Past Events

Past events: audio files and powerpoints available online


2013 Paul Byrne SC Memorial Lecture: The Hon. Murray Gleeson AC QC - 16 October 2013

Date: 16 October 2013

Venue: Foyer, Level 2 New Law Building (F10) Eastern Ave University of Sydney

Cost: Free, however registration essential

Time: 6-8pm (registration from 5.30pm)

Register: online here.

Donate to the Paul Byrne Memorial Fund: here

Guest Speaker: The Honourable Murray Gleeson AC QC

Topic: Presuming Innocence

Chair: His Honour Judge Stephen Norrish QC

Murray Gleeson took silk in 1974 achieving an extensive constitutional, commercial and tax practice. President of the New South Wales Bar Association 1984 to 1986, he received the Order of Australia for service to the law in 1986 and then received the Companion Order of Australia in 1992. He was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of NSW 1988. During his term of office in the Supreme Court he implemented major reforms to the administration of the Court, resulting in increased efficiency. In 1998, Chief Justice Murray Gleeson resigned his commission as Chief Justice of NSW to take up the appointment of Chief Justice of the High Court of Australia in Canberra until 2008.

About Paul Byrne SC

Paul Byrne SC graduated in Arts and Law from the University of Sydney, and worked with the Public Solicitor's Office as a solicitor. He became a barrister in 1979, and was appointed a public defender. In 1983 he was awarded a Master of Laws degree with First Class Honours, and was awarded a University Medal. He was appointed Director of the Criminal Law Review Division and a Commissioner of the New South Wales Law Reform Commission. In 1995 he took silk and continued an outstanding career as an advocate, taking on the toughest cases, in courts at all levels, with a deep sense of responsibility and the utmost commitment to justice and fair process.

This is the second Paul Byrne SC Memorial Lecture honouring Paul Byrne SC, who had a life long interest in criminal law and the criminal justice system, as well being an active participant and generous supporter of the Institute of Criminology at the Sydney Law School.

The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund

The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund has been set up to honour and continue Paul's interest in the criminal justice system by supporting the ongoing activities of the Institute of Criminology, such as lectures, seminars, publications, and awards.

Attendees of the Paul Byrne SC Memorial Lecture are warmly invited to make a donation to The Paul Byrne SC Memorial Fund. Gifts to The Paul Byrne SC Memorial Fund support the activities of the Institute of Criminology and other activities in the field of criminal law at Sydney Law School, in memory of the late Paul Byrne SC.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD unit.

Please note that the podcast from this event will be avaiable online shortly here.


The Inbetweeners: Getting Youth Back on Track available online

The Sydney Institute of Criminology presented the second seminar in the 2012-2013 seminar series sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW on 24 April 2013.

The seminar focussed on the role of early intervention for juveniles as young as 10 years of age following the NSW Government's recent announcement of its Youth on Track program. The program aims to respond to the needs of those young people who come into repeated contact with police, and who have previously fallen through the cracks of service provision. The program will provide adequate services to prevent the further entrenchment of young people in the criminal justice system.

Recordings and presentations from the speakers Brendan Thomas (Assistant Director General for Crime Prevention and Community Programs), Rebecca Magoffin (Principal Policy Officer at the NSW Department of Community Services) and Professor Ilan Katz (Social Policy Research Centre at UNSW ) are now available online here.


They tried to make me go to rehab... young offenders and drug use audio files and powerpoints available online

The Sydney Institute of Criminology presented the third seminar in the 2011-2012 seminar series sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW on 9 May 2012.

The seminar looked at the latest research on cannabis use amongst young offenders, an innovative intervention program specifically designed for young people with low literacy skills, the effect of being caught with small amounts of drugs and their subsequent entanglement in the justice system, and alternatives to incarceration.

Recordings and presentations from the speakers Melanie Simpson (Senior Research Officer/PhD Candidate, National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre), Geoff Wilkinson (Program Manager, Alcohol and Other Drugs, Juvenile Justice NSW) and Jane Sanders (Principal Solicitor, Shopfront Youth Legal Centre) are now available online here.


NSW crime statistics and trends files available online

The Sydney Institute of Criminology held an event on crime statistics and trends in NSW on 24 April 2012. Speakers at the event included Don Weatherburn (NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research), Ray Carroll (National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council), Greig Newbery (Property Crime Squad, NSW Police Force) and Jason Payne (Australian Institute of Criminology).

Recordings and presentations from the speakers are now available online.


Comparative CPTED Conference audio file and powerpoints available online

The Sydney Institute of Criminology hosted a one-day Comparative CPTED Conference on 24 January 2012. This conference brought together academics and practitioners from numerous jurisdictions (England, New Zealand, Western Australia, South Australia, Victoria, Queensland and NSW) to explore the different approaches to designing out crime.

The conference proved to be a great success. Close to 90 people attended and contributed to the discussions. Some feedback from conference delegates included the following:

  • Very enjoyable, well structured and interesting – my compliments to all staff on the organisation of it.
  • Just wanted to say well done on the conference. I think that it was one of the best days I've been to at the Institute. I found the speakers really interesting and very relevant. I brought a landscape architect from work and today she told me her new motto is design out crime.
  • While I'm not in a purely CPTED focussed role, it was so very informative and interesting for me to widen my knowledge of the array of work carried out in the space.

Audio recordings and presentations from some of the conference sessions are now available online.


Spend less and reduce crime: hear how this is done in the United States audio file available online

The Sydney Institute of Criminology presented the second seminar in the 2011-2012 seminar series sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW on 29 November 2011.

International guest speaker Steve Aos discussed the Washington State Institute for Public Policy’s criminal justice research findings, and how they believe that the key to success is to think more generally about crime.

Audio recording of event including the introduction by Institute Director Gail Mason and presentation by Steve Aos : click here to listen.


Training course: Crime Prevention Evaluation powerpoints available online

The Sydney Institute of Criminology and Australian Institute of Criminology delivered a training course on crime prevention evaluation on 18 October 2011.

Evidence-based crime prevention requires sound evaluations to be conducted. Unfortunately, few crime prevention programs in Australia are ever rigorously evaluated. This can result in promising initiatives being de-funded and popular, but not necessarily successful, programs being adopted.

Crime prevention practitioners often feel ill-equipped to conduct evaluations. This one-day training course will help practitioners to: feel more confident in understanding evaluation reports; develop evaluation plans; and contract external evaluators. Through the use of three case studies (focusing on public space closed-circuit television systems, prevention efforts to address alcohol-related problems and youth diversionary programs), this practical training course helped to equip practitioners with evaluation skills and knowledge.

CCTV, liquor accord and Midnight Basketball case studies were covered in the training and presentations are made available here.


Briefing session: uses and abuses of crime statistics audio files and powerpoints available online

Audio recording of event including presentations Dr Don Weatherburn (Director, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research) and Jessie Holmes (Project Officer, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research): click here to listen.

Slides from event: click here to view the powerpoint presentation.


Should NSW have a Mental Health Court? - 1 April audio files available online

The NSW Law Reform Commission, together with the Sydney Institute of Criminology, held a symposium on 1 April to discuss the potential of a mental health 'court' or a specialist list to address issues of diversion in relation to people with cognitive and mental health impairments in the criminal justice system and how such a court or list might be implemented in NSW.

Excerpts of the forum were broadcast on ABC Radio National's program All in the Mind: to listen click here.


Juvenile Offending - What Are the Facts? audio files and powerpoints available online

Introduction to the Juvenile Offending - What Are the Facts? Seminar - Adjunct Lecturer Garner Clancey (Sydney Institute of Criminology) and Peter Muir (Chief Executive, NSW Juvenile Justice): click here to hear the introduction.

Rachel Aalders (Senior Project Manager, Child and Youth Welfare Unit, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare) - click here to hear the presentation. Click here to view the powerpoint presentation.

Jessie Holmes (Information Officer, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research) - click here to hear the presentation. Click here to view the powerpoint presentation.

Dr Eric Heller (Manager of Research, NSW Juvenile Justice) - click here to hear the presentation.


Investing in Alternatives to Prison audio files and powerpoints available online

Audio of Investing in Alternatives to Prison Seminar - The Honourable Harold Sperling QC (Convenor, Crime and Justice Reform Committee), Mr Peter Achterstraat (Auditor-General, Audit Office of NSW) and Emeritus Professor David Brown (University of New South Wales): click here to listen.

Mr Peter Achterstraat (Auditor-General, Audit Office of NSW) - click here to view the powerpoint presentation.

Emeritus Professor David Brown (University of New South Wales) - click here to view the powerpoint presentation.

To visit the website of the Audit Office of New South Wales, click here.


Critical Perspectives of CPTED audio files available online

Introduction to the Critical Perspectives of CPTED Seminar - Adjunct Professor Duncan Chappell (Sydney Institute of Criminology): click here to hear the introduction.

Rodger Watson (NSW Department of Justice and Attorney General) - click here to hear the presentation.

Dr Kurt Iveson (Senior Lecturer in Urban Geography, University of Sydney) - click here to hear the presentation.

Professor Paul Ekblom (Academic Director, Design Against Crime Research Centre, Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, England) - click here to hear the presentation.

Garner Clancey (Adjunct Lecturer, Sydney Institute of Criminology) - click here to hear the presentation.


Complex Needs Seminar audio file and powerpoint available online

Complex Needs Seminar - Professor Margaret Hamilton: click here to hear the presentation.

Complex Needs Seminar: click here to see the slides of the powerpoint.


Restorative Justice Seminar audio files available online

Restorative Justice Seminar - Introduction by Dr Murray Lee and Michaela Wengert: click here to hear the presentation.

Restorative Justice Seminar - Professor Julie Stubbs: click here to hear the presentation.

Restorative Justice Seminar - Natalia Blecher: click here to hear the presentation.


Crime Prevention Seminar audio files and powerpoints available online

Introduction to the Crime Prevention Seminar - Dr Murray Lee and Garner Clancey (Sydney Institute of Criminology): click here to hear the introduction.

Latest Trends in Crime in NSW - Jackie Fitzgerald (Deputy Director, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research): click here to hear the presentation, click here to see the slides of the powerpoint.

The Ghost of Crime Prevention Future - Peter Homel (Research Manager, Crime Reduction and Review, Australian Institute of Criminology): click here to hear the presentation, click here to see the slides of the powerpoint.


Crime Free Housing Seminar audio files available online

  • Introduction by Dr Murray Lee and Garner Clancey: click here.
  • Presentation by Galina Laurie, Director, Community Regeneration Unit, Housing NSW: click here.
  • Presentation by Eileen Baldry, Associate Professor, School of Social Sciences and International Studies, UNSW: click here.
  • Presentation by Chris Martin, PhD Candidate, University of Sydney: click here.
  • Presentation by Shane O'Brien, National Environmental health and Safety Manager, Delfin Lend Lease: click here.

Past Events 2014

One-Punch Assaults - 12 March 2014

Secrecy, Law and Society - 6 & 7 February 2014


One-Punch Assaults - 12 March 2014

Date: 12 March 2014

Venue: Faculty Common Room, Level 4, New Law School Building, Eastern Ave University of Sydney

Cost: free but registration essential

Time: 6-8pm

Register: online here.

The Sydney Institute of Criminology presents an expert panel discussion on the recent debate over one-punch assaults and street violence. The forum is an opportunity to consider ways to address alcohol-fuelled violence within the community, including assessing the effectiveness of the NSW Government's recent response to one-punch assaults. This includes new laws introducing an offence of assault causing death, increased penalties, mandatory minimum sentences and tighter licensing regulations. The panel will discuss key issues relating to the cause, prevention and responses to one-punch assaults.

SPEAKERS INCLUDE:

Professor Raewyn Connell: University Chair, University of Sydney

David Shoebridge: Greens MP in the NSW Legislative Council

Associate Professor Thomas Crofts: Co-Director, Sydney Institute of Criminology, University of Sydney

Professor Mark Halsey: Flinders Law School, Flinders University

Dr Julia Quilter: Senior Lecturer of Law, University of Wollongong

Professor Stephen Tomsen: Professor of Criminology, University of Western Sydney

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units.


Secrecy, Law and Society - 6 & 7 February

A two-day workshop to investigate the legal and socio-legal dimensions of secrecy

Date: Thursday 6 February & Friday 7 February 2014

Venue:
Sydney Law School
New Law Building (F10)
University of Sydney

Price
Full fee: $75.00
Unwaged / concessions: $30.00


About the Workshop
Scholars and critics have shown how a 'culture of security' ushered in after 11 September 2001 has involved exceptional legal measures and increased recourse to secrecy on the basis of protecting public safety and national security. However, secrecy is not confined to this development, and includes legacies of secrecy across a range of institutional and cultural settings. With this in mind, the Workshop will interrogate the legal as well as socio-legal dimensions of secrecy.

In law, secrecy impacts upon the separation of powers, due process and the rule of law, raising fundamental concerns about open justice, procedural fairness and human rights. More broadly, questions concerning secrecy involve the credibility of public and private institutions.

Workshop questions may include:

  • Where is secrecy in the law and what justifies it? And how does the State keep its secrets in litigation?
  • What are the challenges posed to legal and constitutional principles, the rules of evidence, and 'traditional' mechanisms for dealing with sensitive information, such as public interest immunity? Might secrecy be remedied by human rights statutes and safeguards such as the use of special advocates?
  • What bearing does secrecy have on the media, press freedom and free speech?
  • What, if any, relationship exists between secrecy, a right to privacy and breach of confidence?
  • What might be some of the institutional effects of secrecy developments upon security and law enforcement agencies?
  • How might legal and socio-legal perspectives help make sense of cultural, historic and institutionalised forms of secrecy?

Speakers
The Workshop will feature key academics and practitioners, including:

  • Dr Gabrielle Appleby (Senior Lecturer, Law School, University of Adelaide)
  • Dr Steven Churches (Barrister and Senior Lecturer, School of Law, University of South Australia)
  • Dr Lawrence McNamara (Senior Research Fellow & Deputy Director, Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law, London, UK)

Other speakers are to be confirmed.

Call for abstracts/papers
Please email abstracts of 200 words (plus biographical information) to Dr Greg Martin by 31 August 2013. A decision about papers will be communicated to applicants by mid-September 2013.

Speakers whose abstracts are accepted for the Workshop will be required to submit draft papers for circulation in mid-January 2014.

It is anticipated that a selection of Workshop papers will be published in an edited collection or special issue of a peer-reviewed journal. Final papers for publication will need to be submitted by 30 April 2014.


Workshop hosts
Institute of Criminology
Sydney Law School, University of Sydney

The Ross Parsons Centre of Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law
Sydney Law School, University of Sydney

Law & Society Research Network
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Sydney


CONTACT
All enquiries and further information about the Workshop can be directed by email to any of the organisers at the following addresses:

Miiko Kumar
Dr Greg Martin
Dr Rebecca Scott Bray


Past Events 2013

Drugs, Crime and Brief Interventions for Young People - 28 November 2013

Young People, Alternative Education and Diversion Seminar - 7 November 2013

The University Beyond Walls: Transformative Prison Education from the Inside Out - 4 November 2013

The End of Public Religions in America: Occupy Wall Street, Tea Party politics, Same-sex marriage, homosexuality, abortion, Shari'a and the growth of no religion - 30 July 2013

The Inbetweeners: Getting Youth Back on Track - 24 April 2013

Beyond Punishment: Restorative Justice and Adult Offending - 6 March 2013

Right to Silence - 11 February 2013


Drugs, Crime and Brief Interventions for Young People - 28 November 2013

Date: 28 November 2013

Venue: New Law Building Annex, Eastern Ave University of Sydney

Cost: $240 inc GST

Time: 9am-5pm

Register: online here.

Drugs and crime interact in a variety of ways, but certainly tend to exacerbate each other. The evidence is clear that reduced drug use is associated with reduced crime. Frontline workers often feel ill-equipped to address the complexity of presentations of young offenders who use drugs, yet access to effective community or residential treatment is often elusive. This course will provide an update on the drug use of young people, available intervention options, and how those who come into contact with young offenders who use drugs may be able to provide helpful evidence-informed and brief interventions.

Course presenter:

John Howard (BA, MA(Couns), MClinPsych, DipCrim, PhD, MAPS) joined the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) in 2008 as a Senior Lecturer and works with the National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre, as well as NDARC’s international research activities and those with a focus on young people. He has worked in schools, juvenile justice, adolescent mental health and drug treatment, and universities. John is a consultant Clinical Psychologist and his major clinical, teaching and research areas are: adolescent substance use and ‘street youth’, comorbidity, depression and suicide in young people, working with marginalised youth and those with multiple and complex needs, adolescent psychotherapy, same-sex attracted youth, HIV infection in adolescents, resilience, youth treatment capacity-building and developing ‘youth friendly’ harm reduction. He consults to WHO, UNICEF, UNODC and UNESCAP on capacity-building for community treatment of young drug users and increasing access to harm reduction services for young injecting drug users. International work has taken him to Nepal, China, Thailand Viet Nam, Lao PDR, India, Philippines, Egypt and South Africa.

Course outcomes:

At the completion of this course, you will:

  • Be familiar with key illicit drugs and their basic pharmacological effects
  • Understand the reasons why young people use illicit drugs
  • Be introduced to the stage of change model and motivational interviewing
  • Know how to apply basic brief intervention strategies when working with young people.

Course suitable for:

This course provides an introduction to key concepts, making it most suitable for new community, youth, criminal justice and other workers. Members of the public interested in youth drug use and crime are also welcome to attend.


Young People, Alternative Education and Diversion Seminar - 7 November 2013

Date: 7 November 2013

Venue: Law Foyer, Level 2, New Law School Building (F10), Eastern Ave University of Sydney

Cost: Free, however registrations is essential

Time: 9.30am-11.30am

Register: online here.

Various programs seek to maintain young people in education, provide recreational opportunities and divert them from criminal activity and the criminal justice system. Despite the widespread adoption of recreational, sporting, educational and other forms of diversionary program, there has been limited research testing the efficacy of these programs. This free seminar will bring together practitioners involved in developing and delivering innovative alternative education and diversionary programs, and Sydney University research staff to discuss evaluation and research issues. In particular, this seminar will explore how research and practice can better inform each other.

SPEAKERS INCLUDE:

Dr Gareth Jenkins:
Dr Jenkins is the Youth Engagement Coordinator for Save the Child Australia. In this role, Gareth is responsible for designing and implementing youth engagement projects in urban and remote locations. Gareth has a background in education, psychology and digital media projects in the youth and community sector. He will be discussing the Glebe Pathways Project.

Shane Phillips:
Shane is an outstanding community leader and respected spokesperson for Aboriginal Australians. Shane is passionate about the importance of empowering Aboriginal people and is a dedicated contributor to a range of community organisations. He has cultural connections to the Bunjalung, Wonnarua, and Eora peoples. Shane is Chief Executive Officer of the Tribal Warrior Association. Prior to this, Shane's career included roles working with young people in child protection, juvenile justice and the law, including working with the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody as a community liaison officer under the Honourable Justice Hal Wooten.

Superintendent Luke Freudenstein:
Superintendent Freudenstein is the Commander of the Redfern Local Area Command. He recently received the prestigious Australian Police Medal announced in the Australia Day Honours. The award is called the Superintendent's Medal for Excellence. Superintendent Freudenstein joined the NSW Police Force in 1980 when the NSW Police Academy was located in Redfern, and has been the Commander at the Redfern Local Area Command since June 2008.

Dr Kate Russell:
Dr Russell is a Senior Lecturer, Human Movement and Health Education at the University of Sydney. Current research interests include the negotiation of gender in a range of sporting contexts such as swimming, snowboarding, men's netball, female boxing, motor cross and BMX. Kate is also currently involved in a research project looking at the impact of the Young Endeavour Youth Scheme on social inclusion and will discuss current Faculty of Education and Social Work projects.

This seminar is being hosted by the Sydney Institute of Criminology and the Faculty of Education and Social Work.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units.


The University Beyond Walls: Transformative Prison Education from the Inside Out - 4 November 2013

Date: 4 November 2013

Venue: Faculty Common Room, Level 4, Sydney Law School Building, Building F10, Eastern Avenue, Camperdown, University of Sydney

Cost: Free, however registrations is essential

Time: 6-8pm (registration and refreshments from 5:30pm)

Register: online here.

About the panel discussion:

The Institute of Criminology and the Sydney Social Justice Network are excited to announce an innovative panel discussion exploring alternative educational frameworks within the prison setting. The panel will feature Lori Pompa, Founder and Director of The Inside-Out Center at Temple University, USA. Inside-Out brings university students and incarcerated individuals together as peers in a classroom setting that emphasises dialogue, critical thinking, collaboration, and the creation of new ideas. The program aims to deepen the conversation - and transform ways of thinking - about crime, justice, and related social issues. The panel discussion will explore a range of topics relevant to launching Inside-Out in the Australian context, including cultural and institutional issues, education, and methodology. Lori Pompa's first visit to Australia will enliven this discussion around Australia's potential to promote social change through transformative prison education and identify potential challenges. This panel discussion asks: how is a program such as Inside-Out distinct from other courses taught in correctional facilities? What do inside and outside students gain from the experience? What are some of the local issues facing prison educators and students? How might the experiential learning method promote genuine interaction and exchange of ideas between inside and outside students in the Australian context? Join us for this stimulating evening of discussion with prison educators, stakeholders and academics to ask 'How might an Inside-Out program work in Australia?'.

About the speakers:

Lori Pompa is Founder and Director of The Inside-Out Center at Temple University, USA, the International Headquarters of The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program. Beginning in 1997, Inside-Out has been creating opportunities for social change through transformative education, involving individuals inside and outside of correctional facilities working together through dialogue and collaborative problem solving in classrooms behind prison walls. As a 2003 Soros Justice Senior Fellow, she collaborated with others on both sides of the prison wall to develop Inside-Out into a national (now international) model of transformative pedagogy with over 500 Inside-Out classes offered so far in disciplines spanning the social sciences, the arts, and the humanities. Employing experiential and service learning pedagogies in her Criminal Justice classes, she has taken more than 7,000 students to area correctional facilities in the past 11 years, and has worked with men and women inside prison since 1985. Lori has also served on the faculty of the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University in Philadelphia since 1992. Her areas of expertise are correctional issues, race and racism, hands-on experiential learning, and community education. From 2000 to 2003, she served as Director of the Temple University College of Liberal Arts' Office of Experiential Learning. In 2011 she received the Justice Studies Association (JSA) Social Activist Award for her work with the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program.

Jo McAlpin is Performance and Compliance Manager in Corrective Services NSW. She has a background in English Literature and the History and Philosophy of Science. Her diverse experience in education includes prison teaching and being responsible for state wide management of basic adult education for Corrective Services NSW. Jo is currently working in the area of strategic policy and planning for Corrective Services.

Juanita Sherwood has held the position of Professor of Indigenous Education at FASS UTS since the end of 2011. Prior to this appointment Professor Sherwood held the position of senior lecturer, course co-ordinator and co-developer of the Indigenous Studies Masters Program at Nura Gili, UNSW. Juanita has worked actively inside and outside of the academy, in both rural and in urban settings in Aboriginal health and education for over 25 years. She is a registered nurse and a qualified teacher with extensive experience in Aboriginal health policy planning, community consultation, advocacy, community development and management. Her areas of expertise include; Aboriginal mental health, woman's health, family violence, child Health, otitis media, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research monitoring, Indigenous research methodologies, capacity building in primary health care and health service planning.

Experiences working with Community have shaped Juanita's passionate commitment to ensuring that Aboriginal voices are listened two respected and heard. This commitment presently finds expression in Juanita's own Indigenous research and in mentoring and growing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander post graduate students within an Indigenous research agenda. Juanita currently holds the position of lead researcher on the Social and Cultural Resilience and Emotional Wellbeing of Aboriginal Mothers in Prison (SCREAM) project.

Other speakers to be confirmed.


The End of Public Religions in America: Occupy Wall Street, Tea Party politics, Same-sex marriage, homosexuality, abortion, Shari'a and the growth of no religion - 30 July 2013

Date: 30 July 2013

Venue: Foyer, Level 2 New Law Building (F10) Eastern Ave University of Sydney

Cost: Free, however registration essential

Time: 6-8pm (Registration and refreshments from 5.30pm)

Register: online here.

American exceptionalism has typically included the notion that secularization might apply to northern Europe but was not a valid description of religion in the United States. Most accounts of religion in America start with Alex de Tocqueville in the 1840s and conclude with Robert Bell on civil religion. Furthermore, in 1994 Jose Casanova published his influential book on Public Religions in the Modern World to argue against a naïve view of secularization, and to draw attention to the Moral Majority, Solidarity, the Iranian Revolution and Latin American liberal theology. In the last decade the sociology of religion has celebrated the presence of religion in the public domain. The secularization thesis is dead and buried - or at least almost. This lecture looks at what is arguably the failure of the Moral Majority agenda to capture American politics, which is a thesis illustrated by looking at the slow and complex, but significant, acceptance in mainstream politics of homosexuality in the military, in the Body Scouts, and public life. We can also point to the spread of legislation in support of same-sex marriage, and the modest success of creationism. After Obama's second electoral victory, it appears the Republican party is abandoning the Tea Party and embracing Democratic strategies. The lecture reports on some research undertaken in New York on Occupy Wall Street, which had only limited religious support. People who declare 'no religion' has grown to around 20%; 'spirituality' rather than 'religion' has also grown. Is America becoming like northern European societies in terms of secularization? Possibly - but this lecture concludes, because it is timely, with a retrospective reflection on Reagan and Thatcher to consider the different location of political conservatism and conservative politics in the two societies.

About the speaker:
Bryan S. Turner is the Presidential Professor of Sociology and the Director of the Committee on Religion at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and concurrently the Director of the Centre on Religion and Society at the University of Western Sydney. He was the Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge (1998-2005) and was awarded a doctor of letters from the University in 2009. More recently the Alona Evans Distinguished Visiting Professor of Sociology at Wellesley College (2009-2010). His publications in the sociology of religion include Weber and Islam (1974), Religion and Social Theory (1983) (with Kamaludeen and Pereira), Muslims in Singapore (2010), Religion and Modern Society (2011), and The Religious and the Political (2013). He is the founding editor of three sociology journals: Citizenship Studies, Journal of Classical Sociology (with John O'Neill), and Body & Society (with Mike Featherstone). He serves on various editorial boards: Journal of Sociology, The Sociological Review, British Journal of Sociology, Society, Ethnicities, and Contemporary Islam. He is currently editing the Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Social Theory. His current research projects are on Shari'a in the USA and Australia, Occupy Wall Street, assimilation of Muslims in the West, and the same-sex marriage debate in New Zealand and Australia.

This public lecture is co-hosted by the Law & Society Research Network (Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Sydney) and the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School.


The Inbetweeners: Getting Youth Back on Track - 24 April 2013

Date: 24 April 2013

Venue: Foyer, Level 2 New Law Building (F10) Eastern Ave University of Sydney

Cost: Free, however registration essential

Time: 6-8pm (Registration and refreshments from 5.30pm)

Register: online here.

Enhancing outcomes for children and adolescents is an important goal of early intervention programs, where critical aspects of risk and need, rather than simply crime, are addressed. A holistic approach to the lives of young people also has significantly broader effects, including community safety, risk reduction and crime prevention. This important seminar will focus on the role of early intervention for juveniles as young as 10 years of age following the NSW Government's recent announcement of its Youth on Track program. The program aims to respond to the needs of those young people who come into repeated contact with police, and who have previously fallen through the cracks of service provision. The program will provide adequate services to prevent the further entrenchment of young people in the criminal justice system. This second seminar in the 2012 - 2013 Juvenile Justice seminar series explores the role of early intervention for these young people - the inbetweeners - and its effectiveness in getting them back on track.

About the speakers

Brendan Thomas BA was appointed to his current role, Assistant Director General for Crime Prevention and Community Programs in September 2007. Brendan is responsible for Criminal Diversion and Crime Prevention activity for the NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice, including oversight of the Crime Prevention Division, Anti-Discrimination Board, the Aboriginal Programs Division, the Diversity Services and the Victims Services Division. Brendan has worked in crime prevention and criminal justice for more than 18 years and has written widely on crime prevention and Aboriginal justice issues.

Rebecca Magoffin is Principal Policy Officer at the NSW Department of Community Services.

Professor Ilan Katz joined the Social Policy Research Centre at UNSW in January 2005, becoming Director in July 2007-December 2011. He started his career as a social worker and manager in several local authorities and NGOs in the UK. He was Head of Practice Development and Research at the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. After spending some time as a civil servant in the Department for Education and Skills, he returned to research. His research interests include parenting, child protection, disability, youth justice, youth mental health prevention and family support, children and communities, social inclusion, comparative child welfare systems, adoption, migration, race and ethnicity and Indigenous social policy.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW and hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School.


Beyond Punishment: Restorative Justice and Adult Offending - 6 March 2013

Restorative Justice: Adults and Emerging Practice

Date: 6 March 2013

Time: 6-7:30pm (registration and refreshments from 5:30pm)

Venue: Faculty Common Room 432, Level 4, Sydney Law School, New Law Building, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free, however registration essential

Register: click here

The introduction of restorative justice for adult offenders represents a compelling new direction in the criminal justice system. It offers a real and persuasive alternative to the adversarial system. This seminar will explore the value and challenges of restorative justice for adult offenders, victims and communities at different stages of the criminal justice system. John McDonald will give the key note address on ‘Restorative Justice: Some Big Ideas’. The seminar will bring together a panel of experts to offer critical analysis of the emergence and impact of program developments for restorative justice practitioners and professionals.

The Honourable Greg Smith, NSW Attorney General and Minister for Justice, will launch the new book Restorative Justice: Adults and Emerging Practice published by the Sydney Institute of Criminology, at this seminar, providing a timely opportunity to reflect on key issues and developments in restorative justice for adult offending.

Program:

Book Launch: The Honourable Greg Smith, NSW Attorney General and Minister for Justice

Keynote Address: ‘Restorative Justice: Some Big Ideas’, John McDonald, Managing Director, ProActive Resolutions

Panel members:
Kate Milner, Manager, Restorative Justice, Corrective Services NSW
Dean Hart, State Manager, Forum Sentencing, NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice
Professor Elena Marchetti, University of Wollongong

Chair: Dr Jasmine Bruce, University of New South Wales

The seminar will be of interest to restorative justice professionals - lawyers, police, magistrates, program managers, convenors and facilitators – policy-makers, academics and students.

This event is the third event in the 2012-2013 Beyond Punishment seminar series sponsored by Corrective Services NSW. The event is hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School.


Right to Silence - 11 February 2013

Date: 11 February 2013

Time: 5.15 - 6.30pm

Venue: Bar Common Room, NSW Bar Association, Lower Ground Floor, Selborne Chambers, 174 Phillip Street

Cost: Free, however registration essential

Register: FULLY BOOKED. Please email to be placed on a wait list.

The NSW Government has foreshadowed legislation that will change the standard caution given to suspects held in police custody. This panel session will examine the impact of the proposed amendments on one of the fundamental tenets of our legal system - the right to silence - and the implications for accused, legal practitioners and the criminal justice system as a whole.

Panel Members

  • Phillip Boulten SC (NSW Bar Association) - Phillip Boulten SC practises from Forbes Chambers. He specialises in criminal trials and appeals. He is currently the President of the New South Wales Bar Association and is a member of the Law Council of Australia's Criminal Law Committee.
  • Associate Professor David Hamer (Sydney Law School) - David Hamer's primary research interest is in the law of evidence. He takes an interdisciplinary approach, interrogating the law - and the proof process more broadly - using tools drawn from probability theory, narrative theory and psychology. His interest in evidence law often flows over into areas of substantive law and broader issues, in particular law's continuing struggle with the notion of causation, criminal justice, and the causes of and solutions to wrongful convictions.

This is a joint event of the NSW Bar Association and the Sydney Institute of Criminology.


Past Events 2012

Conference: Tackling Complex Needs: An Inter-disciplinary Exploration - 11 December 2012

Working with Domestic Violence Offenders Training Course - 27 November 2012

Beyond Punishment: Facing the challenge of ageing prisoners - 29 October 2012

All in the Family? The use of Family Intervention Programs and Methods in Juvenile Justice - 24 October 2012

Trust in justice, legitimacy and compliance with the law: a European perspective - 15 October 2012

Beyond Punishment: Outsourcing Justice? The Privatisation of Prisons - 5 October 2012

Report Writing Training Course - 27 September 2012

Forensic Science and Justice: From crime scene to court and beyond - 1 August 2012

Beyond Punishment: Frontiers of Penal Policy - 31 July 2012

The Psychology of Crime - 17 July 2012

Towards a Modest Legal Moralism - 16 July 2012

Essentials of crime prevention - 6 June 2012

They tried to make me go to rehab... young offenders and drug use - 9 May 2012

NSW crime statistics and trends - 24 April 2012

Teaching Criminology, Crime and Criminal Justice - 13 April 2012

Drugs, crime and brief interventions for young offenders - 11 April 2012

Understanding Kinship: Indigenous People and Law - 13 March 2012

Surveillance and/in Everyday Life Conference - 20 to 21 February 2012

Comparative CPTED Conference - 24 January 2012


Conference: Tackling Complex Needs: An Inter-disciplinary Exploration - 11 December 2012

Date: 11 December 2012

Venue: Level 1, New Law Building, Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Full fee: $200; FT student: $100; Uni of Sydney staff: $150; Sydney Law School alumni: $150 inc. GST

Time: 9am - 5pm

Register: online here.

This one-day conference will explore 'complex needs'. By adopting a critical inter-disciplinary analysis, conference presenters will explore the multiple needs of criminal justice and human service clients more broadly.

Speakers will include:

  • Professor Eileen Baldry (University of NSW)
  • Associate Professor Susan Goodwin (University of Sydney)
  • Alison Churchill (Community Restorative Centre)
  • Leigh Garrett (OARS, South Australia)
  • Phillip Borg (Housing NSW)
  • Brendan Delahunty (NSW Ombudsman)
  • Jenny Bargen (Sydney Institute of Criminology)
  • Kat Armstrong (Women in Prison Advocacy Network)
  • Dr. Cathy Kezelman (Adults Surviving Child Abuse)
  • Dr Leanne Dowse (University of NSW)
  • Associate Professor Judy Cashmore (University of Sydney)
  • Corinne Henderson (Mental Health Coordinating Council)

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

WELCOME: 9.00am-9.10am
Introduction and welcome Sydney Institute of Criminology

SESSION 1: 9.10am-9.40am
Complex Needs - Setting the Scene Professor Eileen Baldry, UNSW

SESSION 2: 9.40am-10.30am
Disability, Trauma and Abuse Dr Leanne Dowse, UNSW; Kat Armstrong, Women In Prison Advocacy Network; Corinne Henderson, Mental Health Coordinating Council; Dr Cathy Kezelman, Adults Surviving Child Abuse.

MORNING TEA: 10.30am-11.00am

BREAK-OUT SESSIONS 1: 11.00am-12.30pm
Homelessness and Housing Phil Borg, Housing NSW; Assoc. Professor Sue Goodwin, University of Sydney; John Maynard and Dominic Grenot, City of Sydney,
OR
Drugs, Crime and Justice Ruth Marshall Dept. of Juvenile Justice; John Howard, National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre; Phil Naden and Nioka Bill, Aboriginal Legal Service NSW/ACT.

LUNCH 12.30pm-1.30pm

BREAK-OUT SESSIONS 2: 1.30pm-3.00pm
Post-Release Support: The Role of NGOs Leigh Garrett, Offenders Aid and Rehabilitation Service SA; Alison Churchill, Community Restorative Centre NSW; Vaughan Winther, Aust. Community Support Organisation VIC.
OR
Care/Crime Nexus Assoc. Professor Judy Cashmore and Jenny Bargen, University of Sydney; Brendan Delahunty, NSW Ombudsman.

AFTERNOON TEA: 3.00pm-3.30pm

PRESENTATION & PANEL 3.30pm-4.30pm
Legal Issues and Complex Needs: Shifting Terrain John McKenzie, Aboriginal Legal Service NSW/ACT, Deborah Macourt, Law and Justice Foundation

CLOSING REMARKS 4.30pm-5.00pm
Sydney Institute of Criminology

COCKTAIL RECEPTION from 5.00pm
Join us for a drink and canapé to conclude the conference


Working with Domestic Violence Offenders Training Course - 27 November 2012

Date: 27 November 2012

Venue: Room 340, New Law School Annex, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Full fee: $240; F/T student: $150; Uni of Sydney staff: $190; SLS alumni: $190 inc. GST

Time: 9am - 5pm

Register: online here.

This course forms part of the new partnership between Corrective Services NSW and the Sydney Institute of Criminology. This collaboration provides training courses to equip criminology students (and students from related disciplines) and those interested in a career in the criminal justice system with industry-relevant knowledge and skills.

This course will specifically provide participants with information and tool work with and manage domestic violence offenders. This course will be delivered by an accredited Corrective Services NSW Trainer. This course will be especially relevant to anyone interested in a career in corrections or working with domestic violence perpetrators.


Beyond Punishment: Facing the challenge of ageing prisoners - 29 October 2012

Date: 29 October 2012

Venue: Common Room, Level 4, Sydney Law School, Building F10, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free, however registration essential

Time: 6-8pm (registration and refreshments from 5.30pm)

Register: online here.

The Institute of Criminology is pleased to announce the second seminar in the 2012-2013 Beyond Punishment seminar series will focus on issues with ageing prisoners and will be delivered by Azrini Wahidin, Reader in Criminology and Criminal Justice at Queen's University Belfast.

About the seminar

For the first time in history, nations around the globe are faced with the dilemma of managing prisons with ageing populations. For legitimate reasons, prison officials responsible for making decisions about older prisoners are raising concerns about how best to respond to this major challenge. Although a number of countries have commissioned studies to investigate and make policy recommendations, the body of knowledge on elderly prisoners and the issues posed to prisons systems in meeting their special needs is not extensive. From an international perspective, prisons have been slow to respond to the physical and mental needs of older prisoners. As a consequence, a comparative analysis between countries can be an important first step in identifying best practice models and emerging policies. This seminar will identify some of the issues raised from the USA and UK's experience of managing the needs of prisoners in later life. It will also examine and address some of the issues and challenges facing policy makers and correctional / prison facilities in managing the health, social and care needs of an ageing prison population, and will conclude by considering a series of policy recommendations addressing the needs of the ageing prison population.

About the speaker

Azrini Wahidin is a Reader in Criminology and Criminal Justice at Queen's University Belfast. She researches on the issues of imprisonment, engendering of punishment and the experiences of elders in prison in the UK and USA. Her previous work focused on older women in prison, managing the needs of elders in prison, abolitionism and women in the criminal justice system. Her latest research focuses on women who were volunteers in the Irish Republican Army. Author of a range of academic articles in international journals, single authored books and edited collections, Azrini is currently a visiting international scholar at the University of Melbourne in the School of Social and Political Sciences. A selection of her publications include: Older Women in the Criminal Justice System: Running out of Time (2004); Criminology (with Chris Hale, Keith Hayward and Emma Wincup, 2005); Ageing, Crime and Society (with Maureen Cain, 2006), Understanding Prison Staff (with Jamie Bennett and Ben Crewe, 2007) and Criminal Justice (with Anthea Hucklesby, 2009). She is a trustee of the Howard League for Penal Reform and the Irish Penal Reform Trust.

This event is sponsored by Corrective Services NSW and is part of the Beyond Punishment seminar series. The event is hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School.


All in the Family? The use of Family Intervention Programs and Methods in Juvenile Justice - 24 October 2012

Date: 24 October 2012

Venue: Foyer, Level 2 New Law Building (F10) Eastern Ave University of Sydney

Cost: Free, however registration essential

Time: 6-8pm (Registration and refreshments from 5.30pm)

Register: online here.

The Institute of Criminology is pleased to announce the first seminar in the 2012-2013 Juvenile Justice seminar series, which will explore models of family intervention and their effectiveness in reducing juvenile offending behavior. In exploring the role of family intervention, the seminar will bring together key government, non-government organisation and academic perspectives. Critical attention increasingly is being paid to this area of juvenile justice practice; some jurisdictions are enthusiastic about the uptake of such programs, while others are more cautious. In light of this, it is timely that this seminar asks: how effective are family intervention programs and methods? Do they assist young people from deepening contact with the criminal justice system and prevent offending behaviour? Simply put, can and do they work?

About the speakers

Michael Szyjan Ph.D. is the Manager of the Intensive Supervision Program (ISP) in Juvenile Justice, NSW. Michael was trained as a Clinical Community Psychologist at DePaul University, Chicago. He has managed community mental health programs in the US including programs with offenders. Michael provided consultation to the Department of Community Services (DoCs) for the roll out of psychological services. His interest is in the development, implementation and evaluation of evidenced based programs within the NSW public service.

Bron Parker is Manager ALIVE, Catholic Care. She has an MA in Community Management. Originally from Adelaide, Bron worked in nursing with remote Aboriginal communities before moving to Melbourne and working with Community Services in child protection and with youth. She has been with CatholicCare for 20 years where she manages Adolescents Living Independently Via Empowerment (ALIVE). ALIVE was established in 1992 to work with 16-25 year olds at risk of homelessness and empower them with skills and information in their pursuit of secure independent living. ALIVE supports between 40 – 50 young people at any one time and offers a suite of programs, including programs specific to the needs of Juvenile Justice clients. These include the Joint Tenancy Assistance Program (JTAP), the Juniperina Housing and Support Program (JH&SP), and ALIVE HAP (Homeless Action Project) which are ALIVE’s most intensive accommodation support programs. Bron has managed JTAP since its inception in 1997.

Associate Professor Brian Stout joined the University of Western Sydney in April 2012, as Associate Professor of Social Work in Department of Social Work, Welfare and Therapy Studies. Previously he was Associate Head of the School of Applied Social Sciences, De Montfort University, in Leicester, UK, where he worked for 9 years, primarily in Community and Criminal Justice. Associate Professor Stout's practice background is as a probation officer, in Northern Ireland, and has been involved in developing and delivering training and education for probation officers and other criminal justice professionals both in the UK and in South Africa. Most recently, he has been involved in a number of European criminal justice social work projects, and he has also contributed, as an international expert, to probation and prison training in Georgia and Chechnya.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW and hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School.


Trust in justice, legitimacy and compliance with the law: a European perspective - 15 October 2012

Date: 15 October 2012

Venue: Foyer, Level 2, Sydney Law School, New Law Building (F10), Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free, registration essential

Time: 6-8pm (Registration and refreshments from 5.30pm)

Register: online here.

This seminar will present the results of a large-scale empirical test of procedural justice theory in 26 European countries. A team based largely at LSE, Oxford and Birkbeck has used the fifth round of the European Social Survey (ESS) to test an elaboration of procedural justice theory which combines ideas from the work of Tom Tyler and David Beetham.

The ESS is an academically driven survey with around 50,000 respondents. In each round there are 'rotating modules' for which researcher can bid, and we were successful in winning space for questions on trust in justice. Our analysis shows that in most countries covered by the ESS public trust in the fairness of justice institutions supports public belief in their legitimacy, which in turn promotes cooperation and compliance with the law. The study has important implications about the quality of treatment received by the public from police and courts officials.

About the speaker:

Mike Hough is Co-Director of the Institute for Criminal Policy Research and Professor of Criminal Policy, Birkbeck, University of London. He began his research career in the British Home Office, and was a member of the team that started the British Crime Survey. Leaving in 1994, he set up an academic policy research centre, now based at Birkbeck, University of London. Mike's current research interests include: procedural justice theory and public trust in justice; public perceptions of crime and justice; policing and police legitimacy; crime measurement and crime trends; sentencing and sentencing guidelines; offender rehabilitation and desistance (and its evaluation).

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to2 MCLE/CPD unit.

This event is sponsored by the Australian Institute of Police Management.


Beyond Punishment: Outsourcing Justice? The Privatisation of Prisons - 5 October 2012

Date: 5 October 2012

Venue: Common Room, Level 4, Sydney Law School, Building F10, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free, however registration essential

Time: 5.30-7pm (Registration and refreshments from 5.00pm)

Register: online here.

The Institute of Criminology is pleased to announce that Professor Malcolm Feeley, the 2012 Fulbright Flinders University Distinguished Chair in American Political Science, will deliver the first seminar in the 2012-2013 Beyond Punishment seminar series.

About the seminar

The United States and Australia lead the world in the development of private prisons. This development has generated considerable controversy and resistance. There are two well-rehearsed arguments against it. First, many thoughtful observers insist that private prisons are not the efficient and effective institutions that their proponents maintain they are. Second, many observers maintain that it in appropriate and morally wrong for the state to delegate one of its core functions to private contractors, and that it violates the basic understanding of constitutional governance. This seminar by Professor Malcolm Feeley acknowledges these two important objections to privatisation, but raises a third, arguably more important issue: that privatisation tends to expand the net of social control through entrepreneurial creativity. Indeed, privatisation is and has long been one of the major sources of innovation in the criminal justice system. This seminar will examine the historic and contemporary role of private entrepreneurs in developing innovations in the criminal process.

About the speaker

Professor Malcolm Feeley, who is the Claire Sanders Clements Dean's Chair Professor of Law at Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California, Berkeley, is one of two Fulbright Flinders University Distinguished Chairs for 2012. This Fulbright Scholarship was established through the support of Flinders University the U.S. Department of State and the Australian-American Fulbright Commission. Professor Feeley is in currently in Australia to undertake research into privatisation in the criminal justice system as part of a comparative study he is undertaking of the subject in the US, England and Australia.

Before joining the Boalt faculty in 1984, Professor Feeley was a fellow at Yale Law School and taught at New York University and the University of Wisconsin. He served as the director of the campus Center for the Study of Law and Society from 1987 to 1992. He has also been a visiting professor at Hebrew University, Kobe University, and Princeton University. Professor Feeley has written or edited over a dozen books, including The Process is the Punishment (1992), which received the ABA's Silver Gavel Award and the American Sociology Association's Citation of Merit, Court Reform on Trial (1989), which received the ABA's Certificate of Merit, and The Policy Dilemma (1981), Criminal Justice (with John Kaplan and Jerome Skolnick, 1991), Judicial Policy Making and the Modern State (with Edward Rubin, 1998), Federalism: Political Identity and Tragic Compromise (with Edward Rubin, 2008), and Fighting for Political Liberalism: Comparative Studies of the Legal Complex (with Terrence Halliday and Lucien Karpik, 2008). He has authored several dozen articles in social science journals and law reviews. His most recent articles examine issues of federalism, women and crime in the eighteenth century, prison privatisation, and the role of bench and bar in fostering political liberalism. Professor Feeley has received many awards including being appointed as a Russell Sage Foundation Fellow; and the Silver Gavel Award, American Bar Association. He has had a term as President American Law and Society Association, and is the recipient of numerous fellowships and grants.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD unit.

This event is sponsored by Corrective Services NSW and is part of the Beyond Punishment seminar series. The event is hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School. The Institute thanks the Fulbright Commission for their support in having Professor Malcolm Feeley, the 2012 Fulbright Flinders University Distinguished Chair in American Political Science, give this Public Lecture.


Report Writing Training Course - 27 September 2012

Date: 27 September 2012

Venue: Room 340, New Law School Annex, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Full fee: $240; F/T student: $150; Uni of Sydney staff: $190; SLS alumni: $190 inc. GST

Time: 9am - 5pm

Register: online here.

This course is the first in a new partnership between Corrective Services NSW and the Sydney Institute of Criminology. This collaboration provides training courses to equip criminology students (and students from related disciplines) and those interested in a career in the criminal justice system with industry-relevant knowledge and skills.

This course will specifically focus on the preparation of pre-sentence reports and their use within the criminal justice system. This course will be delivered by an accredited Corrective Services NSW Trainer and will provide participants with an understanding of the key requirements of preparing a pre-sentence report. This course will be especially relevant to anyone interested in a career in corrections.


Forensic Science and Justice: From crime scene to court and beyond - 1 August 2012

Date: 1 August 2012

Venue: Common Room, Level 4, Sydney Law School, Building F10, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free, registration essential

Time: 6 - 7.30pm

Register: online here.


The Sydney Law School invites you to the launch of the Forensic Science and Justice: From crime scene to court and beyond Special Issue of the Current Issues in Criminal Justice Journal.

The upcoming Special Issue of the Current Issues in Criminal Justice will be launched on 1 August 2012. A small number of authors who have contributed to the Forensic Science and Justice: From crime scene to court and beyond Special Issue will discuss their contribution to the journal.

Speakers include:

Dr Rebecca Scott Bray, Co-Director, Sydney Institute of Criminology

Associate Professor Roberta Julian, Director, Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies and co-editor of the Special Issue

Alastair Ross AM, Director, National Institute for Forensic Sciences

Mehera San Roque, Senior Lecturer, UNSW

Copies of the journal will be available to purchase at the launch.

This launch and event is kindly sponsored by the Forensic Document Services.


Beyond Punishment: Frontiers of Penal Policy - 31 July 2012

Date: 31 July 2012

Venue: Faculty Common Room, Level 4, Sydney Law School, Building F10, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free, registration essential

Time: 6 - 8pm

Register: online here.

How can prisons be managed in a way that achieves community expectations regarding punishment and deterrence while ensuring the realisation of human rights? What can we learn from other countries and prison systems about how to rehabilitate prisoners in a just, decent, humane and cost effective manner?

This seminar brings together two scholars at the forefront of penal policy and criminal justice: Baroness Vivien Stern CBE and Professor Andrew Coyle CMG.

Baroness Vivien Stern was Secretary General of Penal Reform International from 1989 until 2006. In 1997 she was appointed a Senior Research Fellow of London University, based at the International Centre for Prison Studies. She was awarded a CBE in 1992 and was raised to the peerage as Baroness Stern of Vauxhall in 1999. Stern has been a member of several parliamentary committees and has written several books, including Creating Criminals: prisons and people in a market society; Bricks of Shame: Britain's prisons; Failures in Penal Policy; Imprisoned by Our Prisons: a programme for reform (Fabian Series); The Prisons We Deserve and A Sin Against the Future: imprisonment in the world. Baroness Stern is a patron of several charities including the Venture Trust, the Prisoners' Education Trust, New Bridge Foundation, the Royal Philanthropic Society, Clean Break, and Rethink. She was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1992. In 2009 Stern was invited by the UK Government to conduct a review of UK rape laws. Her subsequent report has attracted significant approval.

Professor Andrew Coyle CMG is Emeritus Professor of Prison Studies in London University and Visiting Professor in the University of Essex. He is Director of the International Centre for Prison Studies, a post which he also held from between 1997 and 2005.] He is a prisons adviser to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, the UN Latin American Institute, the Council of Europe, including its Committee for the Prevention of Torture, the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe and several national governments. Between 2003 and 2010 he was a member of the UK Foreign Secretary's Expert Committee against Torture. He was a founding member of the Task Force of WHO Europe on Health in Prison. Andrew Coyle was appointed by the Council of Europe as an expert to draft the revised European Prison Rules 2006 and has been retained by the Council to draft a Code of Ethics for Prison Staff.

This event is sponsored by Corrective Services NSW and is part of the Beyond Punishment seminar series. The event is jointly hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School, and the Centre for Law, Governance and Public Policy, Bond University.


The Psychology of Crime - 17 July 2012

Date: 17 July 2012

Venue: Room 340, Sydney Law School, New Law Building ANNEX (F10), Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost:
Full fee: $240 (inc. GST)
University of Sydney staff: $190 (inc. GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $190 (inc. GST)
F/T student: $150 (inc. GST)

Time: 9.00am - 5.00pm

Register: online here.

The psychology of crime is a workshop examining the profession of criminal psychology (also referred to as forensic psychology). It will introduce and expand on questions such as: What do criminal/forensic psychologists do to assist police, the courts, the prisons, etc?

The workshop will explore the role of the forensic psychologist with examples of real (anonymous) cases. It is a must for anyone considering a career in the field of psychology, or for psychologists who would like an introduction to the forensic field. The workshop will also be useful for legal professionals and correctional staff in understanding psychological reports, explanations of bizarre behaviours and pathological diagnoses.

What people will know by the end of the workshop:

What forensic psychologists do and how we are trained to think

How psychologists study and understand criminal behaviour

Ways in which psychologists assess and explain criminal behaviour

How psychologists assist the courts in dealing with criminal behaviour

How psychologists treat certain types of criminal behaviour (violence, sex offences, murder)

Topics that will be covered during the workshop:


"What is psychology?", with reference to famous experiments that taught us much about human behaviour. How does psychology assist people working with criminal behaviour?

Assessment of a criminal offender: a look at how we do it. Real-life example of assessments (anonymous).

Treating criminal offenders. Real-life examples of treatment that worked and some that didn't (anonymous).

Please note that the course content will at times involve details about violent crime that may be traumatic. If in doubt about your ability to emotionally deal with such course content, please contact the Sydney Institute of Criminology and discuss your concerns, or please DO NOT ENROL.

This workshop will be facilitated by Pan Tsomis.Pan is a forensic and clinical psychologist with a masters degree in psychology and a masters degree in criminology. He is a registered psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia (Registration No PSY0001404883), and a member of the Australian Psychological Society's College of Forensic Psychologists and College of Clinical Psychologists (Member No 17562). Pan was a psychologist with the NSW Department of Juvenile Justice, and has worked for the Commonwealth Department of Veterans' Affairs,for a child protection agency, and for the Mental Health Team in Port Macquarie and at the St George Hospital. He has been in private practice since 1998, primarily assessing and treating criminal offenders, victims of violent crime, as well as combat veterans and their families. He has taught psychology at the University of Sydney and criminology at the University of Western Sydney. He has presented papers and lectured on forensic psychological assessment at international conferences. He also regularly runs workshops on assessment and management of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), especially with regard to victims and perpetrators of violent crimes.


Towards a Modest Legal Moralism - 16 July 2012


Essentials of crime prevention - 6 June 2012

Date: 6 June 2012

Venue: Sydney Law School, New Law Building (F10), Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost:
One workshop: $200
Two workshops: $300

Register: online here.

Further information: online here.

Enquiries: Kate Hancott, Conference Coordinator, Australian Institute of Criminology, events@aic.gov.au, +61 2 6260 9272

The Australian Institute of Criminology’s Crime Prevention ASSIST program, and the Sydney Institute of Criminology (Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney) are presenting four Essentials of crime prevention workshops on June 6 2012 folllowing the Crime prevention and communities conference. These will be tailored for a wide range of practitioners - police, local government, NGOs - working in crime prevention project development and management. Each workshop will be led by experts who have hands-on experience designing and implementing crime prevention initiatives for a wide range of organisations and communities.

Morning workshops
9.00am - 12.30pm

Workshop 1: Essentials of Finding the Evidence for Effective Crime Prevention
Garner Clancey and Peter Homel

In this age of evidence-based policy and programs, it is critical to know where to find and how to access the best and most relevant information and research. This session will focus on the most important potential sources of information to help crime prevention and policing practitioners. Key databases will be identified and research methodologies and strategies reviewed, enabling end users to determine the relative merits of published research. The session will also review tools and resources that help to distil research evidence into a form that can be used by practitioners.

After they have explored ways of accessing and using research evidence, participants will have the opportunity to share with and hear from crime prevention and policing practitioners what other resources they require. Issues arising will help inform the work of the Australian and Sydney Institutes of Criminology.

Workshop 2: Essentials of of Project Management for Crime Prevention
Rick Brown

Crime prevention projects often struggle at the implementation stage because they have not been adequately planned and managed.

This workshop will examine some of the most common of these problems and then present some practical tools for managing projects.

The workshop will introduce the concept of the ‘dynamic project lifecycle’ and explore how it can be used to plan, implement and monitor project activity.

The workshop will also show how project logic diagrams and work breakdown structures can be used to plan timescales and manage project staff, especially those involving partnership working.

Afternoon workshops
1.30pm - 5.00pm

Workshop 3: Essentials of Problem Solving
Michael Scott

There are many essential elements to solving a problem - working out what the problem is, analyzing it thoroughly, developing and implementing interventions and coming up with a reliable evaluation of the results.

This workshop will focus on one of the more confounding aspects of effective public safety problem solving: persuading reluctant stakeholders to take greater ownership of the problem and to accept their share of responsibility for addressing it.

Too often the various actors do not think it is up to them to control the conditions that give rise to a problem - and the harm it causes - or don’t believe it is in their interest to do so.

This workshop will explore strategies and techniques that crime prevention practitioners can apply to overcome such resistance.

The workshop will provide an overview of the resources of the Center for Problem-Oriented Policing. The Center’s information is valuable and available to crime prevention practitioners.


Workshop 4: Essentials of Evaluation
Katie Willis and Anthony Morgan

Few would argue that evaluation is an important part of effective crime prevention. A well designed evaluation can help to answer a number of important questions about your project. Was it implemented according to how it was designed? Has it worked to address the targeted problem? Why did it or didn’t it work? What could you have done better?

Through the use of case studies, this workshop will equip practitioners with the skills and knowledge to design an evaluation, develop an evaluation plan, contract external evaluators and understand evaluation reports.


They tried to make me go to rehab... young offenders and drug use - 9 May 2012

Date: 9 May 2012

Venue: Law Foyer, Level 2, Sydney Law School, New Law Building (F10), Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free, however registration is required

Time: 6-8pm (registration from 5:30pm)

Register: online here

About the seminar:

The last young people in custody health survey showed that 89% of young offenders had tried illicit drugs, with cannabis (87%) the most common used. As well, 65% had used an illicit drug at least weekly in the year prior to custody, 65% reported committing crime to obtain alcohol or drugs and 20% were intoxicated (on alcohol, drugs or both) at the time of their offence.

This seminar will look at:

  • the latest research on cannabis use amongst young offenders
  • an innovative intervention program specifically designed for young people with low literacy skills
  • the effect of being caught with small amounts of drugs and their subsequent entanglement in the justice system
  • alternatives to incarceration

Speakers:

Melanie Simpson, Senior Research Officer/PhD Candidate, National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre

Geoff Wilkinson, Program Manager, Alcohol and Other Drugs, Juvenile Justice

Jane Sanders, Principal Solicitor, Shopfront Youth Legal Centre

This event is sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW.


NSW crime statistics and trends - 24 April 2012

Date: 24 April 2012

Venue: Law Foyer, Level 2, Sydney Law School, New Law Building (F10), Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free, however registration is required

Time: 10.00am - 1.00pm

Register: online here, limited places available

This seminar will explore the trends emerging from the latest New South Wales (NSW) crime statistics and consider reasons for the significant decline in particular offences (such as break, enter and steal and motor vehicle theft) over the last decade in NSW.

Key commentators will probe recent trends and seek to explain the decline of key offences.

Speakers will include:

  • Dr Don Weatherburn, Director, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research
  • Ray Carroll, Executive Director, National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council
  • Detective Superintendent Greig Newbery, Property Crime Squad, NSW Police Force

This seminar will be of interest to:

  • Government policy-makers
  • Police
  • Security managers
  • Local government community safety personnel
  • Criminology students
  • Media

The NSW Chapter of ASIS has kindly sponsored this seminar.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 3 MCLE/CPD unit.


Teaching Criminology, Crime and Criminal Justice - 13 April 2012

Date: 13 April 2012

Venue: Common Room, Level 4, Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free (registration essential)

Time: 10am-5pm (registration from 9.30am)

Register: online here.


This workshop will explore innovative teaching and learning methods being applied/or applicable to criminology, criminal justice and related fields. With considerable growth in students enrolling in criminology and criminal justice programs in recent years, changing demands on graduates entering the field and developments in teaching technologies and techniques, this workshop provides a timely opportunity to review the latest trends in teaching and learning.

The following will be speaking at this workshop:

  • Alan Moran (Director, Academic Studies, Brush Farm Academy, Corrective Services NSW)
  • Professor John Alford (Professor of Public Sector Management, Australia and New Zealand School of Government)
  • Dr Anthony Billingsley (International Relations, UNSW)
  • Mike Bogle (Educational Technologist, UNSW)
  • Dr Rohan Lulham (Design out Crime Research Centre, UTS)

Workshop sessions will be facilitated to enable review of the following themes:

  • Relevant industry competencies and employment requirements
  • Flexible teaching and delivery methods
  • Innovative assessment techniques
  • Future demands of criminology and criminal justice degree graduates

This free workshop is being organised and hosted by the University of NSW and the Sydney Institute of Criminology (University of Sydney).

A maximum of 40 participants will be able to register for this event.


Drugs, crime and brief interventions for young offenders - 11 April 2012

Date: 11 April 2012

Venue: Room 340, Sydney Law School, New Law Building ANNEX (F10), Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost:
Full fee: $240 (inc GST)
F/T student: $150 (inc GST)
University of Sydney staff: $190 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $190 (inc GST)

Time: 9.00am - 5.00pm

Register: online here.

Drugs and crime interact in a variety of ways, but certainly tend to exacerbate each other. The evidence is clear that reduced drug use is associated with reduced crime. Frontline workers often feel ill-equipped to address the complexity of presentations of young offenders who use drugs, yet access to effective community or residential treatment is often elusive. This course will provide an update on the drug use of young people, available intervention options, and how those who come into contact with young offenders who use drugs may be able to provide helpful evidence-informed and brief interventions.

About the speaker:
John Howard (BA, MA(Couns), MClinPsych, DipCrim, PhD, MAPS) joined the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) in 2008 as a Senior Lecturer and works with the National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre, as well as NDARC's international research activities and those with a focus on young people. He has worked in schools, juvenile justice, adolescent mental health and drug treatment, and universities. John is a consultant Clinical Psychologist and his major clinical, teaching and research areas are: adolescent substance use and 'street youth', comorbidity, depression and suicide in young people, working with marginalised youth and those with multiple and complex needs, adolescent psychotherapy, same-sex attracted youth, HIV infection in adolescents, resilience, youth treatment capacity-building and developing 'youth friendly' harm reduction. He consults to WHO, UNICEF, UNODC and UNESCAP on capacity-building for community treatment of young drug users and increasing access to harm reduction services for young injecting drug usersInternational work has taken him to Nepal, China, Thailand Viet Nam, Lao PDR, India, Philippines, Egypt and South Africa.


Understanding Kinship: Indigenous People and Law - 13 March 2012

Date: 13 March 2012

Venue: Faculty Common Room 432, Level 4, Sydney Law School, New Law Building, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost:
Full fee: $25 (+ GST)
University of Sydney staff: $20 (+ GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $20 (+ GST)
F/T student: $15 (+ GST)

Time: 6.00pm - 8.00pm (registration from 5:30pm)

Register: here. Please note that this event is now full.

Inquiries: Sydney Institute of Criminology

Join the Institute of Criminology for Lynette Riley's 'Kinship' presentation. Lynette Riley, Academic Coordinator of the Koori Centre, University of Sydney, will take participants through a kinship system demonstrating the components of moiety, totem, skin names, language and traditional affiliations, and individual identity. Through Lynette's presentation participants will begin to see why Aboriginal people face particular problems when interacting with the (colonial) Australian legal system.

The Law Reform Commission of Western Australia Report Aboriginal Customary Laws (Final Report, The interaction of WA law with Aboriginal law and culture, Project 94, September 2006, p. 66) highlighted the importance of Kinship to Aboriginal people:

"Kinship is at the heart of Aboriginal society and underpins the customary law rules and norms... Importantly, kinship governs all aspects of a person's social behaviour...

It is important to note...that while the kinship system was an undeniable part of traditional Aboriginal society...it is also strongly instilled in contemporary Aboriginal society, including urban Aboriginals...certain kinship obligations, such as the duty to accommodate kin, are taken very seriously regardless of urban or remote location."

Although the kinship systems throughout Australia are extremely varied and it is not possible in this forum to examine the differences between them, participants in the workshop will gain a new and deeper understanding of how a kinship system operates.

By the end of the workshop participants will have gained insight into:

  • The social structure of Aboriginal society
  • How this social structure and world view differs from the western liberal world view
  • How this difference impacts upon Aboriginal people in the Criminal Justice System and the legal system more broadly

This workshop will be of interest to:

  • Legal practitioners in Criminal Law, Family Law and Care and Protection
  • Government personnel who interact with Indigenous Australians (especially DOCS, Juvenile Justice and Corrective services)
  • The Magistracy and Judiciary
  • Police
  • Students

The workshop will be facilitated by Tanya Mitchell, Lecturer in Criminal Law and Indigenous People and the Law at Sydney Law School. Tanya was a senior solicitor-advocate with the Aboriginal Legal Service in NSW and also with the North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency in the Northern Territory before joining Sydney Law School as a full-time academic in 2010.

Numbers are limited to 80 so be sure to register early.

Light refreshments provided.

The 2-hour workshop is worth 2 CLE points.


Surveillance and/in Everyday Life Conference - 20 to 21 February 2012

Date: 20 to 21 February 2012

Time: 9am-5pm (registrations from 8.30am)

Venue: Sydney Law School, Building F10, Eastern Avenue, The University of Sydney, Australia

Cost:
Full fee: $220 (inc. GST)
F/T student: $50 (inc. GST)

Register online: here.

MCLE/LPDpoints will be advised on finalisation of the program.

Food and refreshments will be provided throughout the day and drinks and canapés served in the evening of 20 February 2012.

The University of Sydney's Surveillance and Everyday Life Research Group is hosting a two-day international conference entitled, Surveillance and/in Everyday Life: Monitoring Pasts, Presents and Futures. The event, to be held in The University of Sydney's state of the art Law School Building, will bring together key international scholars, policy makers, practitioners, artists and social commentators to discuss the social, cultural, historical, political, legal, economic and technical dimensions of surveillance. Few topics have greater contemporary public relevance and social significance than the increased monitoring and visibility of everyday living and the emergent surveillance capacities of new information communication technologies and organizational practices.

The Surveillance and Everyday Life Research Group project brings together a number of early career, mid career and distinguished scholars from across The University of Sydney to critically and collaboratively examine the everyday production and experience of surveillance, and to explore the multitude of thematics emanating from the transactional interplays and exchanges among organizations, technologies and individuals.

About the conference:

The intensification and diversification of surveillance in recent decades has been remarkable. CCTV cameras, private investigators, loyalty cards, body scanners, DNA swabs, RFID tags, Web 2.0 platforms/protocols and internet cache cookies constitute only some of the many instruments facilitating the routine extraction and collection of personal information.

Advancement in technological applications, and wider cultures of risk, uncertainty, distrust and consumption, have all helped to legitimate and naturalize surveillance as a multi-purpose tool in the everyday lives of individuals and organizations. Yet, whilst surveillance seems increasingly embedded in the physical and cultural fabric of contemporary living, and whilst surveillance today is qualitatively and quantitatively different from previous modes, it is by nomeans a novel phenomenon. From time immemorial, detailed records have been accumulated on the health, morality, cognitive development, motivations, sexualities, incomes, work activities and whereabouts of certain populations - not to mention on animal relations, planetary constellations, environmental conditions, and the like. In the past, as in the present, forms of life have been and are targeted by a polymerous array of monitoring and recording devices. Moreover, surveillance as a mode of social regulation, a cultural medium, a symbolic resource and a companion species is set to further dominate the political, economic and socio-cultural landscapes of future human societies and social assemblages; but with what implications for social justice, social relations and subjectivities? This conference critically considers the significance of everyday surveillance in relation to temporality, exploring the changing nature of surveillance as it relates to cultural specificities, past transformations, present landscapes and possible/emergent futures.

Keynote conference presenters include:

* Professor David Lyon, Queen's University, Canada
* Professor Kevin Haggerty, University of Alberta, Canada
* Professor Pat O'Malley, University of Sydney, Australia

There will also be a specialist 'anecdotal' roundtable keynote featuring leading surveillance practitioners, commentators and dissenters.

Abstracts are still being accepted and a full conference program will be released in November 2011.

Security Solutions Magazine is kindly acknowledged as the publications sponsor for this conference.


Comparative CPTED Conference - 24 January 2012

Date: 24 January 2012

Venue: Lecture Theatre 026 (Level 1), New Law Building Annexe (F10a), Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost:
Full fee: $180 +GST
F/T student: $120 +GST
University of Sydney staff: $150 +GST
Sydney Law School alumni: $150 +GST

Discounts will be granted for group bookings of four or more people from the same organisation. Enquiries about these discounts or pertaining to any other matters in relation to this conference should be directed to Garner Clancey .

Register online: here.

MCLE/LPDpoints will be advised on finalisation of the program.

About the conference:

The Sydney Institute of Criminology (University of Sydney) is hosting a one-day Comparative CPTED Conference on 24 January 2012. This one-day conference will explore recent developments in CPTED practice and theory and will bring together an exciting array of academics and practitioners from England, New Zealand, Western Australia, Victoria, Queensland and other locations. National trends and local case studies will reveal different approaches and innovative developments in CPTED practice from numerous jurisdictions.

This conference will consider (amongst other things):

  • The Secured by Design initiative in England
  • The use of civilian built environmental professionals by the Greater Manchester Police in CPTED assessments
  • Urban renewal and CPTED approaches in New Zealand
  • The use of CPTED by planning professionals in Western Australia
  • The relationship between security risk assessment and CPTED
  • The design and management of parks according to CPTED principles
  • Implementing CPTED recommendations and the challenges facing local government
  • The role of police in CPTED

This conference will be of particular interest to:

  • Crime Prevention/Community Safety Officers
  • Crime prevention consultants
  • Police
  • Planners
  • Urban designers
  • Architects
  • Local government personnel
  • Criminology and built environment students, researchers and academics

Conference presenters include:

Dr Rachel Armitage (Reader (Criminology) and Deputy Director of the Applied Criminology Centre University of Huddersfield, United Kingdom)

Ms Leanne Monchuk (Research Assistant, Applied Criminology Centre University of Huddersfield, United Kingdom)

Dr Paul Cozens (Senior Research Fellow, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia)

Tony Lake (International Chair, International CPTED Association)

Chris Butler (Urban Designer, Harrison Grierson Consultants Ltd, Auckland, New Zealand)

Nic Martin (Director, Occams Razor, Security Risk Management Consultancy)

A full conference program will be released in October 2011.


Past Events 2011

Beyond Punishment - Authority, Legitimacy, and Professionalism: Private or Public Sector Prisons? - 15 December

Spend less and reduce crime: hear how this is done in the United States - 29 November

The Paul Byrne lecture - 28 November

Politics of CCTV: trajectory and directions - 14 November

Training course: Crime Prevention Evaluation - 18 October

Youth Justice Conferencing Seminar: Principles of Restorative Justice - 17 October

Beyond Punishment: Imagining Rehabilitation - 21 September

CPTED Plus - 12 August

Understanding Kinship: Indigenous People and Law - 4 August

The psychology of crime - 7 June

Drugs, crime and brief interventions for young offenders - 18 May

Capacity for crime: adolescent brain development, mental health and youth crime - 2 May

Theatres of violence: facts and fictions - 18 April

Briefing session: uses and abuses of crime statistics - 14 April

Beyond punishment: actuarial risk - 11 April

Restorative justice: promoting previously unthinkable ways - 6 April

Working with offenders post-release - 4 April

Should NSW have a Mental Health Court? - 1 April

Expert panel discussion: Australia’s response to child sexual abuse - 31 March

Transitional Justice Workshop - 25 February

Aboriginal young people and crime - 7 February

SafeGrowth and City Crime - Co-Design, Eco-Parks, Funky Laneways and Fixing Deadzones - 24 January

Beyond Punishment - Authority, Legitimacy, and Professionalism: Private or Public Sector Prisons? - 15 December

Date: 15 December 2011

Time: 4-6pm (followed by refreshments 6-7pm)

Venue: Faculty Common Room 432, Level 4, Sydney Law School, Building F10, Eastern Avenue, Camperdown Campus, University of Sydney

Cost: Free however registration is essential

Register online: here.

Speaker

Alison Liebling, Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, England.

This event is being run as part of the Beyond Punishment seminar series sponsored by Corrective Services NSW. This event is also sponsored by The GEO Group Australia Pty Ltd and Urbis.

About the Seminar

What does the evidence tell us about the relative quality, legitimacy and professionalism of public versus private sector prisons? This seminar reports on the findings from a detailed Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)-funded evaluation of four private and two public sector prisons in England and Wales. Two private sector prisons appeared in the lowest end of a quality spectrum, and two at the highest end, complicating any simplistic argument that 'private is better'. Drawing on well validated measures of the moral and social climate of prisons, clear strengths and weaknesses were found in each sector. In particular, there were variations in the professional use of authority by staff. Distinctive power distributions in each sector generated different types of penal order, leading to different outcomes. The evaluation, and its developmental methodology, help to clarify our understanding of prison life, quality and effects, and suggests that some public sector strengths are overlooked in contemporary policymaking. It also raises critical questions about the purpose, uses, effects and management of prisons as well as 'what matters' in evaluation.

About the Speaker

Alison Liebling is Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Cambridge and the Director of the Institute of Criminology's Prisons Research Centre. She is regarded as a leading prisons scholar, a pioneer in the use of Appreciative Inquiry in prisons research, and a specialist in the study of prison suicide, privatisation, the work of prison officers, and the management of prisoners. Professor Richard Harding said in a recent review that 'no-one is more knowledgeable than Professor Liebling in the English-speaking world of research into prison issues'. She has published several books, including Suicides in Prison (1992), Prisons and their Moral Performance: A Study of Values, Quality and Prison Life (2004), The Effects of Imprisonment ((with Shadd Maruna, 2005), and recently, a second edition of the Prison Officer (2010). She has also published widely in criminological journals, and is co-editor-in-chief of Punishment and Society: The International Journal of Penology. Alison's recently completed study of public and private sector prisons, with Dr Ben Crewe, was rated by two reviewers as 'outstanding', with comments including, 'the quality of analysis is strong. The collection of the data was impeccable'. She has also recently completed a repeat study of the nature and quality of staff-prisoner relationships at Whitemoor high security prison, described as: 'a genuine tour de force, a carefully crafted and sophisticated academic analysis, based on painstaking fieldwork …'. It was noted that the developmental methodology and analysis used in the public-private sector study 'could readily be applied to all areas of public policy service delivery via the public and the private sector, particularly relating to closed institutions (psychiatric wards, juvenile institutions, police cells', hospitals and care homes).

For further details on Alison please click here.


Spend less and reduce crime: hear how this is done in the United States- 29 November

Date: 29 November 2011

Time: 6-8pm (registration from 5:30pm)

Venue: Foyer (level 2), Sydney Law School, Camperdown Campus

Cost: Free however registration is essential

Register online: here.

This event is sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW.

About the seminar:

International guest speaker, Steve Aos, is the Director of the Washington State Institute for Public Policy. The Institute is responsible for conducting practical, non-partisan research at legislative direction on issues of importance to Washington State.

Steve will discuss the Institute’s criminal justice research findings, and how they believe that the key to success is to think more generally about crime.

What citizens want is less crime and less taxpayer spending, says Steve.

Washington State has learned that only by thinking of the criminal justice system as a whole - from prevention, juvenile justice to adult corrections and sentencing - can one allocate resources across "silos" in such a way to achieve those goals.

This seminar is not to be missed, with Minister for Justice and Attorney General, Greg Smith, to be in attendance.

About the speaker:

Steve Aos has 35 years of experience conducting cost-benefit analyses and communicating the results to policymakers in a wide range of public policy areas, as well as in the private sector. His current work at Washington State Institute for Public Policy focuses on identifying and evaluating the costs and benefits of programs and policies that reduce crime, improve K-12 educational outcomes, reduce child abuse and neglect, improve mental health and reduce substance abuse. Steve also has many years of experience in energy economics and regulatory policy.


The Paul Byrne lecture - 28 November

Date: 28 November 2011

Time: 6-7:30pm (registration from 5:30pm, refreshments follow the lecture)

Venue: Foyer (level 2), Sydney Law School, Camperdown Campus

Cost: Free however registration is essential

Register online: here.

Guest Speaker: The Hon Michael Kirby AC CMG

Paul Byrne SC graduated in Arts and Law from the University of Sydney, and worked with the Public Solicitor's Office as a solicitor. He became a barrister in 1979, and was appointed a public defender. In 1983 he was awarded a Master of Laws degree with First Class Honours, and was awarded a University Medal. He was appointed Director of the Criminal Law Review Division and a Commissioner of the New South Wales Law Reform Commission. In 1995 he took silk and continued an outstanding career as an advocate, taking on the toughest cases,
in courts at all levels, with a deep sense of responsibility and the utmost commitment to justice and fair process.

Paul had a life long interest in the criminal law and the criminal justice system, and was an active participant in and a generous supporter of the Institute of Criminology at theSydney Law Schoolthroughout his career.

This lecture will honour Paul Byrne who had a life long interest in the criminal law and the criminal justice system, as well as his active participation and generous support of the Institute of Criminology at the Sydney Law School.

The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund

The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund has been set up to honour and continue Paul's interest in the criminal justice system by supporting the ongoing activities of the Institute of Criminology, such as lectures, seminars, publications, and awards.

Attendees of the Paul Byrne lecture are warmly invited to make a donation to The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund. Gifts to The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund support the activities of the Sydney Institute of Criminology and other activities in the field of criminal law at Sydney Law School, in memory of the late Paul Byrne SC.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD unit. For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.


Politics of CCTV: trajectory and directions - 14 November

Date: 14 November 2011

Time: 6-8pm (registration and refreshments from 5.30pm)

Venue: Foyer (level 2), Sydney Law School, Camperdown Campus

Cost: Free however registration is essential

Register online: here.

About the seminar:

Closed circuit television (CCTV) has become ubiquitous in everyday life. Many of our daily movements through urban landscapes are routinely captured by CCTV cameras. This seminar will explore the use and impact of CCTV from different perspectives and consider possible future developments.

Keynote speaker:

Dr Gavin Smith completed, at the University of Aberdeen, an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)-funded PhD thesis which considered the everyday practices of Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) operators as they interacted with mediated spaces through the glassy lens of a video camera and television screen. He holds, from the same university, a Master of Arts degree in Sociology (With First Class Honours) and a Master of Research degree in Social Research Methods (With Distinction).

Gavin is an active member of The Australian Sociological Association, The British Sociological Association, The British Society of Criminology and The Surveillance Studies Network. He is an international collaborator on The New Transparency Project based at Queen's University, Canada, a multi-million dollar Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada-funded cross disciplinary research initiative investigating the social implications of surveillance societies - http://www.sscqueens.org/projects/the-new-transparency and is on the editorial board of the international journal, Surveillance and Society- http://www.surveillance-and-society.org/ojs/index.php/journal.

Guest speaker:

Meg Mundell is an author, journalist and PhD candidate (University of Western Sydney) with a keen interest in place, social justice and power relations. Her first novel, BLACK GLASS (Scribe, 2011), is set in a near-future city ruled by surveillance, class divisions, and the covert manipulation of public space. Gaining favourable reviews in major newspapers both here and in NZ, BLACK GLASS has helped re-ignite public discussions about the impact on surveillance on everyday life, especially for more vulnerable people. Meg's journalism has appeared in The Age, Sydney Morning Herald, The Monthly, New Matilda and The Big Issue. She has published fiction in Best Australian Stories, New Australian Stories, Meanjin, Sleepers Almanac, Eureka Street and other collections.


Training course: Crime Prevention Evaluation - 18 October

Date: 18 October 2011

Time: 9:00am - 5:00pm

Venue: Seminar Room 340, New Law Building Annexe (F10a), Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost:
Full fee: $250 (inc GST)
F/T student: $170 (inc GST)
University of Sydney staff: $200 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $200 (inc GST)

This training course will be delivered by the Australian Institute of Criminology and the Sydney Institute of Criminology.

Evidence-based crime prevention requires sound evaluations to be conducted. Unfortunately, few crime prevention programs in Australia are ever rigorously evaluated. This can result in promising initiatives being de-funded and popular, but not necessarily successful, programs being adopted.

Crime prevention practitioners often feel ill-equipped to conduct evaluations. This one-day training course will help practitioners to: feel more confident in understanding evaluation reports; develop evaluation plans; and contract external evaluators. Through the use of three case studies (focusing on public space closed-circuit television systems, prevention efforts to address alcohol-related problems and youth diversionary programs), this practical training course will help to equip practitioners with evaluation skills and knowledge.

The following staff from the Australian Institute of Criminology and the Sydney Institute of Criminology will be delivering this training:

  • Peter Homel
  • Katie Willis
  • Anthony Morgan
  • Jess Anderson
  • Garner Clancey

This training will be especially relevant to:

  • Local government Community Safety Officers
  • Police Crime Prevention Officers
  • Non-government and government program managers
  • Criminology students

Youth Justice Conferencing Seminar: Principles of Restorative Justice - 17 October

Date: 17 October 2011

Time: 6-8pm (registration and cocktail reception from 5.15-6pm)

Venue: The Foyer, Level 2, Sydney Law School, Building F10, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free however registration is essential

The Sydney Institute of Criminology is pleased to announce the first instalment in the 2011-2012 Juvenile Justice sponsored seminar program titled 'Youth Justice Conferencing Seminar: Principles of Restorative Justice'.

This event is sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW.

About the seminar:

The seminar considers the current state of evidence and practice in restorative justice and youth justice conferencing, which has been an important aspect of dealing with young offenders under the Young Offenders Act in NSW. It brings together a range of perspectives on the youth justice conferencing process including research from the Australian Institute of Criminology, the experience of a youth justice conferencing convenor and the police's involvement in the process.

About the Speakers:

Dr Kelly Richards, is a Senior Research Analyst at the Australian Institute of Criminology, where her research focuses on juvenile justice, restorative justice, human trafficking and sexual violence. Kelly holds a PhD in Criminology from the University of Western Sydney, and has held positions as a Lecturer and Researcher at the University of Western Sydney, the University of Technology Sydney, and Sydney University. She is also currently a Visiting Fellow in the Centre for Restorative Justice at the Australian National University. In 2010, Kelly was awarded the ACT Government Office for Women Audrey Fagan Churchill Fellowship to study restorative measures for the reintegration of child sex offenders in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. She has published widely in the discipline of criminology, and recently released an edited collection, Qualitative criminology: Stories from the field, with Federation Press.

Bryan Boulton is a Youth Justice Conferencing Convenor based in Lismore. Since March 2010 Bryan has convened more than 20 conferences in a large regional area that includes Lismore, Casino and remote regional areas such as Tabulam. He retired from the NSW Police Force in November 2004 after 25 years of service which included being Crime Managerfor the Richmond Local Area Command. Bryan was a senior Police Officer when the Young Offenders Act was first passed and his LAC had high rates of referrals to the youth justice conferencing system.

A/Assistant Commissioner John Gralton, NSW Police, will be addressing the youth justice conferencing process from the perspective of police involvement.


Beyond Punishment: Imagining Rehabilitation - 21 September

Date: 21 September 2011

Time: 6-8pm (registration and refreshments from 5.30pm)

Venue: Faculty Common Room (level 4), Sydney Law School, Camperdown Campus

Cost: Free however registration is essential

Register online: here.

The Sydney Institute of Criminology will continue hosting the Beyond Punishment series starting with the first instalment titled ‘Imagining Rehabilitation’.

This event is sponsored by Corrective Services NSW.

About the seminar:

Rehabilitation is a term often used but rarely interrogated. It can mean different things in a range of penal policy and political contexts. Not only do divergent models of rehabilitation exist, but the goals of rehabilitation should also be subject to critical discussion. This seminar explores the present and futures of rehabilitation.

About the Speakers:

Keynote Speaker:

Pat Carlen, BA, PhD is Visiting Professor at Kent University, Editor-in-Chief of the British Journal of Criminology, co-founder of the UK campaigning group Women in Prison and has published 19 books and many articles on criminal and social justice. She has conducted research in England, Scotland, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, USA and Peru, and given public or invited lectures in all those countries as well as in The Netherlands, Denmark, Portugal, Spain, Canada, Austria, Hungary, Sweden and South Africa. Her work has been translated into Japanese, Norwegian, Dutch, Portuguese and Spanish. In 1997 she was awarded the American Society of Criminology’s Sellin-Glueck Prize for Outstanding International Contributions to Criminology, in 2010 the British Society of Criminology’s Award for Outstanding Achievement and in 2011 an Honorary Doctorate in Laws from Lincoln University. A collection of her selected works entitled A Criminological Imagination: Essays on Punishment, Justice, Discourse was published in Ashgate’s Pioneers in Contemporary Criminology in 2010.

Guest Speaker:

Luke Grant (Corrective Services NSW) was appointed Assistant Commissioner, Offender Services and Programs in June 2006. He is responsible for offender services and programs in custody and in the community including Corrective Services Industries and inmate classification and case management. Prior to this, Mr Grant had been Assistant Commissioner, Offender Management since December 2000. He has held a number of positions in the areas of inmate classification, programs and education and has a background in tertiary education.


CPTED Plus - 12 August

Date: 12 August 2011

Time: 9am - 4:30pm

Venue: Foyer, level 2, Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost:
Full fee: $220 (inc GST)
F/T student: $150 (inc GST)
University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

Contact: Sydney Institute of Criminology

Phone: 02 9351 0450

Email: law.criminology@sydney.edu.au

Registration: click here

Event flyer: click here

People engaged in crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) work often come from diverse backgrounds, with diverse professional development needs. This workshop will address various aspects of CPTED practice to aid practitioners in their work. This workshop has been designed to respond to the needs identified by practitioners at previous Sydney Institute of Criminology professional development events.

It will focus on:

Reading and understanding architectural plans

Adopting an appreciative inquiry approach to working with key stakeholders

Going behind the CCTV screens

Ways of thinking about perception of crime

Conducting and reviewing crime risk assessment reports

Sessions will be delivered by:

Dr Gavin Smith (University of Sydney)

Jonathan Knapp (SJB Urban)

Laurie Gabites (Trustee and Board Member of the Safe Communities Foundation of New Zealand (SCFNZ);Regional Director of the International CPTED Association (ICA))

Garner Clancey (Adjunct Lecturer, Sydney Institute of Criminology)

Dr Murray Lee (Co-Director, Sydney Institute of Criminology)

This workshop will be of interest to:

Crime Prevention/Community Safety Officers

Crime prevention consultants

Police

Planners

Urban designersArchitects

Local government personnel

Criminology and built environment students


Understanding Kinship: Indigenous People and Law - 4 August

Date: 4 August 2011

Time: 6 - 8pm

Venue: New Law School Annexe Seminar Room 340, Sydney Law School, Building F10, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free but registration essential

Registration: click here

Join the Institute of Criminology for Lynette Riley's 'Kinship' presentation. Lynette Riley, Academic Coordinator of the Koori Centre, University of Sydney, will take participants through a kinship system demonstrating the components of moiety, totem, skin names, language and traditional affiliations, and individual identity. Through Lynette's presentation participants will begin to see why Aboriginal people face particular problems when interacting with the (colonial) Australian legal system.

The Law Reform Commission of Western Australia Report Aboriginal Customary Laws (Final Report, The interaction of WA law with Aboriginal law and culture, Project 94, September 2006, p. 66) highlighted the importance of Kinship to Aboriginal people:

"Kinship is at the heart of Aboriginal society and underpins the customary law rules and norms... Importantly, kinship governs all aspects of a person's social behaviour...

It is important to note...that while the kinship system was an undeniable part of traditional Aboriginal society...it is also strongly instilled in contemporary Aboriginal society, including urban Aboriginals...certain kinship obligations, such as the duty to accommodate kin, are taken very seriously regardless of urban or remote location."

Although the kinship systems throughout Australia are extremely varied and it is not possible in this forum to examine the differences between them, participants in the workshop will gain a new and deeper understanding of how a kinship system operates.

By the end of the workshop participants will have gained insight into:

The social structure of Aboriginal society.

How this social structure and world view differs from the western liberal world view.

How this difference impacts upon Aboriginal people in the Criminal Justice System and the legal system more broadly.

This workshop will be of interest to:

Legal practitioners in Criminal Law, Family Law and Care and Protection (the 2-hour workshop is worth 2 CLE points).

Government personnel who interact with Indigenous Australians (especially DOCS, Juvenile Justice and Corrective services).

The Magistracy and Judiciary.

Police.

Students.

The workshop will be facilitated by Tanya Mitchell, Lecturer in Criminal Law and Indigenous People and the Law at Sydney Law School. Tanya was a senior solicitor-advocate with the Aboriginal Legal Service in NSW and also with the North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency in the Northern Territory before joining Sydney Law School as a full-time academic in 2010.

Numbers are limited to 60 so be sure to register early.


The psychology of crime - 7 June

Date: 7 June 2011

Time: 9am - 5pm

Venue: Law Annex Room 342, Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost:
Full fee: $220 (inc GST)
F/T student: $150 (inc GST)
University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

Contact: Sydney Institute of Criminology

Phone: 02 9351 0450

Email: law.criminology@sydney.edu.au

Registration: click here

The psychology of crime is a workshop examining the profession of criminal psychology (also referred to as forensic psychology). It will introduce and expand on questions such as: What do criminal/forensic psychologists do to assist police, the courts, the prisons, etc?

The workshop will explore the role of the forensic psychologist with examples of real (anonymous) cases. It is a must for anyone considering a career in the field of psychology, or for psychologists who would like an introduction to the forensic field. The workshop will also be useful for legal professionals and correctional staff in understanding psychological reports, explanations of bizarre behaviours and pathological diagnoses.

What people will know by the end of the workshop:

What forensic psychologists do and how we are trained to think

How psychologists study and understand criminal behaviour

Ways in which psychologists assess and explain criminal behaviour

How psychologists assist the courts in dealing with criminal behaviour

How psychologists treat certain types of criminal behaviour (violence, sex offences, murder)

Topics that will be covered during the workshop:

"What is psychology?", with reference to famous experiments that taught us much about human behaviour. How does psychology assist people working with criminal behaviour?

Assessment of a criminal offender: a look at how we do it. Real-life example of assessments (anonymous).

Treating criminal offenders. Real-life examples of treatment that worked and some that didn't (anonymous).

Please note that the course content will at times involve details about violent crime that may be traumatic. If in doubt about your ability to emotionally deal with such course content, please contact the Sydney Institute of Criminology and discuss your concerns, or please DO NOT ENROL.

This workshop will be facilitated by Pan Tsomis. Pan is a forensic and clinical psychologist with a masters degree in psychology and a masters degree in criminology. He is a registered psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia (Registration No PSY0001404883), and a member of the Australian Psychological Society's College of Forensic Psychologists and College of Clinical Psychologists (Member No 17562). Pan was a psychologist with the NSW Department of Juvenile Justice, and has worked for the Commonwealth Department of Veterans' Affairs,for a child protection agency, and for the Mental Health Team in Port Macquarie and at the St George Hospital. He has been in private practice since 1998, primarily assessing and treating criminal offenders, victims of violent crime, as well as combat veterans and their families. He has taught psychology at the University of Sydney and criminology at the University of Western Sydney. He has presented papers and lectured on forensic psychological assessment at international conferences. He also regularly runs workshops on assessment and management of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), especially with regard to victims and perpetrators of violent crimes.


Drugs, crime and brief interventions for young offenders - 18 May

Date: 18 May 2011

Time: 9am - 5pm

Venue: Foyer (level 2), Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost:
Full fee: $220 (inc GST)
F/T student: $150 (inc GST)
University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

Contact: Sydney Institute of Criminology

Phone: 02 9351 0450

Email: law.criminology@sydney.edu.au

Registration: click here

Drugs and crime interact in a variety of ways, but certainly tend to exacerbate each other. The evidence is clear that reduced drug use is associated with reduced crime. Frontline workers often feel ill-equipped to address the complexity of presentations of young offenders who use drugs, yet access to effective community or residential treatment is often elusive. This course will provide an update on the drug use of young people, available intervention options, and how those who come into contact with young offenders who use drugs may be able to provide helpful evidence-informed and brief interventions.


Capacity for crime: adolescent brain development, mental health and youth crime - 2 May

Date: 2 May 2011

Time: 6-8pm (registration and refreshments from 5.30pm)

Venue: Foyer (level 2), Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Professor Hickie AM MD FRANZCP FASSA is the Executive Director for the Brain & Mind Institute (BMRI). In 2006 he received the Australian Honours Award of Member (AM) for services to medicine. He wasappointed to the Prime Minister's Australian National Council on Drugs in 2007, and has led the BMRI as a founding member of the new National Youth Mental Health Foundation ('headspace').
From 2008-2013, Professor Hickie is one of the first round of new NHMRC 2008 Australian Fellows. In July 2008 he was appointed to the Federal Health Minister's new National Advisory Council on Mental Health, and in November 2009 he received the Research Australia National Advocacy Award for his work in mental health.

Jonathan Nicholas is the CEO of Inspire Foundation - a national charitable organisation that helps young people lead happier lives and the organisation behind the youth mental health service, ReachOut.com. Jonathan has a background in child and adolescent psychology having spent the large part of my career working in the area of adolescent mental health as a researcher, practitioner and in executive positions for an NGO. He was one of the founding team that developed ReachOut.com in 1997. prior to taking the position of CEO of Inspire Foundation he was the founding CEO of Inspire Ireland Foundation.

Natalie Mamone is the Chief Psychologist at Juvenile Justice in NSW. She is a Specialist Forensic Psychologist with extensive experience as a psychologist over the last 16 years and has worked with offenders, both adult and juvenile, for 25 years. Her duties cover clinical direction for psychological and counselling practice, clinical supervision and consultation for specialist programs targeting the reduction of criminogenic needs and re-offending. Natalie was one of the chief investigators of the 2009 Young People in Custody Health Survey.

Cost: Free however registration is essential

Contact: Event Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0238

Email: law.events@sydney.edu.au

Registration: click here

About the seminar

Recent advances in neuroscience have resulted in greater understanding of adolescent brain development. It now appears that the adolescent brain continues to develop through to early adulthood, which has significant implications for understanding youth crime.

This seminar will explore current thinking in the science of adolescent brain development and review recent research into the mental health of young people within the NSW juvenile justice system. By considering these features of youth crime, it will be possible to reflect upon the efficacy of current programs for young people.

This seminar is the third in a series sponsored by the Department of Human Services NSW - Juvenile Justice.


Guest speakers


Theatres of violence: facts and fictions - 18 April

Date: 18 April 2011

Time: 6pm - 8pm (registration from 5:30pm)

Venue: Foyer (level 2), Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free

Contact: Events Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0248

Email: law.events@sydney.edu.au

Registration: click here

The high profile of crime and violence in our daily press, on our television screens and bestseller lists testifies to society's fascination with prohibited, illicit and unlawful acts. This exciting event draws together a diverse panel of writers who focus on violence in their writing to explore the relationship between real crime and fictional violence. The seminar will consider a varied set of topics on the theme of violence's facts and fictions, such as representations and images of crime; the place of law in reflecting particular pictures of violence; masculinity, femininity, groups and gangs; and crime's myths, figures and fantasies.

Join panel members: former detective now true crime author Clive Small, journalist and fiction writer Mark Dapin, and discussants: law academic and criminologist come fiction writer David Brown and criminologist Rebecca Scott Bray as they investigate theatres of violence in fact and fiction.


Briefing session: uses and abuses of crime statistics - 14 April

Date: 14 April 2011

Time: 10am - 11am

Venue: Foyer (level 2), Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: FREE

Contact: Events Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0248

Email: law.events@sydney.edu.au

Registration: click here

The 2010 NSW crime statistics will be released soon (late April 2011).This background briefing session byDr Don Weatherburn (Director, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research) and Jessie Holmes (Project Officer, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research) will provide a detailed understanding of reporting of crime, the limitations of crime statistics, and ways of interpreting and reporting crime data.

This event will help equip journalists and commentators to understand crime data in all of its complexity.

Journalists, journalism students, criminology students and those generally interested in crime data are encouraged to attend this event.

This briefing session is a joint initiative of the Sydney Institute of Criminology (University of Sydney) and the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research.


Beyond punishment: actuarial risk - 11 April

Date: 11 April 2011

Time: 6-8pm (registration and refreshments from 5.30pm)

Venue: Foyer (level 2), Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free however registration is essential

Contact: Event Coordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0238

Email: law.events@sydney.edu.au

Registration: click here

About the event
Actuarial risk assessment tools have become ubiquitous within the criminal justice system. Attempts to measure risks of offending and reoffending are commonly used in various stages in the criminal justice system. With such widespread use, it is important to consider the implications of these tools. This seminar will explore current uses of actuarial risk assessment methodologies and contemporary research findings.

This event is sponsored by the Department of Corrective Services.

Guest Speakers

James R P Ogloff, JD Ph.D FAPS is a psychologist and Fellow of the Canadian, American, and Australian psychological societies. He is the Foundation Professor of Clinical Forensic Psychology at Monash University and Director of the Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science. He is also Director of Psychological Services at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health (Forensicare). He has worked in clinical and forensic psychology in a variety of settings for more than 25 years. Professor Ogloff has specific expertise in the assessment of risk for violence. He is the Past-President of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Psychiatry, Psychology and Law and a former Chair of the College of Forensic Psychologists of the Australian Psychological Society. He is a Past-President of the Canadian Psychological Association and a Past-President of the American Psychology-Law Society. Professor Ogloff has published 16 books more than 200 scholarly articles and book chapters. He is the recipient of the 2009 Award for Distinguished Contributions in Forensic Psychology from the Australian Psychological Society.

Stuart Ross is a Senior Fellow in the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Melbourne. His research interests include correctional and court-based program design and evaluation, sentencing decision making and criminal justice population modelling. His recent work includes evaluations of release transition programs, court programs and the development of an instrument for assessing risk and need in Victorian prisoners and offenders. He is currently Chief Investigator on an ARC Discovery Project on procedural justice for victims of crime, and an ARC Linkage Project on the integrated responses to family violence.


Restorative justice: promoting previously unthinkable ways - 6 April

Date: 6 April 2011

Time: 5:30-7pm (registration from 5pm)

Venue: Faculty Common Room (Level 4), Sydney Law School, Building F10, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free however registration is essential

Contact: Event Coordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0248

Email: law.events@sydney.edu.au

Registration: click here

In 2003, Northern Ireland introduced restorative justice conferencing, based on the New Zealand model, to the juvenile justice system.Northern Ireland is now recognised as a European leader in restorative conferencing and two recent UK reports - by the Independent Commission on Youth Crime and Antisocial Behaviour (2010) and The Police Foundation and JUSTICE (2011) - have recommended that this model underpin the reform of the UK juvenile justice system. The University of Ulster developed and delivers the training for the Youth Conference Service facilitators and for police officers, and is also actively involved in the research and development of restorative practices more generally.

In this seminar, Dr Derick Wilson (University of Ulster) discusses the development and future directions of restorative justice in Northern Ireland including the Youth Conference Scheme, the Victims and Survivors Forum, policing reforms and restorative approaches in prisons. Dr Wilson will also discuss the potential for using a restorative approach in broader relational, institutional and public policy domains. His presentation will be followed by a short interactive session exploring the relevance of these ideas in the NSW context.

Dr Derick Wilson is a Reader in Education at the University of Ulster, specialising in Community Relations and Restorative Practice. He is currently a member of a programme team developing Restorative Practices across the Criminal Justice Sector, Schools, the Faith traditions and wider civil society in Northern Ireland.

Dr Wilson was awarded the MBE for services to Community Relations (1994), a Distinguished Community Fellowship by the University of Ulster (2002) and a Lifetime Achievement Award by the NI Community Relations Council (2007). He has been the Assistant Director, UNESCO Centre, (2006-09), an Equality Commissioner for Northern Ireland (2003-08) and an Associate Member of the pilot Victims and Survivors Forum (2009-10).


Working with offenders post-release - 4 April


Should NSW have a Mental Health Court? - 1 April

Date: 1 April 2011

Time: 9am - 1pm (registration from 8:30am)

Venue: Foyer (level 2), Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free but registration essential

Contact: Sydney Institute of Criminology

Phone: 02 9351 0239

Email: law.criminology@sydney.edu.au

Registration: Click here to register online.

The NSW Law Reform Commission, together with the Sydney Institute of Criminology, invites you to Should NSW have a Mental Health Court? A symposium to discuss the potential of a mental health 'court' or a specialist list to address issues of diversion in relation to people with cognitive and mental health impairments in the criminal justice system and how such a court or list might be implemented in NSW.

The symposium forms a part of the Commission's consultation process in relation to its review of People with cognitive and mental health impairments in the criminal justice system. Further information about the review is available at http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lrc.

The symposium will feature presentations by experts followed by a panel discussion. Audience participation will be encouraged as part of the panel discussion.

Speakers include:

Chief Magistrate Michael Hill: Chief Magistrate of the Magistrates Court of Tasmania, and Chair of the Steering Committee overseeing the development of the Court's Mental Health Diversion List Program.

Magistrate John Lesser: Victorian Magistrate and supervising Magistrate for the Assessment and Referral Court List at Melbourne Magistrates' Court.

Elizabeth Richardson: PhD Candidate at the Faculty of Law, Monash University, researching the operation of mental health courts and diversionary programs in Australia and overseas.


Expert panel discussion: Australia’s response to child sexual abuse - 31 March

Date: 31 March 2011

Time: 9am - 12pm (registration from 8:30am)

This public panel is presented by the Institute as part of the AusAID funded Australian Leadership Awards Fellowship Program 'A multidisciplinary approach to reducing child sexual abuse in Sri Lanka', headed by Dr Patricia Weerakoon and Dr Rita Shackel of the University of Sydney. The primary goals of the Program are to increase the capacity of Sri-Lankan professionals to deal with child sexual abuse (CSA) in inter-sectorial and multidisciplinary teams and to provide a forum for cross-cultural understanding of CSA. At this event, experts will present on a range of strategies employed in the Australian context by police, prosecutors, courts, psychologists and health workers in relation to CSA.


Transitional Justice Workshop - 25 February

Date: 25 February 2011

Time: 9am - 5pm

Venue: Faculty Seminar Room (level 4), Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Contact: Convenor, Prof Michael Humphrey

Email: michael.humphrey@sydney.edu.au

This workshop will explore transitional justice from the perspective of victims. It will look at the tensions between law and morality in the process of reconciliation, in particular the way human rights and trauma have become universalizing discourses for victim recognition. The seminar will explore different cases of transitional justice and the way particular human rights issues have become dominant in different post-conflict politics of transition – e.g. disappearance, rape of women in war, child abduction.

Rationale: This workshop will bring together a network of social science scholars across Sociology, Anthropology and Law who have undertaken research on different aspects of transitional justice. It addresses research strengths in human rights and democratization, socio-legal studies, criminology. It will also allow current postgraduates working in the field to benefit from presenting their work in this specialized forum.

Presenters include:

Prof Michael Humphrey (Dept Sociology and Social Policy) - Convenor

Prof Vesna Nikolic-Ristanovic, Belgrade University, (Faculty for Special Education and Rehabilitation), Director, Victimology Society of Serbia.

Assoc Prof Estela Valverde (Spanish & Latin America Studies, Macquarie University)

Assoc Prof Adam Czarnota (Law, UNSW)

Dr Hariz Halilovich , (Faculty of Medicine, University of Melbourne)

Assoc Prof Danielle Celermajer (Dept Sociology and Social Policy)

Dr Kiran Grewal (Dept Sociology and Social Policy)

Ms Michelle Veljanovska (Dept Sociology and Social Policy)

Dr Magdalena Zolkos, (Centre for Citizenship and Public Policy, UWS)


Aboriginal young people and crime - 7 February

Date: 7 February 2011

Time: 6-8pm (registration from 5.30pm)

Venue: Foyer (level 2), Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free however registration is essential

Contact: Events Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0248

Email: law.events@sydney.edu.au

Registration: click here

On 11 November 2010, the Department of Human Services NSW - Juvenile Justice and the Sydney Institute of Criminology hosted a seminar that considered the facts of juvenile offending. One major theme emerging from this seminar was the continued over-representation of young Aboriginal people in the juvenile justice system. The next seminar in this series of events focusing on youth crime and juvenile justice will explore in detail the issues associated with Aboriginal young peopleand crime. Consideration will be given to the reasons for this continued over-representation, while also seeking to highlighting promising programs and community-based initiatives.

Guest Speakers

Edwina Crawford Manager, Aboriginal Strategic Coordination Unit, Department of Human Services NSW - Juvenile Justice

Bob Debus, Former Minister for Home Affairs in the Australian Government and a former NSW Attorney General

Anthony Paulson, Centre Manager, Tirkandi Inaburra

Kate Sullivan, Research Scholar, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, Australian National University


This seminar has been made possible through the sponsorship of Department of Human Services NSW - Juvenile Justice.


SafeGrowth and City Crime - Co-Design, Eco-Parks, Funky Laneways and Fixing Deadzones - 24 January

Date: 24 January 2011

Time: 9.30am-5.30pm

Venue: Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost:
Full fee: $220 (inc GST)
F/T student: $150 (inc GST)
University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

Contact: Events Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0248

Email: law.events@sydney.edu.au

Registration: click here

The Sydney Institute of Criminology is hosting a one-day workshop titled, SafeGrowth and City Crime - Co-Design, Eco-Parks, Funky Laneways and Fixing Deadzones on Monday 24 January 2011. This interactive workshop will explore crime in cities, will challenge participants to develop realistic and practical strategies from ideas of speakers and from each other and will seek to highlight some inclusive strategies to prevent crime in cities. We expect that the event will be of great interest to:

Local government staff (planners, crime prevention/community safety, place management, etc.)

Planners

Urban designers

Architects

Police

Criminologists

Crime prevention practitioners

This event will be facilitated by two high profile experts with significant international experience and reputations. Greg Saville and Wendy Sarkissian will facilitate workshops and deliver presentations through this one-day event. Information about these exciting facilitators is provided below:

Greg Saville - Greg is an urban planner specialising in crime prevention and community capacity building. He pioneered problem based learning in law enforcement as co-developer of the Police Training Officer Program and Problem Based Learning for the U.S. Department of Justice. He is a co-founder of the International CPTED Association and vice-chair of the Police Society for Problem Based Learning. He is adjunct professor at the University of New Haven and a former police officer.

Wendy Sarkissian - Wendy was initially trained as an educator, she holds a Masters of Arts in literature, a Master of Town Planning and a PhD in environmental ethics. Building a career as a social planning consultant, she has pioneered innovative planning and development approaches in an astonishing variety of contexts. This work has earned her forty professional awards. She has worked with senior managers and advisors to government departments and private enterprise, primarily in the urban, community, housing and development sectors. Widely regarded as a leader in her profession and acclaimed as a humorous and thought-provoking speaker, Dr Sarkissian is a Fellow of the Planning Institute of Australia and a Member of the International Board of Global Urban Development. She is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Sustainable Development, Bond University and a Member of the School of Sustainable Development Academic Advisory Panel. From 2006 to 2008 she was Adjunct Professor in the School of Community and Regional Planning, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Wendy has served on Boards in South Australia and Queensland and is the award-winning author of six books on housing and community engagement. Three new books on sustainability and community engagement are forthcoming in 2008 and 2009 from Earthscan Publishers, London.

Interspersed throughout the day will be short, engaging presentations from experts covering various disciplines and focused on various issues relevant to the exploration of crime in cities. The final list of guest speakers will be finalised in the coming weeks. Speakers will cover the following topics:

The night-time economy

Graffiti

Public art

Homelessness

Integrated planning and policy development

To download the detailed program please click here.

This workshop has been made possible through our sponsors SJB Urban and the NSW Department of Justice and Attorney General.


Past Events 2010

Post-Release Employment - 2 December

Refining an understanding of Restorative Justice - 29 November

Crime Prevention Master Class - 24 November

Juvenile Offending - What Are the Facts? - 11 November

Investing in Alternatives to Prison - 3 November

Introduction to Crime Prevention - 20 October

Presentation by Dr Rita Shackel to University of Sydney Sex Researchers Team - 28 September

Crime, Morality, and Bioethics in America: The Religious Right and the 'Culture Wars'

Critical Perspectives of CPTED - 20 July

Restorative Justice Practitioners' Forum: The Role of the RJ Facilitator - 19 July

The Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference - 1st and 2nd July 2010

TASA Thematic Group Workshop: Ethnography, Crime and Governance – 30th June 2010

People with Complex Needs Who Pass Through Criminal Justice

Restorative Justice: Moving Forward

Crime Prevention Seminar

Crime Free Housing Seminar - 29th March 2010


Post-Release Employment - 2 December

Date: 2 December 2010

Time: 5.30pm-7.30pm, refreshments from 5pm

Venue: Faculty Common Room, Level 4, Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free

Contact: Events Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0248

Email: law.events@sydney.edu.au

Registration: click here

Gaining employment is frequently advocated as a key form of post-release support. However, with the rise of employment screening, the tightening of regulations around the security industry and a competitive job market (amongst other things), the prospects for recently released prisoners gaining employment has been eroded in recent times. Notwithstanding these issues, there are also many challenges faced by ex-prisoners in staying in poorly paid employment when the lure of easy money beckons.

This seminar will investigate these issues and will explore post-release employment opportunities available to ex-prisoners.

Speakers include:

A representative and clients from the Community Restorative Centre

Dr Bronwyn Naylor (Monash University)

Brad Parker (CFMEU)

This seminar has been made possible through the sponsorship of Corrective Services NSW.


Refining an understanding of Restorative Justice - 29 November

Date: 29 November 2010

Time: 4.30pm-7.00pm

Venue: Foyer, Level 2, Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free

Contact: Events Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0248

Email: law.events@sydney.edu.au

Registration: click here

The term 'restorative justice' is fast becoming part of the common vernacular of the criminal justice system. International organisations such as the United Nations and Council of Europe advocate that restorative justice processes form part of a country's mainstream response to criminal offending by both juvenile and adult offenders. Academics theorise the concepts and evaluate pioneering programs. Proponents argue the social benefits and governments monitor community perceptions and attitudes. Increasingly, jurisdictions are incorporating 'Restorative Justice' into their criminal justice system. But this raises a conundrum: Can a justice process that is still evolving, and that is based on principles and concepts rather than codified law or procedure, be consistently implemented and practiced, let alone researched and evaluated?

The challenge for those working in the field is to remain informed and responsive to developments in theory, and articulate these in a clear practice model of service delivery. Building an interpretive community around restorative justice in NSW is about developing shared understandings of the core goals, principles and values.

How consistently do we understand and apply the term 'restorative justice'? Definitions are tweaked in response to practice, theory or research. Debates flourish: What is or isn't restorative justice? Where does restorative justice fit in relation to other alternative dispute resolution practices in the criminal justice system or indeed with similarly-principled practices applied outside the criminal justice system? What are the core features unique to restorative justice? How best can restorative justice achieve its stated aims relating to victims, offenders or the community?

This RJ Seminar, presented by the Sydney Institute of Criminology and sponsored by NSW Attorney-General's Department, will explore these questions and issues. A panel of experts will each address a short set of questions and then participate in a question-and-answer session responding to issues raised by the audience. So that issues can be explored thematically, registered participants are invited to submit their questions prior to the seminar, by email to (including full name and contact details, please). Supplementary questions from the floor may be invited on the evening.

Panel members include:

Rob Mackay, who set up the first victim-offender mediation scheme in Scotland in the 1980s. He has since taught social work, written about restorative justice theory and served on the boards of a number of UK and European bodies concerned with development and practice of restorative justice. Since moving to Australia in 2008, Rob has been actively involved with restorative justice in NSW.

Dr Meredith Rossner is a research fellow at the Justice Research Group at the University of Western Sydney. She received her PhD in Sociology and Criminology from the University of Pennsylvania (USA). Dr. Rossner has worked as a part of an international research team evaluating restorative justice; her particular interest is in exploring the emotional dynamics and crime reduction potential of face-to-face restorative justice conference in the UK and Australia.

This event is sponsored by the NSW Department of Justice and Attorney General.


Crime Prevention Master Class - 24 November

Date: 24 November 2010

Time: 9.00am-5.00pm (registration from 8.30am)

Venue: Law Annex SR 340, Sydney Law School, New Law Building (F10), Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost:
Full fee: $220 (inc GST)
F/T student: $150 (inc GST)
University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

Contact: Sydney Institute of Criminology

Phone: 02 9351 0239

Email: law.criminology@sydney.edu.au

Further details and registration: click here

This training will provide experienced Crime Prevention Officers / Community Safety Officers with opportunities to learn about the latest developments in crime prevention practice and theory. Drawing on contemporary international developments, this training will be a must for experienced crime prevention practitioners.

To ensure that individual learning outcomes are achieved through this training, each participant will complete an individual training assessment. Aspects of the training will be tailored to address specific requirements and further resources will be recommended to enhance learning beyond the training day. This will ensure that experienced practitioners benefit from this training.

The training will cover:

International developments for evidence-based crime prevention

Advanced methods of program evaluation

Contemporary developments in crime prevention techniques

Sharing of local examples of effective crime prevention

Participants will also receive a CD containing crime prevention information and exercises to supplement the face-to-face training experience.

The training will be facilitated by Garner Clancey. Garner is an Adjunct Lecturer of the Sydney Institute of Criminology and has extensive experience in crime prevention. He has studied psychology, criminology and urban planning; taught crime prevention units across four universities; worked for juvenile justice and police agencies; and completed numerous crime prevention projects, including the development of crime prevention plans for local government authorities. Garner recently authored a resource manual on public space CCTV systems for the Australian Institute of Criminology and has created numerous crime prevention resources. Garner has also served on various Boards and Committees, including the National Children and Youth Law Centre Board, the Australian Crime Prevention Council Executive Committee and the NSW Young Offenders Advisory Council.


Juvenile Offending - What Are the Facts? - 11 November

Date: 11 November 2010

Time: 6.00pm-8.00pm (registration from 5.30pm)

Venue: Foyer (Level 2), Sydney Law School, New Law Building, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free

Contact: Events Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0248

Email: law.events@sydney.edu.au

Further details and registration: click here

We often hear reports and stories about juvenile offending. At times, these reports present alarming scenarios and troubling images. But what are the facts of juvenile offending?

This seminar will bring together a number of experts to review the existing scientific evidence and to sketch out what is known about juvenile offending. The expert panel of speakers will review available evidence on juvenile crime trends, consider factors associated with involvement in crime and discuss what appears to work most effectively in preventing juvenile offending.

Speakers include:

Peter Muir (Chief Executive, NSW Juvenile Justice) will open the seminar.

Dr Eric Heller (Manager of Research, NSW Juvenile Justice)

Jessie Holmes (Information Officer, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research)

Rachel Aalders (Senior Project Manager, Child and Youth Welfare Unit, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare)


Investing in Alternatives to Prison - 3 November

Date: 3 November 2010

Time: 6.00pm-8.00pm (registration from 5.30pm)

Venue: Law Annex SR 340, Sydney Law School, New Law Building (F10), Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney.

Cost: Free however registration is essential

Contact: Event Coordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0238

Email: law.events@sydney.edu.au

Further details and registration: click here

The Australian Institute of Criminology suggests that the overall imprisonment rate per 100,000 of the adult prison population increased from 88 to 168 between 1984 and 2008, an average growth rate of five percent per year. This has profound implications for the people being sentenced to prison and has consequences for resettlement of prisoners coming out of prison. There are also significant financial costs associated with this increased use of incarceration, not least of which is associated with the substantial resources that have to be invested in prison building programs.

This seminar will look at the costs of imprisonment and consider how limited public funds could be invested in alternatives to imprisonment. Speakers at this event include:

The Honourable Harold Sperling QC (Convenor, Crime and Justice Reform Committee)

Mr Peter Achterstraat (Auditor-General, Audit Office of NSW)

Emeritus Professor David Brown (University of New South Wales)


Introduction to Crime Prevention - 20 October

Date: 20 October 2010

Time: 9.00am-5.00pm (registration from 8.30am)

Venue: Law Annex SR 340, Sydney Law School, New Law Building (F10), Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Reasons not to solely rely on the criminal justice system to prevent crime

Local crime statistics and crime data analysis techniques

A crime problem-solving model

Models of crime prevention

Ingredients of successful partnerships

Simple methods of implementing and evaluating crime prevention initiatives
Cost:
Full fee: $220 (inc GST)
F/T student: $150 (inc GST)
University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

Contact: Sydney Institute of Criminology

Phone: 02 9351 0239

Email: law.criminology@sydney.edu.au

Further details and registration: click here

This introduction to crime prevention course provides practical, scenario based training covering an array of topics including:

This training will be especially relevant to local government Community Safety Officers, police, staff from non-government organisations involved in preventing crime, criminology students and others interested in crime prevention. Upon completion of the training, participants will have a working knowledge of key crime prevention concepts and be familiar with strategies to effectively prevent crime. The practical nature of the training means that the skills and knowledge gained through this training will be directly transferable to the workplace.

Participants will also receive a CD containing crime prevention information and exercises to supplement the face-to-face training experience.

The training will be facilitated by Garner Clancey. Garner is an Adjunct Lecturer of the Sydney Institute of Criminology and has extensive experience in crime prevention. He has studied psychology, criminology and urban planning; taught crime prevention units across four universities; worked for juvenile justice and police agencies; and completed numerous crime prevention projects, including the development of crime prevention plans for local government authorities. Garner recently authored a resource manual on public space CCTV systems for the Australian Institute of Criminology and has created numerous crime prevention resources. Garner has also served on various Boards and Committees, including the National Children and Youth Law Centre Board, the Australian Crime Prevention Council Executive Committee and the NSW Young Offenders Advisory Council.


Presentation by Dr Rita Shackel to University of Sydney Sex Researchers Team - 28 September

Date: 28 September 2010

Time: 1.00pm-2.00pm

Venue: Faculty Moot Board Room, Level 1, Sydney Law School, New Law Building (F10), Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Cost: Free, all welcome

Children respond to sexual abuse in a wide range of diverse ways. Much research has been conducted on the short and long term effects of child sexual abuse mostly grounded in the findings of clinical studies. The voice of child victims about the impact of such abuse is often absent from such research. Dr Rita Shackel has recently undertaken detailed analysis of a sample of Victim Impact Statements that provide a rare insight into how children describe the effects of such abuse. A particular point for discussion is how children’s description of the impact of child sexual abuse compares to the findings of clinical and psychological research. Children describe an array of effects but one issue of particular interest is the impact of sexual abuse on children’s sexual development.


Crime, Morality, and Bioethics in America: The Religious Right and the 'Culture Wars'

Date: 31 August 2010

Time: 1.00pm-2.00pm

Venue: The Foyer, Level 2, Sydney Law School, New Law Building, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney.

Cost: Free

Contact: Events Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0429

Email:

John Dombrink, PhD
Professor of Criminology, Law & Society and Sociology,
School of Social Ecology,
University of California, Irvine

This presentation will discuss certain key enduring, shifting and contradictory elements of the American culture war as it moves forward:

the broadening and moderating of the role of religion;

a drop in salience of certain wedge issues, such as same sex marriage and stem cell research;

continued ambivalence surrounding abortion and reproductive rights; and

the rise of a new/old culture war resistance ('birthers', 'deathers', 'Tenthers', 'truthers' and 'tea party' activists) that makes the predictions of realignment and hopes for post-partisanship weaker. Together, the elements suggest a reconfiguring of the 'culture wars' in the United States.

This presentation will draw from a larger project: 'After the Culture War? America in the Obama Era', which examines the competing themes of normalisation of the 'core' culture war issues (abortion, same-sex marriage, aid-in-dying, stem cell research) against the contemporary backlash and resistance,including, but not limited to, the 'tea party' phenomenon. The resulting book will provide an assessment of the status of social and religious conservatism in America, and a measure of the vitality of the culture wars.

About the Speaker

John Dombrink is a sociologist, and professor in the Department of Criminology, Law & Society at the University of California, Irvine. He is the co-author of The Last Resort: Success and Failure in Campaigns for Casinos, University of Nevada Press, 1990 (with William N Thompson); Dying Right: The Death With Dignity Movement, Routledge, 2001 (with Dan Hillyard); and Sin No More: From Abortion to Stem Cells – Understanding Crime, Law and Morality in America, New York University Press, 2007 (with Dan Hillyard). John Dombrink's ongoing research examines 'morality contests' in American culture, and assesses the status of American laws and attitudes toward the sphere of personal morality.


Critical Perspectives of CPTED - 20 July

Date: 20 July 2010

Time: 10.00am-1.00pm

Venue: The Foyer, Level 2, Sydney Law School, New Law Building, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney.

Contact: Events Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0248

Email:

Crime Prevention through environmental design (CPTED) involves the manipulation of the built environment to prevent crime and to reduce the fear of crime. CPTED has gained greater prominence in recent years, with the introduction of guidelines to encourage the designing out of crime. However, to date, there has been limited debate or analysis of CPTED practice in NSW. This seminar will seek to partially address this gap and will critically explore CPTED theory and practice.

The seminar will consist of presentations from the following academics and practitioners:

Professor Paul Ekblom (Academic Director, Design Against Crime Research Centre, Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, England) - Paul Ekblom read psychology at University College London, where he also gained his PhD. He spent much of his career as a researcher in the UK Home Office, centring on crime prevention. He was involved throughout crime prevention's rise from obscurity to widespread recognition by practitioners and policymakers in central and local government and beyond. Paul joined the Design Against Crime Research Centre in June 2005. Paul is an established figure in the worlds of police and crime prevention training, research, knowledge management and advanced practice.

Dr Kurt Iveson (Senior Lecturer in Urban Geography, University of Sydney) - Kurt is primarily interested in the question of how social justice can be achieved in cities. Within this broad interest, his previous research has focused on two main areas. First, he has examined the significance of the urban public realm for citizenship and democracy. This has included looking at contests over different uses of urban public space, including the politics of protest, graffiti writing, cruising, hanging out, and outdoor advertising. Second, he has explored how urban planning might work better to achieve social justice in cities. In particular, he has considered the ways in which planners should conceptualise, and respond to, different forms of diversity in the city.

Garner Clancey (Sydney Institute of Criminology) - Garner has degrees in psychology (undergraduate) and criminology (postgraduate) and over 18 years experience in criminal justice and crime prevention work. He has worked on crime prevention consultancies across Australia, including the development of crime prevention plans for local government, coordinating community safety audits for local government authorities (including on town centres, housing developments and retail precincts) and evaluating various crime prevention initiatives / programs. Garner has worked as part of multi-disciplinary teams to conduct crime risk assessments on proposed developments. Garner recently developed the 'Considerations for establishing a public space CCTV network' report for the Australian Institute of Criminology and is an Executive Member of the Australian Crime Prevention Council and a member of the NSW Young Offenders Advisory Committee.

A representative of the Crime Prevention Division of the Department of Justice & Attorney General, will present on a recent project that aimed to explore graffiti prevention techniques. Graffiti vandalism is a crime that has significant financial and social impacts on the NSW community, affecting Government utilities, public transport operators, local government, business owners and residents.The cost of graffiti management diverts taxpayers' money from important Government services for the community. In recent years, a broad range of programs and initiatives aimed at reducing graffiti vandalism have been introduced across Australia and internationally. However, there is little evidence available on the effectiveness of the strategies in reducing graffiti vandalism. The Crime Prevention Division of the Department of Justice & Attorney General implemented their Graffiti Reduction Demonstration Project aiming to identify and build an evidence-base for the most effective graffiti vandalism prevention strategies. This presentation will explore the approaches tested and the Division's findings on what techniques are effective at preventing graffiti.

This seminar will be of particular interest to:

Crime prevention practitioners

Police

Local government agencies

Architects

Planners

Urban designers

Non-government organisations

Youth and community workers

Security personnel

University students

This seminar has been made possible through the generous sponsorship of the NSW Department of Justice and Attorney General.


Restorative Justice Practitioners' Forum: The Role of the RJ Facilitator - 19 July

Date: 19 July 2010

Time: 5.00pm-7.00pm

Venue: Sydney Law School, New Law Building, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney.

Contact: Events Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0238

Email:

The Sydney Institute of Criminology is pleased to present the first in a program of Restorative Justice Practitioners' Forums, offering professional development opportunities for people working directly in service delivery of restorative justice in the criminal justice system.

The Restorative Justice Practitioners' Forums will comprise a short theoretical introduction to a specific practice issue, followed by interactive small group discussions where practitioners are encouraged to share their experience, knowledge and ideas relevant to the topic.

The RJ Practitioners' Forum on 19 July explores The Role of the RJ Facilitator.

Two short articles will be disseminated on the day, together with a short presentation by Dr Jasmine Bruce on some findings from her thesis research, Facilitating Restorative Justice - A Study of Conference Convenors. The interactive session will be semi-structured, with groups asked to present key discussion points at the conclusion of the session.


The Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference - 1st and 2nd July 2010

Dates: 1st and 2nd July 2010.

Venue: University of Sydney Faculty of Law, New Law School Building, Main Campus, Camperdown NSW.

The Sydney Institute of Criminology at the University of Sydney and the School of Social Sciences at the University of Western Sydney are proud to invite academics, researchers, activists, students and criminal justice professionals to the 2010 Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference. The conference venue is the New Law Building at the University of Sydney Camperdown Campus.

Since 2007, the Critical Criminology Conference has been hosted by a range of universities throughout Australia with the intention of promoting critical and analytic perspectives on crime and justice. The conference in 2010 will continue to foster dialogue beyond the traditional boundaries of the discipline of criminology and promote the ground-breaking research of critical criminologists from Australia and New Zealand.


TASA Thematic Group Workshop: Ethnography, Crime and Governance – 30th June 2010

Dates: 30th June 2010.

Venue: University of Sydney Faculty of Law, New Law School Building, Main Campus, Camperdown NSW.

The Crime and Governance Thematic Group of the Australian Sociological Association (TASA), in conjunction with the Sydney Institute of Criminology at The University of Sydney, will host a workshop on ethnography, crime and governance at the University of Sydney on 30 June 2010, the day before the Critical Criminology Conference.


People with Complex Needs Who Pass Through Criminal Justice

Date: Monday 31st May 2010

Time: 6.00pm-7.30pm (registration and refreshments from 5.30pm)

Venue: Sydney Law School, New Law Building, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney.

Contact: Sydney Institute of Criminology

Phone: 02 9351 0239

Email:

About the Speaker

Professor Hamilton is Professorial Fellow in the School of Population Health, University of Melbourne. She is the immediate past Chair and now Vice-President of the Cancer Council Victoria, and is also an executive member of the Australian National Council on Drugs. She is also a member of the Prime Minister's Council on Homelessness. Professor Hamilton has long standing policy, research and programme development experience in the arena of alcohol and drug dependence, including as a delegate to the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs. Professor Hamilton's background is in social work and public health, and she has conducted research in epidemiology, policy, evaluation (prevention and treatment), young people and drugs, women and alcohol, alcohol problems in remote Australia, evaluation of therapeutic communities and self-help. She was the founding Director of the Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre in Victoria, and recently chaired the Multiple and Complex Needs Panel in Victoria.

About the Presentation

Efforts to enhance efficiency in service provision have produced increasingly sophisticated targeting in the various human service domains.

In the context of changing demographics, the aftermath of de-institutionalisation of the 1970's to 1990's and governments contracting out services with tight specifications this has often had an unintended outcome of excluding those with multiple needs; leaving some people in our community especially vulnerable. Some appear to be at increasingly high risk of being 'serviced' in our state run justice systems. This paper shares the experience of one endeavour of a state to provide an over-sighting service (under legislation) to those at the extreme end of the spectrum of people with multiple and complex needs.

People with Complex Needs Who Pass Through Criminal Justice is part of the Beyond Punishment seminar series, sponsored by Corrective Services NSW.


Restorative Justice: Moving Forward

Date: Monday 24th May 2010

Time: 4.00-7.00pm, followed by refreshments

Venue: Sydney Law School, New Law Building, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney.

Cost: Free however registration is essential

Contact: Events Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0238

Email:

Further information: Sydney Law School News and Events: Restorative Justice: Moving Forward

The Sydney Institute of Criminology presents the first in a proposed series of events relating to restorative justice within the criminal justice system. These events will provide opportunities for restorative justice practitioners, policy-makers, researchers and other interested parties to share knowledge, information and experience.

In NSW, legal practices built on restorative justice principles are well established across the criminal justice system: Youth Justice Conferences with young offenders, Forum Sentencing with adult offenders, Restorative Justice processes with post-sentence adult offenders and Circle Sentencing with Indigenous offenders. However, restorative justice is a dynamic, evolving discipline. Over the coming months, the Sydney Institute of Criminology events will highlight developments in theory and research, explore critical issues and concerns, promote examples of practice, stimulate thinking, reflection and discussion and, potentially, inform the future development of restorative justice policy and practice in NSW.

Restorative Justice: Moving Forward includes short presentations from a small panel of speakers offering different perspectives to a critical discussion of restorative justice. Seminar participants will have opportunities to explore these issues with the speakers after each presentation.

Guest Speakers

Dr Ivo Aertsen, Criminology professor at the Leuven Catholic University (K.U.L. Belgium), is internationally recognised as one of the pre-eminent criminologists currently working in Restorative Justice and has written extensively on the subject. He is a past Chair of the European Forum for Restorative Justice. Dr Aertsen will present, via AVL, on recent theoretical developments in restorative justice and the place of restorative justice in an international context.

Julie Stubbs, Professor of Criminology, Sydney Law School, is internationally respected for her work on gendered violence and widely published in the field. She has a long-standing interest in the relationship dynamics within restorative justice practice. Her presentation will explore these issues and their implications for evolving restorative justice policy and practice.

Natalia Blecher, BA/LLB (Hons); Researcher, Supreme Court of NSW, has recently completed what is fast becoming a seminal study examining the theoretical role and the actuality in practice of apology in the restorative justice conference. Her findings raise a number of considerations of particular interest to restorative justice practitioners and policy-makers.


Crime Prevention Seminar

Date: Monday 10th May 2010

Time: 1.30pm-4.30pm

Venue: The Foyer, Level 2, The New Law School Building, University of Sydney, Main Campus, Camperdown NSW.

Cost: Free

Contact: Events Co-ordinator

Phone: 02 9351 0248

Email:

Further information: Sydney Law School News and Events: Crime Prevention Seminar

Keeping up with the latest developments in crime prevention can be challenging. This seminar will highlight recent developments, including successful local crime prevention initiatives, and will include a small number of keynote presentations and interactive panel sessions.

The two keynote speakers secured for this event are:

Jackie Fitzgerald (Deputy Director, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research). Jackie will discuss recent NSW crime trends. With 2009 NSW crime data to be released in late April 2010, Jackie will be discussing the latest crime trends across NSW.

Peter Homel (Research Manager, Crime Reduction and Review Program, Australian Institute of Criminology). Peter will discuss contemporary crime prevention trends across Australia. Having worked across many Australian jurisdictions in recent years, Peter is in a good position to describe the latest crime prevention approaches being adopted in other States and Territories.

Following the keynote speakers, interactive panel sessions will be conducted. These panel sessions will seek to explore current NSW crime prevention policies and local crime prevention strategies. Particular attention will be paid to the steps involved in developing a successful crime prevention intervention, drawing on practical experiences of crime prevention practitioners. These panel sessions will promote dialogue between audience members and the panellists, rather than relying on lengthy presentations.

This seminar will be of particular interest to:

-Crime prevention practitioners

-Police

-Local government agencies

-Non-government organisations

-Youth and community workers

-Security personnel

-University students

This seminar has been made possible through the generous sponsorship of the NSW Department of Justice and the Attorney General.


Crime Free Housing Seminar - 29th March 2010

Is it possible to design neighbourhoods to prevent and reduce crime? This seminar will explore this question with reference to contemporary developments in New South Wales and other jurisdictions. The seminar will be of interest to planners, police, local government personnel, crime prevention practitioners and architects.

There has been much debate and commentary regarding crime in housing estates in recent years. Reports of problematic estates have regularly received media coverage. This coverage often fails to acknowledge the work that is happening in these areas to reduce and prevent crime. This seminar will bring together an exciting group of academics, policy makers and people planning and managing large housing estates and will explore contemporary practices and policies aimed at achieving crime free housing.

Speakers include:

-Eileen Baldry, Associate Professor, School of Social Sciences and International Studies, UNSW

-Claudia Stephens, General Manager, Newleaf Communities

-Shane O'Brien, National Environmental health and Safety Manager, Delfin Lend Lease

-Galina Laurie, Director, Community Regeneration Unit, Housing NSW

-Chris Martin, PhD Candidate, University of Sydney

This seminar has been made possible through the generous sponsorship of Delfin Lend Lease.