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Featured academics
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Featured academics

Meet some members of our team

Our researchers are at the forefront of exciting fields. Read about their latest projects and the people who inspire them every day.


Professor Lindy Clemson

Professor Lindy Clemson

Themes and nodes:

What is your area of expertise?

I am an occupational therapist with a PhD in epidemiology. I have led the development of three fall prevention programs for older people, all implemented world-wide. I am now applying my skills to improve functional and behavioural outcomes for people with dementia and their carers living in the community.

 

The range breadth and expertise of this growing network is amazing. The Charles Perkins Centre offers a supportive and viable platform to engage and create a sustainable research network.

What is the vision of your research in Active Ageing?

Our vision is for all seniors in Australia to have access to evidence-based sustainable health and aged care that supports them to live at home with dignity and as much independence as possible. 

Who inspires you?

The many participants to our trials. Some stand out as inspirational. Despite challenges in their daily lives they embed the philosophy of a new approach and make real changes to their lives to keep themselves safe and active despite so many personal and physical challenges.

What three items would you bring to a desert island?

  • a fishing line and hook
  • a very sharp knife
  • a satellite mobile phone with a good battery so I can call for help when I have had enough of solitude

 


Professor Lisa Bero

Professor Lisa Bero

Themes:

Politics, governance and ethics

Integrative systems and modelling

Project nodes:

Bias in research

Pharmaceutical policy

Evidence synthesis

What is your area of expertise?

I have been a leader in the field of evaluating bias in primary research and evidence synthesis in clinical medicine and health policy for over 20 years.

What is the vision of your research?

Our work is being used to make the new gold standards for a wide variety of health policy decisions, including pharmaceutical policy. This work has led to international reforms to make data more accessible, funding more transparent, and to calls for stricter standards and policies for managing conflicts of interest, critiquing and reporting evidence, and conducting systematic reviews.

Who inspires you?

I am inspired by all the people - such as overdiagnosed and overtreated patients, smokers, factory workers, the undernourished, the underserved - who have been hurt by corporations that have hidden the harms of their products or promoted their unnecessary use. This is why I am so dogged about finding evidence that can be trusted.

What three items would you bring to a desert island?

  • Sunscreen (giant size)
  • A hat
  • My family and friends
We need to go beyond the biomedical model to change the world in which we live and tackle the complex issues that influence our health. As a multidisciplinary environment, the Charles Perkins Centre is the perfect place for that.

Dr Samantha Solon-Biet

Doctor Samantha Solon-Biet

What is the vision of your research?

My research utilizes a novel nutritional modelling platform called the Geometric Framework to focus on understanding how nutrition influences health and ageing. So far, my research has been able to highlight the importance of the balance of macronutrients (protein, carbohydrate and fat) in reproduction, hormonal control, immunity, metabolism and ageing, emphasizing the need to view the complex nutritional questions in an integrated way.

I am working towards new nutritional interventions that slow down the ageing process and delay the onset of aged-related diseases.

In one of my research projects, I observed that the ratio of macronutrients, not total calories, was responsible for increased health-span and lifespan in mice. Diets low in protein and high in carbohydrate optimised late life health and longevity. Not only do these findings challenge our common conceptions about diet, but they also have important implications for diet management in late-life health and longevity.  If we can use diet to extend health lifespan and delay age-related disease, the potential effects of population-level health, are extraordinary.


Dr Barbara Mintzes

Doctor Barbara Mintzes

Themes:

Politics, governance and ethics

Integrative systems and modelling

Project nodes:

Pharmaceutical policy

Evidence synthesis

What is your area of expertise?

My main area of research is on the influence of pharmaceutical promotion, including direct-to-consumer advertising, on prescribing and medicine use decisions. A further specific area of interest is on women and pharmaceuticals, including patterns of medicine use in pregnancy.

My research has contributed to evidence-based reimbursement decisions by governments and to drug bulletins that help doctors, pharmacists and the public make better decisions on medicine use.

Who inspires you?

I am inspired by Lisa Bero’s work on conflicts of interest and research integrity. I am also very inspired by all of my colleagues in the Pharmaceutical Policy Node, including our Summer Scholarship Students, Honours students and Master’s and PhD students. If I look a little farther, I’m inspired by Ellen ‘t Hoen, who helped turn around the death toll from HIV/AIDS through her political activism to make HIV/AIDS drugs accessible and affordable. 

  


Doctor Kathryn Williams

Doctor Kathryn Williams

Themes and nodes:

Nutrition

Family obesity

What is your area of expertise?

I am an endocrinologist with interest in metabolic disease and a PhD in NAFLD.  I am a Senior Lecturer at the University of Sydney and the Clinical Lead for the Family Obesity Services in the Nepean-Blue Mountains Local Health District. I also collaborate with the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and the Boden Institute. 

What is the real-world impact of your research?

Improving quality of life in those with severe obesity and contributing to the prevention of obesity in children and adolescence via a family based approach.

What 3 items would you take to a desert island?

  • Fresh water
  • Edible plants
  • Some farm animals (cows and chickens)
A public clinic setting, where research meets the real world, facilitates innovative solutions from bench to bedside. Patients with obesity can access cutting edge technologies and methodologies that can impact positively on their treatment.