Novel, nanoporous silicon carbide nanomaterials

Summary

This project involves the preparation, characterisation and comparison of porous, silicon carbide films utilising various polymeric precursors and techniques.

Supervisor(s)

Professor Andrew Harris

Research Location

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Program Type

N/A

Synopsis

High temperature separation of gases with small kinetic diameters such as hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane is applicable to industrial processes involving the reforming of hydrocarbons and biomass gasification. Polymeric membranes are unstable at high temperatures, while silica membranes suffer densification under hydrothermal conditions, resulting in a loss of selectivity and permeance (i.e. they stop working). Silicon carbide’s ability to withstand high temperatures, mechanical stress and corrosive environments makes it a promising material for high temperature gas separation membranes.This project involves the preparation, characterisation and comparison of porous, silicon carbide films utilising various polymeric precursors and techniques. The effect of pyrolysis temperature, reaction environment and curing technique require investigation. Characterisation techniques will include pore size analysis by gas adsorption, thermogravimetric analysis, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

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Keywords

Advanced nanomaterial technologies; membrane; hydrogen; sustainability; nanomaterials; gas separation

Opportunity ID

The opportunity ID for this research opportunity is: 359

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