATH1905 or MATH1015. Approval of Coordinator. Prohibitions: PHSI2005, MECH2901, All intermediate BMED units. Assessment: One written exam; individual and group oral presentations, 2 practical reports (reports will replace some other assessment items from regular course) (100%) Associated degrees: B Sc.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission from the coordinators is required for entry into this course. It is available only to selected students who have achieved a WAM of 75 (or higher) in their Junior units of study. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
This unit of study is an extension of PHSI2005 for talented students with an interest in Physiology and Physiological research. The lecture component of the course is run in conjunction with PHSI2005. This unit of study offers a basic introduction to the functions of the nervous system, excitable cell (nerve and muscle) physiology, sensory and motor systems, and central processing. It also incorporates haematology and cardiovascular physiology. The practical component involves experiments on humans and isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Inquiry-based learning sessions develop critical thinking and generic skills while demonstrating the integrative nature of physiology. Oral and written communication skills are emphasized, as well as group learning and team work. The course will provide an opportunity for students to apply and extend their understanding of physiological concepts by designing and conducting actual experiments. Small class sizes will provide a chance for students to interact directly with faculty members mentoring the practical sessions. Assessment for this stream will be based on oral group presentations and two practical reports. These items will replace some other assessable activities from the regular course.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2010. ISBN 10:0-321-1750071; ISBN 13:978-0-321-750075 (International Edition).
PHSI2006 Integrated Physiology B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Meloni Muir Session: Semester 2 Classes: Five one-hour lectures, one 3-hour practical and one 3-hour tutorial per fortnight. Prerequisites: Except for BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Science units of study. For BLAS students: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus ATHK1001 and 18 credit points from any Junior Sciences. For all students: 3 credit points from (MATH1005, MATH1905, MATH1015). Prohibitions: PHSI2906, MECH2901, All intermediate BMED units. Assessment: Two written exams; group and individual written and oral presentations (100%) Associated degrees: B Sc, B Sc (Nutrition).
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study and 3 credit points of Statistics units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
This unit of study offers a basic introduction to the functions of the remaining body systems: gastrointestinal, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive and renal. The practical component involves experiments on humans and computer simulations, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Inquiry-based learning tutorial sessions develop critical thinking and graduate attributes while demonstrating the integrative nature of physiology. Oral and written communication skills are emphasized, as well as group learning and team work.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2012. ISBN 10:0-321750071; ISBN 13:978-0-321-750075 (International Edition)
PHSI2906 Integrated Physiology B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Atomu Sawatari Session: Semester 2 Classes: Five 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour practical and one 3-hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students will be required to attend the designated Advanced Practical and Tutorial sessions. Students will also be exempt from all Inquiry-based learning tutorials. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry plus 30 credit points from any Junior Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Biology, Psychology units of study. 3 credit points from (MATH1005, MATH1905, MATH1015). Approval of coordinator. Prohibitions: PHSI2006, MECH2901, All intermediate BMED units. Assessment: One written exam; individual and group oral presentations, 2 practical reports (reports will replace some other assessment items from regular course) (100%) Associated degrees: B Sc.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission from the coordinators is required for entry into this course. It is available only to selected students who have achieved a WAM of 75 (or higher) in their Junior units of study. Students taking combined degrees or with passes in units not listed should consult a coordinator if they do not meet the prerequisites. The completion of MBLG1001 or MBLG1901 is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. This unit is not available to BMedSc students.
This unit of study is an extension of PHSI2006 for talented students with an interest in Physiology and Physiological research. The lecture component of the course is run in conjunction with PHSI2006. This unit of study gives a basic introduction to the remaining of the body systems: gastrointestinal, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive and renal. The practical component involves simple experiments on humans, isolated tissues, and computer simulations, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Both oral and written communication skills are emphasised, as well as group learning. The course will provide an opportunity for students to apply and extend their understanding of physiological concepts by designing and conducting actual experiments. Small class sizes will provide a chance for students to interact directly with faculty members mentoring the practical sessions. Assessment for this stream will be based on oral group presentations and two practical reports. These items will replace some other assessable activities from the regular course.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2012. ISBN 10:0-321-750071; ISBN 13:978-0-321-750075 (International Edition).
Senior units of study
NUTM3001 Introductory Nutrition and Metabolism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim Bell-Anderson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures, 1 tutorial per week. 4h laboratory class per fortnight Prerequisites: (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) and 6 credit points from (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971). For BMedSc students: 6 credit points from (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971) and 18 credit points of BMED units of study, including (BMED2401 and BMED2405) or (BMED2801, BMED2802 and BMED2804) Assumed knowledge: Intermediate level Physiology Assessment: Laboratory report and notebook (40%); Critical Review Journal article (10%) one 3 hour exam (50%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Nutrition).
Nutrition is a multidisciplinary science that covers the role of food in health and disease. Advances in the fields of molecular biology and biochemistry have increased the focus of nutrition on metabolism and metabolic pathways that transform nutrients. This unit of study aims to explore core concepts of nutrition and metabolism. The focus will be the biochemical reactions that take place in cells, how these are influenced by different nutrients and what are the implications for the whole body. This unit of study will consider the structure and chemical characteristics of nutrients, their metabolism, and their roles in health and disease.
Textbooks
Recommended Textbooks
NUTM3002 Nutrition & Metabolism Advanced Concepts

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim Bell-Anderson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures, 1 tutorial and an average of 2 hours of practical classes per week. Prerequisites: (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) and 6 credit points from (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971). For BMedSc students: 6 credit points from (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971) and 18 credit points of BMED units of study, including (BMED2401 and BMED2405) or (BMED2801, BMED2802 and BMED2804). Assumed knowledge: Intermediate level Physiology Assessment: One 3-hour exam (2-hour theory-related (50%), 1-hour prac-related (20%), practical-related tasks (e.g. laboratory report (10%), notebook (10%), and critical review of journal article (10%). Associated degrees: B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: Students are strongly advised to complete NUTM3001 before enrolling in NUTM3002 in Session 2.
Nutrition is a multidisciplinary science that covers the role of food in health and disease. Advances in biomolecular science have increased the focus of nutrition on the metabolic pathways that transform nutrients. This unit of study aims to explore recent advances in nutritional science and builds on the introductory concepts of nutrition and metabolism that were explored in NUTM3001. The focus will be the assessment of the biochemical reactions that take place in cells, how these are influenced by different nutrients and what are the implications for the whole body. This unit of study will explore how animal models, cell culture techniques and human trials have contributed to advancing nutritional science. Examples from current research will be used to illustrate how nutrients are metabolised in health and disease.
Textbooks
1. Nutrition and Metabolism 2nd Edition 2011. Edited on behalf of The Nutrition Society (UK) by Michael Gibney, Ian Macdonald and Helen Roche. Blackwell Science Oxford UK. ISBN:0-632-05625-8.
BCHM3071 Molecular Biology & Biochemistry- Genes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell. Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 6-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG 1001/1901) and 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401, BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804). Prohibitions: BCHM3971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes X. 10th edition. Jones & Bartlett. 2011.
BCHM3971 Molecular Biology & Biochem- Genes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell. Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 6-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001/1901) and Distinction in 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and Distinction in BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (Distinction average in BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804) Prohibitions: BCHM3071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3071. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in gene expression and manipulation will be covered.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes X. 10th edition. Jones & Bartlett. 2011.
BCHM3081 Mol Biology & Biochemistry- Proteins

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jill Johnston, Prof Joel Mackay Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 2 hour lectures per week and one 6 hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001/1901) and 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804). Prohibitions: BCHM3981 Assessment: One 2.5 hour exam, practical work (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2011.
BCHM3981 Mol Biology & Biochemistry- Proteins Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jill Johnston, Prof Joel Mackay Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 6-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001/1901) and Distinction in 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and Distinction in BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (Distinction average in BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804). Prohibitions: BCHM3081 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3081. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in protein biochemistry will be covered.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2011.
BCHM3072 Human Molecular Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 6-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001/1901) and 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and 2804) Prohibitions: BCHM3972 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex, S S & Nut), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science. 2008.
BCHM3972 Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 6-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001/1901) and Distinction in 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and Distinction in BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (Distinction average in BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804). Prohibitions: BCHM3072 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3072. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in modern molecular cell biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science. 2008.
BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jill Johnston, A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 6-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001/1901) and 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804). Prohibitions: BCHM3982 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex, S S & Nut), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with molecular biology methods and studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry.
Textbooks
Devlin T Textbook of Biochemistry With Clinical Correlations 7th edition. Wiley 2011.
BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jill Johnston, A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 6-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001/1901) and Distinction in 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and Distinction in BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (Distinction average in BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804) Prohibitions: BCHM3082 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with new methods, including magnetic resonance techniques and molecular biology methods, as well as studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry. Qualified students will attend some lectures/practical classes in common with BCHM3082 and some separate lectures/ practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in metabolic biochemistry will be covered.
Textbooks
Devlin T Textbook of Biochemistry With Clinical Correlations 7th edition. Wiley 2011.
PHSI3005 Human Cellular Physiology: Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr William Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour tutorial slot per week. Prerequisites: Except for BMedSc students: (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906). For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806) Prohibitions: PHSI3905 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of MBLG Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%) and three to five quizzes (40%). Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: It is recommended that this unit of study be taken in conjunction with (PHSI3006 or PHSI3906).
The aim of this unit of study is to examine key cellular processes involved in the growth, maintenance and reproduction of human life. Processes to be studied include the regulation of cell division and differentiation in developing and adult tissues, the regulation of body fluids through ion transport across epithelia, and mechanisms of hormonal and nervous system signalling. Lectures will relate the molecular underpinnings to physiological functions: our current interpretation of how ion channels, hormone receptors and synaptic interactions mediate tissue function and human life. The significance of these molecular mechanisms will be highlighted by considering how mutations and other disorders affect key proteins and genes and how this might lead to disease states such as cancer, intestinal and lung transport disorders and osteoporosis.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science.
PHSI3905 Human Cellular Physiology (Adv): Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Fraser Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour tutorial slot per week. Prerequisites: Students enrolling in this unit should have a WAM of at least 70. Except for BMedSc students: Credit average in (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906). For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED at Credit average including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). Prohibitions: PHSI3005 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of MBLG Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), one 2000-word report (30%) and a report plan arising from a mentored research project (10%). Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is highly recommended that this unit of study ONLY be taken in combination with (PHSI3006 or PHSI3906).
The aim of this unit of study is to examine key cellular processes involved in the growth, maintenance and reproduction of human life. Processes to be studied include the regulation of cell division and differentiation in developing and adult tissues, the regulation of body fluids through ion transport across epithelia, mechanisms of hormonal and nervous system signalling and the regulation of muscle contraction. Lectures will relate the molecular underpinnings to physiological functions: our current interpretation of how ion channels, hormone receptors and synaptic interactions mediate tissue function and human life. The significance of these molecular mechanisms will be highlighted by considering how mutations and other disorders affect key proteins and genes and how this might lead to disease states such as cancer, intestinal and lung transport disorders and osteoporosis. Please see the Physiology website for details of mentored Advanced research topics.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science.
PHSI3006 Human Cellular Physiology: Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr William Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two small group PBL and one 1 hour lecture per week; one 3 hour practical in some weeks. Students are allocated to PBL and practical classes after enrolments are finalised. For this reason students should refer to Blackboard and the Physiology online Master timetable regularly after semester begins. Prerequisites: Except for BMedSc students: (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906). For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). Corequisites: PHSI3005 Prohibitions: PHSI3906 Assessment: One 1.5-hour exam (60%), PBL assessments by oral presentations and paper summaries (20%), prac assessment tasks (20%). Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study complements, and should be taken together with PHSI3005/3905 for students wishing to major in Physiology. PHSI3006 focuses deeply upon certain areas of cellular physiology that have particular relevance to human health and disease. In the problem-based learning (PBL) sessions groups of students work together with the support of a tutor to develop and communicate an understanding of mechanisms underlying the physiology and patho-physiology of disorders such as prostate cancer and neuromuscular disorders. Each problem runs over three weeks with two small group meetings per week. Reading lists are structured to help address written biomedical problems. Lectures provide advice on how to interpret scientific data of the type found in the research papers. Practical classes will emphasize experimental design and interpretation. Collectively, the PBL, lectures and practical classes aim to begin to develop skills and outlook needed to deal with newly emerging biomedical science.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science.
PHSI3906 Human Cellular Physiology (Ad): Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Fraser Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two small group PBL and one 1-hour lecture per week; one 3-hour practical in some weeks. Prerequisites: Students enrolling in this unit should have a WAM of at least 70. Except for BMedSc students: (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) and (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906). For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED at Credit average including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806). Corequisites: PHSI3905 Prohibitions: PHSI3006 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of MBLG Assessment: One 1.5-hour exam (56%), PBL assessments by oral presentations and paper summaries (14%), advanced practical class assessment tasks (30%). Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study complements, and should be taken together with PHSI3905. PHSI3906 focuses deeply upon certain areas of cellular physiology that have particular relevance to human health and disease. In the problem-based learning (PBL) sessions groups of students work together with the support of a tutor to develop and communicate an understanding of mechanism underlying the physiology and patho-physiology of disorders such as prostate cancer and neuromuscular disorders. Each problem runs over three weeks with two small group meetings per week. Reading lists are structured to help address written biomedical problems. Lectures provide advice on how to interpret scientific data of the type found in the research papers. Advanced students will take an extended practical class program. The additional practical problem will emphasize experimental design and interpretation in cell culture studies. Collectively, the PBL, lectures and practical classes aim to begin to develop skills and outlook needed to deal with newly emerging biomedical science. Please see the Physiology website for details of mentored Advanced research topics.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science.