Upcoming Events

Workshop with Manfred Frank

Manfred Frank

Tuesday 11 March 2014
4-6pm

Centre for Modernism Studies
Webster 139
The University of New South Wales


Professor Manfred Frank will discuss with interested postgraduate students and academic staff sections 566-8 of Novalis's Fichte Studies. Interested students and academics are welcome to participate.

Contact Sean Pryor if you would like to attend.


'Putting periodization to use': reflections on the idea of historical 'periods' in general, and on the 'Baroque' in particular

Monteverdi, Purcell and Bach

Professor Sergio Durante
Wednesday 12 March 2014
5-6pm.

Sydney Conservatorium of Music
Room 2174
Macquarie St
Sydney


The paper examines theoretical aspects of music historiography, relating them to the use and meaning of periodization in the context of recent musicological debate as well as in teaching practice. Special attention is given to selected aspects of the ‘baroque’ concept and of its periodization, in the context of music history vis-à-vis other disciplines.

The paper will be followed by drinks and an informal reception. All members of the university community are welcome to attend.

Sponsored by Sydney Intellectual History Network Putting Periodisation to Use Group and the Sydney Conservatorium of Music - Musicology Colloquium Series.

Biography
Sergio Durante was born in Padua in 1954 and studied music and musicology in Bologna and at Harvard University. He has published extensively on the history of singers and of the singing profession, developing among other things a historical dictionary of Italian vocal terminology (Lessico italiano del canto) which is soon to be published online. After his earlier research on Frescobaldi, Corelli and Tartini, he turned his main focus to Mozart studies with numerous essays devoted to vocal music, opera, oratorio and theory of dramaturgy and music analysis. Since 2000 he has been a member of the Mozart Akademie in Salzburg, and since 2012, a member of the Directorium of the International Musicological Society. He is Professor of music philology at the University of Padua.

Selected publications
Tartini and his Texts (2007); Die Opera seria zu Mozarts Zeit (2007); Studi su Mozart e il Settecento/Studies on Mozart and the 18th Century (2007); Musicological introduction to W.A. Mozart. La clemenza di Tito K. 621. Facsimile of the Autograph Score (2009); The trouble with Betulia (2013).


So what?

Manfred Frank

Professor Manfred Frank
Wednesday 12 March 2014

University of New South Wales
Tyree Room, John Niland Scientia Building, Kensington

Click here to RSVP


There is a long-standing prejudice that early romantic philosophy developed in the footsteps of Fichtean foundationalism, and that it was uncritical of the totalitarian seizure of power of subjectivity over Being or Difference allegedly characteristic of J.G. Fichte’s thought. Drawing on the recently developed research method of ‘Constellation Research’, this lecture shows that in fact Early Romanticism was skeptical about foundationalist pretensions, respectful of subjectivity without promoting it into a ‘highest point of philosophy’, ironical with regard to ultimate knowledge claims, ontologically realistic, and in general more modern than so far thought.

Manfred Frank is Emeritus Professor of philosophy at the Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen and member of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences. His work focuses on early German idealism and romanticism, theories of self-consciousness, hermeneutics, theory of literature, aesthetics, and contemporary French philosophy. Among his many books are What Is Neostructuralism? (1984), the 950-page study of German romanticism Unendliche Annäherung (1997), The Subject and the Text: Essays on Literary Theory and Philosophy (1997), The Boundaries of Agreement (2005) and The Philosophical Foundations of Early German Romanticism (2004).


Nature and Culture in German Romanticism and Idealism

Caspar_David_Friedrich_Woman_before_going_down_sun

Click to download (PDF 402 kb)

UNSW Australia and the University of Sydney
12-14 March 2014


The last two decades can be described as witness to a genuine revival of interest in German romantic and idealist philosophy. Philosophers working in a variety of areas have embraced the ideas of the romantics and idealists, disentangling them from false or misunderstood legacies, and reexamining them in light of contemporary debates. This conference aims to advance this significant historical and philosophical research, by investigating the two most central themes in German idealist and romantic philosophy: nature and culture and their interdependence.

Precisely because of the interdisciplinary character of romanticism and idealism, the conference approaches the two movements from a number of related angles. In the first instance, the goal is to consider how various thinkers from the romantic era conceived nature and culture, and sought to harmonize the sphere of the natural sciences (Naturwissenschaften) and the sphere of the humanities (Geisteswissenschaften), which, only some fifty years later, became fully separated. In addition, the conference seeks to investigate the interdisciplinary conception of "Geist" developed during that time, which today can be translated into "mind" as well as its various externalizations as "society", "arts", "institutions", and "culture". In these two ways, the conference will explore the uniqueness of the romantic and idealist views, and consider their potential significance for contemporary debates.

Conference organisers

Heikki Ikäheimo Heikki Ikäheimo (University of New South Wales)
Dalia Nassar (University of Sydney)
Paul Redding (University of Sydney)

Click here to email coordinators

Conference sponsored by the Sydney Intellectual History Network (SIHN) at the University of Sydney and the Faculty of Arts and Social Science and the School of Humanities and Languages at UNSW Australia.

Conference Registration

Registrations close 7 March 2014
Click here to register


Verdi: visions and re-visions of Risorgimento music

Verdi by Boldini 1886

Professor Sergio Durante
Monday 17 March 2014
5:30pm.

Sydney Conservatorium of Music
Macquarie St
Sydney


The contribution of Giuseppe Verdi's music to the cause of Italian Risorgimento and to the unification process of the country (ca. 1848-1870) has been a matter of controversy among music historians over the past two decades. Some believe in fact that the traditional image of Verdi as 'bard' of Risorgimento is really a later ideological construction. The terms of the problem are re-examined against the background of the broader soundscape of the revolutionary years in Italy, including rare relics of popular music.

Sponsored by Sydney Intellectual History Network Putting Periodisation to Use Group and the Sydney Conservatorium of Music - 'About Music' lecture series.

Sergio Durante


Biography
Sergio Durante was born in Padua in 1954 and studied music and musicology in Bologna and at Harvard University. He has published extensively on the history of singers and of the singing profession, developing among other things a historical dictionary of Italian vocal terminology (Lessico italiano del canto) which is soon to be published online. After his earlier research on Frescobaldi, Corelli and Tartini, he turned his main focus to Mozart studies with numerous essays devoted to vocal music, opera, oratorio and theory of dramaturgy and music analysis. Since 2000 he has been a member of the Mozart Akademie in Salzburg, and since 2012, a member of the Directorium of the International Musicological Society. He is Professor of music philology at the University of Padua.

Selected publications
Tartini and his Texts (2007); Die Opera seria zu Mozarts Zeit (2007); Studi su Mozart e il Settecento/Studies on Mozart and the 18th Century (2007); Musicological introduction to W.A. Mozart. La clemenza di Tito K. 621. Facsimile of the Autograph Score (2009); The trouble with Betulia (2013).


Rereading the History of Ideas

Friday 21 March 2014
10am–12pm


Kevin Lee Room, Level 6, Lobby H, Quadrangle
Room Location: Take the MacLaurin Hall lift (near the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences office in the South West corner of the Quadrangle Building) to level 6 and the room is to your left.

In the first meeting for 2014 we will discuss the writings of Sanjay Subrahmanyam.

Subrahmanyam, "Courtly Encounters - Introduction" (PDF)

Subrahmanyam, "Three Ways to be Alien - Introduction" (PDF)

Subrahmanyam, "Connected Histories" (PDF)

Limited Availability. If you would like to attend, please contact for further information.


Finding form for historical lives: a workshop with Tony Birch and Ross Gibson

Thursday 27 March 2014, 3pm-5pm
Location TBA


How do we find a form for representing historical lives, especially those lives that have left only traces in the archive? Or does the form find us? In this workshop, novelist, poet and academic Tony Birch (The University of Melbourne) and author, film-maker and academic Ross Gibson (The University of Sydney) talk about how they have found form for historical lives forgotten and remembered in writing projects, collaborative image-based works, and interactive installation pieces. Tony and Ross will address in particular how to use different media to translate our ideas for public audiences beyond academia.

The workshop is aimed mainly at postgraduate students interested in thinking experimentally about the archives you are working with (broadly conceived) and the imaginative experiences that encountering your archive has inspired. What will you do next with what you have discovered? And how will you go about it?

CLOSED to new applications.

This workshop is generously supported by Global Sensibilities Group, a Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Collaborative Research Group; and Race and Ethnicity in the Global South, a project supported by an ARC Laureate Fellowship at The University of Sydney.