Table 1: Nutrition and Metabolism

Table 1 lists units of study available to students in the Bachelor of Science and combined degrees. The units are available to students enrolled in other degrees in accordance with their degree resolutions.

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Nutrition and Metabolism

For a major in Nutrition and Metabolism, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area which must include NUTM3001 and NUTM3004.
Junior units of study
BIOL1006
Life and Evolution
6    A HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February).
N BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996
Semester 1
BIOL1906
Life and Evolution (Advanced)
6    A 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent.
N BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
BIOL1996
Life and Evolution (SSP)
6    A 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent
N BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
BIOL1007
From Molecules to Ecosystems
6    A HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February).
N BIOL1907 or BIOL1997
Semester 2
BIOL1907
From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)
6    A 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent
N BIOL1007 or BIOL1997

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
BIOL1997
From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)
6    A 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent
N BIOL1007 or BIOL1907

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
Intermediate units of study
MBLG2071
Molecular Biology and Genomics
6    P 6cp from (BIOL1XX7, MBLG1XXX),and 12cp from CHEM1XXX
N BCHM2001 or MBLG2111 or MBLG2871 or BCHM2901 or AGCH2001 or MBLG2901 or BCHM2101 or MBLG2101 or MBLG2971 or MBLG2771 or MBLG2001


Recommended concurrent units of study: (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) and (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
Semester 1
MBLG2971
Molecular Biology and Genomics (Adv)
6    P 12cp from CHEM1XXX and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XX7,MBLG1XXX)
N MBLG2901 or MBLG2001 or BCHM2001 or AGCH2001 or MBLG2101 or MBLG2871 or MBLG2111 or MBLG2771 or BCHM2101 or MBLG2071 or BCHM2901
Semester 1
BCHM2072
Human Biochemistry
6    P 6cp from (BIOL1XX7, MBLG1XXX) and 12cp from CHEM1XXX
N BCHM2002 or BCHM2102 or BCHM2972 or BCHM2902 or BCHM2112 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808


Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and BCHM2071 for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
Semester 1
BCHM2972
Human Biochemistry (Advanced)
6    P 12cp from CHEM1XXX and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XX7, MBLG1XXX)
N BCHM2072 orBMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808


Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
Semester 1
PHSI2005
Integrated Physiology A
6    P 6cp from (MATH1XX5, ATHK1001) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX, PHYS1XXX, PSYC1XXX, CHEM1XXX, MATH1XXX (except MATH1XX5))
N PHSI2901 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2101 or PHSI2001 orBMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology.
Semester 1
PHSI2905
Integrated Physiology A (Advanced)
6    P An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (MATH1XX5, ATHK1001) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX, PHYS1XXX, PSYC1XXX, CHEM1XXX, MATH1XXX (except MATH1XX5))
N PHSI2001 or PHSI2901 or PHSI2101 or PHSI2005 orBMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology.
Semester 1
PHSI2006
Integrated Physiology B
6    P 6cp from (MATH1XX5, ATHK1001) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX, PHYS1XXX, PSYC1XXX, CHEM1XXX, MATH1XXX (except MATH1XX5))
N PHSI2902 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2102 or PHSI2002 orBMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. It is recommended that PHSI2005 is completed before enrolling in PHSI2006.
Semester 2
PHSI2906
Integrated Physiology B (Advanced)
6    P An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (MATH1XX5, ATHK1001) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX, PHYS1XXX, PSYC1XXX, CHEM1XXX, MATH1XXX (except MATH1XX5))
N PHSI2102 or PHSI2902 or PHSI2002 or PHSI2006 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology.
Semester 2
Senior core units of study
Students must complete both NUTM3001 and NUTM3004.
NUTM3001
Introductory Nutrition and Metabolism
6    A Intermediate level Physiology
P [(BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] OR [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) and (BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X)]
Semester 1
NUTM3004
Metabolic Cybernetics
6    P [(BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) and 12 credit points from (BCHM2XXX, MBLG2XXX, BIOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX) and (MATH1005 or MATH1015 or MATH1905 or ATHK1001)] or [(BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED2XXX) and (MATH1005 or MATH1015 or MATH1905 or ATHK1001)]
N NUTM3002
Semester 2
Senior elective units of study
BCHM3071
Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes
6    P [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3001 or BCHM3901 or BCHM3971
Semester 1
BCHM3971
Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points from BMED240X) and (a mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3901 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3071
Semester 1
BCHM3081
Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins
6    P [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3981 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3901
Semester 1
BCHM3981
Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (an average mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3901 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3081
Semester 1
BCHM3072
Human Molecular Cell Biology
6    P [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3972 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3002 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904
Semester 2
BCHM3972
Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (a mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3072 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904 or BCHM3002
Semester 2
BCHM3082
Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry
6    P [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3002 or BCHM3982 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904
Semester 2
BCHM3982
Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (an average mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)]
N BCHM3082 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3904 or BCHM3002
Semester 2
PHSI3009
Frontiers in Cellular Physiology
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X]
N PHSI3905, PHSI3906, PHSI3005, PHSI3006, PHSI3909


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3909
Frontiers in Cellular Physiology (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in (6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X)]
N PHSI3009, PHSI3005, PHSI3905, PHSI3006, PHSI3906


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3010
Reproduction, Development and Disease
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X]
N PHSI3905, PHSI3906, PHSI3005, PHSI3006, PHSI3910


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3910
Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv
6    P [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X]
N PHSI3010, PHSI3005, PHSI3905, PHSI3006, PHSI3906


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3011
Frontiers in Whole Body Physiology
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X]
N PHSI3007, PHSI3008, PHSI3907, PHSI3908, PHSI3911


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3011 or PHSI3911) and (PHSI3012 or PHSI3912) units concurrently
Semester 2
PHSI3911
Frontiers in Whole Body Physiology (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in (6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X)]
N PHSI3011, PHSI3007, PHSI3907, PHSI3008, PHSI3908


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3011 or PHSI3911) and (PHSI3012 or PHSI3912) units concurrently
Semester 2
PHSI3012
Physiology of Disease
6    P [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X]
N PHSI3007, PHSI3008, PHSI3907, PHSI3908, PHSI3912


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3011 or PHSI3911) and (PHSI3012 or PHSI3912) units concurrently
Semester 2
PHSI3912
Physiology of Disease (Advanced)
6    P [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in (6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X)]
N PHSI3012, PHSI3007, PHSI3907, PHSI3008, PHSI3908


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3011 or PHSI3911) and (PHSI3012 or PHSI3912) units concurrently
Semester 2

Nutrition and Metabolism

For a major in Nutrition and Metabolism, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area which must include NUTM3001 and NUTM3004.
Junior units of study
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 12x3hr practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: practical eportfolio (10%), during semester exams (20%), communication (30%), summative final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense.Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. This unit will explore how new species, diseases and parasites continue to arise while others go extinct and discuss the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It will also explain how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes integrating Life and Evolution concepts. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems and organisms into what they are today.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 12x3hr practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: practical eportfolio (10%), during semester exams (20%), communication (30%), summative final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense.Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. This unit will explore how new species, diseases and parasites continue to arise while others go extinct and discuss the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It will also explain how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in alternative components. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Nathan Lo and A/Prof Simon Ho Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 30-36 hours of practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: practical 60% (comprised of two practical reports, laboratory note book and seminar presentation), 40% final summative exam as per biol1906 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense.Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different to BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Pauline Ross Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 12x3hr practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: practical (50%), summative final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Pauline Ross Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 12x3hr practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: summative exam (50%), practical component which may include independent or group project (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Pauline Ross Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: one 2-hour exam (50%), project report (50%) which includes written report and presentation Practical field work: As advised and required by the project - approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be either a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms or organismal/ecosystems biology. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
Intermediate units of study
MBLG2071 Molecular Biology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 4-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XX7, MBLG1XXX),and 12cp from CHEM1XXX Prohibitions: BCHM2001 or MBLG2111 or MBLG2871 or BCHM2901 or AGCH2001 or MBLG2901 or BCHM2101 or MBLG2101 or MBLG2971 or MBLG2771 or MBLG2001 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of practical 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%), Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Recommended concurrent units of study: (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) and (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
The flow of genetic information determines the characteristics and fate of every cell. In this course, we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, covering key processes such as replication, transcription and translation. We will investigate how these fundamental processes can be studied and manipulated in the laboratory. This course will introduce classical tools of molecular biology such as polymerase chain reaction, as well as more recent advances such as gene expression microarrays and novel sequencing technologies. We will discuss how model organisms, ranging from worms to transgenic mice, have changed our understanding of gene expression. In the practical component of the course, we will explore gene regulation and expression using model systems as well as perform plasmid isolation and DNA fingerprinting. This unit of study extends the basic concepts introduced in MBLG1001/1901 and provides a firm foundation for students wishing to continue in molecular biology or apply molecular techniques to other fields.
MBLG2971 Molecular Biology and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical per fortnight, one 2 hour poster session. Prerequisites: 12cp from CHEM1XXX and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XX7,MBLG1XXX) Prohibitions: MBLG2901 or MBLG2001 or BCHM2001 or AGCH2001 or MBLG2101 or MBLG2871 or MBLG2111 or MBLG2771 or BCHM2101 or MBLG2071 or BCHM2901 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of practical 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content is based on the standard unit MBLG2071 but certain aspects will be investigated in greater depth and at a more advanced level. The flow of genetic information determines the characteristics and fate of every cell. In this course, we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, covering key processes such as replication, transcription and translation. We will investigate how these fundamental processes can be studied and manipulated in the laboratory. This course will introduce classical tools of molecular biology such as polymerase chain reaction, as well as more recent advances such as gene expression microarrays and novel sequencing technologies. We will discuss how model organisms, ranging from worms to transgenic mice, have changed our understanding of gene expression. In the practical component of the course, we will explore gene regulation and expression using model systems, clone a DNA fragment into a vector and determine its identity by perfomring a plasmid isolation and restriciton enzyme digest, use PCR to determine the geneotypes of transgenic mice as well as perform DNA fingerprinting. This unit of study extends the basic concepts introduced in MBLG1001/1901 and provides a firm foundation for students wishing to continue in molecular biology or apply molecular techniques to other fields.
BCHM2072 Human Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week, occasional webinar tutorials, and 2-3 hours per week of practicals Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XX7, MBLG1XXX) and 12cp from CHEM1XXX Prohibitions: BCHM2002 or BCHM2102 or BCHM2972 or BCHM2902 or BCHM2112 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: One 3-hour exam (65%), practical work and associated assessments (25%), in semester assignments (10%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and BCHM2071 for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
This unit of study aims to describe how cells work at the molecular level, with a special emphasis on human biochemistry. This includes the chemical reactions that occur inside cells and the molecular architecture that enables cells to transduce messages and communicate with each other. At every stage the focus is on the 'whole body' consequences of reactions, pathways and processes. The section on Cellular Metabolism describes how cells extract energy from fuel molecules like fatty acids and carbohydrates, how the body controls the rate of fuel utilisation and how the mix of fuels is regulated under different physiological circumstances such as starvation and exercise. The metabolic inter-relationships of the muscle, brain, adipose tissue and liver and the role of hormones in coordinating tissue metabolic relationships is discussed. The unit also discusses how the body lays down and stores vital fuel reserves such as fat and glycogen, how hormones modulate fuel partitioning between tissues and the strategies involved in digestion, absorption and transport of nutrients. The section on Signal Transduction covers how communication across membranes occurs (i.e. via surface receptors and signaling cascades) and so reveals the mechanism of hormone action and intracellular process targeting.
Textbooks
No specific text recommended
BCHM2972 Human Biochemistry (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week, occasional webinar tutorials, and 2-3 hours per week of practicals Prerequisites: 12cp from CHEM1XXX and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XX7, MBLG1XXX) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 orBMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: One 3-hour exam (65%), practical work and associated assessments (25%), in semester assignments (10%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
This unit of study aims to describe how cells work at the molecular level, with a special emphasis on human biochemistry. This includes the chemical reactions that occur inside cells and the molecular architecture that enables cells to transduce messages and communicate with each other. At every stage the focus is on the 'whole body' consequences of reactions, pathways and processes. The section on Cellular Metabolism describes how cells extract energy from fuel molecules like fatty acids and carbohydrates, how the body controls the rate of fuel utilisation and how the mix of fuels is regulated under different physiological circumstances such as starvation and exercise. The metabolic inter-relationships of the muscle, brain, adipose tissue and liver and the role of hormones in coordinating tissue metabolic relationships is discussed. The unit also discusses how the body lays down and stores vital fuel reserves such as fat and glycogen, how hormones modulate fuel partitioning between tissues and the strategies involved in digestion, absorption and transport of nutrients. The section on Signal Transduction covers how communication across membranes occurs (i.e. via surface receptors and signaling cascades) and so reveals the mechanism of hormone action and intracellular process targeting.
The differences between the advanced and regular versions of this Unit of Study is in the in-semester assignments (including those related to practical classes), some of the practical sessions and some examination questions.
Textbooks
No specific text recommended
PHSI2005 Integrated Physiology A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Morris Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures per week. Prerequisites: 6cp from (MATH1XX5, ATHK1001) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX, PHYS1XXX, PSYC1XXX, CHEM1XXX, MATH1XXX (except MATH1XX5)) Prohibitions: PHSI2901 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2101 or PHSI2001 orBMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: One written exam; individual written assessments, and quizzes (100%) Practical field work: One 3 hour practical or one 3 hour tutorial per week. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology.
This unit of study offers an introduction to the basic concepts underpinning physiology, excitable cell (nerve and muscle) physiology, as well as the functions of the nervous system (central processing, and sensory and motor systems). It also incorporates cardiovascular and exercise physiology. The practical component involves experiments on humans and isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Tutorial sessions develop critical thinking, the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th edition. 2015. ISBN-10: 0321981227; ISBN-13: 978-0321981226 (International Edition)
PHSI2905 Integrated Physiology A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Atomu Sawatari Session: Semester 1 Classes: Five 1 hour lectures, one 3 hour practical and one 3 hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students will be required to attend the designated Advanced Practical and Tutorial sessions. Students will also be exempt from all Inquiry-based learning tutorials. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (MATH1XX5, ATHK1001) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX, PHYS1XXX, PSYC1XXX, CHEM1XXX, MATH1XXX (except MATH1XX5)) Prohibitions: PHSI2001 or PHSI2901 or PHSI2101 or PHSI2005 orBMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: One written exam; individual and group oral presentations, 2 practical reports (reports will replace some other assessment items from regular course) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology.
This unit of study is an extension of PHSI2005 for talented students with an interest in Physiology and Physiological research. The lecture component of the course is run in conjunction with PHSI2005. This unit of study offers a basic introduction to the functions of the nervous system, excitable cell (nerve and muscle) physiology, sensory and motor systems, and central processing. It also incorporates haematology and cardiovascular physiology. The practical component involves experiments on humans and isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Inquiry-based learning sessions develop critical thinking and generic skills while demonstrating the integrative nature of physiology. Oral and written communication skills are emphasized, as well as group learning and team work. The course will provide an opportunity for students to apply and extend their understanding of physiological concepts by designing and conducting actual experiments. Small class sizes will provide a chance for students to interact directly with faculty members mentoring the practical sessions. Assessment for this stream will be based on oral group presentations and two practical reports. These items will replace some other assessable activities from the regular course.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2010. ISBN 10:0-321-1750071; ISBN 13:978-0-321-750075 (International Edition).
PHSI2006 Integrated Physiology B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bronwyn McAllan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures per week, and one 3 hour practical or one 3 hour tutorial per week. There will be one 4 hour practical session. Prerequisites: 6cp from (MATH1XX5, ATHK1001) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX, PHYS1XXX, PSYC1XXX, CHEM1XXX, MATH1XXX (except MATH1XX5)) Prohibitions: PHSI2902 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2102 or PHSI2002 orBMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: Two written exams; group and individual written and oral presentations (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. It is recommended that PHSI2005 is completed before enrolling in PHSI2006.
This unit of study offers a basic introduction to the functions of the remaining body systems: gastrointestinal, respiratory, haematology, endocrine, reproductive and renal. The practical component involves experiments on humans and computer simulations, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. The tutorial sessions develop critical thinking and graduate attributes while demonstrating the integrative nature of physiology. Oral and written communication skills are emphasized, as well as group learning and team work.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2012. ISBN-10: 0321750071. ISBN-13: 978-0321750075.
PHSI2906 Integrated Physiology B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Atomu Sawatari Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures per week, and one 3 hour practical and/or one 3 hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students will be required to attend the designated Advanced Practical and Tutorial sessions. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (MATH1XX5, ATHK1001) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX, PHYS1XXX, PSYC1XXX, CHEM1XXX, MATH1XXX (except MATH1XX5)) Prohibitions: PHSI2102 or PHSI2902 or PHSI2002 or PHSI2006 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: One written exam; individual and group oral presentations, 2 practical reports (reports will replace some other assessment items from regular course) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology.
This unit of study is an extension of PHSI2006 for talented students with an interest in Physiology and Physiological research. The lecture component of the course is run in conjunction with PHSI2006. This unit of study gives a basic introduction to the remaining of the body systems: gastrointestinal, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive and renal. The practical component involves simple experiments on humans, isolated tissues, and computer simulations, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Both oral and written communication skills are emphasised, as well as group learning. The course will provide an opportunity for students to apply and extend their understanding of physiological concepts by designing and conducting actual experiments. Small class sizes will provide a chance for students to interact directly with faculty members mentoring the practical sessions. Assessment for this stream will be based on oral group presentations and two practical reports. These items will replace some other assessable activities from the regular course.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2012. ISBN 10:0-321-750071; ISBN 13:978-0-321-750075 (International Edition).
Senior core units of study
Students must complete both NUTM3001 and NUTM3004.
NUTM3001 Introductory Nutrition and Metabolism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Wendy Stuart-Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures, 1 tutorial per week. 4-5hour laboratory/presentation class most weeks Prerequisites: [(BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] OR [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) and (BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X)] Assumed knowledge: Intermediate level Physiology Assessment: In semester reports, presentations and quizzes (50%) one 2 hour exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Nutrition is a multidisciplinary science that covers the role of food in health and disease. Advances in biomolecular science have increased the focus of nutrition on the metabolic pathways that transform nutrients. This unit of study aims to explore fundamentals in nutritional science to develop an understanding of the core concepts in human nutrition through exploring the role of macro- and micro-nutrients and their interaction across the lifespan, mostly in the healthy individual. The focus will be the biochemical reactions that take place in cells, how these are influenced by different nutrients and what are the implications for the whole body. This unit of study will consider the structure and chemical characteristics of nutrients, their metabolism, and their roles in health and disease. This unit of study will explore how animal models, cell culture techniques and human trials have contributed to advancing nutritional science. Examples from current research will be used to illustrate how nutrients are metabolised, mostly in health, and the expanding scope of research in human nutrition.
Textbooks
Essentials of Human Nutrition 4th Edition, 2012. Edited by Jim Mann and A. Stewart Truswell. Oxford University Press. ISBN: 9780199566341*
NUTM3004 Metabolic Cybernetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim Bell-Anderson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures, 1 tutorial Prerequisites: [(BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) and 12 credit points from (BCHM2XXX, MBLG2XXX, BIOL2XXX or PHSI2XXX) and (MATH1005 or MATH1015 or MATH1905 or ATHK1001)] or [(BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED2XXX) and (MATH1005 or MATH1015 or MATH1905 or ATHK1001)] Prohibitions: NUTM3002 Assessment: one 1.5hr exam (30%), 2000w project proposal (20%), MCQ test (10%), project report (20%), multimedia group work (10%), 500w student reflection (4%), mentor assessment (6%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Obesity is a worldwide health problem driven by a complex intersection between genetics and the environment. This interdisciplinary unit of study aims to explore recent advances in 'omics' technology and big data analysis. The focus will be on how to tackle highly complex questions such as why some individuals become obese and others don't. The problem will be presented from a range of scientific points of view so that students will be able to understand the contextual nature of bringing multiple disciplines to bear on a really important biological problem. Students will be provided a research training opportunity to contribute to our understanding of the relevant problems of over-nutrition in our society. Collaborative research is supported by lectures and tutorials on nutrition science, 'big data' management strategies and approaches to data analysis.
Senior elective units of study
BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell. Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3001 or BCHM3901 or BCHM3971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones & Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell. Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points from BMED240X) and (a mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3901 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3071. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in gene expression and manipulation will be covered.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones & Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Joel Mackay Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3981 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3901 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Joel Mackay Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (an average mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3901 or BCHM3001 or BCHM3081 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3081. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in protein biochemistry will be covered.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3072 Human Molecular Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3972 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3002 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3972 Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (a mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3072 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904 or BCHM3002 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3072. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in modern molecular cell biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [(BMED2401, BMED2405 and 6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3002 or BCHM3982 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3904 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with molecular biology methods and studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry.
BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jill Johnston, A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12 credit points of (MBLG2071, MBLG2971, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, BCHM2072, BCHM2972)] OR [BMED2401 and (a mark of 75 in BMED2405) and (6 additional credit points of BMED240X) and (an average mark of 75 in MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971)] Prohibitions: BCHM3082 or BCHM3902 or BCHM3004 or BCHM3904 or BCHM3002 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with new methods, including magnetic resonance techniques and molecular biology methods, as well as studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry. Qualified students will attend some lectures/practical classes in common with BCHM3082 and some separate lectures/ practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in metabolic biochemistry will be covered.
PHSI3009 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Anuwat Dinudom Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr/ week lectures and 6 x 2 hr large class tutorials (PBL) per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X] Prohibitions: PHSI3905, PHSI3906, PHSI3005, PHSI3006, PHSI3909 Assessment: four in-class quizzes, one mid-semester exam, one 2hr final exam, two presentations for problem-based learning and 1 practical class report Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Problem-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techniques for investigating cell signalling and the biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for a science graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3909 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Anuwat Dinudom Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr/ week lectures and 3 x 2 hrs large class tutorials (PBL) per semester Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in (6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X)] Prohibitions: PHSI3009, PHSI3005, PHSI3905, PHSI3006, PHSI3906 Assessment: four in-class quizzes, one mid-semester exam, one 2hr final exam, one presentations for problem-based learning and one Advanced research report Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Problem-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techiques for investigating cell signalling and biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science a graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3010 Reproduction, Development and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Fraser Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 4 x 1 hr large class tutorials per semester, 12 x 1hr tutorials (weeks 3-6 and 7-10 only) Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X] Prohibitions: PHSI3905, PHSI3906, PHSI3005, PHSI3006, PHSI3910 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Reprogramming and tissue regeneration will also feature in the lecture content. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and regeneration. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating sperm function, embryogenesis and stem cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3910 Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Fraser Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 4 x 1 hr large class tutorials per semester, 12 x 1hr tutorials (weeks 3-6 and 7-10 only) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X] Prohibitions: PHSI3010, PHSI3005, PHSI3905, PHSI3006, PHSI3906 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Reprogramming and tissue regeneration will also feature in the lecture content. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and regeneration. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating sperm function, embryogenesis and stem cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3011 Frontiers in Whole Body Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Phillip Poronnik Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 4 x 2 hr class tutorials per semester (Week 3 and 13) and 2 x 1 hr tutorial preparation session (week 2 and 12), one contcept based learning tutorial 3 x 2 hours Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X] Prohibitions: PHSI3007, PHSI3008, PHSI3907, PHSI3908, PHSI3911 Assessment: one mid-semester exam, one 2hr final exam, two tutorial reports, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3011 or PHSI3911) and (PHSI3012 or PHSI3912) units concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate homeostasis throughout the whole body with a particular focus not only on the interplay between major organ systems, but also variability amongst individuals. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. Our current understandings of how we functions will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body level. This is detailed fundamental knowledge that is key to understanding the transitions that occur from health to disease. Hands on practical classes will explore the physiology presented in the lectures and tutorial sessions will investigate what 'normal' is in terms of whole body physiology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science; Siverthorn D, Human Physiology: an integrated approach. 7th Edition Pearson.
PHSI3911 Frontiers in Whole Body Physiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Phillip Poronnik Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 4 x 2 hr class tutorials per semester (Week 3 and 13) and 2 x 1 hr tutorial preparation session (week 2 and 12), one contcept based learning tutorial 3 x 2 hours Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in (6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X)] Prohibitions: PHSI3011, PHSI3007, PHSI3907, PHSI3008, PHSI3908 Assessment: one mid-semester exam, one 2hr final exam, two tutorial reports, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 3 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3011 or PHSI3911) and (PHSI3012 or PHSI3912) units concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate homeostasis throughout the whole body with a particular focus not only on the interplay between major organ systems, but also variability amongst individuals. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. Our current understandings of how we functions will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body level. This is detailed fundamental knowledge that is key to understanding the transitions that occur from health to disease. Hands on practical classes will explore the physiology presented in the lectures and tutorial sessions will investigate what ¿normal¿ is in terms of whole body physiology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science; Siverthorn D, Human Physiology: an integrated approach. 7th Edition Pearson.
PHSI3012 Physiology of Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Naylor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 12 x 1hr tutorials (weeks 3-5 and 8-10 only), 2 x 6hr practical (weeks 4-5 and 8-9). Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X] Prohibitions: PHSI3007, PHSI3008, PHSI3907, PHSI3908, PHSI3912 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 2 practical class reports Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3011 or PHSI3911) and (PHSI3012 or PHSI3912) units concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate normal homeostasis throughout the whole body and how defects in these processes can lead to significant human disease. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. The processes leading to cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic disease will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body level. Problem-based learning will focus on cancer and cardiovascular disease and practical classes will utilise both wet lab and online resources to dissect the processes by which normal physiological processes become aberrant leading to human disease.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3912 Physiology of Disease (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Naylor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 2 x 6hr practical (weeks 4-5 and 8-9), Advanced project. Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from PHSI2XX5 and 6cp from PHSI2XX6] OR [An average mark of 75 or above in (6cp from BMED2401 and 6cp from BMED2402 and 6cp from BMED240X)] Prohibitions: PHSI3012, PHSI3007, PHSI3907, PHSI3008, PHSI3908 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, Advanced project report, 2 practical class reports Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3011 or PHSI3911) and (PHSI3012 or PHSI3912) units concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate normal homeostasis throughout the whole body and how defects in these processes can lead to significant human disease. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. The processes leading to cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic disease will be the specific will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body level. Students will undertake an Advanced Project Problem-based learning will focus on cancer and cardiovascular disease and Practical classes will utilise both wet lab and online resources to dissect the processes by which normal physiological processes become aberrant leading to human disease.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science