Current Postgraduate Research

David Adams

Mark Azzopardi

Sophia Barnes

Penny Barraclough

Alix Baumgartner

Suzanne Bellamy

April Bertels-Garnsey

Christopher Black

Anna Breckon

Jessica Brooks

Carolyn Burns

Alison Cardinale

Andrew Carruthers

Katrina Clifford

Patrick Condliffe

James Dahlstrom

Amelia Dale

Christelle Davis

Samuel Dickson

Justine Ettler

Jedidiah Evans

Toby Fitch

Peter Gibbard

Cressida Green

Emma Halpin

Alexandra Hankinson

Claire Hansen

Kay Harrison

Meegan Hasted

Scott Henretty

Chenoa Hunter

Osama Jarrar

Kate Judge

Ben Juers

Aashish Kaul

 

Susan King

Dominic Knight

Tony Knight

David Large

Anastasia Louridas

Georgina Loveridge

Patrick Marland

Ailish McKeown

Samuel Moginie

Tara Morrissey

Bushra Naz

Laura Olcelli

Atilla Orel

Lili Pâquet

Nat Pree

Samuel Reese

Chris Rudge

 

Hayley Rudkin

Diana Shahinyan

Elizabeth Shek-Noble

Adelaide Sheridan

Erin Shiel

Alexandra Smith

Richard Smith

Suk Joo Sohn

Christine Stanton

Jessica Sun

Mark Sutton

Lucas Thompson

John Townsend

Irma Trnka

Diana Walker

Anna Wallace

Bronwen Wareing

Bradley Wells

Kim Wilkins

Fiona Yardley

Yuan Zhang


David Adams

Doctor of Philosophy
Maritain and Poetry in English

Mark Azzopardi

Doctor of Philosophy

Sophia Barnes

Doctor of Philosophy
'It Could Be And, And, And': Doris Lessing, Mikhail Bakhtin and the Politics of Representation

In 2012 it will be 50 years since the publication of Doris Lessing's The Golden Notebook. In 2007 she was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature: for some critics, it was not before time; for others, it was a politically correct decision.

My dissertation is a consideration of the thematic, structural and paradigmatic complexity and innovation which I attribute to The Golden Notebook and to The Four-Gated City (the fifth and final volume of Lessing's The Children of Violence series). I consider Lessing from a critical position informed by Mikhail Bakhtin's theory of aesthetic activity, in particular the category of consummation; I also consider his delineation of the dialogic orientation of discourse, and the consequently contingent, relational and contestable valence of representation.

Reading Lessing with the aid of selected Bakhtin essays lays the groundwork for a renewed and reinvigorated exploration of her rich, and often fraught struggle with the writing of politics and the politics of writing.

Conference Papers
2011. ‘Submitting to Chaos: Deconstructing and reconstructing the narrative self in Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook’, AULLA Conference, Auckland
2011. ‘The De(con)struction of Convention: Doris Lessing's The Golden Notebook’, American Comparative Literature Association Conference, Vancouver
2011. ‘Resisting Interpretation: Formal activism and unstable authorship in Doris Lessing's The Golden Notebook’, International Society for the Study of Narrative Conference, St Louis, Missouri
2011. ‘Critical dialogue: Reading narrative shifts in Doris Lessing’s The Four-Gated City ‘after’ Bakhtin’, XIV International Bakhtin Conference, Bologna, Italy
2011. “Narrative Politics: (Re) Reading Gender in Lawrence’s Women in Love”, D.H. Lawrence Society of North America Conference, Sydney

Publications
2011: ‘Stating the Problem’: Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook and the Possibility of Representation’, Doris Lessing Studies, 29.2 (Fall 2011).
2012: Invited to submit a portion of my work to be considered for inclusion in a forthcoming book collection to commemorate the 50th anniversary of The Golden Notebook's publication.

Teaching
2011: NORA (Narratives of Romance and Adventure), Session I 2011.

Penny Barraclough

Penny Barraclough

Master of Arts (Research)
A new religion: W.B. Yeats, the poetic tradition & the Japanese Noh
In his autobiography, W.B. Yeats claimed that he created for himself a new religion, an “infallible Church of poetic tradition”. To his way of thinking, this tradition consisted of the myths, characters, and legends that formed part of a unique body of knowledge; a tradition which originated at the beginning of time and was passed down through the generations, primarily by poets and painters.
My research will focus on a selection of Yeats’ plays that are based on the Japanese Noh theatre. In the first instance I intend to determine a clear definition of Yeats’ personal religion. In the second instance I intend to explore two questions: how successful was Yeats in articulating his new religious perspective through the selected texts; and to what extent was the Noh tradition a particularly effective framework for achieving his artistic aims?

Alix Baumgartner

Doctor of Philosophy
Messy modernism: the composite mode in interwar America
My project applies questions of aesthetic and narratological coherence to a range of ‘composite’ modernist American texts, including Gertrude Stein’s Three Lives (1909), Jean Toomer’s Cane (1923), John dos Passos’ Manhattan Transfer (1925), James Agee and Walker Evans’ Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1940), and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Last Tycoon (1941). I consider the textual ‘mode’ in which such texts operate. I analyse the short story cycle alongside textual hybrids that exhibit formal continuities with the cycle, articulating connections between transmedia forms and exploring circulatory movements and flows of textual objects through processes of production and consumption.

Conference Papers
2012. ‘“O cant you see it, O cant you see it”: Barely seeable bodies and the composite aesthetic in Jean Toomer’s Cane, ’ Australian Modernist Studies Network Symposium.

Suzanne Bellamy

Doctor of Philosophy
‘Textual Archaeology’: The 1942 thesis on Virginia Woolf by Nuri Mass

April Bertels-Garnsey

Doctor of Philosophy
Characterisation in Old English Verse
My research concentrates on techniques of characterisation in Old English poetry, and the ways in which characterisation expresses wider textual themes. My specific focus is on the depiction of individuals and groups in Andreas, which I consider in relation to vernacular prose writings about Andrew, as well as the poem’s Greek and Latin analogues. My findings will also be considered in relation to an examination of Beowulf and writings about native English saints. By comparing characterisation in these texts, I hope to illuminate some ways in which the Andreas-poet reinterpreted a story about a non-English saint for an Anglo-Saxon audience.

Teaching
2011. ENGL2661 Imagining Camelot

Conference Papers
2011. ‘“Deprived of All Sleep”: Sorrow and Sleep in Old English Elegiac Poetry’, Emotions in the Medieval and Early Modern World, University of Western Australia, Perth

Christopher Black

Doctor of Philosophy
Old Scandinavia in Finnegans Wake and Den lange Rejse
Why does old Scandinavia find so strong a place in the most ambitious novels of the Irish author James Joyce and his Danish contemporary Johannes V. Jensen? How did these two authors use this material in order to create new works of imaginative literature? This project aims to contribute towards an answer to these two linked questions. It will be argued that in both cases, the decision to include old Scandinavia was highly principled, and that both authors found it necessary to work out sophisticated methods for using their source material.

Anna Breckon

Doctor of Philosophy

Jessica Brooks

Doctor of Philosophy
Comparative Conceptions of Freedom: Freedom in Eastern and Western Literary Contexts

Carolyn Burns

Doctor of Philosophy
The Adaptation of Plays and Novels into Twentieth Century Opera
Referring to adaptation theory and narratological analysis of lyric theatre, my thesis examines how modern English-language opera adaptations engage with national literary cultures. Examining a variety of British, American and Australian operas, I place particular emphasis on accounting for the contributions of co-authors in the composition of stage drama.

Conference Papers
2011. ‘Stories About the Storytellers: Literary Biography in Recent British Drama’ AULLA Congress 36, ‘Storytelling in Literature, Language and Culture,’ University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Publications
2011. ‘Adapting the Undead: Vampires, Fidelity Criticism and Hammer Horror’s Dracula 1972AD’, Philament 17.

Alison Cardinale

Alison Cardinale

Doctor of Philosophy (Research)
A dialogic inquiry into poetry and poetic form in the work of Samuel Taylor Coleridge which admits the non-semantic, even irrational quality and texture of Coleridge’s poetry and philosophical writing to identify a dramatic juxtaposition of voices in an authentically Romantic critical methodology. This thesis will consider Coleridge’s poetry and philosophy as an organic whole, sharing the same preoccupations and the same rhetorical and imaginative techniques, in order to recover and characterise an informing experience of poetic rapture involving the whole soul in a momentary glimpse of the Divine. It is vital to return to Coleridge to articulate a theory of poetry that moves beyond Hardy’s ache of modernism or T.S. Eliot’s ‘dissociated sensibility’. In an age in which ways of knowing about ourselves and the world have been claimed by philosophers in the field of neuroscience, whose extreme physicalism represents a developed version of the reductive empiricism emerging in Coleridge’s time, this thesis will attempt to unite different epistemic models of understanding to recover through Coleridge’s writings a broader cosmology akin to that envisioned by Plato and the German Idealists who exerted such a powerful influence on his work.

Andrew Carruthers

Doctor of Philosophy
Literary Scores: Desire, Ekphrases and the Object in Modern and Postmodern American Poetry

Katrina Clifford

Doctor of Philosophy
A Literary and Cultural History of the Brother in Eighteenth-century Novels
My thesis revolves around the figure of the brother in novels written by women from 1750 to 1820, with two main foci. Firstly, it examines the way in which female novelists used the brother figure, and particularly the brother-sister relationship, to examine and critique authority structures, gender inequality, and a woman’s place in society. Secondly, it explores how the brother-sister relationship interacts with narrative form, and how a preoccupation with this relationship shapes not only a novel’s content and characters, but also its structure.

Teaching
2007. Eighteenth-Century: Authority and Anxiety
2008. 2012 Jane Austen and her contemporaries
2009. Eighteenth-Century: Scandal and Sociability

Conference Papers
2008. ‘Literary Scenes and Historical Blindspots: Brothers, sisters, and The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless’, AAL’s Literature and History conference, Macquarie University
2009. ‘Brothers, Sisters, and the Idea(l) of Fraternity in Persuasion’, Chawton House Library ‘New Directions in Austen Studies’ conference, Chawton, UK
2012. ‘“His Sister’s Keeper?”: Familial and Narrative Authority in Novelistic Depictions of Brother-Sister Relationships’, ASECS, Texas

Publications
2004. ‘Elevating the fraternal into the conjugal: an alternative to the “incest” readings of Mansfield Park and Emma’; Sensibilities 28
2009. ‘Brothers, Sisters and the Idea(l) of Fraternity in the novels of Jane Austen’; Sensibilities 38
2010. ‘From reformed coquette to coquettish reformer: the critical history of The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless’ in Remaking Literary History; Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Press.

Patrick Condliffe

Doctor of Philosophy
The (un)Known Wongar: Towards A Hermeneutics of Literary Identity
My project is two-fold. Firstly it attempts to offer a complete re-reading, or in some cases a first reading, of the oeuvre of B. Wongar. Secondly, it is an investigation into the biography of the enigma known as either Sreten Božić or B. Wongar. For many Wongar’s is a name that signals nothing, for a few this name is a reminder not of an author (or authors) but instead a hoaxer. This dissertation seeks to examine the origins of B.Wongar, and his youth as ‘Sreten Božić’, if that is his actual name, with a view to understanding how he came to write literature that became so mired within controversy over accusations of appropriation of Indigenous identity. Further, and what is of specific interest to me, is to attempt to understand why what society perceives as transgressions of identity so rapidly devalue and relegate all aspects of their work, including the positive and arguably important messages and themes, of the texts that authors such as Wongar have created.

Conference Papers
2012 Mining the Silence: Why We Need To Talk About Wongar,CSAA annual conference, University of Sydney, Sydney
2013 Through A Wongar, Darkly. ASAL Dis-located Readings: Translation and Transnationalism Conference, Monash University, Victoria.
2013 B. Wongar, ‘Pre-Editing’, and Transnationalism – The Heteroglossic writing of Sreten Božić. In All Languages: Translingual Cultural production 2013 CRITIC/ ISTR Symposium.

James Dahlstrom

James Dahlstrom

Doctor of Philosophy
James Dahlstrom graduated from Arizona State University with a BA in German in 1995 and English Education in 2001. He was awarded an MA by research from the University of Wollongong in the field of Australian Literature in 2012. Currently he is pursuing a PhD at the University of Sydney concentrating on the works of Peter Carey.

Publications
“America the Forbidden Fruit: Anti-American Sentiment in Robbery Under Arms.” Antipodes 25.2 (2011):137-142.
“Dick the Poet: the ‘allegorical tendencies’ in Robbery Under Arms.” Antipodes 26.1 (2012) 41-45.

Conferences & Symposiums
“The Unusual Life of Gough Whitlam.” The AULLA World Making Congress at The University of Queensland in Brisbane, 10 to 12 July 2013.
“David Meredith’s Affair with America: Rereading Helen Midgeley and Beverly Grove in George Johnston’s My Brother Jack.” Second Annual POPCAANZ (The Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand) Conference in Auckland, New Zealand, 29 June to 1 July 2011.
Australia’s Identity Crisis in Andrew McGahan’s Underground,” EMPA Symposium at The University of New South Wales. 15 and 16 October 2009.

Amelia Dale

Doctor of Philosophy

Souls, Minds and Bodies in Eighteenth-Century Quixotic Narratives
Eighteenth-century England saw numerous adaptations of Miguel de Cervantes’ novel, Don Quixote. These Quixotic narratives centre on the relation between the spiritual and the material – between the Quixote’s beloved text and the Quixote’s body, and between the Quixote’s fantastical ideas and the bodily reality that contradicts them. In this period the relationship between soul and body was contested and redefined; theories about what distinguished matter from spirit shifted throughout the century. My work demonstrates how these contradictory definitions and the role of the imagination in negotiating between the two fuelled the production of Quixotic narratives during the long eighteenth century.

Teaching
2011. ENGL2659 - The 18th Century: Scandal & Sociability
2012. ENGL 2611 - Jane Austen and Her Contemporaries

Conference Papers
2011. ‘Mad Readers and Moonites in Eaton Stannard Barrett’s The Heroine’, Romanticism Studies Association of Australasia ‘Romanticism and the Tyranies of Distance’ Conference
2011. ‘The Quixotic Imagination in Eaton Stannard Barrett’s The Heroine’, 4th Australasian David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies, Melbourne.
2011. ‘"Leaning on my Saviour's Bosom": Christ's Breasts and Textual Transmission in The Spiritual Quixote', Reflections on Revolution and Romanticism Postgraduate Symposium of the Romanticism Studies Association of Australasia, Sydney.
2012. ‘Mr Shenstone’s sluices, souls and The Spiritual Quixote’, British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 41st Annual Conference, Oxford.

Christelle Davis

Doctor of Philosophy

Samuel Dickson

Doctor of Philosophy
Postmodern Literature

Justine Ettler

Doctor of Philosophy
The Best City for Business

Justine Ettler

This thesis analyses the Second Wave feminist critique that surrounded the publication of Bret Easton Ellis’ third novel, American Psycho. It begins by identifying the major shifts in the literature and discusses them in relation to the feminist critique. Next the thesis challenges a number of dominant defences of American Psycho such as the ubiquitous defence of the novel as a satire, or the equally prevalent defence of the novel as postmodern classic. In conclusion, the thesis argues that a balanced assessment of the novel must first of all attempt to reconcile the feminist critique with the postmodern defence.

Jedidiah Evans

Doctor of Philosophy
“Looking Homeward”: Thomas Wolfe, Sehnsucht, and Fascism
This thesis examines Wolfe’s preoccupation with sehnsucht – an addiction to longing – and seeks to explore how this ‘aesthetic of longing’ is linked to his obsession with 1930s Germany, his indebtedness to German Romanticism, and his fascist politics. In doing so I hope to disentangle his writing from solely regional debates surrounding “the South” and highlight the broader significance of his work as part of the transatlantic exchange of myths.

Teaching
2011. ENGL2640: Shakespeare

Toby Fitch

Doctor of Arts
Theme Parks: Alternative Play in Contemporary Poetry
My doctorate will be half academic writing and half creative writing. I am currently researching the French poets Arthur Rimbaud and Stéphane Mallarmé and their influence on and relation to certain tropes in contemporary poetry - from translation to mistranslation, from pattern/concrete poetry to what I like to call ‘absinthe’ poetry. I will be writing my next collection of poems around and in some of these modes, or ‘theme parks’. I will also be travelling to Paris to write and research.

Publications
2011. Dual Book Review/Essay, http://cordite.org.au/reviews/toby-fitch-reviews-michael-farrell-and-john-ashbery/
2012. 'Rawshock', a poem in ten parts modelled on the original Rorschach inkblots, forthcoming in http://meanjin.com.au/

To read more of my published poems, go to: http://tobyfitch.blogspot.com/

Peter Gibbard

Doctor of Philosophy
Republicanism, Tacitism and Style in English Drama: 1585–1608

In late Elizabethan England, there was a vogue for an epigrammatic ‘sententious’ style of writing that was modelled on the style of Seneca and Tacitus. This stylistic fashion was part of a broader European movement, which was closely associated with a surge of interest in Tacitean political texts. Commentators on rhetoric, both in classical Rome and early modern Europe, presented the sententious style as a reaction against the rhetorical style of Cicero. Whereas the Ciceronian style was perceived as linked to Cicero’s republicanism, the sententious style was connected to the political attitudes of Tacitus. This dissertation examines how early modern playwrights, including Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson and Kyd, exploited the political connotations of the Ciceronian and sententious styles to express republican and Tacitean views. In investigating the political and historical context of formal features of style, this dissertation exemplifies a methodological approach that has been labelled ‘the new formalism’ or ‘historical formalism’.

Cressida Green

Doctor of Philosophy
Female Rivalry in Victorian Literature

Emma Halpin

Doctor of Philosophy
John Wayne: Real/Reel
My project examines the relationship between John Wayne, the American film industry and Washington from 1948 to 1962, showing how Wayne’s screen image contributed to the post-war construction of nationalism and projection of American values. The period studied in this thesis includes the United States’ rise to a world superpower during the Cold War, and the change in the production practices of the American film industry towards consolidation. It is also the timeframe in which Wayne’s popularity was at its peak, internalising the demands of the nation through his screen image as America’s hero, on and off screen.

Alexandra Hankinson

Doctor of Philosophy
A Life of their Own: Regarding Animals in Romantic-Period Writing
This project examines the way in which the Romantic discovery of intricacy and individuation in the natural world gradually led to a more complex and empathetic appraisal of non-human animal life. In particular, it considers the way in which the close observation of living creatures that was then taking place in homes, laboratories, and in the field encouraged greater respect for individual animal being and promoted conversation, both literary and scientific, regarding the properties of humans and animals alike. An evaluation of Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s representations of animals and organic form will constitute an integral part of this project.

Conference Papers
2011. ‘“Swallows interweaving there…At distance wildly-wailing”: Observations of Animals in Coleridge’s Notebooks, ’ The Romantic Studies Association of Australasia’s conference, Romanticism and the Tyrannies of Distance, University of Sydney.

Claire Hansen

Claire Hansen

Doctor of Philosophy
Complexity in Shakespeare: creativity and constraint in Shakespeare play, pedagogy and performance
Focusing on the integration of complexity theory into Shakespeare studies, my thesis aims to explore how complexity can be developed as a valuable methodology within the humanities. My research will consider the implications for implementing complexivist approaches to Shakespeare and to literary studies, identify how complexity is already at play within the various fields of Shakespeare texts, scholarship, history, performance and pedagogy, and explore how the incorporation of complexity may enrich and encourage the development of innovative ways of reading, experiencing, learning and teaching Shakespeare.

Teaching
2012 – ENGL1009 Reading English Texts

Conference Papers
2012 – “‘[L]ike a tangled chain; nothing impaired, but all disordered’: complexity theory, pedagogy and systemising Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, 14th Annual British Graduate Shakespeare Conference, Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-upon-Avon, UK.
2012 – “‘Such branches of learning’: implications and applications for the use of complexity theory in teaching Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice at secondary and tertiary levels”, Unlearning Shakespeare Symposium, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.

Kay Harrison

Master of Arts (Research)
The Lost Boys: Un-ravelling the myth of the ‘heroic male’
My project investigates the role of literary discourse in creating and maintaining the myth of the ‘heroic male’ in the Australian national psyche through an exploration of six contemporary novels. It posits that continued dedication to the ‘heroic male’ has a castrating effect on dialogic masculinities in rural settings. This results in a legacy of psychological damage: a thread of lost boys stranded outside the boundaries of hegemonic masculinity who can only be reconciled to it in literary death, binding them to the sacred in nature, thus reinstating their hetero-normative masculinity.

Meegan Hasted

Doctor of Philosophy
Heaven and Earth: John Keats and the Romantic Revolution in Astronomy and Geology
John Keats spent his entire poetic career dedicated to an investigation of the mortal and immortal – the earthly and divine. It is no coincidence, my thesis argues, that this preoccupation with the nature of heaven and earth comes at a time when science (and in particular, English and Scottish science) was investigating the same subject with more precision than ever before. Advances in astronomy and the emergence of geology beginning in the 1780s and continuing throughout the nineteenth century, challenged how poets like Keats could imagine the universe. Both of these scientific disciplines, working independently of (and sometimes contradicting) each other, were concerned with challenging traditional associations with permanence and immutability – themes with which Keats maintains a persistent, even compulsive, interest in his poetry.

Teaching
Jane Austen and her Contemporaries
Victorian Literature

Conference Papers
November 2011. “The Politics of Eternity: Science and Revolution in Keats’s Hyperion,” RSAA Postgraduate Conference, University of Sydney.
July 2011. “‘Myriads of Earthly Wrecks’: James Hutton’s Theory of the Earth and the poetry of Keats,” BARS Conference, University of Glasgow.
February 2011. “Imagining ‘Heaven’s Brink’ in Endymion and ‘Bright Star,’” RSAA Conference, University of Sydney.
July 2010. “‘Things Mysterious, Immortal, Starry’: John Keats and the Herschelian Universe,” AAL Conference, University of NSW.

Scott Henretty

Master of Arts (Research)
Masculinity, Modernism and Conrad’s Nostromo and Lord Jim
My thesis aims to explore Conrad’s role in the construction of the unique form of hegemonic masculinity within modernism. I aim to define and utilise the archetypal fiction of masculinity in terms of determining the significance of the anxious and societally emasculated modernist masculine construct. Defining this paradigm as the ‘flaccid phallus’, I seek to observe Conrad’s position regarding this contextually viable notion.

Chenoa F. Hunter

Chenoa F. Hunter

Doctor of Philosophy
Twenty-first century Tristan: Medieval Masculinity Retold

Editing
2012 Hermes

Teaching
2014. Lecturer in charge: ENGL 215 Literature for Young Adults (Australian Catholic University)
2013. Tutor: ENGL 2658 Love and Desire in Early Modern England (University of Sydney)

Conference Session Chair
SPECULATIVE AND SCIENCE FICTION session, The 37th Congress of the Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, 12 July 2013.

Conference Papers
"Miles' Tristan and Isolde trilogy: a 'womenswold' that takes liberties with Malory’s men," The 37th Congress of the Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, 10-12 July 2013.
"How Sir Dynadan and Lady Tristan were humiliated: forced femininity in the Book of Sir Tristram de Lyones and Camelot 3000," Sourcing Emotions in the Medieval and Early Modern World Conference of The Centre for the History of Emotions, The University Club at the University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia, 27-29 June 2013.
"Masculinity in the Arthurian novels of Kevin Crossley-Holland and Philip Reeve: Guerrières Arthuriennes and Dunghill Cocks," The 2012 Biennial Conference of the Australasian Children’s Literature Association for Research, Canberra, Australia, 20-22 June 2012.

Osama T. Jarrar

Osama Jarrar

Doctor of Philosophy (Research)
“Ideology, Language and Narrative Theory in Children’s Literature: George MacDonald’s Fairytales and Fantasy Novels as a Case Study”

Previous Degree: MPhil

Previous Publications
"Children's Fiction Discourse Analysis: The Critique of Victorian Economics in George MacDonald The Princess and the Curdie.” North Wind: A Journal of George MacDonald Studies. ed. John Bennington. USA: St. Norbert College, 2010.
“Sexuality and Sex role in MacDonald's Fairytales.” North Wind: A Journal of George MacDonald Studies. ed. John Bennington. USA: St. Norbert College, 2009.

Conference attendance
“Fairy Tales Re-imagined: Enchantment, Beastly Tales and Dark Mothers” at UTS.

Kate Judge

Doctor of Philosophy
Pragmatics and Possible Worlds: an Evaluation of Theories of Modality

Ben Juers

Doctor of Philosophy

Aashish Kaul

Doctor of Arts (Creative Writing)
A Novel on the Origin of Chess
Although myths abound as to the invention of chess in the East, it is unclear whether it originated in India, China or Persia. Referencesto a Chess-like game in the Indian epic, Ramayana, refer as far back as the fifth century B.C. Using the game’s development as a narrative strategy and a time period which is immeasurably remote, this project probes perennial literary questions – of desire and despair, the transience of triumph and the weight of failure, the swell of pride and the contraction of frustration, the sweep of providence and the jabs of free will.

Susan King

Doctor of Philosophy
Disturbing Landscapes: Mapping Sydney’s Fictional Geographies

Dominic Knight

Doctor of Arts
Man vs Child

Tony Knight

Doctor of Philosophy
[[b|Richard Burbage: The World’s Greatest Actor]]

David Large

Doctor of Philosophy
Malcolm Lowry and Tradition
The thesis examines the traces of influence in three of Malcolm Lowry’s ‘major minor’ texts – his first novel Ultramarine, the unpublished novel In Ballast to the White Sea, and Lowry’s filmscript adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night. Using a range of critical approaches – genetic, annotation, and theories of fidelity and adaptation – the thesis accounts for Lowry's ‘poetics of plagiarism’, that is, his pronounced tendency to incorporate other voices and texts in the production of his own ‘new’ fiction and poetry.

Teaching
Tutoring at the University of Sydney
ENGL 1002 – Narratives of Romance and Adventure
ENGL 2640 – Shakespeare

Tutoring at the University of Otago (NZ)
ENGL 121 – English Literature: A Survey
ENGL 150 – Popular Literature: The Art of Crime

Conference Papers
2012. “The power and purity”: Sublimation and projection in Malcolm Lowry's Ultramarine. Australian Modernist Studies Network Symposium.
2011. “If the story becomes reality, does the map become the place?”: The Unwritten as an intertext of the Platonic Library. Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand.
2010. ‘Omega Points: The Guiding Principles of Hybridity in Dan Simmonsʼ Hyperion Cantos’. University of New South Wales, Australian Association of Literature.

Anastasia Louridas

Master of Arts (Research)

Georgina Loveridge

Doctor of Philosophy
‘A Landscape without Figures’: Patrick White’s Poetics of Space

Patrick Marland

Doctor of Philosophy
Seeing things in Dickens: A Study of Vision and Hypotposis

Ailish McKeown

Doctor of Philosophy
Saints and the World in late medieval British Saint Plays

Samuel Moginie

Doctor of Philosophy
Australian Poetry in the 1970s

Sam Mogine

The 1970s was a dynamic time for Australia – and for Australian verse culture. My thesis seeks to reappraise and rediscover key works and moments of the decade in poetry – and redress the rhetorics of conservatism and modernism that cut across it. At the moment, I’m interested in the Generation of ’68, Judith Wright, Pam Brown, Ken Bolton & Laurie Duggan (the ‘Coalcliff Gang’ and otherwise), David Campbell, and the magazine New Poetry, the most visible document of the modern and postmodern developments in the poetry of the period.

Teaching
2011. ENGL1026: Constructing the Fictive Self

Conference Papers
2011. ‘John Forbes’s entrepôt poetics’, p Poetry and the Contemporary, Deakin University.

Tara Morrissey

Doctor of Philosophy
Whiteness and Hip Hop

Bushra Naz

Master of Philosophy
Interpersonal Relations in Henry James

Laura Olcelli

Doctor of Philosophy
Italo-Australian Relations in Travel and Language
My research investigates nineteenth-century non-fictional texts that concern Australia and Italy. These chiefly consist of travel accounts, but also exploration and migration literature. By relating Australian national literature and culture to another geographical and social context, I will be able to study it from an inner, domestic point of view (Australians in Italy), as well as from an outer, foreign one (Italians in Australia). My aim is to identify the ways in which the two different cultural and linguistic identities are portrayed and influenced by ‘the other’ when travelling, exploring and migrating.

Conference Papers
2011. ‘Geographical and Linguistic Disorientation in Western Australia: the Response of George Fletcher Moore’, Fifth Annual Conference of the Australasian Association for Literature: ‘Literature and Translation’, Monash University, Melbourne.
2010. ‘Postcards from the Grand Tour: Sublime Geological Change and Curious Natural Disaster’, Fourth Annual Conference of the Australasian Association for Literature: ‘Literature and Science’, UNSW, Sydney.
2010. ‘Travel, Language and Incomprehension in the Accounts of the “Ladies of the Grand Tour”’, Eighteenth Annual Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Women Travel Writers Conference: ‘Journeys’, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA.

Atilla Orel

Doctor of Philosophy
Reality Striving Towards Thought: the Substance of Shelley’s Vegetarianism

Atilla Orel

Generally overlooked, undermined or openly mocked, Shelley’s sustained commitment to vegetarianism was an ethical and intellectual commitment. The consequences of this commitment resonate throughout his politics, poetry and philosophy, the records of his daily life, and his correspondence.

My thesis seeks to replace vegetarianism at the centre of Shelley’s life and work by reconstructing a more accurate sense of how vegetarianism was experienced in a meat-obsessed early nineteenth-century through readings of Shelley’s major poems,and by examining the treatment of (or failure to treat with) vegetarianism in the critical heritage that has developed around Shelley’s life and work.

Teaching and Research
Thus far my Teaching Fellowship teaching responsibilities have included ENGL 2650 (Reading Poetry) and ENGL 2627 (Reading Sexuality). I delivered a paper at the inaugural conference of the Romantic Studies Association of Australia (February 2011) and recently published my article ‘Monsters, Daemons, and Devils: The Accusations of Nineteenth Century Vegetarian Writers’ in the peer-reviewed journal Philament. I’m an active member of the Interdisciplinary C19th Research Group and am currently serving as the postgraduate representative to the executive of Sydney University’s Human Animal Research Network (HARN: http://sydney.edu.au/arts/research/harn/ ).

Lili Pâquet

Doctor of Philosophy
‘From Dames to Dicks: Women in Crime Fiction’
My research concentrates on crime fiction with women protagonists,
written by women who have worked within the criminal justice system.
My thesis argues that the popularity of authors such as Kathy Reichs
and Linda Fairstein marks a development in the genre, which was
historically perceived as masculine.

Conference Papers
2012. ‘Framing Feminism: Hard-Boiled Speech in Contemporary Women’s Crime Fiction’, Telling Truths: Crime Fiction and National Allegory, Wollongong.

Nat Pree

Nat Pree

Doctor of Philosophy
My research is focused on Charles Olson's The Maximus Poems, a twentieth-century epic that addresses concepts of polis as a complex of energies and attentions "necessarily located" and the articulation of a collective "archaic postmodern" consciousness across a range of contexts. Among other concerns, I am looking to demonstrate the liminal and open-ended aspects of human settlement, geographic and psychic, and the poetic implications of inhabiting space that is constantly subject to erosion. I will also be investigating whether Olson’s exploration of topos, his historical and mythological preoccupations, his recovery of artefacts that recall the concept of Deep Image, as well as his particular style of prosody might contain elements that acknowledge and evoke parallels with not only the works of Modernist precursors, but also older, enduring modes of poetic expression.

Samuel Reese

Doctor of Philosophy
Paul Bowles: Violence, Surrealism and the Short Story

Sam Reese

Focusing on the American short story writer, composer and photographer, Paul Bowles, my project explores the relationship between mid-twentieth century politics, surrealism, ideas of violence, and the short story as a genre. I am drawing on ideas of freedom and morality in literature, the relationship between Bowles’ musical aesthetic and his unique style of short story, and the role that surrealism played in defining his artistic expression. I aim to move towards a better understanding of this enigmatic, and oddly spectral figure on the margins of twentieth century literature.

Chris Rudge


www.rudge.tv

Doctor of Philosophy
Experimentalists in perception: drugs, madness and biopolitical society in the speculative fiction and prose of Aldous Huxley and Philip K. Dick

Chris Rudge

My thesis offers a response to Aldous Huxley's and Philip K. Dick's literary and prose illustrations of non-ordinary mental and perceptual experience. It develops new readings of these writers' texts by proposing that they represent the development of strong, individual perceptual philosophies, similar in form to those that had been advanced by Alfred North Whitehead and Henri Bergson in the first half of the twentieth century. It secondly argues for the cogency of Huxley’s and Dick’s literary and prose output to the biopolitical theory and (anti-)psychiatry criticism of the late twentieth century, and particularly to the variously socially-constructionist understandings of madness and schizophrenia that have been developed by the likes of Foucualt, Thomas Szasz, R.D. Laing and Deleuze and Guattari.

I am also a member of the University of Sydney’s Biopolitics of Science Research Network, and my thesis project is featured on their website.

Teaching
ENGL2617: Postmodernism

Conference Papers
2012. ‘Saint Peter’s Snow’: Tracing the European history of research into the psychotomimetics (LSD and mescaline),’ Tonics, Elixirs and Poisons: Psychoactive substances in European History and Culture Conference, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
2012. ‘Madness in mad times: delirium, non-pulsed time and the nonhuman,’ The 26th Annual Meeting of the Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts (SLSA), Milwaukee, United States.
2012. ‘Dick on Drugs: Acid, Amphetamines and the Authoring of Science fiction,’ Worlds Out Of Joint: Re-Imagining Philip K. Dick (First international Philip K. Dick Conference), TU Dortmund University, Germany.
2012. ‘Ancient instincts, modern hardware: the vestigiality of paranoia and its reanimation in the context of modern medical surveillance technics’, The Surveillance and Everyday Life Research Group, Sydney.
2011. ‘Invention and the Tekhnēcolour Labcoat: Scientific History’s Psychotropic Trace’, Society for Literature, Science and the Arts, Kitchener.

Hayley Rudkin

Doctor of Philosophy
The hunger drive in the nineteenth century
My thesis explores the ways in which representations of hunger in literature changed throughout the nineteenth century. Through close analysis of a number of texts, I examine the literal and metaphoric representation of hunger as a physical and psychological drive, from Malthus’ Essay on the Principle of Population in the late eighteenth century, up until Freud’s theory of psychological drives in the early twentieth century. I aim to uncover the ways in which not only the act of consumption, but the desire to consume itself represents a destabilising force within these texts.

Diana Shahinyan

Doctor of Philosophy
Mean Streets: The Legal Geographies of Hammett and Faulkner
My thesis examines the law, justice and criminality encoded in the geographies of Modernist America: the urban, the middle-American town, and the South through the works of Dashiell Hammett and William Faulkner. I focus on the mystery genre’s ability to stylise crime and formulate a fair apportionment of both benefit and burden in the face of the crises and unprecedented developments of the Modern. In America, detectives do not “detect” with their magnifying glass, nor do they come to ironclad conclusions of culpability. The crime does not infect the landscape; rather, in America, the crime is the landscape.

Teaching
2009. Fiction, Film and Power
2011. Narratives of Romance and Adventure

Conference Papers
2011. ‘The figure of the Lawyer in William Faulkner’s short stories”, Annual Society for the Study of Southern Literature Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana

Elizabeth Shek-Noble

Doctor of Philosophy
Crip Poetics: The Erotics of Disability and Dis-Integrity in the works of Kathy Acker, Sigmund Freud, and David Wojnarowicz

This thesis considers the phenomenological and discursive entanglements of disability. My three authors, Acker, Freud, and Wojnarowicz, explore the meanings attached to disabled bodies in ableist culture. I argue that consideration of these authors cannot be separated from their own material experiences of non-normative embodiment.

Teaching
2010. ENGL2635 Contemporary American Literature

Publications
2011. ‘There Were Phantoms": Spectral Shadows in Christos Tsiolkas' Dead Europe’ forthcoming in Journal of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature (JASAL)

Conference Presentations
2011. 'Queering Disability and Disabling Queerness in Rolf de Heer's Bad Boy Bubby', Warwick University, UK
2011. 'Monstrous Cripples, Monstrous Females: The Intercorporeal Erotics of Disability in Kathy Acker's Pussy, King of the Pirates', UNSW, Australia
2011. 'Prosthetic Monstrosity: Reconsidering the Case of "Konrad" the Carcinoma from a Disability Studies Perspective', De Montfort University, UK.

Erin Sheil

Master of Arts (Research)

Adelaide Sheridan

Doctor of Philosophy

Alexandra Smith

Alexandra Smith

Doctor of Philosophy
My thesis examines the recent interrogation of the mediation of aesthetic experience in contemporary literature, focussing particularly on the 2011 novels of Ben Lerner, Leaving the Atocha Station, and Teju Cole, Open City. Using theoretical models to mediate experience, each author is engaged in a practice that aligns with Jacque Rancière's Aisthethis and Walter Benjamin's Arcades Project. Both works mediate different aesthetic experiences, such as those with music, art and literary forms other than the novel, through textual layering and assembly, which ultimately seek to critically consider the way that literature, and the arts more generally, can mediate experience and negotiate urban spectacle.

Teaching
Tutor - ENGL3615 Street Narratives

Conferences Papers
2014. “Poe and an American Pursuit of the Moment,” ANZASA Conference, The University of Otago, Dunedin, NZ.
2013. “Overlaying and Intersecting Cityscapes: Teju Cole’s Practice of the Palimpsest,” Mediating Cityscapes Symposium, TodaysArt Festival, The Hague.

Richard Smith

Doctor of Philosophy

Suk Joo Sohn

Doctor of Philosophy
Sexual Others and Agency in Postcolonial Literature

Christine Stanton

Doctor of Arts (Creative Writing)
Batu – A Historical Novel
I am researching and writing a novel set between 1599-1606; exploring the interface between history and fiction and the issues that arise when attempting to enter and express the mindset of a time long past.

The narrative action moves from Ambon to Europe, from tribal to European urban culture and concerns the misapprehensions experienced by individuals from both in encounters with one another.

Conference Papers
2014 Small Measures, Great World, 'The Prosaic Imaginary' novel studies conference , Sydney University, July 2-5
2013 The Tangled Web - History and Fiction, 'Tethering The Past' cross disciplinary conference , Sydney University, November 29.
2013 Are we there yet? Thinking Backwards,Writing Forwards - issues in writing the historical novel, AULLA Worldmaking Congress, University of Queensland, Brisbane
2012 The Travels of Peter the Savage UNSW Making Tracks PG symposium.

Publications
2014 Chapter from Batu, Copperfield Review 13.2, Spring.

Jessica Sun

Doctor of Philosophy

Mark Sutton

Doctor of Philosophy
“You can always come back, but you can’t come back all the way”: Quotation, Originality and Influence in the Recent Work of Bob Dylan
My research looks at how Dylan’s recent art reconfigures and carries on a conversation with his own past and his own oeuvre through his frequent use of quotation and allusion, both musical and textual. I also investigate issues of originality in Dylan’s work, analysing the debate that has caused some to label Dylan as a plagiarist. My work is focused on Dylan’s albums since 2001, his memoir, his radio programme, his film (and films about him) and his visual art.

Teaching
2010. Imagining America; Fiction Film and Power

Conference Papers
2010. ‘Warp and Woof: The Past, Tradition and Questions of Originality on Bob Dylan’s “Love And Theft”’, The International Association for the Study of Popular Music Conference - Instruments of Change (Monash).
2011. ‘“You Know They Refused Jesus Too”: Bob Dylan's Unforgivable Conversion’, The Unacceptable Conference (Macquarie).
2012. ‘Ideas As My Maps – Travel and Cartography In Bob Dylan’s Early Recordings’, The International Association for the Study of Popular Music Conference - Routes/Roots/Routines (Victoria University, Wellington).
2013. ‘“I Keep Recycling the Same Old Thoughts”: Another Side of Bob Dylan’s Appropriations’, New Zealand Musicological Society – Performance, Creativity, Collaboration.

Publications
2009. ‘Roadmaps For The Soul: History and Cartography in Bob Dylan’s Early Songs’, Australasian Journal Of American Studies

Lucas Thompson

Doctor of Philosophy
David Foster Wallace and the American Existential Tradition
My thesis is an exploration of several fictional and philosophical influences upon the work of David Foster Wallace which I consider to have been given inadequate scholarly treatment. I am arguing that a reading centred on revealing Wallace’s relationship to an entire constellation of existential precursors alters the way we interpret his fiction and non-fiction. My tentative hypothesis is that a detailed, exploratory reading of Wallace alongside (primarily) Kafka, Sartre, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard leads to a deeper understanding of the philosophical underpinnings, ethical ambitions, and broad thematic concerns which run throughout his work.

John Townsend

Doctor of Philosophy

Styles of Literary Criticism
My research is on literary-critical styles of writing, with a specific focus on twentieth-century British literary criticism. Beginning with A. E. Housman’s The Name and Nature of Poetry (1933) and extending to the present day, I investigate the nature of literary discourse and its linguistic manifestation in various literary-critical publications. The linguistic features of the four most frequently-observed styles of writing will be systematically quantified and documented. The social, cultural, and institutional influences which impact upon British literary criticism will also be assessed to determine a literary-critical author’s reasons for choosing a style of writing. I hope that this research will provide a new kind of documentation to those interested in literary-critical techniques, and that it will illuminate the relationship between stylistic selection and the social, cultural, and institutional influences which shape the discourses of literary-critical authors.

Irma Trnka

Master of Arts (Research)
The Effect and Influence of Shakespeare in Prison and Conflict

irma trnka

My project investigates the possibilities, difficulties, and rewarding and significant results of performing Shakespearean theatre with people in situations of incarceration and conflict. In the first part of my project I place particular emphasis on the only Australian Shakespeare-in-Prison program to date, at Borallon Maximum Security Correctional Centre in Ipswich, Queensland (2011). The second part of my project, Shakespeare in Conflict, will document the proliferation of Shakespeare in the Arab world and attempts that are being made through teaching and performance to use Shakespeare’s words to facilitate approaches towards peace and understanding on both sides in the Arab/Israeli conflict.

Diana Walker

Doctor of Philosophy
Shaping Shakespeare

Anna Wallace

Doctor of Philosophy
Time in Anglo-Saxon Literature
My research includes an examination of the physical measurement and understanding of time during the Anglo-Saxon period. It considers approaches and responses to time expressed in literature including secular and religious poetry and prose, as well as scientific writings and epic verse. Popular conception holds that the Anglo-Saxons were a simple people who knew little about science or the world at large, but my research shows that this is not the case: Anglo-Saxon learning and education was comparable to that of contemporary Europe, and Anglo-Saxon authors related to time in a variety of ways which they expressed in their literature.

Teaching
2010 ENGL2661 Imagining Camelot
2010 ENGL2657 Myths, Legends, and Heroes
2011 ENGL3634 Continuing Old English
2011 ENGL2657 Myths, Legends, and Heroes

Conference Papers
2011. ‘“Sorrow is renewed”: Time and Loss in Old English Elegies’, Emotions in the Medieval and Early Modern World, University of Western Australia, Perth
2011. ‘Bede, Byrhtferth, and the Borders of Time’, ANZAMEMS Biennial Conference, University of Otago, Dunedin
2010. ‘Exploring Time and Space in Andreas’, International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds
Refereed Publications
2011. ‘“A Wild Shieldmaiden of the North”: Eowyn of Rohan and Old Norse Literature’, Philament, 17, 23-45

Bronwen Wareing

Doctor of Philosophy
Grief Time: Representations of Temporal Instability, Identity and Memory following Death in Don DeLillo’s The Body Artist, Tim Parks’ Destiny and John Banville’s The Sea
My research project examines the use of temporal constructs in order to represent the physical and psychological effects of grief, as well as the crisis of meaning which follows death, in the novels of DeLillo, Parks and Banville. These ‘traumatic’ losses, resulting from suicide and illness, cause previously stable perceptions of presence and identity to be reassessed. This process transforms the worldview of those who remain, along with their way of conceputalising their connection and engagement with events of the ‘past’.

Bradley Wells

Doctor of Philosophy
The Incarnational Performance Theology of The Collected Plays of Charles Williams

Bradley Wells

I am researching the way Charles Williams (1886-1945) enacted his unique theology through his plays. In doing so, I hope to establish an incarnational aesthetic that pervades the language and performance of all of the known verse dramas. In resurrecting this largely ‘forgotten Inkling’ I also intend to show how radical and modern he was as a thinker and playwright and how he made a hitherto unrecognized significant impact upon his various contemporaries, including, T.S. Eliot, W.H. Auden and Dorothy L. Sayers.

Publications
2011. ‘London – City of Redemption: Charles Williams’s Vision of The City’ Literatur in Wissenschaft und Unterricht. Kinzel, U (ed.) Special Issue (London: Urban space as cultural experience).
2011. ‘Eucatastrophe and Co-inherence in the Utopian Vision of Charles Williams,' Colloquy Issue 21.
2010. ‘Staging Masculinity: Review of Men at Play: Masculinities in Australian Theatre since the 1950s By Jonathan Bollen, Adrian Kiernander and Bruce Parr. Amsterdam, Rodopi,’ Australian Humanities Review. Vol 49.
‘Historical Moments and Historical Change: Review of Turning Points in Australian History. Martin Crotty and David Andrew Roberts (ed.). Sydney: UNSW Press 2009,’ Australian Humanities Review. Vol 49. Nov 2010.
2010. 'Review: American Science Fiction Film and Television by Lincoln Geraghty, Oxford, Berg, 2009', Media International Australia Issue No.136.

Conference Papers
2012. ‘Watch Your Back! Co-inhered Humour in the Divine Vision of Charles Williams’s Verse Drama.’ Varieties of Humour and Laughter: 18th Colloquium of Australian Humour Studies Network (AHSN). Australian National University, Canberra.

Kim Wilkins

Kim Wilkins

Doctor of Philosophy

Thesis title: There is a Problem With the Connection: Existential Anxiety in the American Eccentrics
Kim Wilkins' thesis, titled "There's a Problem with the Connection: Existential Anxiety in the American Eccentrics" centres on a particular group of contemporary American filmmakers that emerged in the 1990s, known as the American Eccentrics. Kim is particularly interesting in defining, and theorising this group within the broader American cinematic tradition, and has formulated her reading of the American Eccentrics through the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological imprint of the New Hollywood cinema (1967-1979).

Conference papers
2012. The Sounds of Silence: Hyper-dialogue in the American Eccentrics PopCAANZ (Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand), Melbourne
2012. On the Road to Nowhere: Wes Anderson's The Darjeeling Limited and the New American Road Movie ANZASA (Australia and New Zealand American Studies Association), Brisbane

Fiona Yardley

Doctor of Philosophy
Writers writing stories about writers writing stories: self-reflexivity, unreliability and ethics in contemporary fiction

Fiona Yardley

This thesis builds on recent scholarship exploring the intersection between unreliable narration and a new ethics of fiction. Set against distinct historical backdrops, works by McEwan, Foer, Atwood and Rushdie all contain characters who are figured as the authors of the novels in which they are found, who commentate, edit, revise, and elide detail in an attempt to control unruly historical and personal narratives. By examining their self-referential involvement with the construction and communication of narrative, this thesis will attempt to build a framework for understanding the ways in which the new ethics of fiction operates in contemporary literature.

Yuan Zhang

Doctor of Philosophy
The Cult of Beauty: Edith Wharton’s Aesthetic Views in I-narrator Genres
This project scrutinizes Edith Wharton’s viewpoints on the aesthetic concept of beauty in I-narrator genres of autobiography, the ghost story, lyric poetry, and the realist novel. Locating the turn of the twentieth century as the historical background Wharton faces, the project proposes that Wharton shapes her unique aesthetic concept of beauty by exposure to the continuities of Victorian Aestheticism and incipient Modernism. By so doing, it intends to evince Wharton’s idiosyncratic aesthetic perceptions, long neglected, underestimated, and misunderstood.

Publications
2009. ‘Marginalized Men in Female-Authored Novels at the turn of the Twentieth Century’, A Hundred Flowers Blossoming: A Collection of Literary Essays Written By Chinese Scholars ed. Xiao-ming Yang (University Press of America)
2011. ‘Ezra Pound’s Poems Applying “Non- Subjective State,” Chinese Poetic Aestheticism’, Journal of Xi’an International Studies University 19.1, 80-82.

Conference Papers
2011. ‘Modern Spectator’s Unfulfilled Desire Catalysing Aesthetic Beauty in Viewing Pre-Raphaelites Paintings’, Desire: from Eros to Eroticism Conference, New York.