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Australia’s biomedical future on show at Westmead

31 October 2016
Eighteen University of Sydney engineering teams pitched their visions for our healthcare future

Showcasing Australia’s future in biomedical innovation eighteen University of Sydney engineering teams pitched their visions for our healthcare future at the inaugural MedTech event, presented this year at Westmead.

student with their display

Nicole Inati, Sean martin and Vanessa Diab explain their concept for 3D printing of spinal tissue. Their project titled 'Global Health spine orthopaedic solutions' was supervised by neorosurgeon and spinal surgeon, Professor James Van Gelder 

Biomedical engineering students at the inaugural Medtech event held at Westmead Hospital

The projects have been focused on improving accessibility and using frontline diagnostics to pick problems up before they escalate
Professor Chris Peck, Dean of Dentistry and the Vice-Chancellor’s representative at Westmead.

Health innovations ranging from the 3D printing of body parts to health apps for smart devices that will help improve access to facilities were presented to the medicos practicing  at one of Australia's largest health precincts.

The student teams have been mentored over recent months by leading clinical specialists at various institutions. The teams were invited to showcase at Westmead in recognition of the history of technological innovation at both Westmead Hospital and The Children’s Hospital at Westmead.

“'Westmead has been a teaching and learning precinct of the University of Sydney for almost forty years and has a long standing tradition of embracing new technology and pushing medical research boundaries," says Professor Chris Peck, Dean of Dentistry and the Vice-Chancellor’s representative at Westmead.

“Westmead for example was one of the first hospitals in Australia to adopt keyhole surgery and the use of stents in cardiac procedures.”

Professor Peck says the eighteen projects under the spotlight have the potential to radically change healthcare delivery for Australia.

“The projects have been focused on improving accessibility and using frontline diagnostics to pick problems up before they escalate.

“A number of the teams are using data-rich environments to streamline and personalise medicine options. While others will allow evidence from standard clinical care to contribute to scientific discovery and improve responses to emergent patterns and trends,” he said.

Globally the medical technology market was valued at US$349 billion in 2012 and is forecasted to grow to US$455 billion in 2018 with a compound annual growth rate of 4.5% between2012-18. Biomedical are key export for the Australian economy.

The Westmead district is predicted as an exponential growth region in the fields of biotech, med-tech, allied health and primary care. 

The University of Sydney is a foundation partner of the Westmead precinct, which includes Westmead Hospital; The Children’s Hospital at Westmead; Cumberland Hospital; Pathology West - ICPMR Westmead; The University of Sydney; The Westmead Institute for Medical Research; Children's Medical Research Institute; Westmead Research Hub; Westmead Private Hospital; Western Sydney University; Ronald McDonald House at Westmead

students with their device Smartphone Opthalmoscope with Cloud Analytics

Joanna Chang and Luca Monk demonstrate their Smartphone Opthalcoscope with Cloud Analytics design

Eighteen teams of biomedical engineering students ptiched their healthcare innovations

Victoria Hollick

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