The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders

2014 Events and Courses Archive

Giving a Tick to Junk Food in Schools

Developmental origins of health and disease

Thursday 1 May 12:00–1:00 pm

Presenter: Dr Kyra Sim from the Charles Perkins Centre and the Boden Institute

Dr Kyra Sim is the Project & Research Officer of the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Centre: Preconception, Pregnancy, and Childhood Cohort Study and at the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders. Since graduating from her PhD in 2012, she has been employed part-time by both the International Diabetes Federation and as a research assistant investigating the association of cardiovascular risk factors in pregnant women and the obese.

The Preconception, Pregnancy and Childhood Cohort Study is a flagship project for the Charles Perkins Centre. This study will investigate how preconception and early pregnancy conditions impact on the pathways of disease. This will enable us to gain a greater understanding of the mechanisms occurring before and during pregnancy that contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and related disorders, throughout life.

What is now clear is that genetic programming occurs in the fetus during pregnancy such that the infant carries a metabolic ‘load’ already by birth that can predispose it to diseases such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Of even more concern is that these epigenetic changes not only persist into adulthood but are transmitted into the next generation.

Adding to this complex situation is an increasing trend to later childbearing coupled with the rising prevalence of parental obesity. Maternal obesity is related to an increased risk of non-communicable disease in the offspring, usually presenting in adolescence and adulthood. Pre-pregnancy and gestational obesity may lead to a self-reinforcing vicious cycle of excessive weight gain and adiposity that is passed on from mother to offspring. Additionally, recent studies have reported adverse outcomes associated with an obese biological father. While the underlying mechanisms of such parental obesity-induced programming remain unclear, the hypothesis has important implications in explaining the rapid rise in obesity.

Most health initiatives have focused on obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease as medical conditions, concentrating on their complex biology at the levels of genes, cells and organs. These are important areas for research, but the causes and consequences of these diseases are much more complicated than biology alone. The Charles Perkins Centre takes a complex systems approach to disease states and the study will provide information about the biological, social, cultural and environmental context of the cohort.

The talk will present the progress of Charles Perkins Centre Cohort Study and discuss importance of the first 1,000 days and how they build the foundation for life.

Misconceptions about exercise and weight loss (seminar)

Image of Shelley Kay

Thursday 3 April 12:00–1:00 pm

The presenter Dr Michelle (Shelley) Kay is from the Diabetes Prevention research team at the Boden Institute

Messages about exercise commonly claim it has “minimal or no effect on obesity or weight loss” and energy restriction is recommended as a more effective option.

Studies using DXA, CT and MRI, frequently report that exercise interventions promote fat loss and the preservation of lean tissue even when there is no weight loss. Further, visceral and intermuscular adipose tissue depots are targeted by exercise even when there is no energy deficit.

The effects of exercise, when limited to changes in body mass or BMI, obscure desirable body composition, anti-inflammatory and pro-metabolic outcomes. This should be considered in health promotion messages and interpretation of research.

Dr Shelley Kay is an exercise physiologist with research, consulting and educational perspectives on exercise prescription for chronic disease management and prevention. Shelley has held professional/clinical roles with a range of organisations including the RSL Lifecare Veterans Village (Narrabeen), the Australian Catholic University (ACU) and the University of Sydney. She has lectured in a number of topics related to exercise prescription and body composition and most recently Exercise, Health and Disease.

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the 21st Century (master class)

Thursday 6 March 1:30–3:00 pm

The presenter Professor Iain Broom is Director of the Centre for Obesity Research and Epidemiology (CORE) at Robert Gordon University and Clinical Professor of Metabolic Medicine at the University of Aberdeen. He is also Medical Director of LighterLife, holds a Professorial Research Fellowship at the Rowett Research Centre and is a founding European SCOPE Fellow.

Summary of master class
Obesity and diabetes are linked, and hence the key to diabetes prevention is the management of weight. Are our current messages re the weight management in diabetes correct, or do we have to rethink our healthy eating message as the Swedes have done? Do we need a wardrobe as opposes to one suit fitting all? There is now evidence that type 2 diabetes can be put into remission, both medical (dietary) and surgical and lessons from this can be put into practice in the prevention of the disease. Discussions around these areas will be the basis of this master class.

This event was brought to you by the Centre for Obesity Management, Prevention and Research Excellence in Primary Health Care (COMPaRE-PHC) in partnership with the Boden Institute.

Environmental waist disposal (seminar)

Thursday 6 March 12:15–1:15 pm

The presenter Professor Iain Broom has been responsible, along with several UK colleagues, for the development of the Counterweight weight-management program, of which he is Chairman. Counterweight is one of the few weight-loss programs that have been successfully rolled out across a health system after research. Counterweight has over 12 years’ experience within the UK’s National Health Service and has been commissioned by over 30 primary care trusts and directly by the Scottish Government to implement Counterweight in 13 out of their 14 Health Boards as the weight management program of choice.

Seminar abstract
The obesity epidemic has not simply crept upon the human population, but has exploded as a major Public Health problem over 30 years. There have always been obesity problems throughout the age of man and obesity has been know to create health and early death problems since the time of Hippocrates. There is a strong genetic linkage to the likelihood of an individual becoming obese, but there is no way that our genetic inheritance has changed in such a short timescale. What has changed is the environment with which our genetic makeup now has to contend. Indeed obesity is probably the best example of gene-environment interaction producing disease. Within our genotype, however, there is the capacity to store fat in appropriate places for future energy transduction (subcutaneous) or as ectopic fat, an example being intra-abdominal fat the latter being seen as increasing waist circumference. The best example of this genotype-phenotype differences in fat deposition is within the comparison of Caucasians and Asians, the latter being more prone to deposit excess accumulation of fat in ectopic areas than the former.

It is therefore essential that we look at the changes that have occurred within our environment since the 1970's when the obesity explosion really started and examine ways by which we can mitigate these environmental effects to reduce our waist size or in effect to "increase WAIST disposal". We must, however, remember that waist circumference is only a surrogate for intra-abdominal fat and that other factors must be considered when assessing the overall risk of concomitant cardio metabolic disease in the obese. Failure to do so will result in inappropriate expenditure on targeting low risk individuals.

This event was brought to you by the Centre for Obesity Management, Prevention and Research Excellence in Primary Health Care (COMPaRE-PHC) in partnership with the Boden Institute.

Circadian drivers of poor mental and physical health

Thursday 27 February 12:00–1:00 pm

The presenter Professor Ian Hickie was appointed as the inaugural executive director of the flagship Brain & Mind Research Institute at the University of Sydney in 2003. Since then he has overseen its development as a major hub in translational neuroscience and clinical psychiatry.

The Brain & Mind Sciences is one of the most fascinating areas of medical research. At its centre is improving our understanding of the nature of our most human experiences – emotion, affection, cognition and social relationships. When things go wrong, we see the most devastating effects on a person’s quality of life.

Improving our treatments, and making sure that people can access to those interventions, lie at the heart of Professor Ian Hickie's work. There is no doubt that the Brain & Mind Sciences will be at the centre of major breakthroughs in the 21st century. The impacts of such advances will go well beyond the treatment of illness to impact on broader issues such as child development, educational practices, workplace transformations and community development.

Behavioural weight management interventions in primary care

Thursday 6 February 12:00–1:00 pm

The presenter Ms Claire Madigan is a final year doctoral student at the University of Birmingham, England. After her study visit to Australia she will be working as a research fellow on a randomised controlled trial, examining the effect of self-weighing for weight maintenance. Her research interests include investigating behavioural weight management programmes, particularly those that can be utilised in primary care.

Prior to commencing her academic career, Claire worked as a public health practitioner commissioning services related to weight management and working strategically on local weight management services for children. She has utilised these experiences in her academic work, ensuring the focus is on interventions that are effective, but can also be implemented in a healthcare setting.


2013 Events and Courses Archive

Policy making: new scientific and strategic challenges

Image of Professor James

Friday 13 December 4:00–5:00 pm

The presenter Professor Philip James CBE, FRSE, MD, DSc is President of the International Association for the Study of Obesity and Honorary Professor of Nutrition at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the United Kingdom.

Professor James trained in science and medicine in University College London, UK and had postgraduate training in the UK, in Jamaica with the Medical Research Council and in the US with the Wellcome Trust. Returning to England as a Senior Lecturer at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine he established the postgraduate training programme for doctors in global nutrition and health before being asked to establish the MRC Dunn Clinical Nutrition Centre in Cambridge to undertake the major UK research programme on obesity and dietary aspects of adult chronic diseases.

In 1982 he was appointed Director of the Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen, then the biggest agriculturally funded nutrition Institute in the world which he directed for 17 years before returning to the London School of Hygiene with his newly established International Obesity Task Force. He started his research career developing new approaches to treating childhood malnutrition before developing the current scientific approaches, based on work with FAO on the assessment of individual and national food and energy needs as well as the current criteria for specifying malnutrition in both children and adults.

Professor James developed the lithium technique for tracking sources of salt and showed that in affluent countries 85% of salt is derived from purchased processed food thereby requiring new approaches to the prevention of high blood pressure. He then introduced in the UK, with WHO EURO and then with WHO globally the criteria, goals and preventive strategies for tackling the current global epidemic of obesity and adult chronic diseases.

GI Baby and Other Stories

Pregnancy bump

Thursday 28 November 12:00–1:00 pm

The presenter Dr Tania Markovic is from Metabolism and Obesity Services at RPAH and the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders.

Obesity is associated with substantial morbidity, earlier mortality and high health costs. Not only is obesity increasing in our adult population but of more concern is the alarming rate of obesity in childhood with 1 in 5 children already overweight or obese by the age of 3 years.

Adiposity at birth is associated with a higher prevalence of obesity in both small and large babies. Excessive fetal growth confers increased risk for obesity and diabetes that carries over to successive generations. Elevated maternal glucose level is well recognised as contributing to excessive fetal growth. Reducing the magnitude of the glycaemic excursion is a logical target to reduce the risk of fetal overnutrition. Postprandial glycaemia can be reduced without carbohydrate restriction (which may result in adverse outcomes), by slowing down the rate of carbohydrate digestion and absorption, with ingestion of low glycaemic index carbohydrates.

The talk focused on Tania's work examining the effects of a low glycaemic diet on pregnancy outcomes in women with or at high risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

Vitamin D in early life and risk of later obesity and diabetes

Thursday 14 November 12:00–1:00 pm

The presenter Professor Berit Heitmann is from the Centre for Health and Society, in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Berit's major research interests include identifying the determinants and consequences of obesity, with particular focus on the dietary determinants of obesity.

Berit achieved her PhD on the basis of a detailed study of measurement of the body composition using the so called bio-impedance method from the Research Department of Human Nutrition at the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University of Denmark.

A randomised controlled trial: The effectiveness of including support people in a cognitive behavioural weight loss program for obese adults

Image of a group discussion

Thursday 7 November 12:00–1:00 pm

The presenter Dr Jessica Swinbourne is a Clinical Psychologist/Research Officer at the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders

Jessica presented the seminar on behalf of Associate Professor Elizabeth Rieger, from the Department of Psychology at the Australian National University.

This study is the first world-wide to assess a Cognitive Behavioural and Motivational Enhancement Therapy (CBTMET) program for the treatment of obese adults that includes the training of support partners in the utilisation of MET strategies.

Innovative methods that entail effective and affordable interventions to address obesity are essential given the substantial prevalence, burden of disease, impaired quality of life, and financial cost that obesity entails. By helping obese patients to increase and sustain their motivation for weight control (as a result of both treatment and from the input of support partners), the MET approach of the current study has the potential to effectively help patients to achieve sustained weight loss (contrary to previous behavioural weight loss programs) while minimising the patient’s need for ongoing, intensive weight control treatment with its attendant costs.

This presentation provided an overview of the research to date, including the background rationale to this study, research design and aims, a summary of the treatment intervention, the proposed timeline for study completion as well as some preliminary statistics.


2 Day Practice Based Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) Workshop

Thursday 26-27 September 2013
Thursday 26-27 September 9:00 am – 4:00 pm


The presenter Dr Sarah Maguire is the NSW Health Director of the Centre for Eating & Dieting at the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders.

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) was developed by Professor Marsha Linehan, and is a popular and empirically validated treatment approach for clients suffering affect instability which leads to engagement in behaviours that are ultimately self destructive. The treatment regime has been successfully applied to borderline personality disorder, drug and alcohol clients, eating disorder clients, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety. DBT is usually delivered as a package involving both a group based skills training component and an individual DBT therapist.

This workshop provided clinicians with a brief introduction to DBT and the four modules that make up the skills training package, namely Distress Tolerance, Interpersonal effectiveness, Emotional Regulation and Core Mindfulness. Although some prior knowledge of the therapy was assumed, the focus of this workshop was on practical application of the DBT package from an individual therapist’s perspective. The workshop used interactive role-plays and participant involvement.

Pre-pregnancy risk factors, complications of pregnancy, and future cardiometabolic risk

Image of a pregnant woman

Monday 2 September 2013
12:00-1:00 pm


Dr Erica P. Gunderson is an epidemiologist (Investigator/Research Scientist II) at the Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California since 1999.

Erica's research focuses on the long term impact of pregnancy and lactation on the development of obesity, cardiovascular disease risk factors, diabetes and metabolic disease in women during mid life. Specifically, she focuses on gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention in both adolescents and adult women, and the impact of lactation intensity and duration on the risk of type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease in women later in life. Her research also investigates the role of pregnancy complications as predictors of future diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life, with a particular interest in the high-risk group of women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm births, and auto-immune diseases.

Erica's current research studies are prospective, longitudinal studies of women during the childbearing years that assess risk factors measured before and after pregnancy as well as lactation in relation to women’s future development of atherosclerosis, cardiac dysfunction, and metabolic disease in mid life. She also studies the offspring exposed to maternal obesity and diabetes in utero and future obesity. Erica's studies assess lactation intensity and duration as well as early nutrition. She has authored over 60 peer-reviewed original research papers and reviews.

Gastrointestinal sensing of dietary fat: role in the regulation of appetite and energy intake in health and obesity

Thursday 4 July 2013
12:00-1:00 pm


Dr Tanya Little is currently a full-time researcher supported by a prestigious National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Career Development Fellowship. She has recently moved from the University of Adelaide to the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders at the University of Sydney. Dr Little's research interests lie in determining the gastrointestinal factors that contribute to the regulation of appetite and energy intake, and their role in the development of obesity.

Summary of talk
The gastrointestinal tract plays a pivotal role in the regulation of appetite and energy intake. The presence of nutrients in the small intestine induces a number of changes in gastrointestinal function, including the modulation of gastric emptying, gastrointestinal motility and the stimulation of a number of gastrointestinal hormones, including cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), and the suppression of ghrelin, which contribute to the suppression of appetite, induction of fullness, and suppression of subsequent food intake. This presentation will examine the role of these factors in energy intake regulation in lean and obese humans, and will cover recent advances in knowledge of the mechanisms underlying nutrient, and in particular fat, detection in the small intestine.

Who, what, when and how? The development and implementation of a set of risk assessment tools for detecting undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in a multi-ethnic UK population

University of Leicester logo

Thursday 13 June 2013
12:00-1:00 pm


Dr Laura Gray is a Lecturer of Population and Public Health Sciences at the University of Leicester, UK. Laura has led the development and implementation of the Leicester risk assessment tools for detecting undiagnosed type 2 diabetes.

Laura’s background is medical statistics with a particular interest in the design and analysis of clinical trials (especially cluster randomised trials, and trials with ordinal outcomes) and evidence synthesis.

Social and spatial patterns of obesity and inactivity: Can theories of diffusion of innovations explain the trends we have seen over three decades in a Norwegian county (the HUNT study)?

A/Prof Steinar Krokstad

Thursday 18 April 2013
12:00-1:00 pm


Associations between modifiable lifestyle behaviours with obesity, blood pressure and retinal vessels by Associate Professor Steinar Krokstad. Steinar has a PhD in Social Epidemiology / Public Health, with research on the socio-economic causes of poor health, disease, mortality and disability. He has research experience in Psychiatric Epidemiology and Health Services Research, has published several book chapters in social medicine and medical sociology, and is one of the editors of the new Social Medicine textbook in Norway.

Steinar was the project manager of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study in 2006-08 (HUNT3), which integrated data from a variety of medical and social science research disciplines (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22879362). Data from HUNT3 have led to extensive research in a wide range of disciplines. In addition, HUNT3 was a population based screening for selected diseases and conditions. As Head of the HUNT Research Centre since 2008 RSVP via (http://www.ntnu.edu/hunt), he has been heavily involved in disease prevention and health promotion in partnership with local, regional and national authorities. Additionally, he was formerly a specialist in general practice, and is now a specialist and consultant in Psychiatry.

The Prevention Research Collaboration and the Boden Institute jointly presented this event.

Associations between modifiable lifestyle behaviours with obesity, blood pressure and retinal vessels

Image of eyes

Thursday 4 April 2013
12:00-1:00 pm


Associations between modifiable lifestyle behaviours with obesity, blood pressure and retinal vessels by Dr Bamini Gopinath, a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Vision Research, Westmead Millennium Institute. One of Bamini's key research interests has been assessing the lifestyle determinants (physical activity, diet and screen time) of obesity, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, and associated adverse changes to the retinal microvasculature, particularly in children and adolescents.

The Sydney Childhood Eye Study is a large community-based sample of children aged 6 and 12 at baseline who were followed over a period of 5 years. Prospective associations between poor diet, physical inactivity and excessive screen time with obesity, elevated blood pressure, and changes to the retinal vessels were examined. The adverse effects of soft drink consumption, high-glycemic index of foods consumed, reduced time spent in physical activity and excessive TV viewing on various health outcomes were shown in this cohort of schoolchildren.

Diabetes in the Pacific Islands: Reasons and remedies

Solomon Islands

Thursday 21 March 2013
1:00-2:00 pm


Diabetes in the Pacific Islands: Reasons and remedies by Dr Si Thu Win Tin from the Boden Institute. Si is a physician and specialises in public health. He has worked as a Public Health Physician in the humanitarian aid organisations such as World Vision International and Aide Medicale Internationale in South East Asia.

He was the Director of Public Health for the Ministry of Health Government of Nauru and then worked as Non Communicable Diseases Adviser for the Secretariat of the Pacific Community, providing technical assistance to Pacific Islands Countries and Territories. Si has experience in international public health, especially in non-communicable diseases program management, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. He is also involved in the clinical care, training and research work in a wide range of public health programs.

Are we making progress on obesity?

A/Prof Timothy Gill

Thursday 7 March 2013
1:00-2:00 pm


Are we making progress on obesity? by Associate Professor Timothy Gill, Principal Research Fellow and Scientific Programs Manager at the Boden Institute, Regional Co-ordinator for the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) in the Asia-Pacific and Executive Officer for the Australian and New Zealand Obesity Society. Tim has wide experience as an academic and within government departments and health agencies. He has authored several key reports on obesity for State and Federal Government departments as well as national and international agencies and has served on a number of World Health Organization expert committees on obesity and chronic disease.

Anabolic exercise and optimal aging: Size does matter

Thursday 21 February 2013
12:00-1:00 pm


Anabolic exercise and optimal aging: Size does matter by Professor Maria Fiatarone Singh from the Discipline of Exercise and Sport Science. Maria is a geriatrician whose research, clinical, and teaching career has focused on the integration of geriatric medicine, exercise physiology, and nutrition as a means to improve quality of life for the aged. She is a fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and is board-certified in both Internal Medicine and Geriatric Medicine in the USA. Maria is currently licensed to practice medicine in Massachusetts, USA as well as New South Wales, Australia.

The effects of 8-week 40% overfeeding on metabolic health and adipose tissue dysfunction

Dr Charmaine Tam

Thursday 7 February 2013
12:00-1:00 pm


The effects of 8-week 40% overfeeding on metabolic health and adipose tissue dysfunction by Dr Charmaine Tam from the Charles Perkins Centre. Charmaine is an NHMRC Early Career Fellow in the Behavior and Ecology Group in the School of Biological Sciences and an Honorary Associate of the Boden Institute. Her broad research areas are inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling in adipose tissue, understanding the mechanisms behind bariatric surgery and explorations of a lean tissue mass signal driving protein intake.


2012 Events and Courses Archive

Class C G-protein coupled receptors as protein sensors (the science behind the high protein diet)

Prof Arthur Conigrave & his laboratory team

Professor Arthur Conigrave (third from left) and his laboratory team

Thursday 15 November 2012
11:30-12:30


G-protein coupled receptors as protein sensors (the science behind the high protein diet) by Professor Arthur Conigrave from the School of Molecular Bioscience. Professor Conigrave is a leading authority on the molecular mechanisms that underlie nutrient-sensing, especially sensing of L-amino acids in cellular and whole body responses to dietary protein.

Research priorities for Non-Communicable Disease prevention and climate change: Results of an International Delphi Survey

Obese man in front of a polluted city

Photo courtesy of Garry Eggar: Obesity Reviews 2008

Thursday 1 November 2012
11:30-12:30


Research priorities for Non-Communicable Disease prevention and climate change: Results of an International Delphi Survey
by Dr Sinead Boylan from the Boden Institute. Her primary role is to help develop, monitor and analyse the national health survey in Brunei and she is also involved in other research fields such as obesity, consumer communication, food security and sustainability.

Health and Social Harms of Mining: Spotlight on the Hunter

Monday 29 October 2012
5:30-7:00


Health and Social Harms of Mining: Spotlight on the Hunter: presenters include Professor Stephen Simpson, Director of the Charles Perkins Centre, Professor Ian Olver AM, CEO of the Australian Cancer Council, Associate Professor Ruth Colagiuri, Director of the Health and Sustainability Unit at the Boden Institute and principal author of the report, and Mark Ogge from Beyond Zero Emissions.

An early obesity intervention trial – Healthy Beginnings Trial: the journey from the beginning

Thursday 25 October 2012
11:30-12:30


An early obesity intervention trial – Healthy Beginnings Trial: the journey from the beginning by Dr Li Ming Wen from the South Western Sydney & Sydney Local Health Districts.

Current global non-communicable disease policy from New York to Rio

Thursday 13 September 2012
11:30-12:30


Current global non-communicable disease policy from New York to Rio by Associate Professor Ruth Colagiuri, Vice-President of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and Director of the Health and Sustainability Unit at the Boden Institute.

Food preferences and obesity

Thursday 30 August 2012
11:30-12:30


Food preferences and obesity by Dr John Prescott from TasteMatters Research & Consulting, a researcher in the human perception of taste, smell and oral tactile sensations with a special interest in how food preferences arise.

Lipids in skeletal muscle

Thursday 16 August 2012
11:30-12:30


Lipids in skeletal muscle by Dr Hoy, from the Discipline of Physiology in the School of Medical Sciences, holds an NHMRC Biomedical Australia Training Fellowship and also an Honorary Associate position with the Boden Institute.

Oral and small intestinal sensitivity to fats in lean and obese humans: Implications for energy intake regulation in obesity

Thursday 2 August 2012
11:30-12:30


Oral and small intestinal sensitivity to fats in lean and obese humans: Implications for energy intake regulation in obesity by Dr Radhika Seimon, a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Boden Institute where she is primarily running a clinical trial looking at the effects of very low calorie diets versus conventional diets on body composition.

Improved strategies for attaining and maintaining an optimum body weight

Thursday 19 July 2012
11:30-12:30


Improved strategies for attaining and maintaining an optimum body weight by Associate Professor Amanda Sainsbury-Salis, who leads a research team at the Boden Institute that aims to help people to attain and maintain an optimum body weight and composition.

Differing aspects of obesity: Lessons from locusts and from Korea

Monday 9 July 2012
12:30-1:30


Differing aspects of obesity: Lessons from locusts and from Korea by Dr Namson Lau, an endocrinologist at Royal Prince Alfred and Liverpool Hospitals, and in-house Medical Officer for the Boden Institute's Clinical Trials Unit.

Resistant starch dose dependently reduces adiposity in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats

Tuesday 3 July 2012
4:00-5:00


Resistant starch dose dependently reduces adiposity in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats by Dr Damien Belobrajdic, a Research Scientist in the CSIRO Food Futures Flagship, who is interested in the role of wholegrains and dietary fibre on reducing the development of metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes.

Clinical Research in China: Present and Future

Thursday 21 June 2012
11:00-12:30


Clinical Research in China: Present and Future by Professor Yanfang Wang, Assistant Director of the Peking University Clinical Research Institute (PUCRI), a comprehensive research centre for all clinical research in the Peking University Health Science Center (PUHSC).

Towards therapeutic engineering of the gut microbiota – they are what you eat

Wednesday 30 May 2012
11:00-12:00


Towards therapeutic engineering of the gut microbiota – they are what you eat by Associate Professor Andrew Holmes, a microbial ecologist in the School of Molecular Biosciences, with expertise in the description of microbial communities, and the linkage between the microbial communities in the gut and health.

Fetal growth, omega-3, and cardiovascular disease

Thursday 17 May 2012
11:30-12:30


Fetal growth, omega-3, and cardiovascular disease by Dr Michael Skilton, from the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders.

Is the weight worth it? Results from a weight loss intervention on pregnancy rates

Thursday 26 April 2012
11:30-12:30


Is the weight worth it? Results from a weight loss intervention on pregnancy rates by Dr Kyra Sim, from the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders.

Prevention of obesity - individualized approaches or food taxation?

12 March 2012 SEMINAR

Prevention of obesity - individualized approaches or food taxation? by our distinguished visitor, Professor Berit Heitmann, a research leader at the Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Centre for Health and Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Evidence based revision of management in obese people with osteoarthritis - the Copenhagen Cartilage and Osteoarthritis trial

28 February 2012 SEMINAR

Evidence based revision of management in obese people with osteoarthritis - the Copenhagen Cartilage and Osteoarthritis trial by Anthony Leeds, Visiting Senior Fellow, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, the University of Surrey | Visiting Professor, Faculty of Life Sciences, the University of Copenhagen | Medical Director, the Cambridge Weight Plan
Download the seminar flyer


2011 Events and Courses Archive

13 December 2011 SEMINAR "The changing face of International Nutrition Work" by Adjunct Professor Ian Darnton-Hill, from the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders.

9 December 2011 Free talk and Q & A "Dietary interventions to tackle obesity" a one hour research talk (including questions) by Dr Susan Jebb, Head of Nutrition & Health, Medical Research Council University of Cambridge, UK. Download the flyer.

7 December 2011 SEMINAR "Developing an obesity strategy for England" by Dr Susan Jebb, Head of Nutrition & Health, Medical Research Council University of Cambridge, UK follwed by, "Obesity policy from the Australian perspective" a related talk by Associate Professor Timothy Gill, Principal Research Fellow and Scientific Programs Manager at the Boden Institute. For information download the flyer

25 October 2011 SEMINAR “Reducing Child Obesity by Dietary Interventions During Pregnancy” by Professor Jennie Brand-Miller, Professor of Human Nutrition, School of Molecular Bioscience and the Boden Institute

18 October 2011 HALF-DAY SYMPOSIUM “The Dietary Guideline on Sugar: Science or Dogma?” presented by the Boden Institute and the Sydney University Nutrition Research Foundation. Sugar Symposium flyer (pdf) Presentations available:


27 September 2011 SEMINAR “Outcomes of the Sydney Diabetes Prevention Program – Should Governments invest in Diabetes Prevention Programs?” by Philip Vita, Director of the Sydney Diabetes Prevention Program at the Boden Institute


19-20 July 2011 COURSE “Diabetes and Obesity Management and Prevention” The Boden Institute presented this course to 38 visiting physicians from China, sponsored by Novo Nordisk. Program (PDF)


5-6 April 2011 COURSE “The ‘How’ of Obesity Management” The Boden Institute and Metabolism and Obesity Services (RPAH) presented this course to 85 health professionals. Program (PDF)