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Peer-assisted study sessions

Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) is a free, optional, peer-facilitated learning program available to students enrolled in most core units of study in the University of Sydney Business School, and selected undergraduate and Juris Doctor units in the University of Sydney Law School.

What's involved

PASS involves weekly hour-long sessions where you work in groups of 10 to 16 students to answer specially prepared activities and problem questions, based around a unit of study you’re enrolled in.

PASS doesn’t re-teach or deliver new content. It’s an opportunity to reinforce key points from lecture and tutorial materials while applying your skills to solve problem questions. The atmosphere of the sessions is relaxed, friendly and low-pressure and you’re encouraged to ask questions and raise concerns with content.

Sessions are led by trained PASS facilitators, who recently excelled in the same unit of study. The facilitator doesn’t re-teach lecture material, but rather guides group interaction and problem solving.

You work interactively with your peers, benefiting not only from group learning but also from the recent experience of your facilitator. As a peer group, generally you decide what is covered in each session. That way, PASS directly responds to your needs and feedback.

Find out about becoming a PASS facilitator.

When PASS sessions begin

PASS sessions start in Week 2, except for Juris Doctor (JD) sessions in Semester 1, which start in Week 3.

Additional sessions may be opened up in the following weeks to deal with unexpected student demand.

Benefits of PASS

If you attend PASS regularly, statistics from past programs show you’re likely to achieve significantly better grades than if you don’t attend. You are also less likely to fail the unit.

If you attend PASS regularly, you’ll improve your:

  • academic performance. If you attend more than 10 sessions in a semester, you’re more likely to achieve a final grade in your PASS units of study approximately 8-20 marks higher than students who don’t attend PASS.
  • ability to study effectively. Studying and collaborating with high-achieving peers and setting your own agenda are highly effective study techniques.
  • transition to university studies and understanding of course expectations. By getting to know students across different years of your course, you can learn first hand about the University’s culture and expectations for learning.
  • communication, team work, critical thinking and discipline-specific language skills. Studying with peers and regularly working in positive and productive team environments will help you develop a range of graduate attributes.
  • experience of academic support. If you’re reluctant to ask your lecturer questions, PASS facilitators are an approachable alternative and many will have experienced the same problems you’re having. You can discuss these problems in a confidential and informal context. Regular feedback in a supportive, student-centred environment will also help you learn more effectively.
  • learning autonomy. You’re encouraged to take responsibility for your learning and develop lifelong learning skills.
  • self-confidence.

It’s also a great way to meet new people and make friends.

You don’t have to be ‘struggling’ to attend. PASS is for all students who want to improve their academic performance.

PASS in Law

Law is an ideal discipline for a strongly student-driven support program. In Law you’ll address dense and complicated material that requires extensive and careful reading. PASS offers a great opportunity to concentrate on the areas you’re most concerned about in a supportive student-centred learning environment.

Law’s focus on problem solving and appreciating the value of different approaches mean that peer collaboration is important in the learning process. PASS in Law facilitates collaboration over problem questions and encourages greater engagement.

PASS units of study

PASS will be held for the following units of study in 2018.

Undergraduate

  • ACCT1006 Accounting and Financial Management
  • ACCT2012 Management Accounting A
  • BUSS1000 Future of Business
  • BUSS1002 The Business Environment
  • BUSS1020 Quantitative Business Analysis
  • BUSS1030 Accounting, Business and Society
  • BUSS1040 Economics for Business Decision Making
  • CLAW1001 Foundations of Business Law
  • FINC2011 Corporate Finance I
  • FINC2012 Corporate Finance II
  • INFS1000 Digital Business Innovation
  • LAWS1015 Contracts
  • LAWS1023 Public International Law

Postgraduate

  • ACCT5001 Accounting Principles
  • ACCT6001 Intermediate Financial Reporting
  • BUSS5020 Business Insights
  • BUSS5001 Firms, Markets and Business Management
  • CLAW5001 Legal Environment of Business
  • QBUS5001 Quantitative Methods for Business
  • QBUS5002 Quantitative Methods for Accounting
  • FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance
  • LAWS5001 Torts
  • LAWS5002 Contracts

Undergraduate

  • ACCT1006 Accounting and Financial Management
  • ACCT2012 Management Accounting A
  • BUSS1000 Future of Business
  • BUSS1020 Quantitative Business Analysis
  • BUSS1030 Accounting, Business and Society
  • BUSS1040 Economics for Business Decision Making
  • CLAW1001 Foundations of Business Law
  • FINC2011 Corporate Finance I
  • FINC2012 Corporate Finance II
  • INFS1000 Digital Business Innovation
  • LAWS1012 Torts
  • LAWS1016 Criminal Law
  • LAWS1017 Torts and Contracts II

Postgraduate

  • ACCT5001 Accounting Principles
  • ACCT6001 Intermediate Financial Reporting
  • BUSS5020 Business Insights
  • BUSS5001 Firms, Markets and Business Management
  • QBUS5001 Quantitative Methods for Business
  • QBUS5002 Quantitative Methods for Accounting
  • FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance
  • LAWS5004 Criminal Law
  • LAWS5005 Public International Law
  • LAWS5006 Torts and Contracts II

PASS Office

Address
Room 3043, Abercrombie Building (H70), The University of Sydney, NSW 2006
The University will be closed from Monday 25 December until Monday 8 January. You can still reach the Student Centre by phone and online during this time.
Last updated: 15 December 2017

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