University of Sydney Handbooks - 2013 Archive

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Unit descriptions

Structure of Honours in Arts and Social Sciences

Honours has different codes from junior and senior Arts and Social Sciences undergraduate units of study. Honours students enrol in four shell units, two for each semester of full-time study, which are together worth a total of 48 credit points. For instance, Philosophy Honours Students enrol in PHIL4011 Philosophy Honours A, PHIL4012 Philosophy Honours B, PHIL4013 Philosophy Honours C, and PHIL4014 Philosophy Honours D unit. These shell units do not correspond directly to the Honours seminars or thesis: they are simply the Student Records system's way of registering that you are enrolled in a 48 credit point Honours program. This means that when you choose your Honours seminars, the only people involved are you, the department Honours Coordinator, and the seminar's teacher.

American Studies

AMST1001 Global America

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. David Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x1000wd essays (2x30%), tutorial participation (10%) and 1x1.5 hr exam (30%)
Note: Students intending to do a major in American Studies must complete AMST1001 and either HSTY1023 or HSTY1076
This unit will investigate the global connectedness of the United States and how this relates to the core values and interests that define America. The primary focus will be on the United States in the 21st global century. The pedagogical aim of this unit is to provide students with analytical frames to understand the most important issues in contemporary American literature, culture, politics, society and the economy, and how they are affected by and affect the world outside the US.
AMST2601 American Foundations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rebecca Sheehan and Dr Michael Thompson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AMST1001 and (HSTY1076 or HSTY1023) Assessment: 1x1500wd group presentation (30%) and 2x1500wd essays (2x30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit introduces students to the contradictory richness of 'Americanness' from an interdisciplinary standpoint and prepares them for the Major in American Studies. It is divided into different modules, each addressing a core national myth. We will approach each module from a variety of angles: historiographical, literary and visual, opening lines of interrelation between historical and imaginary forms in the construction and ongoing redefinition of the United States.
AMST2801 American Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Clare Corbould Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in American Studies at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the American Studies Program.
AMST2802 American Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
See AMST2801
AMST2803 American Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
See AMST2801
AMST2804 American Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
See AMST2801
AMST2805 American Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
See AMST2801
AMST2806 American Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
See AMST2801
AMST4011 American Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars Prerequisites: A credit average or better in 48 senior credit points of American Studies, including AMST2601 Assessment: A thesis of 18,000-20,000 words and 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent for each semester.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in American Studies consists of: 1. A thesis written under the supervision of one member of the academic staff of the American Studies program 2. Two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester, one offered by the American Studies program, one chosen, in consultation with the coordinator of American Studies, from the Honours seminars offered by the departments of English, History and Film Studies. The thesis should be 18,000-20,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000-8000 words of work. The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours seminar and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
AMST4012 American Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Please refer to AMST4011 Corequisites: AMST4011
Refer to AMST4011
AMST4013 American Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Please refer to AMST4011 Corequisites: AMST4012
Refer to AMST4011
AMST4014 American Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Please refer to AMST1001 Corequisites: AMST4013
Refer to AMST4011

Ancient History

ANHS1600 Foundations for Ancient Greece

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alastair Blanshard Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd-equivalent tutorial presentation (5%), participation (15%), 1x1500wd research exercise (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
Delphic oracles, epic stories of heroes, graceful temples, tales of lust and tyranny - the Greek world has much to delight and surprise. This unit of study will introduce you to the study of ancient Greek history and culture and provides a springboard for further studies in history, archaeology and literature. It is informed by a cross-disciplinary approach that combines a variety of perspectives to achieve a holistic view of the ancient world.
ANHS1601 Foundations for Ancient Rome

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Cowan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd exercise (10%), participation (15%), 1x1500wd research exercise (35%) and 1x2hr exam (40%)
From Spain to Turkey, from Britain to Africa, ancient Rome has left physical and cultural reminders of its role as ancient superpower. This unit of study will introduce you to the city of Rome itself, its turbulent history, its empire and its vibrant culture. It will provide a springboard for further studies in history, archaeology and literature. It is informed by a cross-disciplinary approach that combines a variety of perspectives to achieve a holistic view of the ancient world.
ANHS1602 Greek and Roman Myth

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Eric Csapo Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: CLCV1001 Assessment: tutorial quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), 1x1500wd written assignment (35%), and 1x2hr exam (40%)
Stories about Greek and Roman gods, heroes, and monsters occupy an important place in Western culture. Greco-Roman mythology is the fount of inspiration for masterpieces of art, music, and literature. This unit examines these enduring ancient narratives, symbols, and mythical ideas in their historical, cultural and religious context. Learn about the manifold meanings of myth, its transformations and transgressions, its uses and abuses from antiquity to the present day.
ANHS1801 Ancient History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANHS2601 Ancient Imperialism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alastair Blanshard Session: Semester 1,Summer Early Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of ANHS or HSTY OR 6 junior credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of HSTY, ARCA, PHIL, GRKA or LATN Prohibitions: ANHS2001 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (45%), 1x2000wd class paper (45%) and tutorial participation (10%)
The ancient Mediterranean witnessed the rise and fall of several great empires. At the heart of each was a city-state. How did single cities come to dominate their neighbours? How were the experiences of each city-state different and why? This unit compares the material factors and the ideology which lay behind the success and failure of Athens, Rome and Sparta. Why did Rome survive for such a long period while the dominance of the Greek city-states was short-lived?
ANHS2605 Ancient Greek Religion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julia Kindt Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Ancient History, Classical Studies, Ancient Greek or History OR 6 junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 junior credit points of either Latin, Greek (Ancient), Classical Studies, History, Philosophy, Archaeology (Classical) or Archaeology (Near Eastern) Assessment: 1x2000wd class paper (40%), 1x2hr exam (30%), 1x500wd reading journal (15%) and participation (15%)
This unit explores Greek religion as a defining feature of what it meant to be Greek. We will investigate similarities and differences between religious beliefs and practices throughout the ancient Greek world and trace how religion changed over time. Topics addressed include sacrifice, religious festivals and games, the use (and abuse) of divination, and shared notions of purity and pollution.
ANHS2609 Alexander and the Hellenistic World

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Miles Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of ANHS or HSTY OR 6 credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of ARCA, GRKA, HSTY, LATN or PHIL Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), tutorial participation (10%)
The legacy of Alexander the Great is often defined as one of military conquest. However it was also an age when scholars revolutionized the way poetry was written, artists found new ways of representing the body in extraordinarily life-like terms and radical new philosophies competed for hearts and minds. From Greece to Afghanistan we will explore a wonderfully diverse and vibrant world that was as much united by culture and learning as it was statecraft and steel.
ANHS2612 Historiography Ancient and Modern

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points of Ancient History or History or Asian Studies) or (6 junior credit points of Ancient History or History or Asian Studies and 6 junior credit points of either Classical Studies, Latin, Greek (Ancient), or Archaeology) Prohibitions: ANHS2691, ANHS2692 Assessment: 1x2000wd class paper (40%), 1x2hr exam (30%), 1x500wd reading journal (15%) and participation (15%)
Greco-Roman historiography remains a central object of inquiry for students of the ancient world. This unit examines samples of Greco-Roman historiography in light of their original contexts and of modern approaches. Topics will include: Why did the ancients invent and how did they exploit literary representations of the past? What were their methods and their criteria for ascertaining historical truths? How was history implicated in Greco-Roman literature and in Greco-Roman culture? How can modern historiographical theories illuminate ancient practices?
ANHS2613 Ancient Greece and Rome on Film

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alastair Blanshard Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Ancient History, Classical Studies, Ancient Greek or History OR 6 junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 junior credit points of either Latin, Greek (Ancient), Classical Studies, History, Philosophy, Archaeology (Classical) or Archaeology (Near Eastern) Assessment: 1x2000wd essay, 1x2hr exam and tutorial participation
This unit examines the relationship between cinematic visions of antiquity and the writing of ancient history. In particular, it aims to look at how different schools, ideas, and methodologies in ancient history are reflected in cinematic production. Topics to be discussed include the role of historical consultants in film production, archaeological remains and the creation of 'the antique', cinema as an alternate site for the production of 'ancient history', and the utility of filmic metaphors for the practice of history.
ANHS2616 Tragedy and Society in Greece and Rome

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robert Cowan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of ANHS, GRKA, HSTY or LATN OR 6 credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of ARCA, ENGL, GRKA, HSTY, LATN or PHIL. Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), tutorial presentation (10%), 1x500wd review of performance (10%), participation (10%)
Oedipus, Agamemnon, Medea - tragedy as a genre and as a worldview was invented in Classical Athens and has dominated Western culture ever since. This unit will explore all aspects of tragedy in Athens and Rome from the poetry of its language to the theatricality of its staging, but with particular emphasis on how it reflected and shaped the societies in which it was performed, and engaged with those societies' central concerns: gender, religion and politics, war, justice and ethnicity.
ANHS2804 Ancient History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANHS2805 Ancient History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANHS2806 Ancient History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANHS2810 Ancient History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANHS2811 Ancient History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANHS3601 The Mediterranean World and Civil War

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathryn Welch Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of ANHS or HSTY OR 6 junior credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of HSTY, ARCA, PHIL, GRKA or LATN Prohibitions: ANHS3901, ANHS3911 Assessment: 1x2500wd class paper (60%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and 1x1000wd reading log (20%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
In 88BC, Mithridates of Pontus challenged Rome by organising rebellion in Roman Asia. Simultaneously, Rome itself was beset by the first of three civil wars. A century of chaos across the Mediterranean had begun! We will study the age of Pompeius, Caeser, Cicero, Antonius, Octavian and Cleopatra from east to west in order to see how each side affected the other. The rich evidence allows us to develop a range of skills in and aproaches to historical research and analysis.
ANHS4011 Ancient History Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two seminars, each seminar meeting for 2 hours per week for one semester Prerequisites: Credit average in 36 senior credit points of ANHS including ANHS2612 (or equivalent) AND 12 senior credit points (or equivalent) of GRKA or LATN Assessment: a thesis of 18,000-20,000 word and 6,000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Ancient History consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18,000-20,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6,000 words of written work or it equivalent.
The thesis is worth 50% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 25%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Ancient Greek History (Ben Brown)
Roman History (Dr Elly Cowan)
For more information, contact Dr Paul Roche, Honours coordinator.
ANHS4013 Ancient History Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to ANHS4011 Corequisites: ANHS4012 Assessment: Refer to ANHS4011
Refer to ANHS4011
ANHS4014 Ancient History Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to ANHS4011 Corequisites: ANHS4013 Assessment: Refer to ANHS4011
Refer to ANHS4011

Anthropology

ANTH1001 Cultural Difference: An Introduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gaynor Macdonald (s1) Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial or equivalent in intensive Summer session Prohibitions: ANTH1003 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (15%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%) and tutorial participation (15%)
Anthropology explores and explains cultural difference while affirming the unity of humankind. It provides accounts of cultural specificity that illuminate the world today. Lectures will address some examples of cultural difference from the present and the past. These examples will introduce modern Anthropology, the method of ethnography, and its related forms of social and cultural analysis.
Textbooks
A Reader will be available at the University Copy Centre
ANTH1002 Anthropology and the Global

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Terry Woronov Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ANTH1004 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (45%), 1x2hr exam (45%) and tutorial participation (10%)
Anthropology's long-term ethnographic method, within a specific cultural setting, allows for a particularly intimate understanding of people's experiences of the social worlds they inhabit. This course shows the importance of this experiential intimacy for understanding some of the key issues associated with globalisation: the culturally diverse forms of global capitalism, the transnational communities emanating from global population movements, the transformations of colonial and post-colonial cultures, the rise of global movements and the corresponding transformation of Western nationalism.
Textbooks
A reader will be available at the University Copy Centre
ANTH1801 Social Anthropology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANTH1802 Social Anthropology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANTH2601 The Ethnography of Southeast Asia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2500wd essay (45%), 1x350wd seminar presentation (10%), 1x150wd map exercise (5%), tutorial participation (10%)
Southeast Asia is a region of great geographic and cultural diversity, a meeting point for civilizational influences from India and China including the religions of Islam, Buddhism and Hinduism. It is also the laboratory for much anthropological inquiry, attracting the attention of prominent anthropologists and social scientists, like Geertz and Anderson. This unit will examine Southeast Asia in historical and contemporary context, and give grounded ethnographic illustration to such issues as nationalism, cities, migration, political violence, environment and agriculture.
Textbooks
A reader will be available from the University Copy Centre
ANTH2606 Culture and the Unconscious

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jadran Mimica Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Assessment: 1x3500wd essay (70%) and 1x2hr exam (30%)
This is a unit on psychoanalytic anthropology. With the focus on the unconscious dimension of human cultural existence the unit critically examines the systematic topical, theoretical, ethnographic and historical aspects of this unique field of anthropological inquiry. All psychoanalytic conceptual frameworks are elucidated and assessed through ethno-psychoanalytic work done in different cultural life-worlds. Firmly grounded in detailed ethnographic evidence the unit provides a comprehensive phenomenological-existential validation of the discipline and its contribution to both anthropology and psychoanalysis.
Textbooks
A reader will be available at the University Copy Centre
ANTH2623 Gender: Anthropological Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Late Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week or equivalent in intensive Summer session Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from Anthropology Prohibitions: ANTH2020, ANTH2023 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (55%), 1x1500wd essay (35%) and 1x500wd tutorial paper and presentation (10%)
This unit explores the social and cultural dimensions of gender and sexuality in non-western societies. The main focus is the body in two interrelated senses. Firstly, how the body is culturally constructed by giving aspects of gender and sexuality meanings that do not simply reflect biology. Secondly, how bodies are socially constructed, for example through ritual. The relations of the dimensions of the body to the articulation of power and social change are also considered.
Textbooks
A reader will be available at the University Copy Centre
ANTH2625 Culture and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robbie Peters Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2500wd essay (45%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (15%) tutorial participation (10%)
The 1949 speech by US president, Harry Truman, declared his country's commitment to the 'development' of the Third World, and began what many consider to be development as an institutional approach to non-Western societies. Anthropology, well established in its study of non-Western societies, was able to offer a rich ethnographic insight into the developing world. Combining ethnographic detail with social science concepts, this unit covers topics such as food crisis, land, environment, cities, fair trade, migration, nation-state, NGOs, poverty and informal economy.
ANTH2627 Medical Anthropology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Prohibitions: ANTH2027 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (30%), 1x3000wd take-home exercise (60%) and tutorial participation (10%)
Medical anthropology is a comparative and ethnographic response to the global influence of biomedicine within diverse cultural worlds. This unit will examine major theoretical approaches, their respective critiques, and the methods that underpin them. Concepts such as 'health/illness', 'disease', 'well-being', 'life-death', and 'body/mind' will be located in a variety of cultural contexts and their implications for different approaches to diagnosis and treatment considered. The unit will include culturally located case studies of major contemporary health concerns such as AIDS.
Textbooks
readings will be available at the University Copy Centre
ANTH2629 Race and Ethnic Relations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Luis Fernando Angosto Ferrandez Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Prohibitions: ANTH2117 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (15%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%) and participation (10%)
A comparative study of race and ethnic group relations. The unit will consider the history of ideas of 'race' and practices of racialising and their relationship to ethnicity. It will draw on studies from various areas including North America, the Caribbean, Japan and Australia.
Textbooks
reading lists will be available at the beginning of lectures
ANTH2630 Indigenous Australians and Modernity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gaynor Macdonald Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (35%), 2x250wd assignments (20%), 1x2hr exam (35%) and tutorial participation (10%)
Australian Aboriginal peoples have always engaged with the 'modern world' but Enlightenment ideas established a colonial context juxtaposing modernity with tradition. Indigenous difference was locked into past-oriented, static and small scale traditions. The unit examines some key concepts of modernity, including progress, civility, change, tradition - and modernity itself - so as to shed light on Australian Indigenous people's experiences, past and present, as colonial subjects. The unit will explore Aboriginal engagement with, for instance, work, vehicles, the law, and the arts (painting, music etc) as practices through which Aboriginal people have sought 'alternative modernities'.
Textbooks
A reader will be available at the University Copy Centre
ANTH2631 Being There: Method in Anthropology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Linda Connor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology plus 12 Senior credit points from Anthropology Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x3000wd fieldwork-based project (60%), and tutorial participation (10%)
Anthropology's distinctive method, termed ethnography, is grounded in long term participation in the cultural contexts that anthropologists describe and analyse. This unit explores the disciplined but open nature of anthropological research and the radically contextual modes of interpretation that are embedded in the lives of its subjects. Issues include: the history of the method; the diverse situations in which anthropologists practice; the way that fieldwork experience shapes the method. Students will devise and report on their own project.
Textbooks
A reader will be available at the University Copy Centre
ANTH2654 Forms of Families

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ryan Schram Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Assessment: 1x100wd terminology quiz (10%), 1x400wd discussion questions (10%), 1x1500wd critical essay (30%), 1x2500wd comparative essay (40%) and tutorial participation (10%)
Where does nature stop and culture begin? This is why anthropologists study kinship. In this unit we will survey the development of this field from its origins to its contemporary form as a critical investigation of how culture shapes the way we think about personhood, relationships, sex, gender and the body. We will compare various types of kinship systems and discuss controversies over kinship - same-sex marriage, single-parent households, cloning, in-vitro fertilization, and alternative forms of family - from a cross-cultural perspective.
ANTH2655 The Social Production of Space

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yasmine Musharbash Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology. Prohibitions: ANTH3911 Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%) and tutorial presentation/participation (15%)
Space/place appears in anthropology as both a product of historically specific social practice and as an irreducible dimension of any social formation. This theoretical tension will be explored through examination of such themes as: the contradiction between the global as abstract space and the local as qualitatively distinct place; struggles over the definition and control of space; space/time as an aspect of any world; centre/periphery and inside/outside as pervasive tropes of social analysis.
Textbooks
reading lists will be available at the beginning of lectures
ANTH2666 History of Anthropological Thought

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jadran Mimica Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Prohibitions: ANTH2501 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (35%) and 1x2500wd essay (65%)
This unit surveys the key thinkers, theories and ethnographic researches that have shaped the historical development of anthropological thought. The central focus is on the interrelationships and differences between the Continental, British and American thinkers and lineages set against the backdrop of general ideas that defined the Western world-views of the last two centuries. This historical trajectory is systematically referred to its much longer tradition of critical thought and coordinated with the topics and debates in contemporary anthropological discourses.
Textbooks
A reader available from the University Copy Centre
ANTH2667 The Anthropology of Religion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ryan Schram Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Anthropology Assessment: 10x100wd reflections (15%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2000wd research essay (45%), tutorial participation (10%).
This Unit will examine various ways anthropologists have theorised religious belief and practice, and we will challenge these ideas by looking at the vast diversity of religious forms. Starting with the major theories of Durkheim, Weber and others, the Unit will focus on what anthropologists have identified as the key elements of religious forms cross-culturally. It will also look at debates around these ideas. Special emphasis will be put on the continuing salience of religious ideas and identities in modernity.
ANTH2804 Social Anthropology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANTH2805 Social Anthropology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANTH2806 Social Anthropology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANTH2810 Social Anthropology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANTH2811 Social Anthropology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ANTH3601 Contemporary Theory and Anthropology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jadran Mimica Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 senior credit points from Anthropology at credit level or above Prohibitions: ANTH3921, ANTH3922 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%) and 1x3500wd essay (60%)
This honours preparation unit will assist students to define their objectives in anthropology and anticipate their honours year through: 1) exploring key concepts of anthropological analysis and critique, 2) increasing their knowledge of the ethnographic method and its contemporary challenges, 3) developing library research skills and experience in formulating a research project.
Textbooks
A reader will be available at the University Copy Centre
ANTH3602 Reading Ethnography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Linda Connor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 senior credit points from Anthropology at credit level or above Prohibitions: ANTH3611, ANTH3612, ANTH3613, ANTH3614 Assessment: 2x3000wd essays (2x50%)
Note: this unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program
Ethnography is grounded on the 'participant observation' of social practice and the interpretation of values and experience in particular social contexts. It makes the strange familiar, and the familiar strange. This unit will focus on the relationship between research methods and design and the development of regionally and thematically specific debates in anthropology.
ANTH4011 Social Anthropology Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Neil Maclean Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week in Semester 1 Prerequisites: 48 senior credit points in Anthropology with at least a credit average grade. Units must include ANTH3601 and ANTH3602. Requirements for the Pass degree must be completed before entry to level 4000 honours units of study. Corequisites: ANTH4012, ANTH4013, ANTH4014 Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words and 6000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Anthropology consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one member of academic staff;
2. two seminars that meet weekly for 2-3 hrs each in Semester 1.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000wds in length. Each seminar requires 6000wds of written work, or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The department will offer the following two Honours seminars in 2013:
Anthropology of the Nation-State;
Nature and Culture.
For more information, contact the Honours Coordinator.
ANTH4012 Social Anthropology Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ryan Schram Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ANTH4011
refer to ANTH4011
ANTH4013 Social Anthropology Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ANTH4012
refer to ANTH4011
ANTH4014 Social Anthropology Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ANTH4013
refer to ANTH4011

Arabic Language and Literature

ARBC1611 Arabic Introductory 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ali Aldahesh Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prohibitions: ARBC1311, ARBC1312, ARBC1101, ARBC1102 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x1000wd mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)
This unit aims to teach Arabic as a living language. It is meant for students with no previous learning experience of the language. The unit is designed to introduce and build up basic language skills: listening and speaking, reading and writing, using modern standard and educated every-day Arabic. Students will learn basic vocabulary, language structures, morphology and syntax of Arabic in context, through lively dialogues, realistic conversational situations, story lines, exercises and drills, rather than formal grammar. On completion of this unit, students progress to ARBC1612 in second semester.
Textbooks
Nijmeh Hajjar, Living Arabic in Context: An Introductory Course, Beirut, 2005
ARBC1612 Arabic Introductory 2B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ali Aldahesh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1101 or ARBC1611 Prohibitions: ARBC1311, ARBC1312, ARBC1102 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%) and class participation (5%)
This unit aims to strengthen students' listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in living Arabic. Emphasis will be on building up communicative ability as well as extending the vocabulary and language structures through realistic dialogues and story lines in modern standard and educated every-day Arabic. Morphology and syntax of Arabic are gradually introduced in context through a structured method of progression, using realistic patterns, exercises and drills, rather than formal grammar. On completion of this unit, students progress to ARBC2613.
Textbooks
Nijmeh Hajjar, Living Arabic in Context: Arabic for Beginners, Stage 2, Sydney, 2004. (Consult the department for textbook and audio CDs)
ARBC2613 Arabic Language and Literature 3B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1102 or ARBC1612 Prohibitions: ARBC1311, ARBC1312, ARBC2633, ARBC2634, ARBC2103 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)
This unit aims to extend students' language skills in Arabic and enable them to appreciate Arabic literary texts. Students will be able to build up their communicative ability and extend their knowledge of modern Arabic vocabulary and structures, through realistic dialogues and class activity, including role-playing. They will be introduced to modern Arabic literature through reading and discussing selected texts by prominent authors, in their societal context. On completion of this unit, students progress to ARBC2614.
Textbooks
Language material and a selection of literary texts will be available (consult the department)
ARBC2614 Arabic Language and Literature 4B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ali Aldahesh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC2103 or ARBC2613 Prohibitions: ARBC2104, ARBC1311, ARBC1312, ARBC2313, ARBC2314, ARBC2633, ARBC2634, ARBC3635, ARBC3636, ARBC3637, ARBC3638 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)
This unit aims at further strengthening students' communicative skills in Arabic, both aural/oral and written, as well as building up their ability to read, appreciate and discuss samples of Arabic literature by prominent authors in their societal context. Students will be able to extend their knowledge of Arabic vocabulary and structures through realistic dialogues, role-playing and the use of a range of recorded material in Arabic. On completion of this unit, students progress to ARBC3615.
Textbooks
Language material and a selection of literary texts will be available (consult the department)
ARBC2633 Arabic Advanced Language & Literature 3A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HSC Arabic Extension or Arabic Continuers or 70% or above in Arabic Beginners (subject to placement test) Prohibitions: ARBC1311 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)
This unit aims to strengthen practical language skills, including writing and translation, to enrich the students' understanding of Arabic literature and culture, develop their analytical and critical skills through reading of a variety of Arabic texts by writers from different Arab countries, focusing on themes of modernity and identity as reflected in modern Arabic essays on political, social and cultural issues and in contemporary Arabic literature in general.
Textbooks
A dossier of texts will be provided
ARBC2634 Arabic Advanced Language & Literature 4A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1311 or ARBC2633 Prohibitions: ARBC1312, ARBC1101, ARBC1102, ARBC1611, ARBC1612 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)
This unit aims to strengthen practical language skills in Arabic, building on the approach followed in semester 1, including writing and translation skills to enrich students' understanding of Arabic literature and culture, and to develop their analytical and critical skills through reading of modern Arabic writers from various Arab countries.
Textbooks
A dossier of texts will be provided
ARBC2811 Arabic Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARBC2812 Arabic Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARBC2813 Arabic Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARBC2814 Arabic Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARBC3615 Arabic Language and Literature 5B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC2104 or ARBC2614 Prohibitions: ARBC2105, ARBC1311, ARBC1312, ARBC2313, ARBC2314, ARBC2315, ARBC2316, ARBC2633, ARBC2634, ARBC3635, ARBC3636, ARBC3637, ARBC3638 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2500wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)
This unit aims to consolidate students' communicative skills, using realistic dialogues in modern standard and educated every-day Arabic, and samples of the Arabic press and electronic media. It equally aims to extend students' knowledge and appreciation of Arabic literature and culture through reading and discussion of representative texts by major Arabic authors in their societal context, with examples from different genres. On completion of this unit, students progress to ARBC3616.
Textbooks
Language material and a selection of literary texts will be available (consult the department)
ARBC3616 Arabic Language and Literature 6B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ali Aldahesh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC2105 or ARBC3615 Prohibitions: ARBC2106, ARBC1311, ARBC1312, ARBC2313, ARBC2314, ARBC2315, ARBC2316, ARBC2633, ARBC2634, ARBC3635, ARBC3636, ARBC3637, ARBC3638 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2500wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)
This unit aims to consolidate students' competence in Arabic through dialogues in modern standard and educated every-day Arabic, reading and listening to material from the contemporary Arabic media, as well as writing and translation tasks relevant to real life situations. This unit equally aims to extend students' knowledge and appreciation of Arabic literature and culture through reading and discussion of further representative texts by major Arabic authors in their societal context, with examples from different genres.
Textbooks
Language material and a selection of literary texts will be available (consult the department)
ARBC3635 Arabic Advanced Translation & Writing 5A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1312 or ARBC2633 Prohibitions: ARBC2313, ARBC1101, ARBC1102, ARBC1611, ARBC1612 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)
This unit aims to develop written fluency in Arabic and English through translation methodology and skills. The unit is designed to further develop students' advanced writing, reading and interpreting skills. Practical tasks will include translation from Arabic into English and vice versa, using a wide range of texts, including creative literature, the press, business and diplomatic correspondence and basic scientific, technical and literary documents.
Textbooks
Consult the department
ARBC3636 Arabic Advanced for Media Studies 6A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1312 or ARBC2633 Prohibitions: ARBC1101, ARBC1102, ARBC1611, ARBC1612, ARBC2314 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)
This unit aims to strengthen advanced practical language skills in Arabic, including writing and communication, with focus on living Arabic for media studies to enrich students' understanding of Arabic media and culture and to develop their practical and critical skills through dealing with a range of material related to the Arabic media, both written and electronic.
Textbooks
Consult the department
ARBC3637 Arabic Advanced Translation & Writing 7A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1312 or ARBC2633 Prohibitions: ARBC2315, ARBC1101, ARBC1102, ARBC1611, ARBC1612 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)
This unit aims to further develop written fluency in Arabic and English through translation methodology and skills. The unit is designed to further strengthen students' advanced writing, reading, translation and interpreting ability. Practical tasks will include translation from Arabic into English and vice versa, using realistic contexts and a wide range of texts, including creative literature, the press, business and diplomatic correspondence and basic scientific, technical and literary documents.
Textbooks
Consult the department
ARBC3638 Arabic Advanced for Media Studies 8A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1312 or ARBC2633 Prohibitions: ARBC2316, ARBC1101, ARBC1102, ARBC1611, ARBC1612 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)
This unit aims to strengthen advanced practical language skills in Arabic, including writing, translation and communication, with focus on living Arabic for media studies to enrich students' understanding of Arabic media and culture and to develop their practical and critical skills through dealing with a range of material related to the Arabic media, both written and electronic.
Textbooks
Consult the department
ARIS4011 Arabic and Islamic Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two seminars, each seminar meets weekly for 2 hours for one semester Prerequisites: Credit average in 48 senior credit points of Arabic and Islamic Studies, including completion of the major and the special entry unit, ARIS3680 Approaches to Arabic and Islamic Studies. Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words and 2500 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Arabic and Islamic Studies consists of:
1.a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet for two hours a week for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 2500 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 50% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 25%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Methodology of Research in Arabic and Islamic Studies (Dr Nijmeh Hajjar)
Practical Advanced Language for Research Purposes (Dr Nijmeh Hajjar)
For more information contact, Dr Nijmeh Hajjar, Honours coordinator.
ARIS4012 Arabic and Islamic Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIS4011
Refer to ARIS4011
ARIS4013 Arabic and Islamic Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIS4012
Refer to ARIS4011
ARIS4014 Arabic and Islamic Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIS4013
Refer to ARIS4011

Arab World, Islam and The Middle East

ARIS1671 Arabs, Islam & Middle East: Introduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lucia Sorbera Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x class presentation (20%), 1x2hr final exam (40%)
This unit provides an introduction to the study of the Arab world, Islam and the Middle East. It focuses on Arab and Islamic society and culture in the Middle East. Main themes include: Geographical setting and historical orientations; environment and society, the Arabs and the world of late antiquity; the importance of Arab trade and seafaring; the rise of Islam: the Prophet Muhammad and the Qur'an, Pillars of Islam and Community, the early Arab Islamic Caliphate; religion and politics in the Islamic tradition, Islamic law and society, women and gender issues in Islam, aspects of Middle Eastern socio-economic and cultural life in the age of the Caliphate as a background to the early modern Middle East up to Ottoman times. On completion of this unit, students proceed to ARIS1672 in Semester 2.
Textbooks
Course readings and bibliography will be available
ARIS1672 Arab-Islamic Civilisation: Introduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lucia Sorbera Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARIS1001 or ARIS1671 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1xclass presentation (20%), 1x2hr final exam (40%)
This unit focuses on Arab and Islamic Learning, Spirituality and Art. Themes include: The scope of classical Arabic learning: Qur'anic studies and Prophetic traditions, the Hellenistic legacy in Arabic learning, Islamic philosophy and sciences, geographical writings and historiography, issues in Islamic theology, role of scholars, the concept of knowledge; contribution of Arabic-speaking Christian scholars to classical Arab intellectual life; Islamic asceticism, mysticism and the Sufi orders; Arab and Islamic aesthetics: religious and secular art, architectural design and decoration, the role of calligraphy, geometry and arabesque.
Textbooks
Course readings and bibliography will be available
ARIS2673 Islam and Muslims in World History

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lucia Sorbera Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARIS1001 or ARIS1671 Prohibitions: ARIS2003 Assessment: 1x2250wd essay (40%), 1x2250wd take-home exercise (40%), class presentation (20%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit of study focuses on the role of Islam in world history through the discussion of issues of intercultural relations and acculturation. It highlights Islam's place in the Mediterranean world; connections with Eastern Christianity, including Byzantium; the Islamic-European encounter in Spain and Sicily and the Crusades from an Arab perspective. The unit deals with the significance of acculturation and adaptation of Islamic traditions in different parts of Africa and Asia and the role of urbanisation and trade in Islamic history.
Textbooks
Course readings, bibliography and brief notes will be available
ARIS2674 Islam and Politics: Modernity Challenges

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lucia Sorbera Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARIS1001 or ARIS1671 Prohibitions: ARIS2004 Assessment: 1x2250wd essay (40%), 1x2250wd take-home exercise (40%), class presentation (20%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit focuses on Islam as a political and cultural force in the modern world, particularly in the Middle East, North Africa and Asia. Issues include: Islamic political thought; the Sunna-Shi'a divergence and the significance of Shi'a Islam; Islamic traditionalism; reform; radicalism; Jihad and 'fundamentalism'; Islamic political movements in Arab countries; Turkey, Iran and Asia; Islam and legitimacy of political regimes; Muslim minorities in the world; current debates on the 'Islamic threat'; 'terrorism'; 'clash of civilisations' and Islamic-Western mutual perceptions.
Textbooks
Course readings, bibliography and brief notes will be available
ARIS2675 Gendering History in the Arab World

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lucia Sorbera Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at Junior level in at least one of the following: Arabic and Islamic Studies, European Studies, European, Middle Eastern or Classical Languages or Studies, English, Government, History, Political Economy, Sociology, Media and Communication, Gender and Cultural Studies. Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x500wd mid semester test (20%), 1x1000wd research project plan (10%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (20%)
This unit situates contemporary debates about gender in the context of the history of the Middle East and North Africa. The unit focuses on a selection of literary and audiovisual productions from Egypt, Iraq, Palestine, Lebanon and the Maghreb countries. Representations of masculinity (and male and female homosexuality) will form an integral part of the analysis. The interactions of gender, culture and history are analysed through feminist, literary, cultural and historiographical criticism.
ARIS2801 Arab World Islam & Middle East Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARIS2802 Arab World Islam & Middle East Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARIS2803 Arab World Islam & Middle East Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARIS2804 Arab World Islam & Middle East Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARIS2805 Arab World Islam & Middle East Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARIS2806 Arab World Islam & Middle East Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARIS3680 Approaches to Arabic and Islamic Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit in ARIS2673 or ARIS3675 or ARIS2003 or ARIS2005, and credit in ARBC2613 or ARBC3635 or ARBC2103 or ARBC2313 Assessment: 1x3000wd essay in English (40%), 1x500wd summary in Arabic or an additional 1000wd assignment in English (20%), 2x1000wd oral presentations in either Arabic or English (40%)
This unit, which is a prerequisite for intending honours students, will provide students with a grounding in approaches, research tools and critical methodologies in various aspects of Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies today and familiarise them with a range of available resources to support research in this field. It will enable students to discuss issues with established researchers and to carry out practical exercises aimed at developing their critical and analytical skills and their ability to embark on their own individual research projects under supervision in specific areas of Arab, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies.
Textbooks
Course readings, bibliography and brief notes will be available
ARIS4011 Arabic and Islamic Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two seminars, each seminar meets weekly for 2 hours for one semester Prerequisites: Credit average in 48 senior credit points of Arabic and Islamic Studies, including completion of the major and the special entry unit, ARIS3680 Approaches to Arabic and Islamic Studies. Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words and 2500 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Arabic and Islamic Studies consists of:
1.a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet for two hours a week for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 2500 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 50% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 25%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Methodology of Research in Arabic and Islamic Studies (Dr Nijmeh Hajjar)
Practical Advanced Language for Research Purposes (Dr Nijmeh Hajjar)
For more information contact, Dr Nijmeh Hajjar, Honours coordinator.
ARIS4012 Arabic and Islamic Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIS4011
Refer to ARIS4011
ARIS4013 Arabic and Islamic Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIS4012
Refer to ARIS4011
ARIS4014 Arabic and Islamic Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIS4013
Refer to ARIS4011

Archaeology

ARCA1001 Ancient Civilisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Alison Betts, Prof Margaret Miller and Dr Ted Robinson Session: Semester 1,Summer Early Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (1x50%) and 2x1hr class tests (each equivalent to 1000wds and each worth 25%) (2x25%)
This unit is a general introduction to the major civilisations of the ancient world - Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome, China, South East Asia, the Indus Valley, Bactria and Margiana (Central Asia). No prior knowledge of any of these societies is presumed. We aim to balance discussing broad issues relevant to all ancient civilisations, and specific cases (sites, material remains) from specific civilisations. By the end of this unit, you should have gained an appreciation of the major achievements and characteristics of many of the world's earliest civilisations.
ARCA1002 Archaeology: An Introduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Martin Gibbs Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr workshop/week (weeks 4-9) Prohibitions: ARPH1001 Assessment: 2x class tests (equivalent to 1000 words) (20%) and 6x workshop exercises (equivalent to 3500 words) (80%)
Archaeology is a dynamic world-wide discipline which draws on both the sciences and humanities to interpret material remains of the human past. This unit introduces key aspects of archaeological method and theory and explores links between archaeological practice and heritage issues of wide public interest based on archaeological case studies. It provides an essential introduction for senior units of study in Archaeology and will also interest anyone with a more general interest in this fascinating and topical field of study.
ARCA2601 Laboratory Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Annie Clarke and Dr Melanie Fillios Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology Prohibitions: ARPH2614 Assessment: 1x3000wd laboratory report (60%), 1x1500wd class test (40%)
An introduction to post-fieldwork archaeological laboratory principles and practices. The unit introduces students to key principles for the effective management and processing of archaeological finds and other materials excavated from archaeological sites, recording and interpretation of data recorded from this material and the application of various methods of analysis which can be used to produce different types of archaeological knowledge and interpretation.
ARCA2602 Field Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Martin Gibbs Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology Prohibitions: ARPH3921 Assessment: 1x3000wd report/lab book (60%) and 1x1000wd class test (40%)
This unit is an essential introduction to the basic principles and skills involved in archaeological fieldwork. A special focus is on the practical aspects of archaeological research design, including sampling and survey strategies. The unit includes lectures and on-campus training in core survey techniques, including site descriptions and field-plans, tape and compass site recording and surveys using dumpy-level. The ethical and legal aspects of archaeological field investigations will also be considered.
ARCA2605 Archaeology of Aboriginal Australia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Hiscock Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology Prohibitions: ARPH2607 Assessment: 1x3500wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd seminar paper (25%) and 1x1000wd in-class test (15%)
An introduction to major research questions and issues in Australian Aboriginal archaeology. The unit examines archaeological evidence for over 40,000 years of Australia's pre-colonial Indigenous history and for interactions between Aboriginal peoples and outsiders from Indonesia, Britain and elsewhere over the last 300 years or so of Australia's colonial history. Case studies will be used to discuss issues of professional ethics and Indigenous community involvement in Australian archaeology.
ARCA2606 Maps, Time and Visualisation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points Prohibitions: ARPH3690 Assessment: 2x1hr in-class tests and 2x2000wd project reports
This unit examines ways in which maps, timelines and other forms of data visualisation are constructed and used to present archaeological data and historical argument, and how digital methods and web delivery have facilitated the use of visualisation and enabled greater user engagement through interaction with online databases, encyclopaedias, collaborative systems, maps, timelines, animations and 3D models. Practical sessions offer students the opportunity to become familiar with simple techniques and software tools for creating and publishing visualisations on the Web.
ARCA2610 Minoans and Mycenaens

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Margaret Miller Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture and 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or 6 junior credit points of Archaeology plus 6 junior credit points of Ancient History Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), tutorial presentation (15%), tutorial work (5%), 2x1hr exams (40%)
Archaeological research since the 19th century discovery and excavation of Knossos and Mycenae continues to expand our understanding about the rich prehistoric cultures of Greece but dimly remembered in later times. Recent shift of attention from palace centres to the economic, social and religious life of the ordinary person is aided by such discoveries as the Cycladic town at Akrotiri. The three main cultures of Bronze Age Greece (ca. 3000-1100 BC) are explored with focus on their characteristic features.
ARCA2612 A Greek Odyssey: The First Millennium BC

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lesley Beaumont Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or 6 junior credit points of Archaeology plus 6 junior credit points of Ancient History or Classical Studies Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%), tutorial/workshop based exercises (15%)
Between 1050 and 146 BC the Aegean world underwent radical transformation. The changes which took place not only affected all aspects of ancient Greek society, but also established the foundations on which modern western civilization would later build. This unit traces the history and development of the Greek world as evidenced by the surviving material culture of the first millennium BC. The unit also examines the resonances of the ancient Aegean still evident in contemporary Australia.
ARCA2613 Athenian Art, Architecture and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or 6 junior credit points of Archaeology plus 6 junior credit points of Ancient History or Classical Studies Prohibitions: ARCL2601 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay, 1xslide test and 1x2hr exam
Athenian art and architecture are examined within their topographical and socio-political context. The chronological focus of study is the Archaic and Classical periods, a time of great and dynamic cultural and socio-political change. Lectures are complemented by regular "hands-on" tutorials in the Nicholson Museum.
ARCA2614 Contact and Exchange in South Italy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ted Robinson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or 6 junior credit points of Archaeology plus 6 junior credit points of Ancient History or Classical Studies Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%) and 2x1hr class tests (equivalent to 1,000 words each) (40%) and tutorial exercises (equivalent to 500 words) (20%)
Ancient South Italy existed at a vital crossroads between the Eastern and Western Mediterranean. From the arrival of the earliest settled farmers in the 7th millennium BC to its conquest by the Romans, the region experienced repeated waves of migrants, visitors, colonists and conquerors, and developed a distinctive and vibrant culture as a result. The Unit will begin its survey in the Neolithic period, but concentrate especially on the Greek/Italian colonial interactions of the first millennium BC.
ARCA2625 Urbanism and Industrial Transition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Roland Fletcher Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/wk, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: ARCA1002 Prohibitions: ARPH2603 Assessment: 3500wd essay (60%), 1000wd tutorial presentation (30%), tutorial participation (10%)
The unit provides an introduction to the development of agrarian-based urbanism worldwide from the 1st millennium BCE and the transition to industrial-based urbanism from the mid 19th century in the European world . An integrated global approach is applied to understanding the operation of cities and the differing constraints on the growth of compact and dispersed urban settlements.The unit of study concludes with an analysis of the implications for contemporary urban life.
ARCA2801 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARCA2802 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARCA2803 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARCA2804 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARCA2805 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARCA2806 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARCA2807 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARCA2808 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARCA3601 Research in Australasian Archaeology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Roland Fletcher Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit average in 24 senior credit points of Archaeology Assessment: 1x4000wd research report (60%), 1x1500wd seminar paper (30%), 1x500wd seminar presentation (10%)
An advanced seminar for students who wish to develop their research, analytical, writing and presentation skills by investigating a key area of contemporary archaeological research. Specific topics will vary from year to year with primary emphasis on Australasian archaeology (Asia, Australia, and the Pacific) placed in global perspective and/or current issues in archaeological theory, method and practice relevant to staff research projects (e.g. history and philosophy of archaeology, spatial analysis, digital methods, public archaeology and heritage studies, historical archaeology, archaeozoology, archaeologies of colonialism).
ARCA3605 Dialogue of Civilizations: East and West

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Javier Alvarez-Mon and Prof Margaret Miller Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week Prerequisites: Credit average in 24 senior credit points of Archaeology Prohibitions: ARNE2005 Assessment: 1x4500wd research paper (65%), 1x1000wd course journal and literature review (25%) and class presentations equivalent to 500wds (10%)
This unit of study introduces the student to the cultural dialogue between the ancient civilizations of the Western Mediterranean world and Near Eastern and Asian civilizations, by examining the material and literary records of ancient western Asia and neighbouring regions. Western cultural stereotypes and prejudices are investigated, as well as notions of cultural identity, assimilation, rejection, and superiority. Problems to be addressed may concern, amongst many, cultural borrowing, funerary traditions, gift-giving, tribute, plundering, arts and coinage, trade, and dress.
ARNE2603 Introduction to the Archaeology of Iran

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Javier Alvarez-Mon Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/weekand 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or 6 junior credit points of Archaeology plus 6 junior credit points of Ancient History or Classical Studies Assessment: 1x2500wd research paper (50%) and 1x2000wd course journal (50%)
An introduction to the art, archaeology, religion, landscape and settlement patterns of the principal cultures inhabiting the Iranian plateau and adjacent regions, with special emphasis on the culture of the Elamites, Persians, Parthians and Sasanians from prehistoric times to the 6th century AD.
ARPH2612 Historical Archaeology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Martin Gibbs Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology Prohibitions: ARPH2702 Assessment: 1x 3000wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd class test (40%)
This unit will introduce students to the international development of historical archaeology since 1960. Because of its explicit links to historiography and documentary scholarship, historical archaeology enjoys a uniquely interdisciplinary perspective, and has been directly influenced by shifts in both anthropology and history. The current practice and international form of historical archaeology will therefore be explored in detail.
ARPH2616 Public Archaeology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Annie Clarke Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology Prohibitions: ARPH2010 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x1000wd seminar write-up (25%), 1x1000wd in-class test (25%)
This unit introduces and discusses the theory and practice of archaeology in the public domain where archaeologists have responsibilities to Indigenous peoples, community groups, clients and government. Australian and other case studies will be used to discuss the public benefits of archaeology and ways in which government policies and legislation and issues surrounding ethics and professionalism interact with popular and public understandings of the past to produce different kinds of archaeological knowledge and practice which have historical and contemporary evidence.
ARPH2617 Analysis of Stone Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Hiscock Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr laboratory sessions/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology Prohibitions: ARPH2517 Assessment: 1x1000wd laboratory notebook (20%), 1x1500wd in-class test (30%), 1x2000wd report/essay (50%)
This unit introduces students to the methods and theory behind the analysis and interpretation of flaked stone technology. Students will develop skills in the identification, classification and recording of stone artefacts which are valuable in consultancy and research archaeology worldwide. Topics will include the origin and development of stone technology in world prehistory, the reductive nature of artefact manufacture, identifying artefact attributes, implement typology and theoretical links between artefacts and human behaviour.
ARCA4011 Archaeology Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week, each seminar meets weekly for 2 hours for one semester (or equivalent) Prerequisites: Credit average or better in 48 senior credit points of Archaeology (up to 18 credit points of cross-listed units admissable), inclusive of ARCA3601 or ARCA3602. Assessment: a thesis of 18000-20000 words and 6000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Please contact relevant Departmental staff for advice and assistance. All students with credit or above results are encouraged to apply for Honours.
The Honours program in Archaeology consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours (or equivalent) each for Semester 1.
The thesis should be of 18,000-20,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6,000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
History and Philosophy of Archaeology (Prof Roland Fletcher)
Approaches to Archaeological Research (Assoc Prof Alison Betts, Dr Annie Clarke, Dr Ted Robinson)
For more information, contact Dr Lesley Beaumont (Chair of Department 2012)/ Dr Annie Clarke (Chair of Department 2013).
ARCA4012 Archaeology Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to ARCA4011 Corequisites: ARCA4011
Refer to ARCA4011
ARCA4013 Archaeology Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to ARCA4011 Corequisites: ARCA4012
Refer to ARCA4011
ARCA4014 Archaeology Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to ARCA4011 Corequisites: ARCA4013
Refer to ARCA4011

Art History

ARHT1001 Art and Experience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Mary Roberts Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x4000wd total essay and tutorial paper (100%)
ARHT1001 and ARHT1002 offer an introduction to the study of art history and theory as it is taught at the Senior and Honours levels in the department. The subject matter covers a wide range of art practices and media, film, design and costume, and includes the examination of art from different cultures. In each unit of study, historical analysis will be combined with discussions of the different methodologies and approaches to the interpretation and study of these visual materials. Art and Experience: the European Tradition will focus on the history of art and architecture in Western Europe from classical antiquity to the early modern period. A key focus will be on recognising the importance of the social, cultural, political and religious purpose an object or building was designed to serve, and the range of meanings the work was intended to embody - and how these change across time.
Textbooks
ARHT1001 Course Reader
ARHT1002 Modern Times: Art and Film

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catriona Moore Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (55%) and 1x1500wd exam (45%)
This unit of study will focus upon the art and visual culture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, examining this historical period in relation to the thematic of the modern. Visual material studied will include painting, film, architecture and costume. As with ARHT1001, historical analysis will be combined with discussions of the different methodologies and approaches to the interpretation and study of these visual materials.
Textbooks
Course Reader
ARHT1801 Art History and Theory Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Keith Broadfoot Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point Junior unit of study in Art History and Theory at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
ARHT2610 Art and Society in Trecento Italy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Louise Marshall Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARHT1001 and ARHT1002 Prohibitions: ARHT2010 Assessment: 1x1000wd visual test (35%), 1x class presentation (10%) 1x3000wd essay (55%)
This unit of study will explore a range of alternative approaches to art produced in Italy during the late thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. Topics to be investigated include: problems of monographic analysis; the implications of contemporary workshop practice; civic, familial and princely patterns of artistic patronage; the meaning of Trecento 'naturalism'; alternatives to the 'Tuscanisation' of fourteenth-century art through a consideration of other centres such as Bologna, Rimini, Verona, Padua and Venice.
Textbooks
Recommended Readings:
ARHT2613 The Art of France

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Mark Ledbury Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARHT1001 and ARHT1002 Prohibitions: ARHT2013 Assessment: 1x1000wd written assignment - review of literature/exhibition (40%), 1x2hr visual test (40%), 1x1500wd equivalent presentation and presentation notes (20%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit of study explores the development of a national tradition of art and architecture in France from the beginnings of absolutism to the eve of the Revolution. Topics of lectures and tutorials include the circumstances leading to the foundation of Academies and the development of academic discourse; the commitment to an official system for educating young artists, both in France and in Rome; the alliance between art and absolutism; the artist and the courtier; the public display of art and the creation of new audiences; the emergence of art criticism and architectural theory; the portrayal of daily life, landscape and erotic subjects in relation to major currents of Enlightenment thought.
Textbooks
Course Reader
ARHT2632 Modern Australian Art and Cinema

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anita Callaway Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) OR (18 junior credit points including ARHT1002 or ENGL1011 or ENGL1025 or ENGL1026) Prohibitions: ARHT2032 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%), 1x1000wd short-answer test (30%)
This unit of study examines Australian art, cinema and popular visual imagery from 1880-1940. Themes to be covered include the landscape tradition and Australian national identity, urban imagery, images of war, the positioning of women, indigenous and migrant cultures, the fledgling Australian film industry and related responses to issues of modernity and modernism. Students will be encouraged to work with the University art collections.
Textbooks
ARHT2632 Course Reader
ARHT2633 Postwar Australian Art and Film

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Keith Broadfoot Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARHT1001 and ARHT1002 Prohibitions: ARHT2033 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (50%), 2x1000wd tutorial paper (2x25%)
This unit of study traces the shifting relations between modern art, modernism and postmodernism in Australia. These are examined against a field of other cultural, social and political discourses. Issues addressed include artists' responses to World War II, the Cold War and Vietnam; postwar migration and multiculturalism; urban imagery; contemporary Koori art and Aboriginality in art by white Australians; ongoing shifts in the treatment of traditional subjects such as landscape, art and ecology; feminist, gay and lesbian cultural politics; art criticism; art and electronic technologies.
ARHT2636 Contemporary Indigenous Australian Art

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Roger Benjamin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARHT1001 and ARHT1002 Prohibitions: ARHT2036 Assessment: 1x4000-4500wd essay and 1x exhibition (100%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit studies the efflorescence of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art, which makes up over half of today's Australian art market. While providing a grounding in major movements like Papunya Tula (from 1971) and bark painting in Arnhem Land, the focus will be on critical and theoretical issues affecting art practice today: questions of appropriation and copyright, the relationship of art to native title and reconciliation, the market for Indigenous art (from prestigious auctions to tourist shops), the politics of curatorial practice, the changing status of women artists, the Indigenous use and re-use of photography, and the relevance of postmodern and postcolonial theories in reading urban art. Key figures treated will include Tracy Moffatt, Gordon Bennett, Rover Thomas and Emily Kngwarreye. Certain classes will be conducted at the Art Gallery of New South Wales or the Museum of Contemporary Art. Lecturers will include prominent Indigenous curators and artists.
Textbooks
Recommended Readings:
ARHT2640 Modern and Contemporary Asian Art

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Berghuis Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) or (ASNS1001 and ASNS1002) or (ASNS1001 and ASNS1101) Prohibitions: ARHT2040 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd seminar paper (30%), participation (10%)
In Asia there has developed both the nationalist art of a series of modernising states and a counter-establishment art which has frequently been formally modern. Students will learn how to analyse art works and institutions in terms of critical notions of modernity which arise in these Asian contexts but which do not require projection from outside. Focus will chiefly be on China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and India since the 1850s. Other examples will be drawn from Japan, Thailand and Indonesia.
Textbooks
ARHT2640 Course Reader
ARHT2641 Art and Archaeology of South East Asia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Adrian Vickers, Dr Martin Polkinghorne Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from Junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook. Prohibitions: ARHT2041 Assessment: 1x1500wd site, building or artwork report (33%), 1x4500wd long essay (67%)
The focus of this unit of study is the art and archaeology of the medieval civilisations of Southeast Asia, particularly Angkor, that continue to have an effect on the present day issues of the region. Through explorations of text and material culture this unit will examine major themes in the development and transformation of these 'states'. Themes addressed include; the influence of India and China, Hindu-Buddhist religious syncretism in early Southeast Asia, the development of trade links prior to 1500, peripheral communities and minorities, and the historiography of Southeast Asia.
Textbooks
Recommended Readings:
ARHT2652 From Silent to Sound Cinema

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laleen Jayamanne Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARHT1001 and ARHT1002 OR 18 junior credit points including ARHT1002 or ENGL1011 or ENGL1025 or ENGL1026 Prohibitions: ARHT2052 Assessment: 1x1500wd film analysis (30%), 1x2500wd essay (70%)
Note: Film Studies Core Unit. This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Examining cinema as a manifestation of modernity, this unit of study contextualizes film as commodity, industry, institution and mass production of the senses. These concepts will be explored through a study of early American cinema and the Weimar cinema of Germany. The focus is on the aesthetics of the genres of Slapstick, Melodrama, and Horror/Fantasy, studied within an understanding of the historical and industrial context of each national cinema.
Textbooks
Recommended Readings:
ARHT2653 Memory of the World: Key Films

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laleen Jayamanne Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARHT1001 and ARHT1002 OR 18 junior credit points including ARHT1002 or ENGL1011 or ENGL1025 or ENGL1026 Prohibitions: ARHT2053 Assessment: 1x1500wd film analysis (30%), 1x2500wd essay (70%)
1. A historical study of independent cinema, or New Wave movements in post-World War II Europe, including Italian Neo- Realism, the French New Wave and New German Cinema among others. 2. The study of Gilles Deleuze's thesis about these cinematic movements and concepts. 3. A study of the idea of Epic cinema cross-culturally so as to understand how memory is erased, sustained and created anew by film.
Textbooks
A Resource book, available from the University Copy Centre
ARHT2657 Contemporary Hollywood

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith, Dr Bruce Isaacs (Summer) Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARHT1001 and ARHT1002 OR 18 junior credit points including ARHT1002 or ENGL1011 or ENGL1025 or ENGL1026 Prohibitions: ARHT2057 Assessment: 1x3000wd research essay (60%) 1x1500wd review essay (30%) tutorial participation (10%)
This unit of study will investigate the last two decades of the cinema of the USA, including Hollywood. Students will be introduced to the work of a number of established and emerging American filmmakers, to the work of a number of important film critics, and to issues concerning the theory and practice of film criticism. Critical and analytical focus will centre on the changing relation of subjectivity and time in independent cinema. Films that explore questions of subjectivity and that experiment with narrative structure will be featured.
Textbooks
Course Reader will be available for purchase at the University Copy Centre
ARHT2671 Art, Travel, Empires

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Mary Roberts Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARHT1001 and ARHT1002 Prohibitions: ARHT2071 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd visual test (30%), class participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
In this unit of study we examine Orientalist art and the culture of travel from a post-colonial perspective. As well as the work of major artists (Delacroix, Gerome and J.F.Lewis), we will place particular emphasis upon photography, as well as international exhibitions, travel literature and film. Diverse European constructions of the exotic Orient will be examined including the distinctive contribution of women Orientalists. In this unit, the European canon of Orientalism is resituated through the introduction of counter-narratives and alternative images made by indigenous artists and patrons.
Textbooks
Recommended Readings:
ARHT2810 Art History and Theory Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Keith Broadfoot Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Art History and Theory at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Art History and Theory.
ARHT2811 Art History and Theory Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Keith Broadfoot Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Art History and Theory at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Art History and Theory.
ARHT2812 Art History and Theory Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Keith Broadfoot Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Art History and Theory at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Art History and Theory.
ARHT2813 Art History and Theory Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Keith Broadfoot Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Art History and Theory at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Art History and Theory.
ARHT2814 Art History and Theory Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Keith Broadfoot Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Art History and Theory at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Art History and Theory.
ARHT2815 Art History and Theory Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Keith Broadfoot Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Art History and Theory at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Art History and Theory.
ARHT2816 Art History and Theory Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Keith Broadfoot Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Art History and Theory at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Art History and Theory.
ARHT2817 Art History and Theory Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Keith Broadfoot Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Art History and Theory at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Art History and Theory.
ARHT4011 Art History and Theory Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Mark Ledbury (Semester 1), Dr Catriona Moore (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: Credit average or better in 48 credit points in Art History and Film Studies senior units. If you do not have this prerequisite please contact the Honours coordinator to determine possible waiving of the prerequisite. Assessment: 1x18000-20000wd thesis (60%), 2x6000-8000wd written works from the seminars (2x20%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Art History and Theory consists of: 1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff, 2. two seminars (Art is the Issue and Analysing the Visual) that meets weekly for two hours each semester. The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent. The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
ARHT4012 Art History and Theory Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Mark Ledbury (Semester 1), Dr Catriona Moore (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARHT4011
Refer to ARHT4011
ARHT4013 Art History and Theory Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Mark Ledbury (Semester 1), Dr Catriona Moore (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARHT4012
Refer to ARHT4011
ARHT4014 Art History and Theory Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Mark Ledbury (Semester 1), Dr Catriona Moore (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARHT4013
Refer to ARHT4011

Arts

ARTS2600 Internship 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kate Murphy Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main,Winter Main Classes: 4x2-hr workshops, 15-day/120-hr internship Assessment: 4x400wd reflective journals (20%), 1x2500wd final project report (60%), attendance (20%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: only available to incoming Study Abroad students
This unit is based around a project report arising from issues encountered during a 15-day internship project and through a professional development program designed to provide students with the resources to enhance their intern experience.
Students are required to attend 4 workshops which cover: Australian business culture, management styles, cross cultural business communication, teamwork and reflective learning. An interactive approach will be used in the workshops to enable students to draw on their own experiences.
ARTS2601 Internship 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kate Murphy Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x2-hr workshops, 15-day/120-hr internship Assessment: 4x400wd reflective journals (20%), 1x2500wd final project report (60%), attendance (20%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: only available to incoming Study Abroad students
This unit is based around a project report arising from issues encountered during a 15-day internship project and through a professional development program designed to provide students with the resources to enhance their intern experience.
Students are required to attend 4 workshops which cover: Australian business culture, management styles, cross cultural business communication, teamwork and reflective learning. An interactive approach will be used in the workshops to enable students to draw on their own experiences.
ARTS2801 Arts Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARTS2802 Arts Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARTS2803 Arts Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ARTS2804 Arts Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Asian Studies

ASNS1601 Introduction to Asian Cultures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Stavros Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%), tutorial exercises (20%)
This introductory unit explores the histories and cultures of Asia across time, up to the modern era. The curriculum aims to provide both the essential knowledge and intellectual skills necessary for more advanced study of Asia, and to lay the groundwork for comparative investigation of trans-Asian phenomena. Topics and themes may include: religion, ritual, and philosophical thought; sacred kings and capitals; hierarchy and social order; family, kinship and gender systems; art, architecture, and archaeology.
ASNS1602 Modernity in Asia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lionel Babicz Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x1000wd tutorial presentation and abstract (20%)
Asia has undergone dramatic and rapid modernisation since the eighteenth century. Religious change, state-formation, political and social movements, gender and family, consumer culture, rural development, urban culture, and modern class structure are some of the cultural, social, economic and political aspects of Asia's social transformation. Through the study of selected Asian societies, this unit will examine some of these aspects in the contexts of colonialism, nationalism, postcolonial economic development, and globalisation.
ASNS1801 Asian Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ASNS2613 Chinese Thought

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendi Adamek Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook Assessment: 1x1250wd mid semester draft (25%), 1x500wd oral presentation (10%), 1x1750wd research essay (35%), 1x1000wd mid semester test (20%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit offers students the opportunity to explore China's major traditions of philosophy and practice through English translations of key texts as well as authoritative secondary studies. The main foci of the unit include the following major areas: diversity and polemics in early Chinese thought, developments in Daoism, Buddhist thought and influence, and Neo-Confucian (Daoxue) thought.
ASNS2618 Remaking Chinese Society, 1949-Present

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eileen Walsh Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook Prohibitions: ASNS2118 Assumed knowledge: Students with no prior knowledge of modern Chinese history are encouraged to read an introductory textbook (e.g., Edwin E. Moise. Modern China: A History. Second edition. Longman, 1994) before the start of the semester. Assessment: classwork (15%), 1x2000wd essay (35%), 1xoral presentation (15%), 1x1000wd writing assignment (15%), 1x1hr test (20%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The history of the People's Republic of China comprises two periods. In the Maoist era (1949-1978), the Communist-led government attempted to build a centrally planned, socialist society in which politics dominated people's daily lives. In the post-Mao era (since 1978), by contrast, the socialist institutions have largely been dismantled in pursuit of a market-based alternative. This unit of study explores key social, political, cultural and economic features of both periods and analyses the problems and paradoxes of transition.
Textbooks
Maurice Meisner. Mao's China and After: A History of the People's Republic. Third edition. New York: Free Press, 1999.
ASNS2626 Religious Traditions of South Asia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Allon Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hour lectures and 1x1 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook Prohibitions: RLST2003 Assessment: 1x2500 word essay (40%), tutorial paper and presentation equivalent to 1000 words (25%), exam (30%), class participation (5%)
This unit introduces themes in South Asian religions from the Indus Valley Civilisation onward. Attention is paid to the social and cultural contexts in which Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism emerged. Goddess traditions are discussed, as are concepts such as tantra, yoga and meditation, karma and rebirth and dharma. Texts such as Bhagavat Gita are also introduced. A focus will be on the implications of Classical India for an understanding of contemporary Asian cultures, particularly those of South and Southeast Asia.
ASNS2631 Origins of Japanese Tradition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Stavros Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook. Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x1500wd tutorial presentation (20%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%), participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit explores the historical validity of key motifs of Japanese traditions. Through the liberal exploration of primary historical sources including texts, pictorial sources and material artifacts, students will learn of such diverse topics as early religion, imperial authority, the lives of the court and military elites (samurai), Zen monastic practice, medieval aesthetics, geisha, and the tea ceremony. By separating stereotype and cliche from history, we will attempt to construct a more sober yet ultimately more viable narrative of early Japanese history and culture.
ASNS2632 Modern Japanese Social History

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Michael Lewis Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook Prohibitions: ASNS2308 Assessment: 1x class presentation (20%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x1.5-hr mid-semester exam (30%), 1x test (10%), continuous assessment, including class participation and writing tasks (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit of study will begin with examination of social aspects of the Meiji reforms, evaluating interpretations of their aims and effects. The focus will then turn to the emergence of new social forces in the twentieth century, including industrial workers, an urban middle class and a women's movement. We will also explore changes in daily life and attitudes to work and leisure as urbanisation and industrialisation progressed and assess the effects of the Second World War and the Occupation.
ASNS2641 Traditional Korea

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook Prohibitions: ASNS2501 Assessment: presentation and contribution to tutorial discussions (20%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), and 1x2hr final exam or essay (equivalent to 2000wds) (40%)
This unit of study aims to introduce Korea's historical experience from antiquity to the early phase of the Choson dynasty (1392-1910). Topics include sources and historiography of early Korea; foundation myths and legends of the Three Korean Kingdoms; process of state formation and subsequent political developments; religious ideology, focusing on Buddhism; and cultural and social traditions of Korea from the 4th to the 15th century. These topics will enable students to understand and appreciate the uniqueness of Korean identity.
Textbooks
Carter J. Eckert, et. al., Korea Old and New: A History (Seoul: Ilchokak Publishers)
ASNS2642 Modern Korea

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook. Prohibitions: ASNS2502 Assessment: presentation and contribution to tutorial discussions (20%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x2hr final exam (40%)
This unit aims to introduce some of the major issues in the history of Korea in the late 19th century and the last century. Topics include contradictions of the late Choson dynasty society; opening of Korea to the West and Japan and the attendant wave of reforms and rebellions; Japan's colonial rule; Korea's fight for freedom; liberation and division of Korea in 1945 and the subsequent process of nation-building in the two Koreas.
ASNS2651 Asian Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ASNS2652 Asian Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ASNS2653 Asian Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ASNS2654 Asian Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ASNS2655 Asian Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ASNS2656 Asian Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ASNS2660 Islam, Trade & Society-Arabia to SE Asia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Adrian Vickers Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts Handbook. Prohibitions: ASNS2402 Assessment: class participation (15%), tutorial writing tasks and essays (equivalent to 2500 wds), (45%), 1x2-hour final exam (equivalent to 2000 wds), (40%).
This unit of study will examine the commercial, religious and cultural relations between the Islamic world of West Asia and Southeast Asia between the ninth century and the present day. Some attention will be paid to the role of India in these relationships. The unit of study will explore the development of Islamic commercial, political, religious and social ideas and practices, and examine the economic, political, religious and social conditions associated with the localisation of these ideas and practices in Southeast Asia.
ASNS2663 Social Activism in Southeast Asia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Michele Ford Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook. Assessment: class participation (20%), 1x1hr in-class test (equivalent to 1000wds) (20%), 1xessay portfolio (equivalent to 1000wds) (15%), 1x2500wd essay (45%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit examines country-specific and transnational social movements in Southeast Asia, including those focused on labour, women, the environment and identity. During the semester we will explore how these movements emerged, what they have sought to achieve, and how successful they have been in promoting social change in the Southeast Asian region. The unit adopts a multi-disciplinary approach based on contemporary case study material from Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines and Singapore.
ASNS2664 Southeast Asia Transformed

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Adrian Vickers Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week, 1x1-hr mixed tutorial/online learning/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook. Assessment: 1xresearch report (consisting of in-class presentation equivalent to 1000wds, (15%) and 2000wd write-up, (30%)(45% total) , 1x2000wd essay (45%), class participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Social change in Southeast Asia involves shifts in relations of production and consumption. This unit examines these shifts first through tracing the colonial origins of present-day relations of production, and then through assessing the changes in social life since the 1950s. Important features of these changes include the decline of agriculture, the growth of new kinds of industry such as clothing production and tourism, and new patterns of consumption generated by the rise of middle-class lifestyles in the region.
ASNS2670 Mass Media in East Asia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ki-Sung Kwak Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook Prohibitions: KRNS2600, ASNS2600 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial paper (30%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2hr final exam (40%)
This unit introduces students to the media industry and policies in selected countries in East Asia, namely Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea and Taiwan. In addressing the topics, the main features of media in the region are discussed and compared. The unit will be multi-disciplinary, covering various aspects of mass media in the region. These include the social and cultural role of the media, political and economic justification of state control, and implications of the emergence of new communication technologies.
ASNS2672 Japan in East Asia from 1840 until Today

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lionel Babicz Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook Assessment: 2xin-class quizzes (equivalent to 500wds each) (10%), 1x2hr exam (40%), 1xgroup presentation (equivalent to 500wds) (20%), 1x1500wd essay (30%)
This unit inserts the modern and contemporary history of Japan inside its East Asian context. We will examine a dozen key events and subjects pertaining to the relations between Japan, China and Korea, from the 1840 Opium War until today. Doing so, we will touch many sensitive and controversial topics, become aware of the differing historical consciousness prevalent in these three countries, and understand why the historical question constitutes a major political issue in East Asia.
ASNS2677 Beyond the Geisha/Samurai Binary

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rebecca Suter Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook. Assessment: participation (10%), 3x500wd in-class quizzes (30%), 1x1000wd response paper (25%), 1x2000wd research paper (35%)
Foreign perceptions of Japan cluster around two stereotypes: feminized images of elegance and submissiveness, epitomized by geisha, and hypermasculine images of violence, exemplified by samurai. A long tradition of gender subversion, cross-dressing, and androgyny in Japanese culture speaks for a more nuanced vision of masculinity and femininity. Throughout the unit, we will examine the formation and subversion of gender roles as they emerge in a variety of classical and contemporary Japanese fiction and nonfiction genres.
Textbooks
The Changelings (Torikaebaya Monogatari), trans. Rosette F. Willig. Stanford University Press, 1983
ASNS3618 Popular China

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from junior level Asian Studies, or other subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook Assessment: classwork (10%), 1x1500-2000wd essay (40%), 1xoral presentation based on work for essay (20%), other writing assignment (e.g. portfolio with essay, total of 2000wds) (30%)
This unit of study introduces students to popular culture in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora. From film to television, from music to theatre, from print media to the Internet and from popular literature to visual arts, this unit explores popular Chinese culture as it is generated in Chinese societies and lived by Chinese people. It will cover a range of critical and theoretical perspectives to analyse these phenomena.
ASNS3690 Approaches to Research in Asian Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Olivier Ansart Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit average or above in a minimum of 30 senior credit points of Asian studies or Asian language Prohibitions: ASNS3902, JPNS3902, CHNS3902, INMS3902 Assessment: classwork (20%), 1x3000wd research proposal (40%), 1xbibliographical exercise (equivalent to 1000wds) (10%), 1xpresentation based on draft proposal (10%), critical reviews or other written assignments (equivalent to 2000wds) (20%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program
This unit gives students the opportunity to undertake broad background reading in theory and methodology relevant to Asian Studies. The unit trains students to discuss published work exemplifying a range of approaches to humanistic and/or social scientific research. It thus provides models on which students can draw in creating their own research proposal.
Textbooks
Course reader available from the University Copy Centre
ASNS4011 Asian Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Adrian Vickers Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two seminars, each seminar meets weekly for 2 hours for one semester Prerequisites: Credit average or better in 48 senior credit points of Asian Studies, including completion of the major and ASNS3690 Approaches to Research in Asian Studies. Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words and 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Asian Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Semester 1: Theory and Method in Asian Studies (Dr Olivier Ansart)
Semester 2: Engaging Asia (Assoc Prof Michele Ford)
For more information, contact Prof Adrian Vickers, Honours coordinator.
ASNS4012 Asian Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ASNS4011
Refer to ASNS4011
ASNS4013 Asian Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ASNS4012
Refer to ASNS4011
ASNS4014 Asian Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ASNS4013
Refer to ASNS4011

Australian Literature

ASLT2602 Revolutionary Writing?: 1960s and beyond

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bernadette Brennan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from Table A Prohibitions: ASLT2002 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%) and 1x3000wd take-home exercise (70%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The 1960s were a time of international cultural and social upheaval. A new range of cultural influences, drugs, pop art, sexual, women's and gay liberation, and the predominantly American counter-culture, influenced a new generation of Australian writers. Bush realism gave way to previously censored subject material - sex, drugs, anti-Vietnam War sentiment - and innovative forms of writing. This unit of study investigates these issues through the works of some of the key writers of this period.
Textbooks
David Malouf, 'An Imaginary Life';
ASLT2619 Australian Gothic

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Kirkpatrick Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from Table A Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), 1x oral presentation, 1x500wd written summary (20%)
From the earliest days of European colonisation, alongside visions of its promise, Australia has also been seen as the worst of all possible worlds, a hellish place of exile where nature seemed uncannily strange or hostile. The 'gothic' has offered a powerful means of representing this dystopian theme. This unit examines the gothic mode in Australian literature and film from the nineteenth century to the present, taking in such issues as 'Weird Melancholy', ghosts, bunyips, badlands and postcolonial (dis)enchantment.
Textbooks
Ken Gelder and Rachael Weaver (eds), 'The Anthology of Colonial Australian Gothic Fiction' (Melbourne University Press);
ASLT2622 Australian Modernism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Robert Dixon Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from Table A Prohibitions: ASLT2601 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x3000wd take-home exercise (70%)
By 1900 Australia was one of the most urbanised countries in the world and embraced modern life - city living, new technologies, the mass media - with a passion second only to that of the USA. Focusing on the early to mid-twentieth century, this unit explores literary responses to Australian modernity within both popular and high culture, from the poetry of urban life to experimental fiction, together with some of the relationships between writing and other art forms.
Textbooks
May include works by Christopher Brennan, Henry Lawson, Lesbia Harford, Katharine Susannah Prichard, Kenneth Slessor, Xavier Herbert, Marjorie Barnard, Patrick White, James McAuley, the Jindyworobak poets, and others
ASLT4011 Australian Literature Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Robert Dixon Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: Credit or above in 48 Senior credit points from Australian Literature including ENGL3655 Assessment: 1x15000wd thesis (40%), 3x6000wd written work or its equivalent (60%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Australian Literature consists of a thesis written under the supervision of one, or more, members of
academic staff and three seminars, selected from a range of Australian literature options, that meet once a week for two
hours. Students would usually do two seminar options in their first semester, and one in their second semester. One of the first semester options is assessed, in part, through participation in the English department's honours conference. For more information, contact Professor Robert Dixon, Honours Coordinator in Australian Literature.
ASLT4012 Australian Literature Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Robert Dixon Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ASLT4011
Refer to ASLT4011
ASLT4013 Australian Literature Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Robert Dixon Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ASLT4012
Refer to ASLT4011
ASLT4014 Australian Literature Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Robert Dixon Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ASLT4013
Refer to ASLT4011

Biblical Studies

BBCL1001 Reading Bible: Narrative, Law and Ritual

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Assessment: class participation (10%), 1xtutorial presentation and report (equivalent to 1500wds) (30%), 1xresearch essay (equivalent to 2000wds) (30%), 1x2hr exam (30%)
This unit provides an introduction to the study of the Bible, focusing on understanding the literary techniques biblical authors used to convey their message when writing narrative, legal and ritual texts. The first five books of the Bible are the focus of textual study in this semester. There are weekly tutorials at which students present papers.
BBCL1002 Biblical Themes: Joshua to Kings

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Assessment: class participation (10%), 1xtutorial presentation and report (equivalent to 1500wds) (30%), 1xresearch essay (equivalent to 2000wds) (30%), 1x2hr exam (30%)
This unit focuses specifically on narrative books of the Hebrew Bible including Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings and Chronicles. The unit focuses on the themes of these biblical books, as well as exploring the historical background of the texts and the events they describe. Attention will be directed to other relevant writings of the period in the Ancient Near East. There are weekly tutorials at which students present papers.
BBCL2607 Biblical Poetic Books

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ari Lobel Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: BBCL1001 or BBCL1002 or HBRW1112 or HBRW2632 Assessment: 1x1200wd tutorial report (35%) 1x3300wd essay (65%)
This unit examines the Biblical Poetic Books such as Psalms, the Song of Songs and Lamentations. The main focus of the course is on how the literary conventions of the genre of Hebrew poetry are used by the poets to set out the theological and philosophical concepts the texts are designed to express. These literary conventions will be studied in the light of other Ancient Near Eastern literature of a similar genre.
BBCL2608 Biblical Wisdom Literature

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ari Lobel Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: BBCL1001 or BBCL1002 or HBRW1112 or HBRW2632 Assessment: 1x1200wd tutorial report (35%), 1x3300wd essay (65%)
This unit focuses on the Biblical Wisdom books such as Proverbs, Job and Ecclesiastes. The main focus of the course is on the literary, philosophical and religious aspects of the texts. Issues addressed will include whether the books present a dialectic of orthodoxy (Proverbs) versus challenges to that orthodoxy (Ecclesiastes and Job). Additionally, the unit will explore the relationship between the core Biblical Wisdom books and other literature of similar genre, such as Ben Sira and various writings from Qumran.
BBCL2609 Historical Jesus to Written Gospels

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young, Dr John Dickson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: BBCL1001 or BBCL1002 or RLST2624 or MGRK2675 or MGRK2676 Assessment: 2000wd research essay (40%), 1xtutorial presentation and 1000wd paper (25%), 1x1.5hr exam (equivalent to 1500wds) (35%)
This unit examines the relationship between the historical person of Jesus of Nazareth and the literary-theological achievement of the early Christian Gospels (including non-canonical Gospels). Students are encouraged to apply rigorous historical method and careful literary analysis in order to gain a nuanced understanding of how the leader of a Jewish renewal movement became the object of devotion in earliest Christianity. The unit will read Biblical texts in English translation.
BBCL2610 The New Testament as Literature

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young, Dr Greg Clarke Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: BBCL1001 or BBCL1002 or RLST2624 or MGRK2675 or MGRK2676 Assessment: 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1xtutorial presentation and 1000wd paper (25%), 1x1.5hr exam (equivalent to 1500wds) (35%)
This unit of study provides an overview of the New Testament as a literary and theological work, seeking to understand both the early Christian 'story' and the various modes in which it was retold and applied in the first century CE. Students explore the various genres of NT literature, including 'gospel', epistolary forms, parable and apocalyptic. Particular attention is paid to reader-response criticism of the Gospels and intertextuality in the NT epistles. Documents will be read in English translation.
BBCL2801 Biblical In-Country Study A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Approved course in an overseas tertiary level institution.
BBCL2802 Biblical In-Country Study B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Approved course in an overseas tertiary level institution.
BBCL4011 Biblical Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ari Lobel Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two seminars in semester 1 and one seminar in semester 2, each two hours per week Prerequisites: Credit average or better in 48 senior credit points from Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies including completion of the major. These credit points must include 24 senior credit points from Biblical Studies and at least 12 senior credit points in Classical Hebrew. Assessment: A thesis of 15000 words and 5000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Biblical Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars in semester 1 and one seminar in semester 2, each two hours per week.
The thesis should be of 15000 words in length. Each seminar will require 5000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 40% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Biblical Themes (Dr Ari Lobel)
Biblical Texts in Hebrew (Assoc Prof Ian Young / Dr Ari Lobel)
The Book of Daniel (Assoc Prof Ian Young)
For more information, contact Dr Ari Lobel, Honours coordinator.
BBCL4012 Biblical Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ari Lobel Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: BBCL4011
Refer to BBCL4011
BBCL4013 Biblical Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ari Lobel Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: BBCL4012
Refer to BBCL4011
BBCL4014 Biblical Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ari Lobel Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: BBCL4013
Refer to BBCL4011

Buddhist Studies

BDST1602 Introduction to Buddhism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendi Adamek, Dr Mark Allon Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: RLST2609, RLST2610 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1xtutorial oral presentation (15%), 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%), 1x1500wd exam (25%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit introduces Buddhist traditions from their Indian origins to developments elsewhere in Asia, such as Theravada Buddhism in Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand and Cambodia, and Mahayana and Vajrayana (Tantric) Buddhism in Tibet, China, Korea and Japan. Students will study literary, philosophical, social, cultural, artistic and contemplative expressions of Buddhism, and are introduced to academic approaches within Buddhist Studies. Emphasis is laid upon understanding Buddhist writings and practices in larger doctrinal, historical and cultural contexts.
BDST2613 Zen and Chan Buddhism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendi Adamek Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Handbook Assessment: 1x1250wd mid semester draft (25%), 1xoral presentation (equivalent to 500wd) (10%), 1x1750wd research essay (35%), 1x1000wd mid semester test (20%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit explores the thought and practice of Zen (Japanese) and Chan (Chinese) Buddhism. In the first part of the unit we examine the formation of Chan Buddhism in China. In the second half we focus on two major figures in the history of Japanese Zen (Dogen and Hakuin). We then turn to key transitions in the 20th century.
BDST2615 Buddhism and Contemporary Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendi Adamek Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from subject areas listed in Table A in the Faculty of Arts Handbook Assessment: 1x1250wd mid-semester draft (25%), 1xoral presentation (equivalent to 500wd) (10%), 1x1750wd research essay (35%), 1x1000wd critical summary (20%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit compares Buddhist and contemporary theories of human agency. The three main topics covered are social ethics, complex systems (like social networks and ecosystems), and philosophies of mind. Traditional Buddhist concepts like karma, interdependence, and co-dependent arising are considered in comparison with contemporary theories on feedback loops and interaction as constitutive of phenomena. Drawing from current research, material for this unit may include studies of social engagement, environmental issues, economic systems, and cognitive science.

Celtic Studies

CLST2601 Defining the Celts

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x2-hr exam (50%)
The 'Celts' are any of those peoples of Europe who speak or spoke a Celtic language. By the Iron Age the Celtic peoples were spread across Europe and across the course of millennia have given rise to a number of European nations and cultures-including the Irish, the Welsh and the Bretons. This unit explores definitions of the Celts, examining their history and development, and provides an overview of their languages.
CLST2602 Old Irish 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: CLST2606 Assessment: 1x2500wd grammar, metrics and translation exercise (50%), 1x2hr exam (50%)
The unit seeks to give students further insights about Old Irish, building on those achieved by taking Beginners' Old Irish (or equivalent elsewhere). The main focus remains on the grammar of the language, as well as its phonology and orthography; an outline is provided of the history of Irish. Further key texts are read and explicated; the complex metrical patterns of the magnificent poetry are presented.
CLST2603 Middle Welsh 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: CLST2604 Assessment: 1x2500wd grammar, metrics and translation exercise (50%), 1x2hr exam (50%)
Building on the knowledge acquired by following Beginners' Middle Welsh (or equivalent elsewhere), the unit seeks to give students further insights about Middle Welsh. The main focus remains on the grammar of the language, as well as its phonology and orthography; an outline is provided of the history of Welsh. Further key texts are read and explicated; the complex metrical patterns of the beautiful poetry are presented.
CLST2604 Middle Welsh 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Assessment: 1x2500wd grammar and translation exercise (50%), 1x2-hr exam (50%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (advanced) degree programme
Middle Welsh was the language spoken and written in Wales in the Middle Ages (from about the twelfth to the fourteenth century). The most famous text surviving in Middle Welsh is the Mabinogion, a compilation of mythical and legendary material often of much earlier date. In this unit students will develop a knowledge of Middle Welsh grammar and vocabulary and learn to read texts in Middle Welsh.
CLST2605 Celts in History

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Assessment: 1x3500wd seminar paper (70%), 1x2500wd weekly journal (30%)
Finding the Celts in History from c.500 B.C. to the present raises issues of the extent of invasion or migration that has occurred in the past and its role in cultural change, indeed the very nature of cultural change itself. These will be addressed from written sources, material remains and genetic evidence. While this unit stands on its own, its topics have been carefully selected to allow students who have done CLST2601 to explore further the Celtic world.
CLST2606 Old Irish 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Assessment: 1x2500wd grammar and translation exercise (50%), 1x2hr exam (50%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (advanced) degree program
Old Irish was the language spoken and written in Ireland in the early Middle Ages and is preserved in a range of records, from Ogham stones to manuscripts. In this unit students will develop a knowledge of Old Irish grammar and vocabulary and learn to read texts in Old Irish.
CLST2607 Modern Irish Linguistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%), 1x2000wd essay (50%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (advanced) degree program
The unit develops students' knowledge of linguistics through the detailed study of Modern Irish. The grammar and linguistics of Modern Irish form the major focus; students will bring to the unit a background in language study and/or linguistics. The unit will consider the ways in which Modern Irish differs from other Western European languages, studying syntax and phonology.
CLST2608 Modern Welsh Language and Culture 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Assessment: 2x1500wd essays (46%), 1x2000wd written exam (46%), 1x500wd oral exam (8%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (advanced) degree programme
The Welsh language has one of the oldest literary traditions in Europe. This unit will introduce students to this culture by providing them with the basic structure and vocabulary of the language, with an emphasis on the acquisition of oral and written skills of communication through functionally oriented language activities. The language will be studied in the context of Welsh history, literature and society.
CLST2609 Modern Welsh Language and Culture 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points including CLST2608 Assessment: 2x1500wd essays (46%), 1x2000wd written exam (46%), 1x500wd oral exam (8%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (advanced) degree program
The Welsh language has one of the oldest literary traditions in Europe. The language is widely used today and is the vehicle for a rich culture. In this course the Irish language will be studied in depth (in the context of Welsh history and culture), building on the insights achieved through attending CLST2608.
CLST2610 Modern Irish Language and Culture 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Assessment: 2x1000wd essays (46%), 1x1000wd exam (46%), 1x500wd oral exam (8%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (advanced) degree program
The Irish language has one of the oldest literary traditions in Europe. The language is widely used today and is the vehicle for a rich culture. In this course the Irish language will be studied in depth in the context of Irish history and culture.
CLST2611 Modern Irish Language and Culture 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points including CLST2610 Assessment: 2x1000wd essays (46%), 1x2000wd exam (46%), 1x500wd oral exam (8%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (advanced) degree program
The Irish language has one of the oldest literary traditions in Europe. The language is widely used today and is the vehicle for a rich culture. In this unit, following up on the insights provided by CLST2610, the Irish language will be studied in further depth in the context of Irish history and culture.
CLST2612 Scottish Identity, History and Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x2000wd exam (30%), 1x1000wd tutorial presentation (20%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (advanced) degree program
This unit will examine key defining moments in the history of Scottish self-awareness from the Picts to the Enlightenment. Topics may include internal conflict between different groups with different languages, external conflict with the country's nearest neighbours and cultural changes that arose from Scotland's part in the wider events of Europe such as the Reformation. It will concentrate on teaching students to use a variety of primary sources written, artistic and archaeological to elucidate problematic aspects of Scotland's culture.
CLST4011 Celtic Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week for one semester Prerequisites: A major in Celtic Studies plus 12 additional senior credit points, all with a Credit average Assessment: 1x18000-20000wd thesis (60%), 2x6000-8000wd of written work or its equivalent for the 2 seminars (40%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Celtic Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of a member of staff nominated by of the Professor of Celtic Studies
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester each.
The thesis is worth 18-20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars are worth 20%.
The following seminars may be on offer in 2013:
Selected Old and Middle Irish texts (Prof A Ahlqvist)
Selected Early Welsh texts (Prof A Ahlqvist)
It is important that prospective Honours students consult the Professor of Celtic Studies to ensure that their choice of senior units of study is appropriate to their intentions for the Honours Year.
CLST4012 Celtic Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: CLST4011
Refer to CLST4011
CLST4013 Celtic Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: CLST4012
Refer to CLST4011
CLST4014 Celtic Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anders Ahlqvist Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: CLST4013
Refer to CLST4011

Chinese Studies

CHNS1101 Chinese 1A (For Beginners)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Linda Tsung Session: Semester 1,Summer Main,Winter Main Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 3x1-hr tutorials/week Corequisites: Students are strongly advised to take CHNS1601 Understanding Contemporary China Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers; eligibility for CHNS1201 or higher Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 100wd) (10%), 5xon-line or individual learning assignments (30 minutes each) (20%), 2xoral presentations (3 minutes each) (40%), 2xwriting projects (1.5hrs each) (30%)
This unit is an introduction to basic communication skills in Modern Standard Chinese for beginners. Foundation work on pronunciation, pinyin romanisation, elementary grammar and the Chinese writing system will be followed by conversational drills, comprehension, reading and writing practice in classwork and homework.
Textbooks
Ted Yao and Yuehua Liu. Integrated Chinese. Level One, Part One. Textbook, Workbook and Character Workbook. 3rd edition. Boston: Cheng and Tsui, 2010
CHNS1102 Chinese 1B (For Beginners)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Linda Tsung Session: Semester 2,Summer Late Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: CHNS1101 Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers, eligibility for CHNS1201 or higher Assumed knowledge: One semester of Chinese at introductory level Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 100wd) (10%), 5xon-line or individual learning assignments (30 minutes each) (20%), 2xoral presentations (3 minutes each) (40%), 2xwriting projects (1.5hrs each) (30%)
This unit is a continuation of Chinese 1A. Emphasis will be on grammar patterns that facilitate speaking and reading skills. On completion, students should have a good grasp of common grammatical patterns and be able to communicate with Chinese native speakers in daily contexts.
Textbooks
Ted Yao and Yuehua Liu. Integrated Chinese. Level One, Part One. Textbook, Workbook and Character Workbook. 3rd edition. Boston: Cheng and Tsui, 2010
CHNS1201 Chinese 1C (For Advanced Beginners)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 3x1-hr tutorials/week Corequisites: Students are strongly advised to take CHNS1601 Understanding Contemporary China Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers, eligibility for higher-level classes Assumed knowledge: Native- or near-native fluency in a spoken Chinese language (e.g., Putonghua, Cantonese) combined with no, or very limited, knowledge of characters Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 150wds) (15%), 1xoral presentation (2.5 minutes) (25%), quizzes and exercises (equivalent to 300wds) (30%), 2x1hr reading/writing tests (30%)
A fast-paced intermediate unit of study intended primarily for native and fluent "background" speakers of Chinese languages, including Cantonese, who know few (up to about 200) characters or none at all. The objective is rapid development of Chinese-language proficiency to equip students for advanced work in Chinese Studies. Emphases include reading and writing skills and standard Putonghua pronunciation.
Textbooks
Consult Department
CHNS1202 Chinese 1D (For Advanced Beginners)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: CHNS1201 Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers, eligibility for higher-level classes Assumed knowledge: Native- or near-native fluency in a spoken Chinese language (e.g., putonghua, Cantonese) combined with full mastery (reading and writing) of about 400 to 500 characters and at least basic communicative skills in Putonghua Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 100wds) (10%), 1x5 minute oral presentation (20%), vocabulary quizzes (10wds each) (20%), composition tests and exercises (equivalent to 200-300wds) (20%), 2x1.5hr major reading/writing tests (2x15%)
Continuation of Chinese 1C, with similar objectives, pace and workload. By the end of the year, students should be able to read Chinese-language materials of limited complexity, and to discuss them in Putonghua.
Textbooks
Consult Department
CHNS1303 Chinese for Background Speakers 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wei Wang Session: Semester 1,Summer Main,Winter Main Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: Must have passed HSC Chinese (Background Speakers) or have completed a major part of their secondary education in Chinese Prohibitions: CHNS1101, CHNS1102, CHNS2601, CHNS2602 Assessment: written assignments (equivalent to 2500wds in English) (50%), 1x oral presentation (equivalent to 1000wds in English) (20%), 1x written class test (equivalent to 1000wds) (30%)
The unit meets the needs of students who have passed HSC Chinese (Background Speakers) or have completed a major part of their secondary education in Chinese. The unit aims to further improve their language skills and cultural awareness. It teaches advanced Chinese communication skills and sensitises students to differences between Chinese and English languages and discourses. A range of authentic material will be used, drawn from various media and literary sources, covering topics of contemporary interest.
CHNS1304 Chinese for Background Speakers 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wei Wang Session: Semester 2,Summer Late Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: CHNS1303 Prohibitions: CHNS1101, CHNS1102, CHNS2601, CHNS2602 Assessment: 1x written assignment (equivalent to 1000wds in English) (20%), 1x mini research project (equivalent to 1500wds in English) (30%), 1x oral presentation (equivalent to 1000wds in English) (20%), 1x written class test (equivalent to 1000wds in English) (30%)
The unit is a continuation of CHNS1303. It aims to further improve language skills and cultural awareness of students who have passed HSC Chinese (Background) or have completed a major part of their secondary education in Chinese. It teaches advanced Chinese communication skills, including basic academic research skills in Chinese writing and oral presentation, through dealing with a range of authentic material beyond that covered in CHNS1303.
CHNS1600 The Chinese Language, Present and Past

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Linda Tsung Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: CHNS1101 or CHNS1201 Corequisites: CHNS1102 or CHNS1202 or CHNS2602 Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers; CHNS2111, CHNS2112, CHNS2903, CHNS2904, CHNS1313, CHNS1314 Assessment: 4x30-minute tests (40%), 1x1000wd essay (30%), 1x10 minute oral presentation based on work for essay (10%); 3 or 4xhomework assignments (200wds each) (20%)
The Chinese language is a complex, constantly evolving social institution with a fascinating history. Its influence has been felt throughout East Asia and much of mainland Southeast Asia. This unit of study introduces important aspects of that history to students at the early stages of learning Modern Standard Chinese. Besides acquiring insights that will aid their mastery of the modern language, students will sample the interest and beauty of the classical language, vehicle of traditional Chinese poetry and philosophy.
CHNS1601 Understanding Contemporary China

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joyce Nip Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ASNS1101 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1xin-class test (30%), 1xclass presentation (equivalent to 1000wds) (20%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit of study introduces key topics essential to understanding contemporary Chinese society and culture, including geography and environment, recent social and political change, art, literature and cultural practice, population and economic structure, education systems and issues of gender and sexuality. As a foundational unit in Chinese studies, it assumes no background knowledge of China or the Chinese language. It will be taught in English with an interdisciplinary approach.
CHNS1801 Chinese Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit exists solely as an enrolment option for students who wish to study elementary Chinese while on exchange. Students who plan to study intermediate or advanced Chinese in China or Taiwan should seek department permission to enrol in a "Chinese In-Country Study" unit instead.
CHNS1802 Chinese Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
See under CHNS1801.
CHNS2601 Chinese 2A (Lower Intermediate)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Xiaowei Zhang Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 4x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: CHNS1102 Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers or equivalent, CHNS2101 Assumed knowledge: One year (approx. 5 hours per week for 26 weeks) of Chinese at introductory level Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 1000wds) (10%), short compositions (equivalent to 1000wds) (15%), oral tests (equivalent to 1000wds) (35%) and in-class tests (equivalent to 1000wds) (40%)
Intermediate unit of study in Modern Standard Chinese. Rapid vocabulary expansion, strengthening of reading, writing, listening and speaking skills, and sophistication of grammatical knowledge will be pursued in integrated fashion. On completion of this unit of study, students should be able to engage in real life communication, write short compositions and read fluently within their vocabulary range.
Textbooks
Ted Yao and Yuehua Liu. Integrated Chinese. Level One, Part Two. Textbook and Workbook. 3rd edition. Boston: Cheng and Tsui, 2010
CHNS2602 Chinese 2B (Lower Intermediate)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Xiaowei Zhang Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 4x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: CHNS2601 or CHNS2101 Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers or equivalent, CHNS2102 Assumed knowledge: Sound intermediate knowledge of Modern Standard Chinese, including full mastery of about 1000 characters (preferably full-form). Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 1000wds) (10%), short compositions (equivalent to 1000wds) (15%), oral tests (equivalent to 1000wds) (35%) and in-class tests (equivalent to 1000wds) (40%)
Continuation of Chinese 2A, with similar workload. Rapid enhancement and expansion of essential Chinese-language skills (proficiency in listening and speaking, reading comprehension, dictionary use, character knowledge, etc.). On completion of this unit of study, students be able to read Chinese-language materials of limited complexity and to discuss their content orally and write short compositions.
Textbooks
Ted Yao and Yuehua Liu. Integrated Chinese. Level One, Part Two. Textbook and Workbook. 3rd edition. Boston: Cheng and Tsui, 2010
CHNS2611 Classical Chinese A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: CHNS1102 or CHNS1202 or CHNS2602 or CHNS3602 or CHNS3604 or CHNS2102 or CHNS3104 or CHNS2204 Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers (or equivalent), CHNS2111, CHNS2903, CHNS1313 Assumed knowledge: Minimum of one year of Chinese at introductory level. Assessment: classwork (10%), 2x30-minute tests (10%), 3x40-minute tests (60%), 1xreading project resulting in 1500wd essay (20%)
Foundation work in Classical Chinese, an ancient language that still plays a role in modern China and that often challenges Western notions of how languages behave. Students will develop a basic understanding of the grammar and vocabulary, thus equipping themselves for exploration of China's distinctive philosophical and literary traditions in the original language. They will undertake supplementary reading in English on a topic of their choice, thus enriching their knowledge of premodern Chinese culture.
Textbooks
Robert L. Chard, Helen Dunstan and Derek Herforth. Foundations in Classical Chinese: A Constructional Approach. Available from the University Copy Centre
CHNS2612 Classical Chinese B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: CHNS2611 or CHNS2111 or HSC Chinese for Background Speakers or CHNS1313 or CHNS2903 Prohibitions: CHNS2112, CHNS2904, CHNS1314 Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 100wds) (10%), 3x50-minute tests (3x20%), homework exercises (equivalent to 200wds) (10%), 1xreading project resulting in a 1500wd essay (20%)
Continued study of Classical Chinese grammar and vocabulary through original texts. Students will gain the knowledge and confidence to explore a wider range of ancient and early-imperial Chinese philosophical and literary writings, including some poetry, thereby acquainting themselves with certain major authors in the Chinese tradition. Supplementary reading in English will enable them to broaden and deepen their understanding of Chinese culture while practising some basic research skills.
CHNS2613 Communication and Social Change in China

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joyce Nip Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in one of the following: Anthropology, Asian Studies, Chinese Studies, Cultural Studies, Economics, Gender Studies, Geography, Government and International Relations, History, Global Studies, Media and Communications, Political Economy, Political Economic and Social Sciences, Sociology, Social Policy or Socio-Legal Studies Assumed knowledge: No Chinese-language skill is required Assessment: 1xcase study presentation (equivalent to 500wds) (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (equivalent to 1500wds) (30%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit examines the relationship between communication and social change in contemporary China, inclusive of mainland China, Hong Kong, and regional sites. Students will learn about selected major events and trends in Chinese societies. They will also learn about the use of communications, including new media, in selected major events. Theories that examine the consequences of communication on community development and democratic participation will be introduced.
CHNS2650 Chinese In-Country Study A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wei Wang Session: Int December,Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: CHNS1102 or CHNS1202 (or a sequel within the same stream); or any senior CHNS unit of study whose numeric code has 60 as the second and third digits. Native speakers of Chinese who can read Chinese fluently and seek special permission to undertake in-country study after first year must present a coherent academic rationale to the department. Assumed knowledge: At least a year of Modern Standard Chinese at tertiary level (or equivalent). The department recommends that students complete at least two semesters of Chinese prior to undertaking a full semester of in-country study. Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Enrolment in an approved semester-based program of study (normally intermediate or advanced Modern Standard Chinese language) at a tertiary institution in China or Taiwan. Students can earn 6 credit points for every 52 hours of Chinese-language class in China or Taiwan, to a maximum of 24 credit points in any one semester. Credit may also be awarded at the rate of 6 credit points per 4 full weeks of intensive study after completion of an approved summer in-country Chinese-language program.
CHNS2651 Chinese In-Country Study B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
All details as for CHNS2650.
CHNS2652 Chinese In-Country Study C

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
All details as for CHNS2650.
CHNS2653 Chinese In-Country Study D

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
All details as for CHNS2650.
CHNS2654 Chinese In-Country Study E

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
All details as for CHNS2650.
CHNS2655 Chinese In-Country Study F

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
All details as for CHNS2650.
CHNS2656 Chinese In-Country Study G

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
All details as for CHNS2650.
CHNS2657 Chinese In-Country Study H

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
All details as for CHNS2650.
CHNS2810 Chinese Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit exists solely as an enrolment option for students who wish to study Chinese while on exchange at a university elsewhere than in China or Taiwan. Students who plan to study intermediate or advanced Chinese in China or Taiwan should seek department permission to enrol in a "Chinese In-Country Study" unit instead.
CHNS2811 Chinese Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
See under CHNS2810.
CHNS2812 Chinese Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
See under CHNS2810.
CHNS2813 Chinese Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
See under CHNS2810
CHNS3601 Chinese 3A (Upper Intermediate)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Linda Tsung Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: CHNS2602 or CHNS1202 Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers, CHNS3103 Assumed knowledge: Two years of university-level Chinese-language instruction for students without prior knowledge of Chinese Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 1500wds) (10%), oral presentations (equivalent to 1000wds) (30%), writing assignments (equivalent to 1500wds) (20%), in-class tests (1500wds equivalent) (40%)
Upper-intermediate unit of study in Modern Standard Chinese. Proficiency in reading will be developed through study of Chinese-language texts on a range of social and cultural topics. Speaking, listening, reading and writing will be enhanced through advanced language exercises, including composition and discussion, with due attention to the more sophisticated skills (e.g., use of appropriate registers, intelligent dictionary use, expressing ideas on more complex issues than at lower-intermediate level).
Textbooks
Ted Yao and Yuehua Liu. Integrated Chinese. Level Two, Textbook and Workbook. 3rd edition. Boston: Cheng and Tsui, 2010
CHNS3602 Chinese 3B (Upper Intermediate)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Linda Tsung Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: CHNS3601 or CHNS3103 Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers, CHNS3104 Assumed knowledge: Two and a half years of university-level Chinese-language instruction for students without prior knowledge of Chinese Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 1500wds) (10%), oral presentations (equivalent to 1000wds) (30%), writing assignments (equivalent to 1500wds) (20%), in-class tests (1500wds equivalent) (40%)
Continuation of Chinese 3A (Upper Intermediate). Continuing development of Chinese-language literacy through study of texts on a range of social and cultural topics, including some authentic literary texts. Further enhancement of speaking, listening and writing skills through advanced language exercises, including composition and discussion. Upon completion, students should be comfortable with both full-form and simplified characters, use dictionaries and language registers discerningly, and be confident of their ability to express ideas and arguments effectively in Chinese.
Textbooks
Ted Yao and Yuehua Liu. Integrated Chinese. Level Two, Textbook and Workbook. 3rd edition. Boston: Cheng and Tsui, 2010
CHNS3603 Chinese 4A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: CHNS1202 or CHNS3602 or CHNS3104 Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers, CHNS2203, CHNS2204 Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 2000wds) (10%), in-class tests (equivalent to 2000wds) (40%), 1x30 minute oral presentation (30%) and Chinese-language writing assignments (equivalent to 2000wds) (20%)
Advanced training in modern Chinese language, with a focus on reading. By studying a range of literary and non-literary texts, graded for difficulty, students will acquire the reading skills necessary for advanced work in Chinese Studies. They will enrich their knowledge of Chinese as a vehicle for discussion of important issues, while developing their own skills in oral and written expression of relatively complex subject matter.
Textbooks
Hong Gang Jin et al. China Scene: An Advanced Multimedia Course (Traditional & Simplified Character edn.), Boston: Cheng & Tsui Company, 2007
CHNS3604 Chinese 4B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Xiaowei Zhang Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: CHNS3603 or CHNS2203 Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers, CHNS2204 Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 2000wds) (10%), in-class tests (equivalent to 2000wds) (40%), 1x30 minute oral presentation (30%) and Chinese-language writing assignments (equivalent to 2000wds) (20%)
Continuation of Chinese 4A (Advanced). Further training in the reading skills necessary for advanced work in Chinese Studies or professional work requiring Chinese-language literacy. Students will gain familiarity with a broader range of literary and non-literary texts reflecting the concerns of Chinese people in the modern world, while enhancing their ability to discuss complex subject matter in both spoken and written Chinese.
Textbooks
Hong Gang Jin et al. China Scene: An Advanced Multimedia Course (Traditional & Simplified Character edn.), Boston: Cheng & Tsui Company, 2007
CHNS3605 Advanced Chinese Studies A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wei Wang Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: CHNS3604 or Distinction in CHNS3602. (Note: students who have earned a Distinction in CHNS3602 will be permitted to take this subject either with or instead of Chinese 4A). Prohibitions: HSC Chinese for Background Speakers Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 1000wds) (10%), in-class tests (equivalent to 1000wds) (40%), 1xpresentation based on research project (equivalent to 500wds) (20%), 1xessay resulting from research project (equivalent to 2500wds) (30%)
This unit is designed for advanced learners and near native speakers of the Chinese language. It emphasizes analysis and discussions in Chinese on topics that reflect aspects of modern Chinese society, culture and politics. Students will gain practice in independent library-based research through associated research project and essay work.
CHNS3606 Advanced Chinese Studies B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wei Wang Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: CHNS3605 Advanced Chinese Studies A, or department permission. [Note: students who have earned a Distinction in CHNS3603 Chinese 4A (Advanced) will be permitted to take this subject either with or instead of CHNS3604 Chinese 4B (Advanced)] Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 1000wds) (10%), in-class tests (equivalent to 1000wds) (40%), 1xpresentation based on research project (equivalent to 500wds) (20%), 1xessay resulting from research project (equivalent to 2500wds) (30%)
This unit is a continuation of CHNS3605. It emphasizes analysis and discussions in Chinese on topics that reflect aspects of modern Chinese society, culture and politics. Students will gain research skills through associated research project and essay work.
CHNS3607 Chinese Buddhist Texts

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendi Adamek Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: CHNS2612 or CHNS2112 or CHNS2904 Assessment: Translations (equivalent to 2000wds) (35%), 1x1000wd mid semester test (20%), 1x1500wd research essay (35%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit introduces students of literary Chinese to Buddhist texts. Students read and translate text selections in a variety of genres, as well as reading secondary materials on textual analysis in order to gain familiarity with a range of styles of discourse that developed during the formative period of Buddhism in China. This unit also serves as an introduction to translation methods and linguistic problem-solving.
CHNS3610 Chinese Translation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wei Wang Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr seminars/week Prerequisites: (CHNS1303 and CHNS1304) OR CHNS3604 OR CHNS3612 Assessment: 1x500wd exam (20%), 1x800wd reflective essay (10%), 1x1000wd mini practicum project (20%), 1x500wd online discussion (10%), weekly assignments (equivalent to 3200wds) (40%)
This unit aims to develop written fluency in Chinese and English through translation practices. The unit is designed to further develop students' advanced writing and translation skills. Practical tasks will include translation from English into Chinese and vice versa, using a wide range of texts, including newspaper reports, advertisements, product package text, film subtitles, tourist brochures, web pages, and relatively simple technical, legal and official documents.
CHNS3611 Chinese for Specific Purposes 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Linda Tsung Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: CHNS3602 or CHNS3604 Prohibitions: CHNS3605, CHNS3606 Assessment: 1x1500wd written assignment (40%), 2x10 minute oral presentations (30%), 1x1000wd research project (20%), classwork and participation (10%)
This unit of study is intended for students who have a sound intermediate competence of Modern Standard Chinese and wish to study the language for specific purposes. The unit provides training in basic knowledge of Chinese terms, etiquette and ethics in different professions, such as medicine, law, engineering and business. It will enhance students' practical communication skills in different social and professional contexts. It will also help them develop a general understanding of inter-professional knowledge in Chinese.
CHNS3612 Chinese for Specific Purposes 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Linda Tsung Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: CHNS3611 Prohibitions: CHNS3605, CHNS3606 Assessment: 1x2000wd written assignment (40%), 2x10 minute oral presentations (30%), 1x1000wd research project (20%), classwork and participation (10%)
The unit is a continuation of CHNS3611. It aims to further improve students' Chinese communication skills for specific purposes. The unit provides training in advanced knowledge of Chinese terms, etiquette and ethics in different professions, such as medicine, law, engineering and business. It will focus on a wide range of genres, including case studies in different social and professional contexts. It will enhance students' analytical and practical communication skills in Chinese.
CHNS3633 Lu Xun and China's Modern Literature

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from Table A of the Table of Units of Study in the Faculty of Arts Assumed knowledge: No knowledge of the Chinese language or literature is required Assessment: classwork (10%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), other written assignments, (e.g. discussion report) (equivalent to 1500wds) (30%), oral assignments, (e.g. presentation plus discussion leadership) (20%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program
Lu Xun was one of the most influential Chinese writers in the early decades of the twentieth century. The works of Lu Xun and his contemporaries marked the emergence of a modern Chinese literature that reflected its proponents' anxiety for sociocultural change and national salvation, absorbed external influences, and was intended to reach a wide readership. This unit of study highlights works by Lu Xun and other major authors in the context of the intellectual history of the time.
Textbooks
Reader available from the University copy Centre
CHNS3634 Gender in Modern Chinese Literature

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from Table A of the Table of Units of Study in the Faculty of Arts Assumed knowledge: No knowledge of the Chinese language or literature is required Assessment: classwork (10%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), group debate (20%), oral assignments (30%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program
Recent research on gender and related issues in Chinese cultural context has transformed conventional ideas about the roles of women in the Chinese world. This unit of study will illustrate the value of gender-sensitive scholarship by focusing on literary studies. Students will learn fresh approaches to the study of Chinese society and culture by examining the representation of gender and sexuality in (mainly) modern Chinese literature.
Textbooks
Reader available from the University Copy Centre
CHNS3645 Classical Chinese Prose

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: CHNS2112 or CHNS1314 or CHNS2904 or CHNS2612 Prohibitions: CHNS3547, CHNS3447 Assessment: 2x45 minute tests (30%), 1x2000wd essay (25%), 1x20 minute oral presentation based on work for essay (10%), short written translation exercises (equivalent to 1000wds) (15%). classwork (20%). Students may choose to write their essay in Chinese (consult instructor for the required number of characters)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Critical examination of samples of admired nonfictional writing in Classical Chinese from after the foundation of the unified empire in 221 B.C. Students will gain an appreciation of the relationship between style and substance in literary Chinese prose. One or two genres (e.g., travel-related or argumentative essays) or periods (e.g., the Tang dynasty) may be studied in greater depth, and students will be expected to consult relevant secondary scholarship in the selected areas.
CHNS3647 Classical Chinese Poetry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: CHNS2612 or CHNS2112 or CHNS1314 or CHNS2904 Prohibitions: CHNS3441, CHNS3541 Assessment: classwork (15%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1hr tests (2x20%), 1xoral presentation (15%)
An outstanding achievement of Chinese culture has been a vast corpus of poetry, remarkable for its aesthetic qualities and political and cultural importance. In this unit, the development and distinctive features of classical poetry will be explored through selected poems representing various genres and periods. One or two genres may be studied in greater depth, such as the ancient, richly symbolic Chu ci, the poetry of the great Tang masters, or the innovative lyric verse of the Song dynasty.
Textbooks
Consult Department
CHNS4011 Chinese Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Linda Tsung Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two or three seminars, each meets weekly for two hours for one semester Prerequisites: Credit average or better in 48 senior credit points of Chinese Studies, including completion of the major. ASNS3690, Approaches to Research in Asian Studies is strongly recommended and may be counted towards the required 48 senior credit points by all students except those whose qualifying senior credit points include CHNS2601 (or 2101) and/or CHNS2602 (or 2102). Intending Honours students are advised to take as many senior credit points as possible in Chinese language and China-related subjects. Assessment: a thesis of 18000-20000 words and two seminars or a thesis of 12000 - 15000 words and three seminars
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Chinese Studies consists of:
1. a long thesis written in English (18000 - 20000 words) and two seminars. The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours result and the seminars 40% (each seminar 20%) or
2. a short thesis in English (12000 - 15000 words) and three seminars. The thesis is worth 40% of the final Honours result and the seminars 60% (each seminar 20%).
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Semester 1: Theory and Method in Asian Studies (Dr Olivier Ansart) Approaches to Research on Modern China (Prof Bonnie McDougall)
Semester 2: Engaging Asia (Assoc Prof Michele Ford) In consultation with the supervisor and with the approval of the Chair of the Department, students can also select seminars from other programs in the Faculty of Arts. The Department also offers joint Honours supervision with other programs.
For more information, contact Dr Linda Tsung
CHNS4012 Chinese Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: CHNS4011
Refer to CHNS4011
CHNS4013 Chinese Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: CHNS4012
Refer to CHNS4011
CHNS4014 Chinese Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: CHNS4013
Refer to CHNS4011

Classical Studies

CLSS4011 Classics Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two seminars, each seminar meeting for 3 hours per week for one semester Prerequisites: Either credit average in 36 senior credit points of Latin, including two of LATN3603, 3604, 3605, 3606 plus 18 additional senior credit points of Greek OR credit average in 36 senior credit points of Greek, including two of GRKA3603, 3604, 3605, 3606 plus 18 additional senior credit points of Latin. Assessment: a thesis of 15,000 words, 6,000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar and one exam
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Classics consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for three hours for one semester
3. one unseen exam in both Greek and Latin.
The thesis should be of 15,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6,000 words of written work or it equivalent.
The thesis is worth 45% of the final Honours mark, each of the seminars is worth 22.5% and the unseen exam is worth 10%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Classics of Greek Literature (Prof Peter Wilson)
Greek Philosophical Texts (Prof Rick Benitez)
Latin Imperial Poetry (Dr Paul Roche)
Latin Republican Prose (Dr Frances Muecke)
For more information, contact Dr Paul Roche, Honours coordinator.
CLSS4012 Classics Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: CLSS4011
Refer to CLSS4011
CLSS4013 Classics Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: CLSS4012
Refer to CLSS4011
CLSS4014 Classics Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: CLSS4013
Refer to CLSS4011

Cultural Studies

See Gender and Cultural Studies.

Digital Cultures

ARIN2600 Technocultures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Chris Chesher Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: ARIN3000 Assessment: 1x1500wd influence analysis (30%), 1x500wd discussion-leading and report (15%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), participation (15%)
Technocultures explores how technology and culture are bound together in increasingly complex ways. Information and communication technologies in particular contribute to widespread reconfigurations of writing, sociality, politics, embodiment, aesthetics, perception, memory and thought itself. Drawing on recent critical theory and cultural research, this unit unravels the complex interplay between humans and technologies.
Textbooks
ARIN2600 Course Reader.
ARIN2610 Web Transformations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr John Tonkin (Semester 2), Dr Chris Chesher (Winter School) Session: Semester 2,Winter Main Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr workshop/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: ARIN2100 Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent presentation (20%), 1x2000wd analysis (35%), 1x1500wd equivalent design project (35%), participation (10%)
The Internet is a medium undergoing constant change, while also becoming progressively integrated into everyday life.
Web Transformations critically examines recent changes in the technology, language, design and social networking on the
internet. It introduces key skills in evaluation, strategy, interaction design and writing for the web within a historical context.
Beyond the web, it evaluates the implications of emerging applications such as mobile technologies, internet of things and social media.
Textbooks
ARIN2610 Course Reader.
ARIN2620 Cyberworlds

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: ARIN2200 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd report (20%), 1x1000wd case study (20%), participation (20%)
Are online encounters different from face-to-face encounters? What is the difference between the real and the virtual?
How do online identities relate to offline identities? This unit of study introduces students to key perspectives, themes and
debates in the expanding world of online interaction and cultural production including social media, art, games, virtual
worlds, augmented reality and participatory culture. Is the term 'cyberworld' redundant in a world where online and
offline experiences, cultural forms and identities have become increasingly enmeshed?
Textbooks
ARIN2620 Course Reader
ARIN2630 Digital Arts

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: ARIN2300 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd art review (30%), 1x1000wd tutorial activity (15%), tutorial participation (15%)
Digital Arts explores the ways digital and new media technologies are being used to transform cultural production, distribution and reception in the visual and performing arts, film and popular culture. Students will learn about the changing aesthetic, cultural and technical dimensions of new digital technologies and will develop the critical and analytical tools with which to
discuss and evaluate digital art works and the ways that audiences interact with them.
Textbooks
ARIN2630 Course Reader
ARIN2801 Digital Cultures Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Digital Cultures at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Digital Cultures.
ARIN2802 Digital Cultures Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Digital Cultures at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Digital Cultures.
ARIN2803 Digital Cultures Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Digital Cultures at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Digital Cultures.
ARIN2804 Digital Cultures Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Digital Cultures at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Digital Cultures.
ARIN2805 Digital Cultures Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Digital Cultures at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Digital Cultures.
ARIN2806 Digital Cultures Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Digital Cultures at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Digital Cultures.
ARIN2807 Digital Cultures Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Digital Cultures at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Digital Cultures.
ARIN2808 Digital Cultures Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Digital Cultures at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Digital Cultures.
ARIN3620 Researching Digital Cultures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Chris Chesher Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points Prohibitions: ARIN2000 Assessment: 1x2000wd research blog (40%), 1x2500wd research proposal (45%), participation (15%)
How do people use new media technologies? To answer this question you need to know how to conduct research: a systematic investigation using carefully chosen and ethically sound methods. In this unit students prepare a research proposal to improve knowledge about the social implications of the latest developments in information technologies. They build their methodology by choosing a combination of methods: ethnography, interviews, surveys, online methods, discourse analysis, content analysis or case studies.
Textbooks
ARIN3620 Course Reader.
ARIN3640 Computer Games and Simulation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr John Tonkin Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent presentation (20%), 1x2000wd analysis (35%), 1x1500wd equivalent design project (35%), participation (10%)
From first person shooters to massively multiplayer environments, computer games are rapidly emerging as distinctive cultural forms. The screen languages of interaction and simulation are diverging from and complicating cinematic and televisual conventions. Simulation and visualisation technologies and techniques have developed across many fields. This unit of study introduces students to key concepts and methodologies in computer games and simulation. It combines critical and historical readings in games studies, new media theory and interaction design with hands-on exercises.
Textbooks
Readings will be supplied online.
ARIN4011 Digital Cultures Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week per semester Prerequisites: Credit average in 48 senior credit points in the Digital Cultures Program comprising ARIN and cross-listed units of study. Assessment: 1x18000-20000wd thesis (60%), 2x6000-7000wd seminar essays (40%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Digital Cultures consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff 2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester. The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000-7000 words of written work or its equivalent. The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
For more information, contact Dr Kathy Cleland, Honours Coordinator.
ARIN4012 Digital Cultures Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIN4011
Refer to ARIN4011
ARIN4013 Digital Cultures Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIN4012
Refer to ARIN4011
ARIN4014 Digital Cultures Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIN4013
Refer to ARIN4011

Econometrics

ECMT1010 Business and Economic Statistics A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr workshop/week Prohibitions: ECMT1011, ECMT1012, ECMT1013, MATH1015, MATH1005, MATH1905, STAT1021, ECOF1010, BUSS1020, ENVX1001 Assessment: homework (15%), quizzes (30%), assignment (15%) and 1x2hr final exam (40%)
This unit provides an introduction to basic statistics and its applications in economics and business disciplines. Topics include: methods for data management; analysis and interpretation of data; probability; the normal distribution; an introduction to sampling theory and hypothesis testing; and the concepts of regression analysis. A key component is the provision of instruction and experience in the use of computers and statistical software as an aid in the analysis of data. Students are expected to use data resources on the World Wide Web, retrieve data and analyse this data using Excel.
ECMT1020 Business and Economic Statistics B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: ECMT1010 or ECOF1010 or BUSS1020 Prohibitions: ECMT1021, ECMT1022, ECMT1023 Assessment: 3x quizzes (25%), workshop questions/homework (10%), assignment (15%) and 1x2hr final exam (50%)
Note: Other than in exceptional circumstances, it is strongly recommended that students do not undertake Business and Economic Statistics B before attempting Business and Economic Statistics A.
This unit broadens the knowledge gained in the unit ECMT1010 Business and Economic Statistics A by introducing further tools (and their applications) for use in economics, finance, marketing and accounting. This unit features practical applications. Possible topics include: further aspects of hypothesis testing including goodness-of-fit models; regression analysis including a brief introduction to logit models, time series and its applications to economics and finance; input-output analysis; index numbers and mathematics of finance. The material is further complemented by mathematical topics including matrices and partial differentiation. In addition, students are expected to use data resources on the World Wide Web, retrieve data and analyse this data using Excel.
ECMT1551 Econometrics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECMT2110 Regression Modelling

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECMT1010 or ECOF1010 or BUSS1020 Prohibitions: ECMT2010 Assessment: group project (20%), 3x assignments (15%), mid-semester test (25%) and 1x2.5hr final exam (40%)
Students undertaking this unit have some background in basic statistics including an introduction to regression analysis. Using this knowledge as a base, an extensive discussion of basic regression theory and some of its extensions is provided. The unit covers how linear regression models can be applied to data to estimate relationships, to forecast, and to test hypotheses that arise in economics and business. Guidelines for using econometric techniques effectively are discussed and students are introduced to the process of model building. It is essential that the discussion of regression modelling be complemented with practice in analysing data. An important task is the computing component using econometric software.
ECMT2130 Financial Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECMT2110 or ECMT2010 Prohibitions: ECMT2030 Assessment: 2x assignments (2x20%) and 1x2hr final exam (60%)
Over the last decade econometric modelling of financial data has become an important part of the operations of merchant banks and major trading houses and a vibrant area of employment for econometricians. This unit provides an introduction to some of the widely used econometric models for financial data and the procedures used to estimate them. Special emphasis is placed upon empirical work and applied analysis of real market data. Topics covered may include the statistical characteristics of financial data, the specification, estimation and testing of asset pricing models, the analysis of high frequency financial data, and the modelling of volatility in financial returns.
ECMT2901 Econometrics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECMT2902 Econometrics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECMT2903 Econometrics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECMT3110 Econometric Models and Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECMT2110 or ECMT2010 Prohibitions: ECMT3010 Assessment: assignments (20%), mid-semester test (20%), 2hr final exam (60%)
This unit extends methods of estimation and testing developed in association with regression analysis to cover econometric models involving special aspects of behaviour and of data. In particular, motivating examples are drawn from dynamic models, panel data and simultaneous equation models. In order to provide the statistical tools to be able to compare alternative methods of estimation and testing, both small sample and asymptotic properties are developed and discussed.
ECMT3120 Applied Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECMT3110 or ECMT3010 Prohibitions: ECMT3020 Assessment: group project (25%), mid-semester test (25%), 2hr final exam (50%)
Econometric theory provides techniques to quantify the strength and form of relationships between variables. Applied Econometrics is concerned with the appropriate use of these techniques in practical applications in economics and business. General principles for undertaking applied work are discussed and necessary research skills developed. In particular, the links between econometric models and the underlying substantive knowledge or theory for the application are stressed. Topics will include error correction models, unit roots and cointegration and models for cross section data, including limited dependent variables. Research papers involving empirical research are studied and the unit features all students participating in a group project involving econometric modelling.
ECMT3130 Forecasting for Economics and Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr lab/week Prerequisites: ECMT2110 or ECMT2010 Prohibitions: ECMT3030 Assessment: assignment (20%), group assignment (25%), mid-semester test (20%) and 2.5hr final exam (35%)
The need to forecast or predict future values of economic time series arises frequently in many branches of applied economic and commercial work. It is, moreover, a topic which lends itself naturally to econometric and statistical treatment. The specific feature which distinguishes time series from other data is that the order in which the sample is recorded is of relevance. As a result of this, a substantial body of statistical methodology has developed. This unit provides an introduction to methods of time series analysis and forecasting. The material covered is primarily time domain methods designed for a single series and includes the building of linear time series models, the theory and practice of univariate forecasting and the use of regression methods for forecasting. Throughout the unit a balance between theory and practical application is maintained.
ECMT3150 The Econometrics of Financial Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr lab/week Prerequisites: (ECMT1010 or BUSS1020), (ECMT2110 or ECMT2010) and (ECMT2130 or ECMT2030) Prohibitions: ECMT3050 Assessment: assignment (20%), group assignment (30%), mid-semester test (15%) and 2.5hr final exam (35%)
This unit studies and develops the econometric models and methods employed for the analysis of data arising in financial markets. It extends and complements the material covered in ECMT2130. The unit will cover econometric models that have proven useful for the analysis of both synchronous and non-synchronous financial time series data over the last two decades. Modern Statistical methodology will be introduced for the estimation of such models. The econometric models and associated methods of estimation will be applied to the analysis of a number of financial datasets. Students will be encouraged to undertake hands-on analysis using an appropriate computing package. Topics covered include: Discrete time financial time series models for asset returns; modelling and forecasting conditional volatility; Value at Risk and modern market risk measurement and management; modelling of high frequency and/or non-synchronous financial data and the econometrics of market microstructure issues. The focus of the unit will be in the econometric models and methods that have been developed recently in the area of financial econometrics and their application to modelling and forecasting market risk measures.
ECMT3901 Econometrics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECMT3902 Econometrics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECMT3903 Econometrics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECMT4101 Econometrics Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6-hrs/week Prerequisites: Students who want to take honours in Econometrics have to: (i) qualify for a major in Econometrics; (ii) obtain a Weighted Average Mark (WAM) of at least 65 in all units of study in the degree; (iii) obtain a distinction average or better in ECMT3110 and ECMT3120; (iv) obtain a WAM of at least 75 in the senior units of study in the ECMT major. Variations on entry requirements are possible only with permission of the Head of School. Please see the School online homepage for entry requirements in detail. Assessment: 1x thesis (33.3%) and 4x coursework options comprised of assignments, presentations and final exams (66.7%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Requirements for the pass degree must be completed before entry to level 4000 honours units of study
The Honours program in Econometrics consists of: (1) a thesis not exceeding 65 A4 pages of typescript written under the supervision of one, or more, members of academic staff, and (2) four semester-length coursework options that each meet once a week for three hours. Students take two coursework options in their first semester, and two in their second semester. Assessment details vary per coursework option, however all contain a final examination worth up to 50% with the remaining balance comprised of written work and oral presentations, and (3) a (non assessed) weekly meeting with the thesis supervisor in both semesters.
ECMT4102 Econometrics Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6-hrs/week Corequisites: ECMT4101 Assessment: See ECMT4101
See ECMT4101
ECMT4103 Econometrics Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6-hrs/week Corequisites: ECMT4102 Assessment: See ECMT4101
See ECMT4101
ECMT4104 Econometrics Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6-hrs/week Corequisites: ECMT4103 Assessment: See ECMT4101
See ECMT4101

Economics

ECON1001 Introductory Microeconomics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: online quizzes (10%), 1x mid-semester test (30%), 1x essay (10%) and 1x2hr final exam (50%)
Introductory Microeconomics addresses the economic decisions of individual firms and households and how these interact in markets. It is a compulsory core unit for the Bachelor of Economics and an alternative core unit for the Bachelor of Economic and Social Science. Economic issues are pervasive in contemporary Australian society. Introductory Microeconomics introduces students to the language and analytical framework adopted in Economics for the examination of social phenomena and public policy issues. Whatever one's career intentions, coming to grips with economic ideas is essential for understanding society, business and government. Students are given a comprehensive introduction to these ideas and are prepared for the advanced study of microeconomics in subsequent years. It is assumed that students undertaking this unit will have a prior knowledge of mathematics.
ECON1002 Introductory Macroeconomics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: tutorial participation (5%), 5x online quizzes (10%), mid-semester test (25%), essay (10%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
Introductory Macroeconomics addresses the analysis of the level of employment and economic activity in the economy as a whole. It is a compulsory core unit for the Bachelor of Economics and an alternative core unit for the Bachelor of Economic and Social Sciences. Introductory Macroeconomics examines the main factors that determine the overall levels of production and employment in the economy, including the influence of government policy and international trade. This analysis enables an exploration of money, interest rates and financial markets, and a deeper examination of inflation, unemployment and economic policy. It is assumed that students undertaking this unit will have a prior knowledge of mathematics.
ECON1003 Quantitative Methods in Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: in-class tests (25%), mid-semester test (25%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
This unit of study provides an introduction to the quantitative methods used in economics and business. Emphasis is placed on developing the skills to set up models to study real-world phenomena, using appropriate techniques to manipulate and analyse these models and their economic interpretation. In this unit particular emphasis will be placed on the intuition of the models studied, making extensive use of a range of economic examples and business applications. It is important to note that while mathematical techniques are used in this unit, this unit is not intended as a substitute for mathematics units offered by the School of Mathematics and Statistics. Students wishing to pursue further study in mathematics, such as a major in mathematics, should consult the Faculty of Science Handbook for offerings by the School of Mathematics and Statistics. Note this unit is not available to students from the Faculty of Science.
ECOS1551 Economics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOS2001 Intermediate Microeconomics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON1001 or BUSS1040 Corequisites: ECMT1010 or BUSS1020 Prohibitions: ECON2001, ECOS2901, ECON2901 Assessment: tutorials (10%), 2x in-class tests (40%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
Note: Certain combinations of Maths/Stats may substitute for Econometrics. Consult the School of Economics Undergraduate Coordinator.
The aim of Intermediate Microeconomics is the development of theoretical and applied skills in economics. It covers applications and extensions of the theory of consumer choice, firm behaviour and market structure. Emphasis is given to the economics of information and choice under uncertainty; industry structures other than monopoly and perfect competition; markets for factors of production; general equilibrium and economic efficiency; market failure and the role of government. This unit provides a basis for the more specialised options that comprise third year economics.
ECOS2002 Intermediate Macroeconomics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON1002 Corequisites: ECMT1020 Prohibitions: ECON2002, ECOS2902, ECON2902 Assessment: mid-semester test (30%), assignments (20%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
Note: Certain combinations of Maths/Stats may substitute for Econometrics. Consult the School of Economics Undergraduate Coordinator.
This unit of study develops models of the goods, money and labour markets, and examines issues in macroeconomic policy. Macroeconomic relationships, covering consumption, investment, money and employment, are explored in detail. Macro-dynamic relationships, especially those linking inflation and unemployment, are also considered. Exchange rates and open economy macroeconomics are also addressed. In the last part of the unit, topics include the determinants and theories of economic growth, productivity and technology, the dynamics of the business cycle, counter-cyclical policy and the relationship between micro and macro policy in the context of recent Australian experience.
ECOS2201 Economics of Competition and Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON1001 or BUSS1040 Prohibitions: ECON2201, ECOS3005 Assessment: 2x mid-semester tests (40%) and 2hr final exam (60%)
This unit introduces new and comprehensive methods for the analysis and formation of business strategy. The unit analyses strategies for developing competitive advantages, including product differentiation, cost advantages and product life cycles; implementing incentives, control, firm boundaries, and internal firm decision-making mechanisms; implementing pricing, auction and signalling practices; assessing industry attractiveness and the regulatory/trade practices environment; and managing industry cooperation and conflict. Students are taught a set of tools that they can bring to bear on new problems. Understanding competitive dynamics and strategic thinking are emphasised. Case studies and problem-solving form an important part of the teaching method.
ECOS2551 Economics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOS2552 Economics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOS2901 Intermediate Microeconomics Honours

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ECON1001 or BUSS1040) and ECON1002 with a Credit average or better in the two units of study combined Corequisites: ECOS2903 or MATH2070 and (ECMT1010 or BUSS1020) Prohibitions: ECON2901, ECOS2001, ECON2001 Assessment: 2x mid-semester tests (50%) and 2.5hr final exam (50%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is comprised of lectures based upon the curriculum for ECOS2001 Intermediate Microeconomics, supported by a seminar for one hour a week. The content of lectures reflect a more analytical and critical treatment of the topics than ECOS2001. The topics, which build on the theory of consumer and firm behaviour and market structure, include game theory, oligopoly, general equilibrium and welfare, externalities and public goods and the economics of information.
ECOS2902 Intermediate Macroeconomics Honours

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ECON1001 or BUSS1040) and ECON1002 with a Credit average or better in the two units of study combined Corequisites: ECMT1020 Prohibitions: ECON2902, ECOS2002, ECON2002 Assessment: essay (20%), mid-semester test (30%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is comprised of lectures based upon the curriculum for ECOS2002 Intermediate Macroeconomics, supported by a seminar for one hour a week. The content of lectures reflects a more intensive treatment of the topics than ECOS2002. Topics covered include: models of the goods, money and labour markets; macro-economic relationships such as consumption, investment, demand for money and labour demand and supply; macro-dynamic relationships, especially those linking inflation and unemployment; exchange rates and open economy macroeconomics; theories of economic growth; productivity and technological change; the dynamics of the business cycle; and the relationship between micro- and macro-economic policy.
ECOS2903 Mathematical Economics A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Corequisites: ECOS2901 Prohibitions: ECON2903 Assessment: problem sets/quizzes (30%), mid-semester test (20%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students intending to proceed to the third year economics honours program must take this unit or MATH2070
This unit provides an introduction to mathematical techniques commonly employed by economists. Students who wish to proceed to final year Economics Honours must complete either ECOS2903 or MATH2070. Topics include: limits, continuity, differentiation of single- and multi-variable functions, unconstrained and constrained optimisation.
ECOS3002 Development Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: One of (ECOS2001 or ECON2001) or (ECOS2002 or ECON2002) or (ECOS2901 or ECON2901) or (ECOS2902 or ECON2902) Prohibitions: ECON3002 Assessment: 2x in-class tests (30%) and 2.5hr final exam (70%)
This unit examines the role of the state, rationale for planning and market mechanisms in developing economies, and also the sociocultural preconditions and economic requirements for a market economy. It focuses on a wide range of developmental problems and issues from both microeconomic and macroeconomic points of view. It closely studies the integration process of the traditional segment of a developing society into its modern counterpart in countries selected from Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Pacific regions.
ECOS3003 Hierarchies, Incentives & Firm Structure

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: Either (ECOS2001 or ECON2001) or (ECOS2901 or ECON2901) Prohibitions: ECON3003, ECOS2306 Assessment: group assignment (25%), mid-semester test (20%) and 2hr final exam (55%)
This unit deals with the coordination and motivation problems faced by firms. More specifically this unit examines: whether firms use price or command mechanisms to allocate resources within firms; the problems associated with designing incentive contracts; the principles of efficient contract design and; the real world applications of those principles. The final section deals with the manner in which the coordination and motivation problems faced by firms determines their financial, vertical and horizontal structure.
ECOS3004 History of Economic Thought

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: 1 of (ECOS2001 or ECON2001) or (ECOS2901 or ECON2901) or (ECOS2002 or ECON2002) or (ECOS2902 or ECON2902) or (ECOP2011 or ECOP2001) or (ECOP2012 or ECOP2002) Prohibitions: ECON3004 Assessment: essay (20%), mid-semester test (30%) and 70min final exam (50%)
Where do the current beliefs - theories, doctrines, postulates and attitudes - of modern economics come from? If current theories and doctrines have a definite historical beginning, what schools of thought did they supplant? Are there alternative or dissident views which subsisted alongside mainstream economics in the twentieth century - and if so, what are they and where did they originate from? This unit seeks to answer these questions, as well as others. It provides an overview of the development of economic ideas from the seventeenth to the twentieth century, combined with a more intensive focus on the thought of certain key figures in that history. The particular topics covered include: the formation of economics to 1776; Adam Smith; classical economics from Smith to J.S. Mill; the rise of marginalist economics; John Maynard Keynes; and orthodox and heterodox currents in twentieth century economics.
ECOS3005 Industrial Organisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECON2001 or ECOS2901 or ECON2901 Prohibitions: ECON3005, ECOS2201 Assessment: mid-semester test (35%), problem sets (5%) and 2hr final exam (60%)
This unit of study examines the nature of inter-firm rivalry in industries with market power. It explores the various ways in which firms can increase their market power by: extracting more surplus from consumers, by colluding with rivals or by excluding entrants. The unit also analyses the international competitiveness of industries in the context of industry assistance and the prevalence of foreign multinationals. Competition policy is also discussed.
ECOS3006 International Trade

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: Either (ECOS2001 or ECON2001) or (ECOS2901 or ECON2901) Prohibitions: ECON3006 Assessment: problem sets (5%), mid-semester test (35%) and 2hr final exam (60%)
This unit of study provides a systematic analysis of the theory of international trade and trade policy. Initially differences between countries are emphasised as the source of trade and the gains from trade. Models that are examined include the Classical-Ricardian model, the Heckscher-Ohlin model and the Specific-Factors model. Next economics of scale and imperfect competition are introduced as sources of trade and gains from trade. The unit concludes with an examination of empirical studies aimed at testing trade theories. The analysis of trade policy begins with a discussion of the instruments of trade policy, in particular, tariffs and quotas and their effect on welfare. This discussion is then extended to the case of imperfect competition and strategic trade policy.
ECOS3007 International Macroeconomics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: ECOS2002 or ECON2002 or ECOS2902 or ECON2902 Prohibitions: ECON3007 Assessment: assignments (20%) and mid-semester test (20%) and 1x2hr final exam (60%)
This unit studies macroeconomic theory and policy in a global trading world. The microfoundations of the various sectors are examined in the context of an open economy. The evolution of international money and capital markets is described, the operation of the foreign exchange market is examined, showing how its microstructure affects its macro performance. Theories and tests of the efficiency of international capital markets are surveyed, as well as core theories and tests of exchange rate and asset price determination. The unit develops the macroeconomic implications of monetary and fiscal policies for small and large open economies for different regimes.
ECOS3008 Labour Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: One of (ECOS2001 or ECON2001 or ECOS2901 or ECON2901 or ECOP2011 or ECOP2001) and one of (ECOS2002 or ECON2002 or ECOS2902 or ECON2902 or ECOP2012 or ECOP2002) Prohibitions: ECON3008 Assessment: essay (25%), mid-semester test (25%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
This unit aims to provide an understanding of labour markets and related issues such as work conditions, pay and employment levels. Labour supply and demand, theories of wage determination, labour mobility and discrimination are examined. It also analyses the role of trade unions and labour market contracts. These topics are applied to current issues in Australian labour markets such as enterprise bargaining, the role of centralised wage fixing systems, training and other labour market programs. Policies designed to improve the functioning of the labour market are examined and particular attention is given to the problem of persistent unemployment.
ECOS3010 Monetary Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECON2001 or ECOS2901 or ECON2901 or ECOS2002 or ECON2002 or ECOS2902 or ECON2902 Prohibitions: ECON3010 Assessment: multiple choice test (30%) and written paper (20%) and 70min final exam (50%)
This unit provides an overview of the main elements of monetary economics, with emphasis upon macroeconomic issues - analysis of economic processes in which money enters the picture in an essential manner. The content primarily concerns economic principles and theory, but there is also considerable focus on the Australian monetary system and monetary policy in particular. The particular topics covered include: functions of money; the concept of 'liquidity'; money demand; determinants of money supply changes; financial crises and the 'lender of last resort' function of central banking; the Reserve Bank of Australia and the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority; term and risk structures of interest rates; alternative theories of the level of the rate of interest; the monetary policy transmission mechanism; monetary policy instrument choice; central bank credibility; policy reaction functions; the global monetary system; and Reserve Bank market operations.
ECOS3011 Public Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: Either (ECOS2001 or ECON2001) or (ECOS2901 or ECON2901) Prohibitions: ECON3011 Assessment: mid-semester test (20%), assignment (30%) and 3hr final exam (50%)
Public Finance is about the taxing and spending decisions of governments. The unit covers a wide range of public finance topics. After an introduction to welfare economics and the role of government in the economy, the unit focuses on the revenue side of the budget: tax incidence, efficient and equitable taxation, the Australian system of revenue raising, issues of tax reform and the theory and practice of public utility pricing. It then focuses on the expenditure side of the government budget: public goods, externalities, and programs aimed at redistribution. It also introduces techniques of policy evaluation.
ECOS3012 Strategic Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECON2001 or ECOS2901 or ECON2901 Prohibitions: ECON3012, ECOS3901 Assessment: mid-semester test (35%), online quizzes (20%) and 2hr final exam (45%)
To think and act strategically, one needs to evaluate the effect of one's actions on the actions of others. As most economic decisions are strategic, such as the decision to lower a price or introduce a new tax, economics, if it is to avoid simplistic models, requires a theoretical framework capable of illuminating strategic behaviour. This unit offers a comprehensive, critical introduction to the theory which purports, not only to satisfy this theoretical need, but also potentially to unify the social sciences: game theory. After examining important concepts of game theory, the unit investigates the repercussions for the theory of bargaining and for the evolution of social institutions.
ECOS3015 Law and Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial fortnight Prerequisites: Either (ECOS2001 or ECON2001) OR (ECOS2901 or ECON2901) Prohibitions: ECON3015 Assessment: assignments (20%), mid-semester test (30%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
Law and economics examines the economic role of law and legal institutions on the actions of economic agents. The economic analysis of law is founded on models of human behaviour and examines how decision making is affected by different legal regimes. The behavioral approach gives rise to a set of principles that can be applied widely across disparate areas of the law, and is becoming increasingly important world-wide, as such analysis is often utilized in courts and public policy forums. The unit begins with a revision of relevant tools of economic analysis. Subsequently, it studies the economics of various branches of law such as: property; contract; nuisance; accident and liability law; and, criminal law
ECOS3016 Experimental and Behavioural Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: (ECOS2001 or ECON2001) OR (ECOS2901 or ECON2901) Assessment: 2x take home assignments (50%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
Experimental economics uses experimental methods to evaluate the performance of economic models, institutions and policies. Behavioural economics combines experimental and field evidence with insights from neighbouring disciplines such as psychology, to develop richer economic models of decision-making. This unit will develop the key research methods and major findings of each of these fields, and explore both theoretical and practical implications. Students will read a number of seminal research papers in both experimental and behavioural economics, and will have opportunities to participate in classroom experiments, to analyse experimental data, and to design and program their own research projects.
ECOS3017 Health Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECON2001 or ECOS2901 or ECON2901 Assessment: 2x in-class tests (30%) and 2hr final exam (70%)
The purpose of this unit is to introduce the student to the methods of health economics and demonstrate how these methods can be applied to analyse issues in health policy and management. This unit will teach the student to use economic analysis to understand critical issues in health care and health policy. Topics covered include the institutions of the Australian system of health care and health statistics, evaluation techniques, production of health, demand for health care and technology, moral hazard and adverse selection in health insurance markets, health labour markets, including physician-patient interactions, managed care, regulation and payment systems for providers, comparative health systems, the pharmaceutical industry, health policy and social insurance.
ECOS3018 Economics of Growth

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: (ECOS2001 or ECON2001) or (ECOS2901 or ECON2901) AND (ECOS2002 or ECON2002) or (ECOS2902 or ECON2902) Prohibitions: ECOS3001 Assessment: 2x in-class tests (40%) and 1.5hr final exam (60%)
At the heart of an understanding of the dynamics of market or capitalist economies is an understanding of economic growth. This unit is an introduction to the analysis of economic growth including a comparison of competing explanations within formal growth theory. It considers the connection between growth and distribution, growth and technical progress, the role of economic policies and economic institutions in promoting growth as well as the limitations on growth associated with exhaustible natural resources. Lectures also provide some consideration of the empirical evidence on different explanations of growth.
ECOS3019 Capital and Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2 hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: (ECOS2001 or ECON2001 or ECOS2901 or ECON2901) and (ECOS2002 or ECON2002 or ECOS2902 or ECON2902) Prohibitions: ECOS3001 Assessment: 2x in-class tests (40%) and 2hr final exam (60%)
Fundamental to the theory of value, income distribution and output is a coherent treatment of the concept of capital. The definition and measurement of 'capital' is essential to the explanation of relative prices, and hence integral to any explanation of distributive shares in national income. It is also indispensable to a proper understanding of debates over the theory of output. The aim of the unit is to provide a comprehensive account of the different approaches to capital theory (e.g. in traditional aggregative neoclassical theory, general equilibrium theory and classical/Sraffian inspired models) and to highlight their significance for different views about value, distribution and output. This account necessarily involves some focus on the intersection of capital theory and the theory of dynamics as it applies to multi-sectoral/multi-commodity models, including growth theory, the dynamics of inter-industry competition, the analysis of technological progress and the intertemporal dynamics of production in the context of exhaustible natural resources.
ECOS3020 Special Topic in Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: (ECOS2001 or ECON2001) and (ECOS2002 or ECON2002) OR (ECOS2901 or ECON2901) and (ECOS2902 or ECON2902) Assessment: assessment dependent on topic
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must seek written permission from the School of Economics Undergraduate Coordinator to enrol in this unit.
Study of a special topic in Economics. Topics will vary from semester to semester according to staff availablity and the presence of visitors. If taught in both semesters, the topic in Semester 2 will be different to that of Semester 1.
ECOS3021 Business Cycles and Asset Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: ECOS2002 or ECON2002 or ECOS2902 or ECON2902 Assessment: class participation (5%), mid-semester test (20%), project report (25%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
The unit of study provides theoretical and empirical training in analysing macroeconomic fluctuations and the interactions between the real economy and asset markets. The unit of study will introduce theoretical models of the business cycle to identify sources of economic fluctuations. It then provides a theoretical framework in which the asset market-the real economy can be analysed. In addition to theoretical analysis, the unit will develop empirical tools for analysing economic and financial indicators as well as evaluating the performance of theoretical models. The role of government policy will also be discussed by taking both Australian and global episodes.
ECOS3022 The Economics of Financial Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: (ECOS2001 or ECON2001 or ECOS2901 or ECON2901) and (ECOS2002 or ECON2002 or ECOS2902 or ECON2902) Assessment: problem sets (20%), mid-semester test (25%) and 2hr final exam (55%)
Financial assets play a vital role coordinating the actions of savers and investors; consequently, they play a crucial role in creating wealth and facilitating economic activity. The aim of this unit is to explore the economic principles underlying: the pricing and development of financial assets; the trade-off between risk and return and the how investors construct portfolios in response to this trade-off. The focus is on the economics of financial markets: the factors of demand and supply; risk and uncertainty; incomplete contracts and renegotiation; and asymmetric information and its implications. We will emphasize the key aspects of markets for financial assets and the main differences to markets for consumption goods. The unit also examines the development of financial institutions and current issues in financial markets.
ECOS3023 Personnel Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: mid-semester test (25%), assignment (25%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
Personnel economics deals with the analysis of human resource issues within organisations. Throughout the unit of study, students will be introduced to economic concepts and analytical tools that provide a rigorous framework with which to analyse these relationships. Topics covered include recruitment and hiring decisions; turnover of staff; remuneration and motivation schemes designed to enhance productivity; and, the analysis of team production within the modern business organisation. Empirical studies that test theoretical predictions will also be considered throughout the unit.
ECOS3551 Economics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: ECON1001 and ECON1002
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students wishing to undertake a Study Abroad program must enrol in this unit to receive credit for a unit equivalent to an ECON2000-level subject
ECOS3552 Economics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: ECON1001 and ECON1002
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students wishing to undertake a Study Abroad program must enrol in this unit to receive credit for a unit equivalent to an ECON2000-level subject
ECOS3553 Economics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: ECON1001 and ECON1002
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOS3554 Economics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: ECON1001 and ECON1002
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOS3901 Advanced Microeconomics Honours

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: (ECOS2901 or ECON2901) and (ECOS2902 or ECON2902) and (ECOS2903 or ECON2903 or MATH2070) with a 70% average or better over the three units combined Corequisites: ECMT2110 or ECMT2010 Prohibitions: ECON3901, ECOS3012 Assessment: mid-semester test (30%), problem sets (10%) and 2.5hr final exam (60%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students intending to proceed to fourth year economics honours must also complete at least one unit of study from (ECOS3001 or ECON3001) to (ECOS3023) inclusive, in either semester of their third year
ECOS3901 Advanced Microeconomics is the second unit of study in the microeconomics sequence in the Economics Honours program. The goal of the unit is to provide a working knowledge and understanding of the most powerful methods of analysis and discourse in modern microeconomic theory. We build on the foundations of ECOS2901 and ECOS2903 to continue progress toward the frontier of microeconomics.
ECOS3902 Advanced Macroeconomics Honours

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: (ECOS2901 or ECON2901), (ECOS2902 or ECON2902), (ECOS2903 or ECON2903 or MATH2070) and (ECOS3901 or ECON3901) Corequisites: ECOS3903 or (ECMT3110 and (ECMT2120 or ECMT3120 or ECMT3130 or ECMT3160 or ECMT3170)) Prohibitions: ECON3902 Assessment: mid-semester test (30%), take home assignments (10%) and 2hr final exam (60%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students intending to proceed to fourth year economics honours must also complete at least one unit of study from (ECOS3001 or ECON3001) to (ECOS3023) inclusive, in either semester of their third year
ECOS3902 Advanced Macroeconomics is a third year honours unit of study in macroeconomics. Its main objective is to develop a framework for thinking about macroeconomic questions. This unit is designed for the students enrolled in the Economics Honours stream. ECOS2901, ECOS2902, ECOS2903 and ECOS3901 are prerequisites and the corequisite is ECOS3903,or ECMT3110 plus one of ECMT2120, ECMT3120, ECMT3130, ECMT3160 or ECMT3170.
ECOS3903 Applied Microeconomics Honours

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: (ECOS2901 or ECON2901), (ECOS2902 or ECON2902), (ECOS2903 or ECON2903) and ECMT2110 Corequisites: ECOS3901 or ECOS3902 Assessment: assignments (10%), referee report (15%), mid-semester test (25%) and 2hr final examination (50%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students intending to proceed to fourth year economics honours must take this unit or (ECMT3110 plus one of ECMT2120, ECMT3120, ECMT3130, ECMT3160 or ECMT3170).
This unit is designed to provide students with estimation techniques frequently used in applied microeconomics. It will mainly cover cross section and panel data methods. Various empirical topics in labour economics, international trade, etc., will be discussed.
ECOS3904 Applied Macroeconomics Honours

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: ECOS2901, ECOS2902, ECOS2903 and ECMT2110 Corequisites: ECOS3901 or ECOS3902 Assessment: 1x1hr mid-semester test (20%), computer assignments (30%) and 1x2hr final exam (50%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides an introduction to econometric methods that are useful for understanding applied macroeconomic and financial economic models and research. It also aims to provide students with the necessary analytical tools for undertaking applied research using time series data. It discusses how time series techniques can be applied to other areas of economics such as international trade, energy economics, economics of terrorism, etc. This unit of study can be both complementary to or a substitute for Applied Microeconomics Honours.
ECON4101 Economics Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6-hrs/week Prerequisites: The prerequisite for entry to Economics Honours is at least 24 credit points at 3000 level Economics, including Advanced Microeconomics Honours: (ECOS3901 or ECON3901), Advanced Macroeconomics Honours: (ECOS3902 or ECON3902) and Applied Microeconomics Honours (ECOS3903) with a 70% or better in ECOS3901, ECOS3902 and ECOS3903; and Regression Modelling (ECMT2110 or ECMT2010) and Mathematical Economics A (ECOS2903 or ECON2903). Assessment: 1x15000wd (max.) thesis (30%) and 5x4500wd of written work, or its equivalent (70%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Requirements for the Pass degree must be completed before entry to 4000 level honours units of study.
The Honours program in Economics consists of: 1. a thesis written under the supervision of one, or more, members of academic staff 2. five semester-length coursework options that each meet once a week for two hours. Students would usually take three coursework options in their first semester, and two in their second semester. Each coursework option requires 4000wd of written work or its equivalent, including mid-semester test, final exam and other assessments 3. a (non assessed) thesis seminar, which meets every two weeks in both semesters.
ECON4102 Economics Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ECON4101
Refer to ECON4101
ECON4103 Economics Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ECON4102
Refer to ECON4101
ECON4104 Economics Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ECON4103
Refer to ECON4101

English

ENGL1008 Australian Texts: International Contexts

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Kirkpatrick Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial /week Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial task (20%), 1x1500wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%)
This unit explores how Australian authors write in, to and about the wider world. It will open up a range of questions: how international influences work in Australian writing; how Australian texts rewrite authoritative texts of other cultures; how Australian texts imagine other places; how careers, reputations, publication and reception take place within and beyond the nation. In addressing these questions, the unit will focus on issues of authority, identity, representation, translation, borders and authenticity.
Textbooks
Texts may include works by authors such as Gail Jones, Patrick White, Christina Stead, Nam Le and others
ENGL1009 Reading English Texts

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Barry Spurr Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd close reading assignment (20%), 1x1500wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%), tutorial participation (10%)
Interpretation of texts is the central concern of this unit. Key questions will include: what is 'reading'? what is a 'text'? what might the aims of interpretation be? Topic areas will include an introduction to the history of reading, the role of grammar in interpretation, the importance of the medium of the text (from medieval manuscripts to electronic books) and the role of literary theory. Authors will range from Chaucer and Shakespeare to the present day.
ENGL1011 Introduction to Film Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Hardie Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (30%), tutorial participation (10%)
How do form and style structure our experience of film? This unit provides a critical introduction to elements of film making and viewing, moving through an exploration of formal components of film to consider film aesthetics in relation to the history of film scholarship. We will consider films in a variety of cultural and historical contexts, from early cinema to youtube, and introduce a series of "case studies" to explore historical, cultural and material contexts of film production and consumption.
ENGL1026 Constructing the Fictive Self

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Victoria Burrows Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial presentation (15%), 1x2000wd essay (45%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
What makes the subject of identity so compelling? How are we ourselves involved in the construction of such identity?
This unit explores the topic of self in a range of texts, both literary and filmic. It will provide an opportunity for students to analyse and interrogate the construction of self in a variety of social contexts by focusing on textual representations of sexuality, race and gender in ways that are relevant to being and living in today's world.
ENGL1801 English Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point junior unit of study in English at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Student Advisor.
ENGL1802 English Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point junior unit of study in English at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Student Advisor.
ENGL2613 Literature, Politics and Modernity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof William Christie Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points from English) OR (6 junior credit points from English plus AMST1001) Prohibitions: ENGL2013 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x1500wd take-home exercise (35%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (15%)
This unit considers the creative interplay between literature and politics in the modern period (1789-1945), introducing and examining how authority, social structures and individual autonomy have been represented and analysed in real and imagined settings. Using an array of forms including novels, poems, documents, essays and film, we look at topics such as revolution, equality, imperialism, the environment and utopias. We track historical changes in how political power has operated and been challenged at the personal, national and global levels.
Textbooks
'The Norton Anthology of English Literature' Vol 2, 9th edition; Dickens: 'Hard Times'
ENGL2627 Screening Sexuality

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Kate Lilley Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points including ARHT1002 or ENGL1025 or ENGL1026 or ENGL1011 OR 18 senior credit points from English or Australian Literature Prohibitions: ENGL2027 Assessment: 1x1500wd word essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit explores the relationship between cinema and sexuality in classic films through detailed, historicised readings. Questions to be investigated include the erotics of cinematic genre and form; the sexual politics of representation and spectatorship; stardom, scandal and cult appreciation; cinema and sexuality as technologies of modernity; cinema, sexuality and pedagogy.
Textbooks
'Laura' (dir. Preminger)
ENGL2638 Literature and Cinema

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Kelly Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points including ARHT1002 or ENGL1025 or ENGL1026 or ENGL1011 OR 18 senior credit points from English or Australian Literature Prohibitions: ENGL2038 Assessment: 1x500wd oral presentation (10%), 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x1500wd take-home exercise (40%)
This unit will examine issues arising from a comparative study of literature and cinema. Our focus will be on issues arising from a consideration of the continuities and discontinuities between the two mediums, including: the cultural and historical contexts of literary and cinematic texts; authorship, auteurism and aesthetic authority; adaptation and intertextuality; the figurative styles of literature and cinema; narrative and narration in literature and cinema; genre study.
ENGL2640 Shakespeare

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Huw Griffiths Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points from English or Australian Literature Prohibitions: ENGL2040 Assessment: 1x500wd metaphor exercise (20%), 1x2000wd essay (45%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%)
This unit is an intensive study of plays by Shakespeare in a variety of genres, particularly focusing on current critical interventions, as well as the detailed reading of Shakespeare's dramatic language. Current approaches to Shakespeare read his texts as a way of thinking about ideas of urgent concern in the twenty first century: the environment and ideas of the natural; sexuality and gender; scepticism and belief. Watching film versions of the plays will form an integral part of our study.
Textbooks
'The Norton Shakespeare', gen. ed. Stephen Greenblatt
ENGL2648 Travellers' Tales

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Vanessa Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from English Prohibitions: ENGL2048 Assessment: 1x500wd equivalent class presentation (10%), 1x1500wd close-reading exercise (40%), 1x2500wd take-home exercise (50%)
This unit explores a range of texts, from the Ancient world to the twentieth century, encompassing real and imaginary voyages of travel and exploration. We examine both the narrative structure and imagery of the voyage, and the contexts of encounter or empire that these reflect or disguise. The unit considers the ways in which generic themes and literary structures find articulation in particular cultural and political contexts. Students will sample a broad spectrum of narrative modes, complemented by visual resources.
Textbooks
Homer: 'The Odyssey';
ENGL2653 Western Theories of Language

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Riemer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points from English) or (6 junior credit points from English and AMST1001) Prohibitions: ENGL2053 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial notes (10%), 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
An introduction to the history of Western ideas about the structure, origin and use of language, with a particular focus on theories of English grammar and on the main theoretical developments of the 20th century. Students will consider the evolution of grammatical and rhetorical thought with reference both to the inherent constraints on linguistic theorizing, and to the varying ideological currents that have shaped Western ideas on language structure and use from antiquity to the present.
Textbooks
A course reader will be available from the University Copy Centre.
ENGL2656 From the Metaphysicals to Milton

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Barry Spurr Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points from English or Australian Literature Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (55%), 1x2hr exam (45%)
The English Renaissance of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries presents an extraordinary variety of literary themes and styles, from love lyrics to the most profound religious meditations, from the brief utterances of songs and sonnets to the epic scope of 'Paradise Lost', from personal revelation to urgent political and social commentary.
This unit of study offers a survey of the period, in historical, cultural and aesthetic terms, and focuses closely on the poetry of Spenser, Donne, Herbert, Milton and Marvell.
Textbooks
'The Norton Anthology of Poetry', 5th edn.
ENGL2658 Love and Desire in Early Modern England

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Liam Semler Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points from English) or (6 junior credit points from English and AMST1001) Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (25%), 1x1500wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd take-home exercise (35%)
This unit is an introduction to texts and concepts of the early modern period (1550-1750). It specifically looks at the languages used to investigate love and desire in early modernity. Students will explore works by Shakespeare and other male and female writers and be encouraged to discover relationships between emotion, reason, poetic language, rhetoric, politics and sexuality.
Textbooks
'Broadview Anthology of British Literature Vol. 2: The Renaissance and Early Seventeenth Century
ENGL2659 The 18th Century: Scandal & Sociability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicola Parsons Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points from English or Australian Literature Assessment: 1x1500wd research exercise (35%), 1x2500wd research essay (45%), 1x500wd discussion board posts (20%)
This unit examines the development of literature during the eighteenth century through two important literary and social figurations: scandal and sociability. We will investigate tropes of conversation, politeness and community as constitutents of literary texts as well as components of the spaces in which they were consumed. In addition, we will examine current theories regarding the development of a public sphere and the shifting social and cultural location of reading.
Textbooks
Delarivier Manley, 'The Adventures of Rivella';
ENGL2660 Reading the Nation: American Literature

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Gleeson-White Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from English) or (6 junior credit points from English and AMST1001) Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (45%), 1x500wd class exercise (15%), 1x1500wd take-home exercise (40%)
In this unit, we study a variety of American literary and visual texts to consider what it means to read "nationally". We first examine the rise of literary nationalism to look then at the ways in which exigencies of empire, race and ethnicity, and gender and sexuality, for example, have exerted pressure on the fantasy of a cohesive national culture. We will also consider the transnational turn of recent decades to understand the nation's function in a global context.
ENGL2662 Deceit, Disguise and Medieval Narrative

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lawrence Warner Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points from English) or (6 junior credit points from English and AMST1001) Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x2hr exam (50%)
In the Middle Ages notions of deceit, disguise, and temptation permeated how people thought about the world, their place in it, and the roles of God, the devil, and death. This worldview generated some of the most exciting, moving, and even comic literature of the Middle English tradition, ranging from Chaucer's 'Canterbury Tales' to the recollections of the mystical Margery Kempe. This unit of study focuses the varied ways in which poets, playwrights, and memoirists negotiated a world of tricksters.
Textbooks
Chaucer: 'Pardoner's and Nun's Priest's Tales';
ENGL2664 Transpacific American Literature 1838-99

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Paul Giles Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from English Assessment: 1x2hr exam (30%), 1x500wd presentation (10%), 1x1500wd essay (25%), 1x2000wd research essay (35%)
This unit of study will consider ways in which American Literature during the second half of the ninteenth century engaged with the opening up of Pacific space. Questions to be considered will be the nature of westward expansion, the opening up of California and its engagement with Mexico, the relation of native peoples to U.S. nationhood both on the mainland and the Pacific Islands. A representative range of poets and prose writers will be studied.
ENGL2811 English Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in English at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Student Advisor in the Department of English.
ENGL2812 English Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in English at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Student Advisor in the Department of English.
ENGL2813 English Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in English at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Student Advisor in the Department of English.
ENGL2814 English Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in English at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Student Advisor in the Department of English.
ENGL2815 English Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in English at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Student Advisor in the Department of English.
ENGL2816 English Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point Senior unit of study in English at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Student Advisor in the Department of English.
ENGL2817 English Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point Senior unit of study in English at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Student Advisor in the Department of English.
ENGL2818 English Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point Senior unit of study in English at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Student Advisor in the Department of English.
ENGL3612 Metaphor and Meaning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Riemer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points from English or Australian Literature Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x4000wd essay (60%)
Metaphors challenge received understandings of the nature of linguistic communication since they constitute a systematic case in which expressions are not used in accordance with their meanings. This unit adopts a variety of theoretical perspectives to explore the issue of metaphor within an articulated semiotics of language. Topics discussed include the nature of metaphorical meaning, the literal/metaphorical division, metaphor and language-use, cognitive aspects of metaphor, and the origins of metaphor as a category of European metalinguistic discourse.
Textbooks
Course reader available from the University Copy Centre
ENGL3633 Introduction to Old English

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Anlezark Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points from English or Australian Literature Prohibitions: Students who have completed ENGL3621, ENGL3622, ENGL3631, ENGL3632 must consult the unit co-ordinator. Assessment: 1x1000wd translation exercise (20%), 1x1500wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%)
Old English was the language of England from the fifth century until the twelfth. This earliest phase of the English literary tradition evolved against a background of cultural encounters: as the Anglo-Saxons encountered the culture of Rome, as they adopted and adapted the Christian religion, and as they reflected on their origins on the European continent. This unit introduces students to the language spoken and written by the Anglo-Saxons, and presents the opportunity to translate and read Old English texts.
Textbooks
'A Guide to Old English' (Mitchell and Robinson, 7th edition)
ENGL3635 Old Norse

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Anlezark Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points from English or Australian Literature Prohibitions: Students who have completed ENGL3621, ENGL3622, ENGL3631, ENGL3632, ENGL3636 must consult coordinator Assessment: 2x1500wd essays (70%), 1x1hr exam (30%)
Old Norse is the name given to the language of medieval Scandinavia which was spoken by the Viking invaders of Britain
in the early Middle Ages. Old Norse literature presents a rich variety, from mythological and legendary poetry to Icelandic sagas. This unit extends students' understanding of the Germanic culture which the Anglo-Saxons brought to Britain by introducing them to the language of medieval Iceland, the literary centre of medieval Scandinavia, through texts written in Old Icelandic.
Textbooks
Students are advised to consult the unit coordinator
ENGL3642 Medieval Literature: Dreams and Visions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jan Shaw Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points of English or Australian Literature Assessment: 1x1500wd annotated bibliography (25%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (35%)
This unit will study the literature of dreams and visions of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period against a range of literary and social backgrounds. The unit will begin with a survey of the classical and biblical background to works which may be defined as dreams or visions, as well as examining the relationship between the two genres and their transformations from the Middle Ages into the Renaissance.
Textbooks
'The Dream of the Rood';
ENGL3651 Christopher Marlowe

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Liam Semler Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points of English or Australian Literature Prohibitions: ENGL3922 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (25%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (35%)
Christopher Marlowe was a radically creative, dramatic and poetic genius. This unit of study is a collaborative pursuit of Marlowe via the interplay of four resources: his texts, our creativity, academic scholarship and educational theory (how humans learn and change). These resources will be used to explore Marlowe's poetics, radicalism and dramaturgy, and to contextualise his work in his own time and the present.
Textbooks
C. Marlowe. 'The Complete Plays'. Penguin Classics. Eds. Frank Romany and Robert Lindsey. 2003
ENGL3655 The Literary in Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bruce Gardiner Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit or above in 18 senior credit points from English Assessment: 1x2000wd seminar presentation of research proposal (30%), 1x4000wd research essay (70%)
This unit will introduce students to significant movements in modern and contemporary literary theory to think about what it means to speak of the literary. The unit of study begins by examining the question of "literariness" through its exposition and defence by a number of scholars. We will pursue the applications of their arguments through a selection of theoretical models, including queer and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and race theory, to consider the cultural and ideological work imaginative literature undertakes.
ENGL3658 Narrating Trauma

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Victoria Burrows Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points from English or Australian Literature Assessment: 1x1500wd close reading essay (25%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x2hr take-home exercise (35%)
This unit explores the theory and pracices of narrative trauma. The trauma texts we study will illustrate how trauma impacts on the construction of memory and its articulation in situations of war, the ongoing affects of racism and in individual personally traumatic events. However, these narratives also demonstrate how the art of representation in all its diversity can allow for movement beyond the interrupted consciousness of trauma and so provide a context in which indivdual and social healing may occur.
ENGL4101 English Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Huw Griffiths Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x2-hr seminars Prerequisites: Credit or above in 48 senior credit points from English including ENGL3655 Assessment: 1x15000wd thesis (40%) and 3x6000wd of written work, or its equivalent (60%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in English consists of a thesis written under the supervision of one, or more, members of academic staff and three seminars, selected from a range of options, that meet once a week for two hours. Students would usually do two seminar options in their first semester, and one in their second semester. One of the first semester options is assessed,
in part, through participation in the English department's honours conference. For more information, contact Dr Huw Griffiths, Honours Coordinator.
ENGL4102 English Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Huw Griffiths Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ENGL4101
Refer to ENGL4101
ENGL4103 English Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Huw Griffiths Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ENGL4102
Refer to ENGL4101
ENGL4104 English Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Huw Griffiths Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ENGL4103
Refer to ENGL4101

European Studies

EUST2607 Comparing Cultures: Europe and the East

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture-seminar/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at junior level in at least one of the following: European Studies, European, Middle Eastern or Classical Languages or Studies, Asian Studies, English, Government, History, Ancient History, Philosophy, Political Economy, Sociology, Media and Communication Assessment: 1x2500wd research essay (60%), 1x1000wd mid semester short answer test (20%), 1x1000wd end of semester short answer test (20%)
The diverse and multiethnic realities of today's world require a sound knowledge of the roots of European intellectual traditions along with their complex relationship with non-European cultures. Based on analysis and discussion of influential early texts from Plato to the Biblical and Islamic traditions, from India to China, this unit clarifies the presuppositions of the cultural dialogue between West and East. Using a comparative approach, it focuses on the use of intercultural concepts such as toleration, respect, assimilation and understanding.
EUST2610 Europe and its Others

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Bronwyn Winter Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture-seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at Junior level in at least one of the following: European Studies, European, Middle Eastern or Classical Languages or Studies, English, Government, History, Political Economy, Sociology, Media and Communication. Assessment: 1x1200wd group class presentation (30%), 1x1800wd report (30%), 1x3000wd take home exercise (40%)
Europe has been constructed over the centuries from many peoples, societies and cultures. How does Europe see itself now? What are the fracture lines of the new Europe, and how does it relate to its 'others'? In this unit we examine aspects of current European identity through three main foci: migration and the construction of material and symbolic border zones; civil society and the 'NGOisation' of Europe; and the role of culture in constructing or challenging European identity.
EUST2613 Romanticism and Revolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Françoise Grauby Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: At least 18 junior credit points from Part A of the Table of Units of Study, of which 12 credit points are from one subject area Assessment: 2x2000wd essays (2x45%), 1x500wd class presentation (10%)
This unit will examine the impact of the Romantic Movement across Europe by examining the historical and cultural connections between three European countries (Germany, England and France) during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We will consider the different national contexts separately, look at their influence on each other and at the influence of Romantic thought throughout European society, identifying ways in which Romantic ideas and values revolutionised social, cultural and aesthetic ideas, transformed worldviews and shaped the future of Europe.
EUST2616 European Modernity and the Greek Ideal

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anthony Dracopoulos Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at Junior level in at least one of the following: European Studies, European, Middle Eastern or Classical Languages or Studies, English, Government, History, Political Economy, Sociology, Media and Communication. Prohibitions: MGRK2657 Assessment: 1x1000wd presentation (20%), 1x1000wd short essay (20%), 1x4000wd essay (50%), tutorial participation (10%)
Throughout the last 2000 years, the Greek legacy has exerted a powerful influence on the European imagination. It has remained a reference point for western politics, thought and culture and has contributed significantly in shaping the European tradition of rational humanism and critical reflection. The unit draws on literature, images and films to survey the European preoccupation with Greek culture, from the Roman period to Postmodernism, and to explore the reasons behind this ongoing fascination.
EUST2805 European Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
EUST2806 European Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
EUST2807 European Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
EUST2808 European Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
EUST4011 European Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Morgan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two seminars, each seminar meets weekly for 2 hours for one semester Prerequisites: A credit average or above in 48 senior credit points in European Studies, including completion of the major. Assessment: A thesis of 18000 - 12000 words and 6000 - 8000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in European Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18000 - 20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000 - 8000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
Students should consult with the Director of European Studies, Professor Morgan, regarding seminar offerings in 2013 For more information, contact Prof Peter Morgan, Director of European Studies.
EUST4012 European Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Morgan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: EUST4011
Refer to EUST4011
EUST4013 European Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Morgan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: EUST4012
Refer to EUST4011
EUST4014 European Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Morgan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: EUST4013
Refer to EUST4011

Film Studies

FILM2601 Cinema Today: Traffic in Moving Images

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points including ARHT1002 or ENGL1011 or ENGL1025 or ENGL1026 Assessment: 1x500wd descriptive exercise (10%), 1x1500wd critical analysis (30%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%), participation (10%)
The twentieth century was known as the cinematic century. How best should we understand film today? Once confined to the physical space of the movie theatre, the cinematic image is now mobile, part of our everyday mediascapes. This unit considers the broad history of film from the perspective of the contemporary moment, while also providing the conceptual tools for analyzing the future of film in a media-convergent world.
FILM2810 Film Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Film at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Studies Coordinator.
FILM2811 Film Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Film at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Studies Coordinator.
FILM2812 Film Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Film at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Studies Coordinator.
FILM2813 Film Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Film at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Studies Coordinator.
FILM2814 Film Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Film at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Studies Coordinator.
FILM2815 Film Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Film at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Undergraduate Studies Coordinator.
FILM4101 Film Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bruce Isaacs (Semester 1), Dr Richard Smith (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 4x workshops/semester Prerequisites: Credit average or better in 48 senior credit points in Film Studies. Candidates who do not have this prerequisite should contact the Honours Coordinator to determine possible waiving of the prerequisite Assessment: 1x18000-20000wd thesis (60%), 2x6000-8000wd written works from one seminar and one workshop (2x20%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Film Studies consists of: 1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff, 2. a seminar (What is Cinema Studies) that meets weekly for two hours for one semester 3. a workshop (Studying Fim Festivals) that meets during one semester. The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar and the workshop require 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent. The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars and workshop is worth 20%.
FILM4102 Film Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bruce Isaacs (Semester 1), Dr Richard Smith (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: FILM4101
Refer to FILM4101
FILM4103 Film Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bruce Isaacs (Semester 1), Dr Richard Smith (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: FILM4102
Refer to FILM4101
FILM4104 Film Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bruce Isaacs (Semester 1), Dr Richard Smith (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: FILM4103
Refer to FILM4101

French Studies

FRNC1611 Junior French Introductory 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alice Caffarel Session: Semester 1,Summer Main,Winter Main Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: Complete beginners, or less than 2 years of French, or less than 65% in Beginners HSC French Prohibitions: FRNC1101 Assessment: continuous assessments: participation and weekly exercises online and face-to-face (equivalent to 900wds) (20%), 2xgrammar tests (equivalent to 1350wds) (30%), 1xoral test (equivalent to 1350wds) (30%), 1xwritten test (equivalent to 900wds) (20%)
This unit is based both on communicative methodology and functional approach to language. Its main objective is to teach the learner how to communicate and use grammar appropriately in a range of situations, while learning about French culture. Speaking, writing, listening and reading comprehension skills, will be developed through communicative activities. In addition, online resources and grammar activities will complement face-to-face teaching. This unit provides the essential skills for negotiating in and understanding everyday situations. FRNC1612 is the standard progression.
Textbooks
Di Giura, M. and Beacco, J-C. (2007). Alors? Méthode de français Niveau A1
FRNC1612 Junior French Introductory 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alice Caffarel Session: Semester 2,Summer Late,Winter Main Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: FRNC1611 or FRNC1101 Prohibitions: FRNC1102 Assessment: continuous assessment: participation and weekly exercises online and face-to-face and written expression (equivalent to 2250wds) (50%), 1xoral exam (20%), 1xwritten exam (equivalent to 2250wds) (30%)
FRNC1612 Junior French 2 is the continuation of FRNC1611 Junior French 1. It aims at strengthening students' oral communication skills and at developing further their written skills (reading and writing). Having completed FRNC1612 Junior French 2, students in their second year will normally enter FRNC2611 Senior French 1.
Textbooks
Robbe-Grillet, A (1985). Djinn. Un trou entre les pavés disjoints
FRNC1621 Junior French Intermediate 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carolyn Stott Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: Less than 80% in HSC French Continuers or more than 65% in HSC French Beginners Prohibitions: FRNC1201 Assessment: class participation and WebCT discussion board (10%), online homework exercises (equivalent 400wds) (10%), 2xwritten compositions in French (equivalent 1000wds) (20%), 2xwritten grammar tests in French (equivalent 1000wds) (20%), 1xcomprehension (aural & reading) and dictation test in French (equivalent 800wds) (20%), 1xoral test in French (4 minutes, equivalent 800wds) (20%)
This unit is designed for students who have studied some French but have not taken the Higher School Certificate examinations, or have less than 80% in French Continuers or Extension unit, or more than 65% in Beginners. It is based on a communicative approach and provides a systematic review of spoken and written French, building on students' previous experience of the language.
Textbooks
St. Onge & St Onge, Interaction (8th edition) 2010 - package comprises text, audio CD and Heinle Access card, which includes an online Student Activity Manual
FRNC1622 Junior French Intermediate 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1621 or FRNC1201 Prohibitions: FRNC1202 Assessment: class participation (10%), online homework exercises (equivalent 400wds) (10%), 2xwritten compositions in French (equivalent 1000wds) (20%), 2xwritten grammar tests in French (equivalent 1000wds) (20%), 1xcomprehension (aural & reading) and dictation in French (equivalent 800wds) (20%), 1xoral test (4 minutes, equivalent to 800wds) (20%)
This unit is the continuation of FRNC1621 Junior French 3. It continues to develop speaking, listening, writing and reading skills, while providing further insights into contemporary French culture. Having completed FRNC1622 Junior French 4, students in their second year will usually enter FRNC2611 Senior French 1.
Textbooks
St. Onge & St Onge, Interaction (8th edition) 2010 - package comprises text, audio CD and Heinle Access card, which includes an online Student Activity Manual
FRNC1631 Junior French Advanced 5

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Françoise Grauby Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSC French Continuers and Extension or more than 80% in Continuers French Prohibitions: FRNC1301 Assessment: class participation (15%), language: 2x200wd written assignments in French (equivalent to 800wds in English) (30%), 1xwritten class test in French (equivalent to 1500wds in English) (20%), 1x4-5 minute oral test in French (equivalent to 1000wds in English) (20%), Reading: written class test in French (equivalent to 1200wds in English) (15%)
This unit is designed for students who have completed HSC French Continuers and Extension or obtained more than 80% in Continuers. It consists of two segments (Practical Language and Reading) that together seek to develop speaking, writing, listening and reading skills, while providing an insight into contemporary French culture.
Textbooks
Course booklets to be purchased from the University Copy Centre
FRNC1632 Junior French Advanced 6

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francoise Grauby Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1631 or FRNC1301 Prohibitions: FRNC1302 Assessment: class participation (10%), Practical Language: 2x200wd written assignments in French (equivalent to 800wds in English) (30%), 1xwritten class test in French (equivalent to 1000wds in English) (20%), 1x3 minute oral test in French (equivalent to 700wds in English) (5%), Reading: 1x1hr test on medieval literature (equivalent to 1000wds in English) (15%), 1x3 minute oral exercise on theatre in French (equivalent to 1000wds in English) (20%)
This unit is the continuation of the first semester unit FRNC1631. Like that unit, it consists of two segments (Practical Language and Reading) that together seek to develop speaking, writing, listening and reading skills, while providing an insight into contemporary French culture.
Textbooks
Aucassin et Nicolette, Garnier Flammarion
FRNC1801 French Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Int July,Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying overseas.
FRNC1802 French Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Int July,Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying overseas.
FRNC2611 Senior French Intermediate 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sonia Wilson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1622 or FRNC1612 or FRNC1202 or FRNC1102 Prohibitions: FRNC2103 Assessment: 2x400wd in-class tests (35%), 2x15 minute aural tests (15%), 1x300wd writing test (20%), 3x200wd short take home assignments (10%), 1x10 minute oral test (20%)
This unit is based on a communicative approach and concentrates on interactive exercises and activities to consolidate speaking, listening, writing and reading skills, reinforce grammar, extend vocabulary and improve confidence in communication. This unit is normally taken by specialist students in conjunction with FRNC2614 French Reading 1.
Textbooks
Collins-Robert French Dictionaries.
FRNC2612 Senior French Intermediate 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sonia Wilson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC2611, FRNC2103 Prohibitions: FRNC2104 Assessment: classwork (equivalent to 600wds) (15%), written tests (equivalent to 2600wds) (65%), oral tests (equivalent to 800wds) (20%)
This unit is based on a communicative approach and concentrates on interactive exercises and activities to develop skill in complex sentence formation and communicative functions, extend vocabulary, learn about aspects of French culture and acquire skills necessary for oral class presentations and essay writing in French. This unit is normally taken by specialist students in conjunction with FRNC2615 French Reading 2. Having completed FRNC2612 Senior French 2, students in their third year will enter FRNC2621 Senior French 3.
Textbooks
Collins-Robert French Dictionaries.
FRNC2614 French Reading 1: Text and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Françoise Grauby Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1612 or FRNC1622 or FRNC1102 or FRNC1202 Prohibitions: FRNC3631, FRNC2501, FRNC3621, FRNC3622 Assessment: 3xwritten assignments (equivalent to 6000wds in English in total); 1xclass test (30%); 1xcommentary on text (30%), 1xessay (30%), participation and preparation (10%)
Note: This unit is required for students intending to major or take options in their third year
This unit provides a socio-historical and cultural framework for students' studies within the department and develops reading, analytical and critical skills through the close study of a variety of contemporary, authentic texts. The segment presents an overview of the social transformations France has undergone in the twentieth century and the political challenges it confronts as it attempts to redefine its role in the world and in Europe.
Textbooks
A dossier of texts to be purchased from the University Copy Centre
FRNC2615 Literature and Theatre

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC2614, FRNC2501 Prohibitions: FRNC2502, FRNC3631, FRNC3621 Assessment: 1x1000wd class test (10%), 1x1000wd commentary (10%), 1xoral presentation (equivalent to 1500wds) (30%), 1x2500wd essay (50%)
Note: this unit is required for students intending to major or take options in their third year
This unit continues the study of French national and cultural identity through the centuries, the development of reading, analytical and critical skills, and the practice of oral and written French. It places greater emphasis on literary texts, including study of narrative fiction and a play. It is designed for students in the second year of the beginner or intermediate streams, to be taken by specialist students in conjunction with FRNC2612.
Textbooks
Aucassin et Nicolette, Garnier-Flammarion
FRNC2621 Senior French Intermediate 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Caroline Lipovsky Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr language class/week, 1x1-hr language class/week Prerequisites: FRNC2612 or FRNC2104 Prohibitions: FRNC3105 Assessment: 3xwritten class tests in French (equivalent to 3000wds in English) (60%), 1x4-5 minute oral test in French (equivalent to 1500wds in English) (30%), participation (10%)
This unit follows on from FRNC2612 Senior French Intermediate 2. It seeks to develop speaking, writing, listening and reading skills while providing an insight into contemporary French culture. The unit is based on a communicative approach to language learning. Students' active participation through teamwork, role-playing and other interactive techniques is an essential aspect of all classes.
Textbooks
Course booklets to be purchased from University Copy Centre
FRNC2622 Senior French Intermediate 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Caroline Lipovsky Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr language class/week, 1x1-hr language class/week Prerequisites: FRNC2621 or FRNC3105 Prohibitions: FRNC3106 Assessment: 3xwritten class tests in French (equivalent to 3000wds in English) (60%), 2xoral tests in French (equivalent to 1,500wds in English) (30%), participation (10%)
This unit is a continuation of FRNC2621. It provides further insights into contemporary French culture and will lead to simple discussions on French cultural issues and current affairs.
Textbooks
Course booklets to be purchased from University Copy Centre
FRNC2651 Introduction à la Linguistique

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alice Caffarel Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: FRNC1302 or FRNC1632 or FRNC2502 or FRNC2615 Prohibitions: FRNC2602 Assessment: classwork and online discussions (20%), 2xsmall in-class assignments (equivalent to 500wds each) (2x20%), 1xfinal text analysis and interpretation (equivalent to 4000wds) (40%)
This unit is a general introduction to linguistics and in particular functional linguistics. It explores language as a system of choices for making meaning in various contexts and aims at providing students with an understanding of what we do when we use language, and grammar, in particular.
Textbooks
Caffarel, A. 2008. A Systemic Functional Grammar of French: From Grammar to Discourse. London: Continuum
FRNC2655 Professional French

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Marie-Therese Barbaux, Dr Caroline Lipovsky Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1632 or FRNC2622 Prohibitions: FRNC3631 Assessment: 2xwritten assignments in French (e.g. business letter, CV) (equivalent to 1000wds each) (30%), 2xwritten class test in French (equivalent to 3000wds) (50%), 1xoral test in French (20%)
With its business orientation, this language unit aims at developing the communicative and cultural skills necessary to operate successfully in a French or francophone professional environment. Students will develop their oral and written skills in a professional context. They will also be familiarised with French business practices and will reflect on cross-cultural issues that affect language and communication in the workplace.
FRNC2666 Research Methods in French Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michelle Royer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: Credit in FRNC1632 or FRNC2615 or FRNC1302 or FRNC2502 Assessment: 1x10-15 minute class presentation in French (equivalent to 3000wds in English) (30%), 1xresearch methodology project in French (equivalent to 3000wds in English) (60%), class participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit is a prerequisite for admission to honours but may also be taken by students with a credit average as an additional unit. It introduces students to research methodologies and practices in various aspects of French Studies and provides students more generally with the basic tools for carrying out research in the humanities and social sciences.
FRNC2681 French Narrative Cinema

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michelle Royer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: FRNC1632 or FRNC1302 or FRNC2615 or FRNC2502 Prohibitions: FRNC2802 Assessment: 1xoral presentation (equivalent to 2000wds) (30%), classwork (equivalent to 1000wds) (10%), written assignments (equivalent to 3000wds) (60%), all assessment is in French
This unit will explore the ways in which French cinema and society have interacted since WWII. It will examine how French society has been represented in fiction films and how major socio-political events have shaped French cinema. We will explore some basic concepts in French film theory and analytical methods derived from them. Film screenings are an integral part of the unit, and students must arrange their timetable so that they can watch each film at least once.
Textbooks
A dossier of texts to be purchased from the University Copy Centre
FRNC2692 The Second French Revolution?

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Bronwyn Winter Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: FRNC1632 or FRNC1302 or FRNC2615 or FRNC2502 Prohibitions: FRNC2702 Assessment: 1x20-30 minute group debate presentation in French (equivalent to 2500wds in English) (40%), 1x1800wd essay in French (equivalent to 3500wds in English); (60%) (total assessment equivalent to 6000wds)
In the second half of the twentieth century, French society underwent unprecedented changes, which continue to inform political debate in the third millennium. This unit of study examines the nature of those changes and explores their impact on those caught up in them and on contemporary debates. It draws on the work of theorists such as Simone de Beauvoir, Aimé Césaire and Pierre Bourdieu, and considers the impact of political figures and social movements on both the left and right.
Textbooks
A dossier of texts to be purchased from the University Copy Centre.
FRNC2803 French Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying overseas.
FRNC2804 French Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying overseas.
FRNC2805 French Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying overseas.
FRNC2806 French Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying overseas.
FRNC2807 French Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Int July,Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying overseas.
FRNC2808 French Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Int July,Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying overseas.
FRNC3621 Senior French Advanced 5

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Marie-Therese Barbaux Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hr language class/week Prerequisites: FRNC1632 or FRNC1302 Prohibitions: FRNC2303 Assessment: 1xwritten assignment in French (equivalent to 2000wds in English) (30%), 1xwritten class test in French (equivalent to 1000wds in English) (25%),1xgrammar test (equivalent to 1000wds) (25%), 1xcomprehension class test in French (equivalent to 500wds in English) (10%), preparation and participation (10%)
This unit will provide a review of formal grammar, concentrating on complex sentences, paragraph and text structure, as well as placing emphasis on oral and written receptive and active communicative skills through functionally-oriented language activities. A range of authentic and semi-authentic material will be used, drawn from written and audiovisual media and occasional literary sources, covering topics of contemporary interest and providing vocabulary development. This unit of study is normally taken by specialist students in combination with one of the options.
Textbooks
J. Ollivier, Grammaire Française, 4th edition
FRNC3653 French Translation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit in FRNC1632, FRNC1302, FRNC2615 or FRNC2502 Prohibitions: FRNC3810 Assessment: 1xwritten assignment (equivalent to 500wds in English) (10%), 2xportfolio of written translation tasks (equivalent to 1500wds in English each) (2x20%), 1xwritten test (equivalent to 2500wds in English) (40%), participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
An investigation into the theory and practice of translation, from French into English. Students will be required to undertake weekly exercises in translation and to build a translation portfolio with critical and analytical commentary (equivalent to 3000 word essay overall).
FRNC3655 French Sociolinguistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Caroline Lipovsky Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: FRNC1302 or FRNC1632 or FRNC2502 or FRNC2615 Assessment: 1x10-12 minute class presentation in French language (equivalent to 3000wds in English) (30%), 1xresearch based essay in French language (equivalent to 3000wds in English) (60%), participation (10%).
The focus of this unit is French language. It will familiarise students with the history, status and profile of the main varieties of French outside France and current issues in language policy in the French speaking world, while introducing them to key concepts such as language use, linguistic variation (according to gender, age, social origin, etc.), or issues of bilingualism and identity. Through critical reading and practice, students will learn how to design, conduct and report research projects regarding French language.
FRNC3682 French Popular Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Françoise Grauby Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: FRNC1632 or FRNC1302 or FRNC2615 or FRNC2502 Prohibitions: FRNC3805, FRNC3806 Assessment: class participation (10%), 1x10-12 minute class presentation (equivalent to 3000wds in English) (40%), 1x1500wd essay in French (equivalent to 3000wds in English) (50%)
The aim of this unit is to define and study French popular culture. What are the distinctions between popular culture and elite culture? How is the audience characterised? By studying different media (popular literature, advertising, comic strips, etc.), we will analyse the elements that characterise popular culture and discuss its social, ideological and psychological functions. The theoretical discussions will be based on the studies of Barthes, Eco and Baudrillard.
Textbooks
Course booklet to be purchased from the University Copy Centre
FRNC3801 French In-Country Study A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carolyn Stott Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying in an approved course at an overseas tertiary level institution.
FRNC3812 French In-Country Study B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carolyn Stott Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying overseas in an institution with which the University of Sydney does not have an exchange agreement.
FRNC3813 French In-Country Study C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carolyn Stott Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying overseas in an institution with which the University of Sydney does not have an exchange agreement.
FRNC3814 French In-Country Study D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carolyn Stott Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying overseas in an institution with which the University of Sydney does not have an exchange agreement.
FRNC4011 French Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Bronwyn Winter Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two seminars, each seminar meets weekly for 2 hours for one semester Prerequisites: 48 senior credit points in French Studies with a credit average or above, including completion of the major and FRNC2666 Research Methods in French Studies and FRNC3631 Senior French Language (or equivalent). Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words in length and 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in French Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words. Each seminar requires 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
Students should consult with the Honours Coordinator, Assoc Prof Bronwyn Winter, regarding seminar offerings in 2013
For more information, contact Assoc Prof Bronwyn Winter, Honours coordinator.
FRNC4012 French Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: FRNC4011
Refer to FRNC4011
FRNC4013 French Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: FRNC4012
Refer to FRNC4011
FRNC4014 French Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: FRNC4013
Refer to FRNC4011

Gender and Cultural Studies

GCST1601 Introduction to Cultural Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Guy Redden Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x online reflective learning journal equivalent to 2000 words (40%), 1x group presentation (10%), 1x2000wd essay (40%) and participation (10%)
Cultural studies explores everyday life, media and popular culture. It shows us how we can make sense of contemporary culture as producers, consumers, readers and viewers, in relation to our identities and communities. How do various cultural texts and practices convey different kinds of meaning and value? Drawing upon key approaches in the field, students will learn how to analyse cultural forms such as advertising, television, film and popular music.
GCST1602 Introduction to Gender Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Probyn-Rapsey Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x400wd critical summaries (30%), 1xpresentation (10%), 1x1200wd essay (30%), 1x1500wd essay (20%), participation (10%)
How does gender organise lives, bodies, sexualities and desires? How does gender relate to sex and sexuality? Are there really only two genders? How and why is gender such an integral part of how we identify ourselves and others? This unit introduces students to foundational concepts in the study of gender and critically engages with questions of identity, sexuality, family, the body, cultural practices and gender norms in light of contemporary gender theories.
GCST2603 Animal/Human Cultures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Probyn-Rapsey Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Assessment: 1x2000wd research essay (50%) and 1x2000wd research journal (50%)
The idea of the 'animal' infuses western knowledge about what constitutes the 'human'. From 'humanism' to 'posthumanism', this unit teases out various animal/human connections; classifying, seeing, domesticating, eating, making pets, writing, thinking about rights, rhetoric and representation. How do gender, race and class play out in the realm of the animal/human? What cultural formations support and also challenge the line between animal and human?
GCST2604 Sex, Violence and Transgression

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Prohibitions: WMST2004 Assessment: 1x2000wd case study (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exam (40%), online participation (20%)
Violence is one of the most prevalent themes in popular culture and public discourse today. It shapes our lives in all sorts of ways, both real and imagined. Incorporating concepts and theoretical tools from gender and cultural studies, this unit will examine the construction and representation of violence in relation to sexuality, transgression, difference and power.
GCST2605 Race and Representation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jane Park Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points, including GCST1601 or GCST1602 Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), 500wd group presentation (15%), 400wd journal (15%), 1000wd midterm essay (25%), 2200wd final research essay (35%)
This unit introduces students to cultural theories about race and ethnicity and uses these theories to examine representations of racial minorities across a range of media such as film, literature and performance within multiple national contexts. By interrogating the relationship between these representations and those of other identity categories including gender, sexuality and class, it provides a complex understanding of how 'race' as an institutional force and lived experience helps shape perceptions of ourselves and others.
GCST2606 Genres in Cultural Context

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ruth Barcan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Assessment: 1x1500wd short exercise (25%), 1x2000wd close reading (35%), 1x2500wd viewing/reading journal (40%)
This unit introduces students to some theories of genre and to textual examples of specified genres. Several genres will be studied; possible examples may include romance, soap opera, sci-fi, horror, the musical, music video, and reality TV. Examples will be drawn from different media and from both popular and "high" culture. Key themes will include the place of gender in genre and the role of textual conventions in structuring meaning.
GCST2607 Bodies, Sexualities, Identities

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kane Race Session: Semester 1,Summer Late Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: WMST2007 Assessment: tutorial participation and exercises (10%), 1x1500wd essay (40%), 1x2500wd essay (50%)
In this unit of study we will examine the ways in which feminist and other cultural theories have used bodies and sexualities in order to theorise difference and identity. The body and sexuality have been shown to be a major site for the operation of power in our society. We will look at how bodies and sexualities have given rise to critical understandings of identity. The unit of study will be devoted to working through some of the major theories of sexuality and embodiment, and the analysis of cultural practices.
GCST2609 Masculinity, Mateship and Men's Lives

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anna Hickey-Moody Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Prohibitions: WMST2009 Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), 1xtutorial presentation (10%), 1x1500wd write-up of presentation (30%) and 1x2000wd essay/take-home exam (50%)
What do men want? From a traditional focus on femininity in gender studies, it is increasingly clear that masculinity has undergone tremendous changes in the last several decades. From a perspective of gender and cultural studies, this unit examines the economic, social and cultural contexts in which masculinity is lived. We will consider different case studies focused on the changing representation of men in contemporary culture. These will include aspects of style and consumption, roles within workplaces, and in domestic practices.
GCST2610 Intimacy, Love and Friendship

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Gregg Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Prohibitions: WMST2010 Assessment: participation (10%), 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x1500wd essay (30%) and 1x2000wd final essay (50%)
This unit examines the representation and practices of intimate relations focusing especially on the intersection between intimacy and constructions of gender. Divided into three sections, the unit will examine theories of love and friendship, contemporary cultural representations of love, desire and friendship, and the ethics and politics of erotics. This unit will also examine new technologies of intimacy, and discuss their implications for gender and sexuality.
GCST2612 Youth Cultures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anna Hickey-Moody Session: Semester 2,Summer Late Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: WMST2012 Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), 1x tutorial presentation (10%), 1x1500wd write-up of presentation (30%), 1x2000wd essay/take-home exam (50%)
This unit examines academic and popular cultural ideas about youth and practices of youth culture. It will introduce students to some of the current parameters for studying youth cultural forms, practices and theories by drawing on research with young people. Points of focus will include discussion of youth, youth subcultures, filmic depictions of youth cultures, youth arts and critical perspectives on schooling. These seemingly diverse narratives and sites are brought together by the fact that they all play roles in shaping the lived experience of contemporary youth culture.
GCST2614 The Body: Theories, Practices, Cultures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ruth Barcan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week, 1x30min online participation/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Prohibitions: WMST2012 Assessment: 1x1000wd close reading exercise (25%), 1x1500wd analytical essay (35%), 1x2000wd final essay (40%) and 5x non-assessable posts to discussion board (online participation)
How are bodily life and social worlds intertwined? What meaning can be found in even the most mundane or intimate body practices and cultures? This unit introduces students to the cultural study of embodiment and the body, drawing on a variety of body practices, cultures and functions, including breathing, toileting, nudism, yoga and body modification. Key concepts include: the mind/body split; disgust and taboos; the creation of borders, surfaces and depths; and the plasticity of bodies in culture.
GCST2804 Gender Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GCST2805 Gender Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GCST2806 Gender Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GCST2810 Gender Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GCST2811 Gender Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GCST2812 Cultural Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GCST2813 Cultural Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GCST2814 Cultural Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GCST2815 Cultural Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GCST2817 Cultural Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GCST2818 Cultural Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GCST2819 Cultural Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GCST3603 Consumer Cultures, Environmental Futures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Elspeth Probyn Session: Semester 2,Winter Main Classes: 1x1.5-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week, 4 film screenings totalling 4.5hrs (equivalent to 0.5-hr/week) Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points, including 6 credit points in GCST Prohibitions: WMST3003 Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), 2x journal exercises (equivalent to 1000 words) (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), and 1x2000wd essay (35%)
Consumerism is a contradictory cultural formation. It is a source of meaning, pleasure and identity, but also a cause of environmental degradation, social injustice and, for some, individual alienation. This unit sets out some of the ethical, environmental and social problems associated with consumerism, and examines in detail some of the creative, ingenious and determined responses to these problems.
GCST4011 Cultural Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Gregg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: three seminars, each seminar meeting for 2 hours per week for one semester Prerequisites: Credit average in 48 credit points of Cultural Studies Assessment: a thesis of 15000 words and 6000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Cultural Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. three seminars, each seminar meeting for 2 hours per week for one semester
3. non-assessable participation in an Honours "mini-conference" held one month prior to thesis submission.
The thesis should be of 15,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6,000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 40% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Arguing the Point (Dr Melissa Gregg) (Sem 1)
Philosophy in the Feminine (Sem 1)
Key Thinkers for Cultural Studies (Prof Meaghan Morris) (Sem 1)
Modernism, Modernity and Modern Culture (Sem 2)
Identity, Place and Culture (Prof Meaghan Morris) (Sem 2)
Natures and Cultures of Bodies (Dr Kane Race) (Sem 2)
For more information, contact Dr Melissa Gregg, Honours coordinator.
GCST4012 Cultural Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Gregg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to GCST4011 Corequisites: GCST4011
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Refer to GCST4011
GCST4013 Cultural Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Gregg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to GCST4011 Corequisites: GCST4012
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Refer to GCST4011
GCST4014 Cultural Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Gregg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to GCST4011 Corequisites: GCST4013
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Refer to GCST4011
GCST4015 Gender Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Gregg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: three seminars, each seminar meeting for 2 hours per week for one semester Prerequisites: Credit average in 48 credit points of Gender Studies Assessment: a thesis of 15000 words and 6000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Gender Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. three seminars, each seminar meeting for 2 hours per week for one semester
3. non-assessable participation in an Honours "mini-conference" held one month prior to thesis submission.
The thesis should be of 15,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6,000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 40% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Arguing the Point (Dr Melissa Gregg) (Sem 1)
Philosophy in the Feminine (Sem 1)
Key Thinkers for Cultural Studies (Prof Meaghan Morris) (Sem 1)
Modernism, Modernity and Modern Culture (Sem 2)
Identity, Place and Culture (Prof Meaghan Morris) (Sem 2)
Natures and Cultures of Bodies (Dr Kane Race) (Sem 2)
For more information, contact Dr Melissa Gregg, Honours coordinator.
GCST4016 Gender Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Gregg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to GCST4015 Corequisites: GCST4015
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Refer to GCST4015
GCST4017 Gender Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Gregg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to GCST4015 Corequisites: GCST4016
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Refer to GCST4015
GCST4018 Gender Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Gregg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to GCST4015 Corequisites: GCST4017
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Refer to GCST4015

Germanic Studies

GRMN1111 Junior German 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prohibitions: HSC German Extension, German Continuers, German Beginners 70% or above Assessment: 1x300wd grammar and reading test (15%), 1x500wd grammar, reading and listening test (25%), 1x600wd listening/speaking test (10%), 1x2-hr exam (50%)
Practical language classes based on a communicative approach that aims to develop the following language skills: speaking and understanding basic conversational German, writing German of an everyday kind and reading simple German texts which will provide an insight into aspects of contemporary life in the German-speaking countries.
Textbooks
Funk et al, studio d A1. Deutsch als Fremdsprache. Kurs-und Übungsbuch (Cornelsen)
GRMN1122 Junior German 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrea Bandhauer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: GRMN1111 Assessment: 1x300wd grammar and reading test (15%), 1x500wd grammar, reading and listening test (25%), 1x600wd listening/speaking test (10%), 1x2-hr exam (50%)
Practical language classes based on a communicative approach. These classes will develop and extend the language skills acquired in Semester 1.
Textbooks
Funk et al, studio d A2. Deutsch als Fremdsprache. Kurs-und Übungsbuch (Cornelsen)
GRMN1211 Junior German 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HSC German Beginners 70% or above or German Continuers below 70% Assessment: 1x500wd reading comprehension test (7%), 1x600wd listening and comprehension test (7%), 1x200wd writing test (7%), 1x150wd grammar test (14%), 1x600wd speaking test (7%), 10x100wd take-home exercises (7%), 1x25 minute vocabulary test (15%), 1x50minute reading comprehension test (15%), 1x2-hr exam (21%)
Practical language classes: 3 hours per week. These classes provide a systematic review of each of the four language skills and a coordinated program to develop and extend these skills. Text study class: 1 hour per week. This part of the unit of study is designed to develop students' reading and comprehension skills; it also provides an introduction to the skills of literary analysis.
Textbooks
Funk et al, studio d B1. Kurs- und Übungsbuch (Cornelsen)
GRMN1222 Junior German 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrea Bandhauer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: GRMN1211 Assessment: 1x800wd reading comprehension test (7%)1x800wd listening and comprehension test (7%), 1x200wd writing test (7%), 1x150wd grammar test (14%), 1x600wd speaking test (7%), 10x100wd take-home exercises (7%), 1x30 minute vocabulary test (15%), 1x50minute reading comprehension test (15%), 1x2-hr exam (21%)
Practical language classes: 3 hours per week. These classes provide a systematic review of each of the four language skills and a coordinated program to develop and extend these skills. Text study class: 1 hour per week. This part of the course is designed to further develop students' reading and comprehension skills; it also provides an introduction to the skills of literary analysis.
Textbooks
Funk et al, studio d B1. Kurs- und Übungsbuch (Cornelsen) Funk et al, studio d B1. Vokabeltaschenbuch (Cornelsen) Niemann, studio d B1. Deutsch als Fremdsprache. Sprachtraining (Cornelsen) Teichert et al, Allerlei zum Lesen, 2nd edition (D.C. Heath and Company) Hering et al, em Übungsgrammatik (Hueber)
GRMN1311 Junior German 5

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HSC German Extension or German Continuers 70% or above Assessment: 1x1500wd reading comprehension test (7%), 1x300wd writing test (7%), 1x1500wd oral presentation (7%), 2x150wd vocabulary / grammar tests (14%), 1x1500wd listening comprehension test (7%), 10x200wd take-home exercises (7%), 1x1500wd tutorial presentation (15%), 1x900wd tutorial paper (15%), 1x2-hr exam (21%)
Practical language classes: 3 hours per week. These classes provide a systematic review of each of the four language skills and a coordinated program to develop and extend these skills. Literature class: 1 hour per week. Discussion of a selection of literary texts to develop students' appreciation of these genres and introduce them to the skills of literary and film analysis.
Textbooks
Dallapiazza et al, Ziel B2, Kursbuch Band 2
GRMN1322 Junior German 6

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrea Bandhauer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: GRMN1311 Assessment: 1x2000wd reading comprehension test (7%), 1x400wd writing test (14%), 1x1500wd speaking test (7%), 1x150wd vocabulary / grammar tests (7%), 1x2000wd aural comprehension test (7%), 10x200wd take-home exercises (7%), 1x1500wd tutorial presentation (15%), 1x900wd tutorial paper (15%), 1x2-hr exam (21%)
Practical language classes: 3 hours per week. These classes provide a systematic review of each of the four language skills and a coordinated program to develop and extend these skills. Literature class: 1 hour per week. Discussion of a variety of literary texts to develop students' appreciation of literature and introduce them to the skills of literary analysis. At the end of this unit students will be able to sit the TestDaF, the pre-requisite language examination for German universities.
Textbooks
Dallapiazza et al, Ziel B2, Kursbuch Band 2
GRMN2611 Senior German 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr seminar/week, 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: GRMN1122 Prohibitions: GRMN1211, GRMN1222, GRMN1311, GRMN1322 Assessment: 1x500wd reading comprehension test (10%), 1x600wd listening comprehension test (10%), 1x600wd speaking test (10%), 1x200wd writing test (10%), 1x150wd grammar test (20%), 10x100wd take-home exercises (10%), 1x2-hr exam (30%)
Using the most recent textbook materials which conform to both the European and International reference frameworks, this unit is designed to consolidate and extend the basic German knowledge gained in Junior German 1 and Junior German 2. Classes will practise both written, oral/aural and comprehension skills.
Textbooks
Funk et al, studio d B1. Kurs- und Übungsbuch (Cornelsen)
GRMN2612 Senior German 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr seminar/week, 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: GRMN2611 or GRMN2211 Prohibitions: GRMN1211, GRMN1222, GRMN1311, GRMN1322 Assessment: 1x800wd reading comprehension test (10%), 1x800wd listening comprehension test (10%), 1x600wd speaking test (10%), 1x200wd writing test (10%), 1x150wd grammar test (20%), 10x100wd take-home exercises (10%), 1x2-hr exam (30%)
Using the most recent textbook materials which conform to both the European and International reference frameworks, this unit is designed to consolidate and extend the basic German knowledge gained in Senior German 1. Classes will practise both written, oral/aural and comprehension skills.
Textbooks
Funk et al, studio d B1. Kurs- und Übungsbuch (Cornelsen)
GRMN2613 Senior German 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: GRMN2612 or GRMN1222 or GRMN2222 Prohibitions: GRMN1311, GRMN1322 Assessment: 1x1000wd reading comprehension test (10%), 1x300wd writing test (15%), 1x1000wd oral presentation (15%), 2x150wd vocabulary / grammar tests (10%), 1x800wd listening comprehension test (10%), 10x150wd take-home exercises (10%), 1x2-hr exam (30%)
Using the most recent textbook materials which conform to both the European and International reference frameworks, this unit is designed to consolidate and extend students' command of the German language by practising both written, oral/aural and comprehension skills at a level higher than the level already completed. At the completion of this unit students will have reached the equivalent of the 'Zertifikat Deutsch'.
Textbooks
Dallapiazza et al, Ziel B2, Kursbuch Band 1
GRMN2614 Senior German 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: GRMN2613 or GRMN2311 Prohibitions: GRMN1311, GRMN1322 Assessment: 1x1500wd reading comprehension test (10%), 1x300wd writing test (15%), 1x1000wd speaking test (15%), 1x150wd vocabulary / grammar tests (10%), 1x1500wd listening comprehension test (10%), 10x150wd take-home exercises (10%), 1x2-hr exam (30%)
Using the most recent textbook materials which conform to both the European and International reference frameworks, this unit is designed to consolidate and extend students' command of the German language by practising both written, oral/aural and comprehension skills at a level higher than the level already completed.
Textbooks
Dallapiazza et al, Ziel B2, Kursbuch Band 1
GRMN2615 Senior German 5

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: GRMN2614 or GRMN2322 Prohibitions: GRMN1311, GRMN1322 Assessment: 1x1500wd reading comprehension test (10%), 1x300wd writing test (15%), 1x1500wd oral presentation (15%), 2x150wd vocabulary / grammar tests (10%), 1x1500wd listening comprehension test (10%), 10x200wd take-home exercises (10%), 1x2-hr exam (30%)
Using the most recent textbook materials which conform to both the European and International reference frameworks, this unit is designed to consolidate and extend students' command of the German language by practising both written, oral/aural and comprehension skills at a level higher than the level already completed.
Textbooks
Dallapiazza et al, Ziel B2, Kursbuch Band 2
GRMN2616 Senior German 6

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: GRMN2615 Prohibitions: GRMN1311, GRMN1322 Assessment: 1x2000wd reading comprehension test (10%), 1x400wd writing test (15%), 1x1500wd speaking test (15%), 1x150wd vocabulary / grammar test (10%), 1x2000wd aural comprehension test (10%), 10x200wd take-home exercises (10%), 1x2-hr exam (30%)
Using the most recent textbook materials which conform to both the European and International reference frameworks, this unit is designed to consolidate and extend students' command of the German language by practising both written, oral/aural and comprehension skills at a level higher than the level already completed.
Textbooks
Dallapiazza et al, Ziel B2, Kursbuch Band 2
GRMN2617 Senior German 7

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jörn Hausner Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: GRMN2616 or GRMN1322 Prohibitions: GRMN2351, GRMN2362 Assessment: 1x1500wd presentation (20%), 1x2200wd reading comprehension / grammar test (10%), 1x2200wd listening / grammar comprehension test (10%), 1x2500wd class test (20%), 1x2-hr exam (40%)
Using the most recent textbook materials which conform to both the European and International reference frameworks, as well as additional materials, this unit is designed to consolidate and extend students' command of the German language by practising both written, oral/aural and comprehension skills at a level higher than the level already completed. In this unit students will especially acquire a good foundation on the cultural conditions leading to understanding and using the German language.
Textbooks
Lodewick, DSH & Studienvorbereitung 2020. Deutsch als Fremdsprache für Studentinnen und Studenten. Text- und Übungsbuch. (Fabouda)
GRMN2618 Senior German 8

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jörn Hausner Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: GRMN2617 Prohibitions: GRMN2362 Assessment: 1x1500wd presentation (15%), 1x250wd text production test (15%), 1x2200wd listening / grammar comprehension test (10%), 1x2500wd class test (20%), 1x2-hr exam (40%)
Using current materials, this unit is designed to consolidate and extend students' command of the German language by practising both written, oral/aural and comprehension skills at a level higher than the level already completed. In this unit students will especially acquire a good foundation on the specific structure of the German language and its background.
Textbooks
Lodewick, DSH & Studienvorbereitung 2020. Deutsch als Fremdsprache für Studentinnen und Studenten. Text- und Übungsbuch. (Fabouda)
GRMN2631 Reading Comprehension and Text Study

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (GRMN1111 and GRMN1122) or (GRMN1211 and GRMN1222) Prohibitions: GRMN1311, GRMN1322, GRMN2615, GRMN2616, GRMN2617, GRMN2618 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 3x1000wd class tests (30%), 1x1hr exam (30%)
This unit of study is particularly suitable for students who have completed Junior German 1 and 2. The emphasis will be on improving students' reading skills as a necessary prerequisite to literary analysis and interpretation.
Textbooks
Teichert et al, Allerlei zum Lesen, 2nd edition (D.C. Heath and Company)
GRMN2633 Topics in German Film

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrea Bandhauer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of German Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x1500wd written tutorial paper (25%), 1x1500wd class presentation (25%)
This unit of study will explore German film from the perspectives of film theory and historical culture. Discussions will situate films within the German political and cultural context of their time and study them from the perspective of contemporary cross-cultural critique. The unit may concentrate on the works of a specific director, a period or a genre, or deal with key social and political issues within a selection of German films.
Textbooks
German film course pack to be purchased from the University Copy Centre
GRMN2634 The Fantastic in German Literature

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of German not including GRMN1133 Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1xtutorial paper (1500wds) (25%), 1xclass presentation (1500wds) (25%)
This unit considers the fantastic as an essential aspect of literature. It will explore literary works in German of differing epochs and genres dealing with forms and subjects of the magic, uncanny, or supernatural, including aspects of science fiction. Several functions of the fantastic in literature - such as escapism, dealing with the rationally unexplainable, as well as depicting futuristic worlds and going through potential problematic situations - will be investigated.
Textbooks
Gebrüder Grimm, Blaubart (copy provided by the department)
GRMN2637 Business German

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrea Bandhauer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: GRMN1222, GRMN1322, GRMN2222 or GRMN2612 Assessment: 1x400wd essay (7.5%), 2x45min in class tests (20% total), 1x10min oral presentation (15%), 1x500wd written assignment (7.5%), 1x2hr exam (40%), participation (10%)
This unit develops and practices the language skills, both oral and written, necessary for working in a German business environment. It will deal with issues ranging from everyday communication within a business context, to in-depth analyses of specific economic topics.
Textbooks
Lévy-Hillerich, Kommunikation im Beruf - Für alle Sprachen: B1-B2 - Kommunikation in der Wirtschaft: Kursbuch mit Glossar auf CD-ROM, Fraus Verlag
GRMN2641 German Culture and Society 1806-1848

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Yixu Lu Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of German Assessment: 1x2500wd learning journal (40%), 1x1500wd class presentation (25%), 1x2hr written exam (35%)
This unit offers an introduction to German culture and society in the first half of the 19th century. It looks at how the foundations of the German nation state were laid in the wake of upheavals that began with the French Revolution, and at the traces of these developments in literature and society. Through analysing contemporary literary texts and examining cultural, social and political conditions, it builds an understanding of how German society moved towards a unified nation state and towards industrialisation.
Textbooks
Course pack to be purchased from the University Copy Centre
GRMN2683 German Literature and Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Yixu Lu Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit average in 12 Junior credit points of German, not including GRMN1111, GRMN1122 Assessment: 1x3500wd essay (55%), 1x1500wd tutorial paper (25%), 1x1000wd class presentation (20%)
(This is a special honours entry unit.) What is the place of literature in life? Why do people write and read literature? This unit will provide students with an overview of the history of German literature within its broader cultural context. It will look at different styles of writing and introduce different methodological ways of dealing with literary texts of various times. It will examine the role of literature within society and its importance for sociological and anthropological discourses.
Textbooks
Lessing: Emilia Galotti (suhrkamp 44)
GRMN2686 The German Wende in Literature & Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit average in 12 Junior credit points of German Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1xoral presentation including written summary equivalent to 1500wds (25%), 1x1500wd essay (25%)
Reunification and the cultural, societal and political changes that preceded and followed the fall of the Berlin Wall remain key issues in contemporary German culture and society. The seminar will introduce students to key aspects of the German "Wende" (Turnaround) and reunification, via the study of a selection of German texts produced since 1989. It will introduce students to key works that focus on the "Wende" and German reunification and its repercussions as well as the historical background.
Textbooks
Jens Sparschuh: Der Zimmerspringbrunnen Thomas Brussig: Helden wie wir Course pack to be purchased from the Copy Centre
GRMN2811 Germanic Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler (Semester 1) Dr Andrea Bandhauer (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GRMN2812 Germanic Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler (Semester 1) Dr Andrea Bandhauer (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GRMN2813 Germanic Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler (Semester 1) Dr Andrea Bandhauer (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GRMN2814 Germanic Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler (Semester 1) Dr Andrea Bandhauer (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GRMN2815 Germanic Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Birte Giesler (Semester 1) Dr Andrea Bandhauer (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GRMN4011 German Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Yixu Lu Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Semester 1: two seminars, each seminar meets weekly for two hours; Semester 2: one seminar, two hours per week Prerequisites: 48 senior credit points of German Studies with a credit average or above, including completion of the major and 12 credit points of special Honours entry units (2680 level). Assessment: A thesis of 15000 words and 7000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Germanic Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. three seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
The thesis should be of 15000 words in length. Each seminar requires 7000 - 8000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 55% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 15%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
1. Film Adaptations of German Language Literature (Dr Andrea Bandhauer)
2. Artificial Humans in German Literature and Film (Dr Birte Giesler) 3. Women and love in German literature from the Enlightenment to Romanticism (Assoc Prof Yix Lu) For more information, contact Assoc Prof Yixu Lu, Honours coordinator.
GRMN4012 German Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: GRMN4011
Refer to GRMN4011
GRMN4013 German Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: GRMN4012
Refer to GRMN4011
GRMN4014 German Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: GRMN4013
Refer to GRMN4011

Government and International Relations

GOVT1001 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GOVT1101 Australian Politics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anika Gauja Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1000wd critical research exercise (10%), 1x 2hr exam (40%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit introduces students to debates about the nature and limits of Australian democracy, to the major institutions of Australian politics, and to the distribution of power in Australian society. Major institutions and forces such as parliament, executive government, the federal system, political parties and the media are examined as arenas of power, conflict and consensus. Who rules? How? Which groups are excluded?
Textbooks
Texts to be advised.
GOVT1105 Geopolitics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ryan Griffiths (S1), Dr Diarmuid Maguire (S2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x1hr mid-term exam (20%), 1x2hr final exam (40%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit will examine how the contemporary international political order has emerged by focusing upon the interplay of diplomatic and strategic issues in the post-war world. It will begin with an analysis of the Cold War and its origins, tracing the development of Soviet-American rivalry, its manifestations in Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America, and the different ways in which that rivalry was played out. The collapse of the Soviet Union as both a superpower and a state and the disappearance of the communist bloc will be analysed, before surveying the post-Cold War international scene. Among the issues reviewed in the post-Cold War era will be the question of US hegemony and unilateralism vs. multilateralism, nuclear proliferation, the continuing tension between the first and the third worlds, questions of civilisational conflict, non-state actors and terrorism, democratisation, and regional conflict.
GOVT1202 World Politics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gil Merom; Dr David Smith (Summer) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 1x500wd essay (10%), 1x2300wd essay (35%), 1x2hr in-class test (40%) and tutorial participation (15%)
Note: In Summer School this unit is available to current HSC students only.
This unit introduces the core content of the field of international relations. The first part of the unit presents the realist, liberal, Marxist and constructivist paradigms of international relations. The second part of the unit discusses the key actors and processes political scientists define in the field, including the state, decision makers, bureaucratic organisations, and classes. The final part of the unit focuses on international security, international political economy, and global problems.
GOVT1881 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GOVT1882 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GOVT2112 Modern Political Thought

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alex Lefebvre Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations Assessment: 1x1500wd mid-semester take-home exercise (30%), 1x2500wd final essay (60%), and participation (10%).
This unit considers key themes in modern and contemporary political thought. It uses primary texts to address topics such as sovereignty, democracy, fascism, liberalism, human rights, politics and religion, violence, and political identity. Authors may include Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Kant, Nietzsche, Marx, J.S. Mill, Tocqueville, Rawls, Arendt, Schmitt, and Foucault.
GOVT2114 The Australian Political Party System

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government Prohibitions: GOVT2104 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd website review (20%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
The unit examines the Australian party system, including colonial-era pre-party politics, the development of major parties (Labor, Liberal and National) and minor parties (Democrats, Greens, One Nation etc), parties and ideology, parties and social movements, internal party politics, parties and the law, parties and elections, parties and parliamentary politics, and parties and public policy. Emphasis is placed on how theoretical and comparative models of political parties help to explain Australian party politics.
GOVT2119 Southeast Asia: Dilemmas of Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Lily Rahim Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government Prohibitions: GOVT2109 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (25%), 1x1hr mid-semester exam (20%), 1x1hr final exam (25%) and 1x2000wd tutorial presentation and participation (30%)
Until the 1997 East Asian economic/financial crisis, Southeast Asia was acclaimed as one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing regional economies in the Asia-Pacific sphere. Not surprisingly, the region has attracted enormous interest from social scientists and the wider business community in Australia. However, there is limited consensus about the causes for the region's economic performance and socio-political trajectory during the 'boom' and 'post-boom' years. This course aims to place the region's economic experiences and socio-political changes within a broader historical and comparative context. Such an approach allows us to better appreciate the economic continuities, understand the major socio-political dilemmas and changing patterns of development.
GOVT2221 Politics of International Economic Rels

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Mikler Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government Prohibitions: GOVT2201 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (30%), 1x1000wd tutorial presentation (20%) and participation (10%)
This unit provides an overview of four major theoretical approaches to international political economy and how these apply to understanding the practice of international economic relations. These theories are: economic nationalism, liberalism, neo-Marxism and poststructuralism. The unit analyses the theory and practice of economic relations by and between states, by focussing in particular on relations between the developed and developing world. It applies each of the four main theories to developing country regions. In this way students also become acquainted with the theory and practice of economic development.
GOVT2225 International Security in 21st Century

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gil Merom Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government Prohibitions: GOVT2205 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x2hr in-class exam (40%) and tutorial participation (20%)
This unit introduces the theoretical foundations, essential concepts and central issues in the field of international security. It provides students with analytical tools to understand and participate in current debates concerning security and threats. The first part of the unit provides an introduction to the theoretical interpretations of international security. The second part discusses security phenomena, problems and strategies, including the coercive use of force, deterrence, guerrilla and counterinsurgency, nuclear stability, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, crisis management, arms races and disarmament, security cooperation and security regimes. The discussion in this part includes a critical review of the dilemmas, strategies, and solutions in each of the issue areas.
GOVT2228 Environmental Politics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robert MacNeil Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government Prohibitions: GOVT2208 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x2hr exam (30%) and tutorial participation (20%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Environmental issues pose increasingly difficult challenges to our societies. What is the nature of these challenges? Where have they come from? How have political institutions adapted to them, at the national and international levels? What further changes might be necessary to better meet them? How might these changes come about? What effects might they have on the future of politics? This unit of study will engage these kinds of questions as an introduction to some theoretical and practical dimensions of environmental politics.
GOVT2336 Gender and Human Rights

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Megan Mackenzie Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in Government Prohibitions: GOVT2306 Assessment: 1x600wd essay proposal (15%), 1x2500wd final essay (35%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%) and tutorial participation (15%)
This unit considers key human rights questions and debates with attention to gender and identity. It critically analyses the role of state and international political institutions in shaping human rights, and focuses particularly on the ways in which the rights of women, gays, lesbians, and transgendered individuals have tended to be ignored. Attention will be given to the experiences of women in western and non-western countries in accessing rights and assess the role that religion and culture play in this process. The gender dimensions of specific rights issues relating to war and conflict will also be emphasised.
GOVT2424 Politics of China

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Reilly Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government Prohibitions: GOVT2402 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd essay (40%) and tutorial participation (20%)
Introduction to government and politics of modern China. Brief examination of traditional background and modern revolution from 19th century to 1949. Primary focus on ideology, leadership, institutions and political processes of the People's Republic. Covers politics of social groups, major issue areas, the Cultural Revolution and the politics of reform.
GOVT2442 Comparative Politics of Ethnic Conflict

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Diarmuid Maguire Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government Prohibitions: GOVT2402 Assessment: 1x2hr final exam (40%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit examines the role that ethnic conflict plays in national and international politics. Under modernity, settler societies, former colonies, ex-communist nations and liberal democracies have had to deal with the political consequences of ethnic tensions. This unit considers ethnicity and nationalism as perennial forces often released when imperial systems break up. The systems of the European, Ottoman, and Soviet empires all produced species of nationalism and ethnic conflict. From this conjuncture, the nation states of modern Europe emerged while statehood was built in modern Africa and South America out of the break up of the modern European empires. The so-called "new nationalism" of the post-Soviet Empire is yet another round of de-colonization, in which power is devolved to elites on the periphery but popular movements are also involved. This unit is comparative and covers competing theoretical approaches.
GOVT2445 American Politics and Foreign Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ben Goldsmith Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government Prohibitions: GOVT2405 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 10x30wd tutorial quizzes (10%), 1x2hr exam (40%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit will be an overview of the American political system and the formulation of foreign policy. It will cover the major Federal political institutions: the Presidency, the Congress, and the Supreme Court. The unit will consider how foreign policy is made through the interaction of these institutions and with other elements of civil society. Finally, it will examine the outcome of this process - US foreign policy itself - with special emphasis on the post-Cold War period. We will seek to answer two key questions: (a) what is the influence of domestic politics on US foreign policy; and (b) how does the US system cope with the apparent contradictions between its ideals and the imperatives of global power?
GOVT2603 Media Politics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Chen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week; 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in Government Assessment: 2000wd essays (2x45%) and 1x in-class quiz (10%)
This unit is primarily about news, its production, contents and impacts. It will examine the special demands of different news organisations and of reporting different news areas; the news media as an arena in political conflicts and the consequent interests and strategies of various groups in affecting news content; and the impacts of news on political processes and relationships. Our primary focus is on Australia, but there is some comparison with other affluent liberal democracies. The substantive areas the course will focus on include election reporting, scandals and the reporting of war and terrorism.
GOVT2611 Capitalism and Democracy in East Asia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Reilly Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government Prohibitions: GOVT2411 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 3x reading quizzes (20%), 1x1hr mid-term exam (20%), tutorial debates (10%) and participation (10%)
This unit will shed light on the springs of change in politics and economics and their intersections in East Asia, which includes South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. The unit examines the political and economic transformation in the region. Among the major issues considered are: Are East Asia's political institutions distinctive? How does economic change affect political power and the state? Will democratisation and globalisation undermine the distinctive traditions of the region?
GOVT2615 Topics in Environmental Politics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor David Schlosberg Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture/week plus 1 x 1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Government and International Relations Assessment: 10x100wd reading reflections (10%), 1x2000wd research paper (40%), 1x 750wd mid-semester take home exam (20%), 1x750wd end-semester take home exam (20%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit will offer a broad overview of key contemporary issues in environmental politics such as climate change policy, environmental justice, food security and politics, sustainable cities, or timely issues in the Australian or global context. The goal will be to ground these issues in the relevant literatures of politics and environmental studies.
GOVT2617 Introduction to Non-Traditional Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Frank Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week. Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in Government. Assessment: 1x500wd equivalent group role playing exercise (10%), 1x1000wd mid-semester exam (30%), 1x2500wd analytical essay (50%), and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit introduces a variety of non-traditional security (NTS) challenges, along with different perspectives and policies regarding threats other than war. How does NTS relate to war and peace, and what dangers are most threatening? When does conflict over scarce resources - food, water, energy - affect survival? And what can be done about emerging threats like climate change and cyber attack? Considering these and other questions, students will tackle some of the greatest security challenges in the world.
GOVT2618 Science, Technology and Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Frank Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 6 senior credit points in Government and International Relations Assessment: 1x1500wd mid-semester test (25%), 1x4000wd analytical essay (50%), 1x500wd equivalent group presentation (10%), and seminar particiaption (15%)
This interdisciplinary unit introduces upper-year undergraduate students to the complex relationships between modern science, advanced technology, and traditional as well as non-traditional aspects of international security. It examines how science and technology affect security, and conversely, how security concerns influence the development of science and technology. Using different theories that explain these relationships, this unit will consider a wide range of issues, including nuclear weapons, the revolution in military affairs, cyber security, and singularity studies, among other topics.
GOVT2774 Islam: Democracy, Development and Gender

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Lily Rahim Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in Government Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x1500wd tutorial essay/report and presentation (30%), 1x1hr final exam (30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit will focus on progressive and reformist interpretations of Islam propagated in the periphery (non-Middle Eastern regions) of the Muslim World where the vast majority of Muslims reside. In particular, the unit will investigate the way in which reformist interpretations of Islam can provide Muslims with the framework to constructively address the myriad socio-economic and political challenges confronting them and the wider global community. Towards these ends, the theological discourses, socio-economic initiatives and political activities of progressive Muslim reformers, feminists and organisations in the Muslim periphery of Southeast Asia, North America and Europe will be closely examined. An important theme that will be another focus of analysis is the discursive contest between the forces of progressive and conservative Islam.
GOVT2991 Political Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ariadne Vromen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government at the level of Credit or better, or with the consent of the Honours Coordinator, Dr John Mikler Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (35%), 1x1500wd group project (30%), mid-semester test (25%) and tutorial participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit assists students enrolled in the honours program to develop the conceptual and practical skills they need to excel in any area of substantial political inquiry. An overview of political inquiry is presented through an examination of the diversity in theoretical and methodological approaches used by those who carry out political research. This includes looking at, for example, institutional, behavioural, discourse and feminist approaches in political inquiry, and the usage of quantitative and qualitative methods. The assessment is based around constructing research projects that can be utilised to answer current political questions.
Textbooks
David Marsh and Gerry Stoker 'Theory and Methods in Political Science', 3rd edition
GOVT3993 Power

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture-seminar/week, 1x1-hr lecture-seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Government and GOVT2991, each at the level of Credit or better, or with the consent of the Honours Coordinator, Dr John Mikler. Prohibitions: GOVT3991 Assessment: 1000wd essay (2x15%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), in-class and online participation (20%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Power is the essential concept of political science, which is the systematic study of politics. Bertrand Russell, perhaps the greatest mind of the 20th Century, said power is the central concept of all the social sciences. Students explore this concept in different parts of political science and survey some debates on power, assessing the advantages and disadvantages of concepts of power. There are three themes in this unit. The first is the distribution of power in society. The second is power in comparative politics and the third is power in international relations. The emphasis is on the nature, sources and use of power.
Textbooks
Unit Reader will be available at the University Copy Centre
GOVT3994 Research Preparation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anika Gauja Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Government and GOVT2991, each at the level of Credit or better, or with the consent of the Honours Coordinator, Dr John Mikler. Prohibitions: GOVT3992 Assessment: 1x1500wd thesis review (20%), 1x1500wd thesis comparison (20%), 1x3000wd thesis prospectus (60%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit assists students to build towards a better fourth year honours dissertation. It considers the construction of a dissertation topic, planning the research, bibliographic searches, and writing the dissertation. The unit devotes a considerable amount of time to exercises designed to help students envisage their honours dissertation and plan fruitful lines of inquiry.
GOVT4101 Government Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Susan Park (S1); Dr Anika Gauja (S2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week in Semester 1 Prerequisites: Credit grades in two junior GOVT units of study, and completion of 8 senior GOVT units of study with a credit minimum in each, including completion of GOVT2991, GOVT3993 and GOVT3994. Requirements for the Pass degree must be completed before entry to level 4000 honours units of study. Assessment: a thesis of 18000-20000 words and 6000 words of written work or its equivalent each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Government and International Relations consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one member of academic staff;
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours each in Semester 1.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar requires about 6000 words of written work, or its equivalent. The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The Department will decide which Seminars are available in 2013, with these potentially including the following: Australian Democracy in Comparative Perspective, American Politics, Power and Identity in International Relations, Population Politics, Environmental Justice and Comparative Ethnic Politics. With the permission of the Honours Coordinator, it will also be possible to do one seminar through the Honours programs at UNSW or Macquarie University.
For more information, contact Dr Susan Park (S1) or Dr Anika Gauja (S2), Honours Coordinator or the Chair of the Department
GOVT4102 Government Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: GOVT4101
refer to GOVT4101
GOVT4103 Government Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: GOVT4102
refer to GOVT4101
GOVT4104 Government Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: GOVT4103
refer to GOVT4101

Greek (Ancient)

GRKA1600 Introduction to Ancient Greek 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robert Cowan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: GRKA2620 Assessment: 1250wd-equivalent weekly language assignments (30%), 1250wd-equivalent weekly quizes (30%) and 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit provides the essential linguistic foundation to the study of Greek literature, philosophy, culture, and history. No previous knowledge of any foreign language is assumed and all grammatical concepts encountered will be explained. The unit introduces the basics of Greek through the study of grammar, and is valuable for students interested in all aspects of European history, archaeology, language, literature and philosophy.
GRKA1601 Introduction to Ancient Greek 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sebastiana Nervegna Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: GRKA1600 Prohibitions: GRKA2621 Assessment: 1250wd-equivalent weekly language assignments (30%), 1250wd-equivalent weekly quizzes (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in GRKA1600, enabling students to read Greek texts in the original. It conerntrates particularly on additional morphology, reading skills and the syntax of the sentence, while also introducing further grammatical concepts and constructions. Grammatical knowledge is reinforced by translation from and into Greek, while reading skills are further consolidated through the study of selected extracts from Greek prose and/or verse texts.
GRKA2600 Intermediate Greek 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Eric Csapo Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSC Greek or GRKA1601 or GRKA2621 Assessment: 2500wd-equivalent weekly assignments (50%), 1x2hr exam (50%)
This unit consolidates the knowledge of Greek acquired in GRKA1601, GRKA2621 or by advanced study of Greek at school. It involves both formal language study, including practice in unseen translation and prose composition, and the close reading of extended extracts from Greek prose and/or verse texts. Increasing attention will be paid to the literary qualities, style, generic and socio-historical background of the texts, as well as to their grammar and syntax.
GRKA2601 Intermediate Greek 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Hartwig Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: GRKA2600 Assessment: 2500wd-equivalent weekly assignments (50%), 1x2hr exam (50%)
This unit builds further on language knowledge and translation skills acquired in GRKA2600, and develops skills in the literary study of Greek texts. It will involve the close reading of extended extracts from classic works of Greek prose and/or poetry, as well as practice in writing in Greek. Attention will be paid to style, literary and narrative technique, and the generic and socio-historical background of the texts, as well as to the intricacies of grammar and syntax.
GRKA2620 Reading Greek 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robert Cowan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: GRKA1600 Assessment: 1250wd-equivalent weekly language assignments (30%), 1250wd-equivalent weekly quizzes (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit provides senior-level students with the essential linguistic foundation to the study of Greek literature, philosophy, culture, and history. No previous knowledge of any foreign language is assumed and all grammatical concepts encountered will be explained. The unit introduces the basics of Greek through the study of grammar, and is valuable for students interested in all aspects of European history, archaeology, language, literature and philosophy.
GRKA2621 Reading Greek 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sebastiana Nervegna Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: GRKA2620 or GRKA1600 Prohibitions: GRKA1601 Assessment: 1250wd-equivalent weekly language assignments (30%), 1250wd-equivalent weekly quizzes (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in GRKA2620, enabling senior-level students to read Greek texts in the original. It concentrates particularly on additional morphology, reading skills and the syntax of the sentence, while also introducing further grammatical concepts and constructions. Grammatical knowledge is reinforced by translation from and into Greek, while reading skills are further consolidated through the study of selected extracts from Greek prose and/or verse texts.
GRKA2804 Greek (Ancient) Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GRKA2805 Greek (Ancient) Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
GRKA3600 Advanced Greek

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Wilson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: GRKA2601 Assessment: 2250wd-equivalent weekly assignments (45%), 2250wd-equivalent weekly tests (45%), class participation (10%)
This unit offers advanced study and practice in the literary language of ancient Greek. Reading and translation skills will be honed by weekly language classes and the translation of unseen passages; exercises in Greek composition will further develop knowledge and appreciation of literary Greek. The unit will also involve the close reading and analysis of classic works of Greek prose and/or poetry, paying close attention to style and diction, and to literary and narrrative technique.
GRKA3602 Greek Epic

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Frances Muecke Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Corequisites: GRKA2601 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (50%), participation (10%)
The Iliad, the Odyssey and the poems of Hesiod are the classics of the classics. This unit offers an introduction to the language, style and content of the Greek epics which served as the foundations of Greek cultural identity and are the primary textual sources for Bronze Age, Geometric and Archaic Greek language, religion, history and thought.
GRKA3604 Greek Philosophical Texts

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Rick Benitez Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Corequisites: GRKA3600 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (45%), 5x100wd unseen translation exercises (10%) and 1x2000wd essay (45%)
This unit offers a close reading in the original Greek of select classics of Greek philosophy with particular attention to the genres of philosophical expression and the linguistic, cultural and ideological background to Greek philosophical thought. Language skills will continue to be tested and developed by periodic exercises in unseen translation.
GRKA3606 Classics of Greek Literature

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Wilson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: GRKA3600 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (45%), 5x100wd unseen translation exercises (10%) and 1x2000wd essay (45%)
In this unit we undertake advanced study of select genres of Greek literature, such as choral lyric, epinician, mime and the novel. It is intended for students with a firm command of Greek literary language and close familiarity with two or more other poetic or prose genres. Language skills will continue to be tested and developed by periodic exercises in unseen translation. Texts will be advised in advance on the Department of Classics and Ancient History website.
GRKA4011 Greek Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two seminars, each seminar meeting for 3 hours per week for one semester Prerequisites: Credit average in 42 senior credit points of Greek including two of GRKA3603, 3604, 3605, 3606 plus 6 additional senior credit points of Greek, Latin or Ancient History. Assessment: a thesis of 15,000 words, 6,000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar and one exam
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Greek (Ancient) consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for three hours for one semester
3. one unseen exam on a Greek text.
The thesis should be of 15,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6,000 words of written work or it equivalent.
The thesis is worth 45% of the final Honours mark, each of the seminars is worth 22.5% and the unseen exam is worth 10%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Classics of Greek Literature (Prof Peter Wilson)
Greek Philosophical Texts (Prof Rick Benitez)
For more information, contact Dr Paul Roche, Honours coordinator.
GRKA4012 Greek Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to GRKA4011 Corequisites: GRKA4011
Refer to GRKA4011
GRKA4013 Greek Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to GRKA4011 Corequisites: GRKA4012
Refer to GRKA4011
GRKA4014 Greek Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to GRKA4011 Corequisites: GRKA4013
Refer to GRKA4011

Hebrew (Classical)

HBRW1111 Hebrew Classical B1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prohibitions: HBRW1311 Assessment: 1x2-hr exam (50%), continuous assessment (quizzes, grammar assignments, equivalent to 2000wds) (40%), class participation (10%)
This unit, for those beginning the study of Hebrew, brings students from their first acquaintance with the Hebrew alphabet to an understanding of the Hebrew language used in the Biblical texts. The unit is devoted to the study of the grammar and the principles of translation.
Textbooks
Contact the department
HBRW1112 Hebrew Classical B2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1111 Prohibitions: HBRW1312 Assessment: 1x2-hr exam (50%), continuous assessment (quizzes, grammar assignments, equivalent to 2000wds) (40%), class participation (10%)
This unit continues the study of grammar and classical Hebrew (Biblical) texts.
Textbooks
Contact the department
HBRW2623 Hebrew Classical 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1112 or HBRW2402 or HBRW2632 or HSC Hebrew Prohibitions: HBRW2115 Assessment: 2x1-hr exams (60%), assigned preparation of text for class [equivalent to 500wds] (10%), 1x2000wd essay (30%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The books of the Hebrew Bible are studied in the light of their setting and their literary and linguistic features. The course consists of: set classical texts; and special background area study: Mishnaic Hebrew.
Textbooks
Contact the department.
HBRW2624 Hebrew Classical 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1112 or HBRW2402 or HBRW2632 or HSC Hebrew Prohibitions: HBRW2116 Assessment: 2x1-hr exams (60%), assigned preparation of text for class [equivalent to 500wds] (10%), 1x2000wd essay (30%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The books of the Hebrew Bible are studied in the light of their setting and their literary and linguistic features. The course consists of: set classical texts and special background area study, Dead Sea Scrolls Hebrew.
HBRW2631 Hebrew Accelerated C1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Corequisites: 6 senior credit points in a subject area from the School of Archaeology, Classics and Ancient History or from the Department of Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies or from the Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies. Prohibitions: HBRW2401 Assessment: 1x2-hr exam (50%), continuous assessment (quizzes, grammar assignments, equivalent to 2500wds) (40%), class participation (10%)
An introduction to Hebrew language for those whose existing corequisite units of study require a basic language ability. It is taught concurrently with the existing Hebrew B-stream.
HBRW2632 Hebrew Accelerated C2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2401 or HBRW2631 Prohibitions: HBRW2402 Assessment: 1x2-hr exam (50%), continuous assessment (quizzes, grammar assignments, equivalent to 2500wds) (40%), class participation (10%)
This unit brings students to a level necessary for the study of Hebrew at an advanced level. It forms a bridge between Hebrew Accelerated C1 and other senior Hebrew units.
HBRW2651 Syriac 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ebied Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1112 or HBRW2402 or HBRW2632 or HSC Hebrew Prohibitions: HBRW2911 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (60%), weekly assignments, exercises and class participation (40%).
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For those beginning the study of Syriac this is a preparation for more advanced study of Syriac language and literature. It concentrates on the study of elementary Syriac grammar, prose composition and an introductory study of selections of texts from the Old and New Testament Peshitta.
Textbooks
Robinson, T.H., Paradigms and Exercises in Syriac Grammar, rev.edn. by L.H. Brockington, Oxford, OUP
HBRW2652 Syriac 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ebied Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2911 or HBRW2651 Prohibitions: HBRW2912 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (60%), weekly assignments, exercises and class participation (40%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit builds on the foundation of Syriac 1. It concentrates on the study of advanced Syriac prose composition and selections of texts from the Old and New Testament Peshitta.
HBRW3653 Syriac 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ebied Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2912 or HBRW2652 Prohibitions: HBRW3911 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%), 1x2500wd essay (30%), continuous assessment (20%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit continues the study of Syriac texts begun in Syriac 1 and 2. This unit concentrates on the study of selections of advanced Syriac Peshitta, Patristic texts, etc.
HBRW3654 Syriac 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ebied Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW3911 or HBRW3653 Prohibitions: HBRW3912 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%), 1x2500wd essay (30%), continuous assessment (20%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit builds on the foundation of Syriac 3. This unit concentrates on the study of more advanced Syriac Patristic and Hagiographical texts, etc., as well as a brief survey of the history of Syriac literature.
HBRW2801 Hebrew (Classical) In-Country Study A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying in an approved course at an overseas tertiary level institution.
HBRW2802 Hebrew (Classical) In-Country Study B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For students studying in an approved course at an overseas tertiary level institution.
HBRW4011 Hebrew (Classical) Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two seminars in semester 1 and one seminar in semester 2, each two hours per week Prerequisites: Credit average or better in 48 senior credit points from Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies, including completion of the major and consisting of: (HBRW2113 or HBRW2623) and (HBRW2114 or HBRW2624) and (HBRW2115 or HBRW2625) and (HBRW2116 or HBRW2626) and an additional 24 senior credit points from the department of Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies. Assessment: a thesis of 15000 words in length and 5000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Classical Hebrew consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars in semester 1 and one seminar in semester 2, each two hours per week.
The thesis should be of 15000 words in length. Each seminar requires 5000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 40% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Biblical Themes (Dr Ari Lobel)
Biblical Texts in Hebrew (Assoc Prof Ian Young / Dr Ari Lobel)
The Book of Daniel (Assoc Prof Ian Young)
For more information, contact Assoc Prof Ian Young, Honours coordinator.
HBRW4012 Hebrew (Classical) Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: HBRW4011
Refer to HBRW4011
HBRW4013 Hebrew (Classical) Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: HBRW4012
Refer to HBRW4011
HBRW4014 Hebrew (Classical) Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: HBRW4013
Refer to HBRW4011

Hebrew (Modern)

HBRW1011 Hebrew Modern B1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Gilead Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Assessment: 5x10 minute vocabulary quizzes (10%), 10x100wd writing tasks (25%), 1x1.5hr class test (30%), 1x5 minute oral test (5%), 1x2-hr exam (30%)
This unit provides an introduction to Modern Hebrew. It is intended for students who have little or no previous knowledge and practice of the language. The unit fosters the development of oral communication skills relating to everyday topics. It includes learning the Hebrew alphabet and basic reading and writing skills as well as the introduction of basic vocabulary and language functions. It is imperative that all prospective students contact the coordinator to arrange for a placement test upon enrolment.
Textbooks
Chayat, S., Israeli, S., Kobliner, H. (2007) Hebrew from Scratch, Part I (new edition) Academon, Jerusalem.
HBRW1102 Hebrew Modern B2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Gilead Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1011 Prohibitions: HBRW1302 Assessment: 5x10 minute vocabulary quizzes (10%), 10x100wd writing tasks (25%), 1x1.5hr class test (30%), 1x5 minute oral test (5%), 1x2-hr exam (30%)
This unit is an extension of the work done in HBRW1011 (B1). It further develops the language skills acquired in B1. This unit involves a range of learning styles that assist you to further develop and consolidate your listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.
Textbooks
Chayat, S., Israeli, S., Kobliner, H. (2007), Hebrew from Scratch, Part I (new edition) Academon, Jerusalem.
HBRW2603 Hebrew Modern 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Gilead Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1102 Prohibitions: HBRW2103 Assessment: 5x10 minute vocabulary quizzes (10%), 10x100wd writing tasks (25%), 1x1.5hr class test (30%), 1x5 minute oral test (5%), 1x2-hr exam (30%)
This unit is an extension of the work done in HBRW1102. It consists of an intensive study of spoken Modern Hebrew with emphasis on communicative skills that enable students to communicate in simple Hebrew for everyday situations. Simple literary texts and language components, which are orientated around relevant themes, are dealt with. A variety of different methods are used to explain grammatical structures, morphology and syntax and to provide examples in their use.
Textbooks
Chayat, S, Israeli S, Kobliner H. (2007) Hebrew from Scratch. Part I (new edition) Academon, Jerusalem.
HBRW2604 Hebrew Modern 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Gilead Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2603 Prohibitions: HBRW2104 Assessment: 3x10 minute oral assignments (15%), 10x150wd writing tasks (25%), 1x1.5hr class test (30%), 1x2-hr exam (30%)
This unit is an extension of the work done in HBRW2603. It uses a communicative approach to language learning. Students' active participation through teamwork, role-playing and other interactive techniques is an essential aspect of all classes. It is expected that by the end of this unit students will be able to take part in simple everyday Hebrew conversation.
Textbooks
Chayat, S., Israeli, S., Kobliner, H. (2007) Hebrew from Scratch, Part I (new edition) Academon, Jerusalem.
HBRW2605 Hebrew Modern 5

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Gilead Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2604 Prohibitions: HBRW2105 Assessment: 3x10 minute oral assignments (15%), 10x150wd writing tasks (25%), 1x1.5hr class test (30%), 1x2-hr exam (30%)
This unit picks up from HBRW2604. It covers language skills and knowledge of Level Beit. In addition to consolidating and further developing spoken communication and writing skills, this unit introduces the student to a variety of Modern Hebrew texts such as poems, songs, short stories and newspaper articles as well as some Classical Hebrew texts.
Textbooks
Chayat, S., Israeli, S., Kobliner, H. (2001) Hebrew from Scratch Part II, Academon, Jerusalem.
HBRW2606 Hebrew Modern 6

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Gilead Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2605 Prohibitions: HBRW2106 Assessment: 3x10 minute oral assignments (15%), 10x150wd writing tasks (25%), 1x1.5hr class test (30%), 1x2-hr exam (30%)
This unit is an extension of the work done in HBRW2605. By the end of the unit, students will be able to converse confidently in everyday Hebrew. As well, this unit is designed to enable students who wish to continue learning Modern Hebrew to make the transition into HBRW2607 and HBRW2608.
Textbooks
Chayat, S., Israeli, S., Kobliner, H. (2001) Hebrew from Scratch Part II, Academon, Jerusalem.
HBRW2607 Hebrew Modern 7

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Gilead Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2106 or HBRW2606 or Modern Hebrew HSC Prohibitions: HBRW1301 Assessment: 1x1.5hr mid-semester exam (30%), 1x2hr final exam (30%), 3x10 minute oral assignments (15%), 1x500wd assignment (15%), 5x100wd writing tasks (10%)
This unit picks up from HBRW2606. Students further develop their speaking fluency while improving their grammar and usage. The ability to read a variety of Modern Hebrew texts, including newspaper articles, short stories, poems and other literary texts, which reflect socio-cultural issues from the 19th century to the present time, is further developed.
Special significance is attached to this unit. Upon its completion, students are eligible to be considered for admission to regular studies at the Hebrew University.
Textbooks
Cohen, M. (1992) Hebrew, what a Language (Agada shel Safa), Academon, Jerusalem.
HBRW2608 Hebrew Modern 8

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Gilead Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1301 or HBRW2607 Prohibitions: HBRW1302 Assessment: 1x1.5hr mid-semester exam (30%), 1x2hr final exam (30%), 3x10 minute oral assignments (15%), 1x500wd assignment (15%), 5x100wd writing tasks (10%)
This unit is an extension of HBRW2607. Students will further improve their communicative skills while consolidating their grammatical knowledge. Special significance is attached to this unit. Upon its completion, students are eligible to be considered for admission to regular studies at the Hebrew University.
Textbooks
Cohen, M. (1992) Hebrew, what a Language (Agada shel Safa), Academon, Jerusalem
HBRW2609 Hebrew Modern 9

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Gilead Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1302 or HBRW2608 Prohibitions: HBRW2303 Assessment: 1x1.5hr mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr final exam (25%), 1x750wd essay (20%), 5x150wd writing tasks (20%), 3x10 minute oral assignments (15%)
This unit picks up from HBRW2608. It is an intensive language-learning program covering Level Dalet. It is based both on communicative (speaking, listening) and writing (reading, writing) skills. Through using the Hebrew language in a range of contexts, students further extend and develop their communicative skills. As well, they are introduced to contemporary texts that reflect socio-cultural issues of Israeli society over the last two centuries.
Textbooks
Huminer, G. and Shai, T. (2010) Between the Lines, Academon, Jerusalem.
HBRW2610 Hebrew Modern 10

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Gilead Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1302 or HBRW2609 Prohibitions: HBRW2304 Assessment: 1x1.5hr mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr final exam (25%), 1x750wd essay (20%), 5x150wd writing tasks (20%), 3x10 minute oral assignments (15%)
This unit is an extension of HBRW2609. It further develops, enhances and extends students' good knowledge of Modern Hebrew. It is based on communicative (speaking, listening) and writing (reading, writing) skills.
Textbooks
Huminer, G. and Shai, T. (2010) Between the Lines, Academon, Jerusalem.
HBRW2611 Hebrew Modern 11

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Gilead Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2610 Prohibitions: HBRW2305 Assessment: 1x1.5hr mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr final exam (25%), 1x1000wd essay (20%), 5x150wd writing tasks (20%), 3x10 minute oral assignments (15%)
This unit is an extension of HBRW2610 and it covers Level Hey. Through using the Hebrew language in a range of contexts, students will have the opportunity to fine-tune their knowledge and usage of the language. As well, they will further extend and develop their understanding of the way in which various functions of the language come together. In addition, they will read and analyse contemporary literature and poetry, which reflect socio-cultural issues of Israeli society.
Textbooks
Bliboim, R (2010) Ivrit be-Hey ha-Yehidi'a. Academon, Jerusalem.
HBRW2612 Hebrew Modern 12

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Gilead Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1302 or HBRW2611 Prohibitions: HBRW2306 Assessment: 1x1.5hr mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr final exam (25%), 1x1000wd essay (20%), 5x150wd writing tasks (20%), 3x10 minute oral assignments (15%)
This unit is an extension of HBRW2611. It offers an opportunity for in-depth examination of the linguistic functions of Modern Hebrew as they are manifested in literature and poetry. Through using the Hebrew language in a range of contexts, students will further extend and develop their understanding of the way in which various patterns of the language come together. As well, they will be introduced to contemporary texts, which reflect socio-cultural issues of Israeli society.
Textbooks
Bliboim, R (2010) Ivrit be-Hey ha-Yehidi'a, Academon, Jerusalem.
HBRW4021 Hebrew (Modern) Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Yona Gilead Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two seminars in semester 1 and one seminar in semester 2, meeting weekly for 2 hours each Prerequisites: Credit average or better in 48 senior credit points of Hebrew Biblical and Jewish Studies including completion of the Modern Hebrew major. Assessment: A thesis of 12000 words (in Hebrew) or 15000 words (in English) and 5000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Modern Hebrew consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars in semester 1 and one seminar in semester 2, meeting weekly for 2 hours each
The thesis should be of 12000 words in length if written in Hebrew or 15000 words in length if written in English. Each seminar requires 5000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 40% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
Seminars will be offered from the following list in 2013:
'Language in use' as reflected in MH Discourse;
Research Methodologies
For more information, contact Yona Gilead, Honours coordinator.
HBRW4022 Hebrew (Modern) Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Yona Gilead Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: HBRW4021
Refer to HBRW4021
HBRW4023 Hebrew (Modern) Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Yona Gilead Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: HBRW4022
Refer to HBRW4021
HBRW4024 Hebrew (Modern) Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Yona Gilead Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: HBRW4023
Refer to HBRW4021

History

HSTY1023 Emerging Giant: The Making of America

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Michael McDonnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: HSTY2634 Assessment: 1x500wd document assignment (15%) and 1x2000wd research paper (40%) and 1x2000wd exam (35%) and tutorial participation (10%)
Touching down on the shores of the 'New World', the first European colonists imagined the creation of an earthly paradise. But their mission soon floundered in the face of internal dissenters and alien cultures pursuing their own ideals. Fierce clashes between regions, races, social groups and other nations have marked American history ever since. Exploring the origins and outcomes of these contests from first settlement onward, this unit charts America's emergence onto the world scene in the nineteenth century.
HSTY1025 The Middle Ages

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 8x150wd tutorial exercises (25%), 1x1800wd essay (25%), tutorial participation (10%), 1x1500wd exam (40%)
The Middle Ages were actually a beginning, the birth and early growth of Europe's influential civilisation, shaping social relations and institutions in ways that still resonate today. From key moments in the lives of medieval men and women, we explore the Christianisation of England; rise of Islam and its impact on the Mediterranean; Vikings, Normans and Crusade; evolution of feudal relations; growth of towns and universities; creation of epic, romance and chivalry; and the deadly threat of inquisition and plague.
HSTY1031 Renaissance and Reformation (1498-1648)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Gagné Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%) and 1x2hr exam (40%) and tutorial participation (10%)
Starting with the brilliant culture of Renaissance Italy, with its courts, despots, republics, courtiers, diplomats, with its humanists, artists and their patrons, the unit of study will then move to the religious, political, social and cultural revolution known as the Reformation, with its great theologians, preachers and writers like Luther, Calvin, More and Montaigne. Throughout the semester, attention will be paid to both 'high' and popular culture. The unit of study will conclude with an examination of how these forces were played out in the English Revolution. Attention will also be given to Europe's 'discovery' and conquest of the New World.
HSTY1044 Twentieth-Century Europe

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Marco Duranti Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: HSTY1043 Assessment: 1x1000wd short essay (20%), 1x2000wd long essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit surveys Europe's twentieth century, examining the First World War, the Russian Revolution, fascism, the cultural ferment of the interwar years, the Second World War and the Holocaust, European empires and decolonization, Cold War culture and politics, and European unification. The transformations of the twentieth century took place in many different spheres of human existence, and this unit introduces students to some of the varieties of history and the diverse ways historians approach the past.
HSTY1045 Modern European History 1750-1914

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Robert Aldrich Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd short essay (20%), 1x2000wd long essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit covers the dramatic changes in European life that marked the transition from pre-modern to modern societies. We will see that these changes emancipated many Europeans from legal and physical burdens while creating many new ones of their own. The catastrophes of the twentieth century have their roots in the period we examine, a period that culminated in the First World War and the spectacular explosion of the ideals of material and moral progress that had animated bourgeois elites. In particular, we discuss the transformations that took place in the key areas of human activity: politics and ideology; family life; work and technology; religious belief; colonialism; social class.
HSTY1089 Australia: Blood on the Wattle

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Kirsten McKenzie Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%) and tutorial participation (10%)
Was Australia the peacefully settled 'quiet continent'? First, this unit examines convict society, frontier conflict, the impact of gold and battles around self-government. Second, it maps the creation of a nation state in the period after 1880, involving constitutional and political conflict, the creation of foundation stories, shifts in Indigenous-settler relations and the impact of war on different social groups. Finally, we chart the nation's cultural, political and economic transformation after 1945 into the post-industrial postcolonial society of today.
HSTY1090 History of Chinese Civilisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ASNS1101 Assessment: 2x1500wd essay (2x30%), 1.5hr exam (25%), tutorial participation (15%)
Images of China abound, from tiny female foot to endless Wall. But what of the historical realities that shaped today's emerging superpower? What links bronze monsters, clay warriors, little red books and Shanghai skyscrapers? This unit of study introduces the 4,000-year story, both looking at big issues and making time for ordinary people's lives. Through sampling the evidence historians use to understand the Chinese past, we establish a well-grounded sense of China's political, cultural, social and intellectual history.
HSTY1801 History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
HSTY1802 History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
HSTY2604 Popular Culture in Australia 1850-1945

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2004 Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%), participation (15%)
Between 1850 and 1945, a modern culture emerged from a collection of disparate colonies and people. Focusing on everyday life and new forms of popular culture, this unit follows the threads of modernity, gender and nationalism through this formative half-century. Popular stereotypes of Australian men and women evolved from society's engagement with new notions of time and space, urban and rural culture, modernism high and low, changing sexual and family politics, and all the seductive attractions of modern life.
HSTY2606 China in the Nineteenth-Century World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2006 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (20%) and 1x2500wd essay (40%) and 1x1000wd take-home exam (30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
The nineteenth century was a time of critical transition in China's history. The Qing dynasty was declining, like every dynasty before it, but this decline was different. The most famous rebel claimed to be Christ's younger brother; the most successful article of foreign trade was opium (imported); China's most dangerous foreign foes were island nations - first Britain, later Japan. We explore how the dynasty responded to the crises and how foreign intrusions affected China's cities, intellectual life and ordinary people.
HSTY2611 America in World Affairs: A History

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Curran Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd historiography assignment (30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit of study examines the ideas and ideological assumptions that have shaped America's approach to the world from the Revolution until the presidency of Barack Obama. It explores how the leading politicians and policymakers in Washington have projected power overseas, and how their decisions have played out in the public sphere. Key topics include: isolationism and internationalism; Communism and the Cold War; the challenge of unipolarity; terrorism; and the underlying historical forces shaping US policy, especially American national mythology.
HSTY2612 High Renaissance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Eckstein Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1000wd document exercise (20%), 2500wd essay (50%), 1000wd reading journal (20%), tutorial participation (10%)
Europe after 1500 saw conflict, companionship, refinement and squalor. Beginning in opulent Rome, we discover a cast of Renaissance men and women, from Machiavellian political theorists and crafty swindlers to prophets and scientists, artists and poets. This was a world of bustling towns, sumptuous artefacts, bitter religious disputes, and electric debates over politics and learning. Europeans travelled to Italy, which in turn nourished culture and ideas around Europe: this unit follows these many pathways.
HSTY2616 The Human Rights Revolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Marco Duranti Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
What accounts for the spectacular rise of human rights movements and norms from 1945 to the present? This unit investigates the causes and consequences of this radical global transformation in transnational activism, foreign policy and international law. The first portion of the unit explores the early history of natural rights, minority rights, women's rights and humanitarianism. The second portion examines the impact of domestic politics, gender politics and geopolitics on the postwar 'human rights revolution'.
HSTY2619 Living in Colonial Australia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2019 Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd take-home exam (30%) and class participation (10%)
If "the past is a foreign country", how did people live in colonial Australia? Taking a fresh perspective on Australia's history by focusing on everyday life, we question our assumptions that Australia was settled by people not that different from ourselves. Considering the economic, social and cultural impact of colonization and exploring the contested aims of diverse groups within this emerging society, we will discover why colonial Australia was stranger and more fascinating than you ever imagined.
HSTY2620 War and Cinema

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Judith Keene Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies or 18 junior credit points including ARHT1002 or ENGL1011 Assessment: 1x2500wd research essay (50%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%), 1x500wd group presentation (10%)
War and the experience of individuals in wartime have been central to the movie narrative across a range of cinemas. Equally, popular understandings of particular wars and their national significance are frequently derived from cinematic representation. Screening Hollywood, European and Australian films, this course will examine representations of war and their significance for national identity and popular understanding as well as in the development of cinema history.
HSTY2623 China's Traumas, 1937-1971

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Helen Dunstan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/wk and 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 2000wd reflective journal (40%), 2000wd essay (40%), 500wd presentation (10%), tutorial participation (10%)
Invasion, atrocity, and occupation by Japan (1937-45); the Civil War (1946-49); the Great Leap Forward into famine (1958-61); the Cultural Revolution's deadly first six years (1966-71): four horrors whose effects were felt for decades. Most textbooks draw a line in 1949 between each pair of episodes; this unit asks what we can learn by exploring all four in sequence. It draws on insightful new historiography to seek a deepened understanding of contemporary China's recent past.
HSTY2626 Fascism and Antifascism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Judith Keene Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2026 Assessment: 1x2500wd research essay (50%) and 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%) and 1x1hr formal exam (20%) and tutorial participation (10%).
This unit will examine the origins and development of the movements of the New Right that emerged in Europe after World War One paying particular attention to their political, social and cultural manifestations as well as the movements on the left that attempted to confront what was seen as a new political phenomenon. The unit will use primary material of literature, diaries, cinema and photography as well as the more conventional sources of political and historical analysis.
HSTY2640 Twentieth-Century China

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Helen Dunstan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY3071, HSTY3072 Assessment: 1x1750wd essay (35%), 1x2250wd essay (35%), 1x individual or group oral presentation (equivalent to 500wds) (15%), tutorial participation (15%)
In the 1920s, China was likened to a sleeping lion - one whose roar would shake the world when it awoke. This prediction has already proved true more than once. Why was China ever said to be "asleep"? How did a whole nation awaken, to what, and with what results? This unit of study traces the forces of nationalism and revolution through China's tumultuous twentieth century. We focus upon making sense, in Chinese terms, of events that outsiders have found baffling.
HSTY2659 Nationalism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Robert Aldrich Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2059 Assessment: 1x500wd oral tutorial presentation (10%), tutorial participation (10%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
Nationalism is surely one of the most potent forces in the modern era. It has generated wars and shaped identities, forged common bonds and torn populations apart. When and how did nationalism first appear? How should we understand this peculiarly modern phenomenon? After looking at the way scholars have understood nationalism, we delve into nineteenth- and twentieth-century case studies, considering along the way how literature, art and popular culture have been crucial vehicles for furthering nationalist sentiment.
HSTY2660 Violence in Italy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Eckstein Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2060 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (35%), 1x1000wd journal (25%), 1x1500wd exam (30%), tutorial participation (10%)
Violence is a feature of all human societies in every era. This unit examines the cultural significance of violence in Italy, from the Ancient Roman amphitheatre to the language of twentieth-century Fascist violence and post-war Italy's confrontation with left and right-wing terrorism, the 'years of lead', and Italy's continuing struggle with the Mafia. Themes include urban violence in Medieval, Renaissance and Early-Modern Italy, religious, gender and sexual violence, crime and punishment, and nationalist representations of violence in the nineteenth century.
HSTY2664 Medieval Cultures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Ann Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2064 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd exam (30%), tutorial participation (10%)
This is a unit about people and cultures. Women and men, merchants and monks, Christians and Jews all formed the cultures, classes and statuses which constituted late medieval European society. The study themes of this unit focus on the means by which ideas, cultures and expectations were constructed and transmitted, and include topics such as healthcare, civic life, the body, gender and sexuality, religious beliefs and practices, otherness, death, political theory, art and architecture, travel.
HSTY2670 New York, New York

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Stephen Robertson Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 2x1500wd essays (60%), 1x1500wd take-home exam (30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
New York, New York is the city so great they named it twice. This unit explores the history and representation of New York City, from its beginnings as a Dutch settlement down to 9/11, using the archetypal modern metropolis as a window on American history. We look at the people, images and events that defined the city, including such icons as the Five Points, Central Park, Harlem, the Empire State Building, Yankee Stadium and the Brooklyn Bridge.
HSTY2672 Britain and the World: C.1837-1914

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kit Candlin Session: Semester 2,Winter Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd draft essay (20%), 1x2000wd final essay (40%), 1x1500wd take home exam (30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit explores the political, social and cultural significance of Britain's foreign engagements c.1837-1914, including war (e.g. Crimean War, Afghan Wars, Maori Wars, Boer War), 'gunboat diplomacy' (e.g. the Royal Navy in the Pacific) and colonial rule (especially India, Ireland and Australia). Special emphasis will be given to the role these engagements played in fostering or challenging a sense of British identity among a wide range of men and women, both in Britain and the wider world.
HSTY2677 Australia: Politics and Nation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Curran Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%) and 1x1000wd historiography assessment (20%) and 1x1hr exam (30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit examines the intersection between political culture and nationalism in Australia, with particular attention to the question of when (and if?) Australia became an 'independent' nation. It examines the content and character of British race patriotism in Australia before 1945 and the gradual unravelling of this British myth in the post-war period. Among other issues, the unit explores the end of 'White Australia', the rise of multiculturalism, engagement with Asia, Aboriginal reconciliation and republicanism.
HSTY2688 Enlightenment Journeys

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cindy McCreery Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd draft essay (20%) and 1x3000wd essay (60%) and 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit explores the cultural, diplomatic, military and scientific journeys that defined eighteenth and early nineteenth century European thought. We study expeditions made by people such as Cook in the Pacific, Humbolt in Latin America, Macartney in China, Napoleon in Egypt and Mary Wollstonecraft in Scandinavia. We consider how these journeys promoted artistic, philosophical, political, scientific and technological change. Particular attention will be paid to contemporary responses through journalism, art exhibitions, theatrical performances, scientific advances, museum displays and fashion.
HSTY2689 Civility & Squalor: 18 C. British Isles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cindy McCreery Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of junior History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY3699 Assessment: 1x1000wd draft essay (20%) and 1x3000wd essay (60%) and 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%) and tutorial participation (10%)
Eighteenth-century British and Irish society displayed stark contracts: conspicuous consumption jostled with abject poverty, humanitarian campaigns co-existed with capital punishment, and major treatises on political liberty were published alongside drinking manuals. This unit uses contemporary sources like newspapers, magazines, cartoons and pamphlets to trace major cultural, political, economic and social themes in Britain and Ireland, eg aristocratic leadership and decadence, political liberty and repression, religious faith and doubt, women's private and public lives, urbanization and unemployment, fashion and leisure.
HSTY2691 Writing History

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Michael McDonnell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2901, ANHS2691 Assessment: 1x2000wd journal review (30%) and 1x1000wd reflective essay (30%) and 1x3000wd diary (30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
How do we write history? How and why do our approaches to events, lives, and ideas differ from those taken by historians in the past? What is the relationship between historical scholarship and society? To answer these questions, we will examine History's history, social theories (e.g. Marxism, feminism, structuralism, post-structuralism), various historical methods, and processes of historical research and publication. Far from dry discussion, this lively unit focuses on debates that fire up historians, past and present.
HSTY2805 History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
HSTY2806 History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
HSTY2809 History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
HSTY2810 History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
HSTY2811 History Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
HSTY4011 History Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Eckstein Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week in Semester 1 Prerequisites: 48 senior credit points of History (up to 18 credit points of which may be cross-listed), including HSTY2691, with an average mark in those units of study of credit or better. Students who do not meet this requirement, however, may apply to the Honours Coordinator for a waiver to permit their entry into the honours program. Assessment: a thesis of 15000-20000 words and 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in History consists of:
1. a thesis under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester (students must complete one 'Approach' seminar and one 'Field' seminar).
The thesis should be of 15,000-20,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6,000-8,000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
Honours seminars are only offered in Semester 1. Students must begin their program in the March semester and mid-year entry to History Honours is not permitted.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
To be announced
HSTY4012 History Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Eckstein Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to HSTY4011 Corequisites: HSTY4011
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Refer to HSTY4011
HSTY4013 History Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Eckstein Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to HSTY4011 Corequisites: HSTY4012
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Refer to HSTY4011
HSTY4014 History Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Eckstein Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to HSTY4011 Corequisites: HSTY4013
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Refer to HSTY4011

Indigenous Australian Studies

KOCR2600 Indigenous Australia: An Introduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Lynette Riley Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lec & 1 x 1hr tutorial weekly Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Prohibitions: KOCR2100 Assessment: research essay (40%); tutorial presentation (10%); tutorial paper (20%); short essay (30%)
This unit of study is the first stepping stone in the Indigenous Australian Studies (IAS) Major. Structured around three themes - representation and identity, invasion and colonisation, and resistance and agency - the unit critically examines the historical, social and political contexts of the survival and growth of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies and cultures. Students will gain a critical awareness of traditional and contemporary Indigenous Australia, and develop a decolonised critical framework which underpins the IAS major.
KOCR2602 Issues in Indigenous Rights

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen O'Brien Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr lec and 1 x 2hr tut Corequisites: KOCR2600 Prohibitions: KOCR2102 Assessment: seminar (30%), seminar paper (20%), essay (50%)
The aim of this unit of study is to critically explore the philosophical, legal and cultural foundations of Indigenous rights in Australia and internationally. The unit builds generic skills in philosophical and historical research and theoretical analysis, encouraging students to develop an informed and independent assessment of contemporary issues in Australian and international Indigenous rights.
KOCR2603 Indigenous Health and Communities

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Katrina Thorpe Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr lec and 1 x 2hr tut Corequisites: KOCR2100 or KOCR2600 Assessment: tutorial presentation and fact sheet (30%), short essay (20%), essay (50%)
This unit of study is the first of three units that form part of the Health and Wellbeing Stream of the Indigenous Studies Major. This unit aims to give an historical and contemporary understanding of the diverse range of issues impacting on Aboriginal Health. Students have the opportunity to examine sociological and Indigenous health frameworks and identify a range of strategies which work towards improving the health of Indigenous Australians. A highlight of this unit is the opportunity to hear from both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people who are passionate about contributing to such improvements. Students will also explore the ways in which they may work with Aboriginal people and communities to facilitate self-determination in Aboriginal health.
KOCR2604 Politics of Identity, Gender & Knowledge

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen O'Brien Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture and 1 x 2hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: presentation (20%), seminar paper (30%), research essay (50%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study will provide students with grounding in contemporary theories of Indigenous identity and an understanding of current critical writings on identity formation in colonised societies. It will enable students to formulate strategies and methods for understanding and working with notions of identity in relation to Indigenous peoples. In this unit students explore the history and formation of Indigenous identity. Combining contemporary theoretical and historical approaches they will explore the ways in which Indigenous Australians were constructed by colonial discourses. Students explore the multi-layered facets of identity that are held in and on the Indigenous body and identify and critically analyse sites of power, Indigenous knowledges, processes of cultural dissemination and transmission and consider how Indigenous identities were racialised, gendered and subordinated. Students will explore the arena of cultural politics and investigate the ways in which Indigenous agency has manifested, for example, through innovative critical perspectives and through creative re-presentations in a variety of media, in film, documentary, photography and prose.
KOCR2605 Speaking Gamilaraay 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Giacon Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar/wk Assessment: homework sheets (35%), oral performance (45%), essay (20%)
Gamilaraay is an Indigenous Australian language from the mid-northwest of NSW that is currently undergoing revitalisation. This unit of study will provide students with a basic competence in speaking, understanding, reading and writing Gamilaraay sufficient to recognise and construct simple utterances in the language, and to understand its relationships with other languages. Classes will take the form of three-hour intensive oral workshops that progressively develop each student's abilities in the language. Assessment will be by short written assignments based on lesson content and an appraisal of individual oral/aural performance together with a short essay on Gamilaraay culture or a related topic.
KOCR2607 Indigenous Creative Expression

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Michelle Blanchard Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar/wk Assessment: essay (40%), seminar presentation (25%) and creative exhibit (35%)
This unit of study aims to give students the opportunity to critically engage with a variety of artistic and creative practices undertaken by Indigenous Australians. It's envisaged that students will be encouraged to critically examine and understand the role of Indigenous performance/theatre, writing, dance, film, visual arts and music in Indigenous Australian cultural maintenance.
KOCR2608 Speaking Gamilaraay 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Giacon Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: KOCR2605 Assessment: written exercises (35%); spoken performance (45%); language learning resource (20%)
This unit builds on the language covered in Speaking Gamilaraay 1. After revision of that work it focuses on speaking Gamilaraay more fluently and using more complex language. It introduces further vocabulary and more grammatical features relating to pronouns, verbs and other aspects of language. There will also be some work on language texts and songs, and discussion of the nature of revival languages. Students will also be required to produce a language learning resource.
KOCR2610 Indigenous Community Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Evans Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture/week and 1 x 2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: KOCR2603 Assessment: participation (10%), presentation (20%), essay (30%), field task (40%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study examines how community development approaches can influence health and wellbeing outcomes for Indigenous peoples. Students will examine past approaches, current trends and theories underpinning community development. Students will reflect on their role in working with Aboriginal communities to develop processes that build capacity in health delivery and support Indigenous self determination. This unit also considers the nature of ethical research practice within an Indigenous community setting.
KOCR2611 Issues in Indigenous History

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Leah Lui-Chivizhe Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture/week and 1x 1 hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: KOCR2600 or 12 credit points junior history Assessment: participation (10%), review (30%), essay (60%)
This unit explores the key issues and debates that have shaped the development of Indigenous History in Australia. You will examine how Indigenous responses to colonialism have been variously interpreted, explore Indigenous perspectives on the writing and representation of Indigenous History in historiography, documentary and feature film and literature, and examine the legacy of the past in the present. The unit also considers questions of historical evidence, the uses of evidence and the different ways of presenting history.
KOCR2612 Introduction to Aboriginal Literature

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Minter Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 junior Arts credit points Assessment: participation (10%), presentations (20%), short essay (30%), take-home exan (40%)
This unit of study provides an introduction to the literature of Aboriginal Australia. It surveys a range of texts from the late eighteenth to the early twenty-first century, including early letters and chronicles, works of fiction, poetry and plays, and political manifestos and song-lyrics. These texts are read in the light of Aboriginal cultural and political life, the specificities of tradition, colonisation, resistance and survival, and Aboriginal interpolations of modernity, postmodernity and postcolonialism.
KOCR3602 Race, Racism and Indigenous Australia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Lynette Riley and Dr Lynda Blanchard Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lecture/week and 1 x 1hr tutorial/week Corequisites: KOCR2600 Assessment: presentation (35%), resource (30%), case study (35%)
This unit explores theories of race and racism focussing on Indigenous Australian race relations. Opportunity is provided to understand the development of Racism as an impact on individuals - victim and perpetrator; and systemic systems at local, national and international levels. The unit explores what racism means in the social justice agenda through issues such as: equity and anti-racism; in particular the direct impact of racism as a tool in the creation of social and economic disadvantage in Australian Indigenous communities.
KOCR3607 Re-awakening Australian Languages

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Hobson and Susan Poetsch Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr semesinar per week, Fieldwork excursion Prerequisites: KOCR2600 or LNGS2611 or KOCR2605 Assessment: presentation and paper (20%), essay (40%), field report (40%)
Australia holds an unenviable record for its loss of Indigenous languages and actively pursues a de facto policy of English monolingualism. This unit examines how Indigenous communities are resisting this trend and reviving so-called extinct languages through examining the roles of language policy and planning, community activism, language centres, education, technology and the linguistic processes involved. Lecture and seminar content is supplemented by a fieldwork excursion (at additional cost) to a regional language centre and associated school programs.
KOCR3608 Case Studies in Indigenous Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Katrina Thorpe Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture and 1 x 2hr workshop weekly Prerequisites: KOCR2603 Assessment: literature review (20%), group project (30%), presentation (20%), reflective journal (30%)
This unit of study is underpinned by an assumption that the statistical life expectancy gap that exists between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians will be closed through a range of diverse actions that include but are not limited to the health sector. A series of Indigenous health case studies focusing on sport, substance use and nutrition will be explored. Students will develop an understanding of effective ways to collaborate with Indigenous Australians across the disciplines of health, education and social work in order to achieve improved health and wellbeing outcomes for individuals and communities.
KOCR3612 Transnational Indigenous Poetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Minter Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar/weekly Prerequisites: 12 senior credit points from Table A Assessment: participation (10%), presentation (20%), short essay (30%), take-home exam (40%)
This unit engages in a transnational study of Australian, Pacific, Asian and American Indigenous poetry and poetics. It surveys a range of key twentieth and twenty-first century Indigenous poets and their principal texts, reading them as exemplars of the encounter between Aboriginal cultural and poetic traditions and western modernity, postmodernity and the postcolonial. The unit explores the centrality of poetry to Indigenous cultures, its spiritual, social and political functions, and the distinctiveness of its contribution to a contemporary transnational poetics.

Indonesian Studies

INMS1101 Indonesian 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Michele Ford Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: Native or near native speakers of Indonesian or Malay, HSC Continuers, or Extension Indonesian or Beginners Indonesian with 75% or above Assessment: 10xweekly language exercises (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 2xoral assessments (equivalent to 1500wd) (30%), 1xresearch assignment (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 2xin-class tests (equivalent to 1000wd) (30%)
Indonesian 1A is designed to give beginning students a solid basis from which to continue Indonesian Studies at higher levels. It combines 3 hours per week of intensive Indonesian language instruction and private language study with a series of English-language lectures that introduces students to Indonesian culture and society.
Textbooks
Materials may be purchased from the University Copy Centre
INMS1102 Indonesian 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: INMS1101 Prohibitions: INMS1301, INMS1302 Assessment: 10xweekly language exercises (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 2xoral assessments (equivalent to 1500wd) (30%), 1xresearch assignment (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 2xin-class tests (equivalent to 1000wd) (30%)
Indonesian 1B is designed to further build students' understanding of the language in preparation for the study of Indonesian at higher levels. It combines 3 hours per week of intensive Indonesian language instruction and private language study with a series of English-language lectures that extends students' knowledge of Indonesian culture and society.
Textbooks
Materials may be purchased from the University Copy Centre.
INMS2601 Indonesian 2A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: INMS1102 or HSC Continuers or Extension Indonesian or HSC Beginners Indonesian 75% and above Prohibitions: INMS2101, INMS2102, INMS2301, INMS2302, INMS2501, INMS2901, INMS3101, INMS3102, INMS3301, INMS3302, INMS3902, INMS2602, INMS3601, INMS3602 Assessment: 10xweekly language exercises (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 2xoral assessments (equivalent to 1500wd) (30%), 1xresearch assignment (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 2xin-class tests (equivalent to 1000wd) (30%)
This unit emphasises practice in the spoken forms of standard and colloquial Indonesian, along with development of reading and writing skills. Reading of texts related to modern Indonesian society will develop students' understanding of the social and cultural contexts in which Indonesian is used.
Textbooks
Materials may be purchased from the University Copy Centre
INMS2602 Indonesian 2B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Michele Ford Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: INMS2101 or INMS2601 Prohibitions: INMS2102, INMS2301, INMS2302, INMS2501, INMS2901, INMS3101, INMS3102, INMS3301, INMS3302, INMS3902, INMS3601, INMS3602 Assessment: 10xweekly language exercises (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 2xoral assessments (equivalent to 1500wd) (30%), 1xresearch assignment (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 2xin-class tests (equivalent to 1000wd) (30%)
This unit consolidates and develops the skills acquired in INMS2601 and is designed to prepare students for advanced study of Indonesian. Students will study important social issues and the language required to discuss, read and write about them.
Textbooks
Materials may be purchased from the University Copy Centre
INMS2650 Indonesian In-Country Study A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: As prescribed by the host institution Prerequisites: INMS1102 or INMS2101 or INMS2601 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled in this unit will complete an approved program of study at a tertiary institution in Indonesia, normally through the Australian Consortium for In-Country Indonesian Studies (ACICIS). Students can earn 6 credit points for every 3 semester credits (sks) successfully completed at an Indonesian tertiary institution, to a maximum of 24 credit points in any one semester. Credit may also be awarded pro rata when a student has successfully completed a summer (or equivalent) in-country Indonesian-language program. Intending students must consult the Indonesian Studies Coordinator prior to undertaking any in-country program for which credit will be sought.
INMS2651 Indonesian In-Country Study B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: As prescribed by the host institution Prerequisites: INMS1102 or INMS2101 or INMS2601 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled in this unit will complete an approved program of study at a tertiary institution in Indonesia, normally through the Australian Consortium for In-Country Indonesian Studies (ACICIS). Students can earn 6 credit points for every three semester credits (sks) successfully completed at an Indonesian tertiary institution, to a maximum of 24 credit points in any one semester. Credit may also be awarded pro rata when a student has successfully completed a summer (or equivalent) in-country Indonesian-language program. Intending students must consult the Indonesian Studies Coordinator prior to undertaking any in-country program for which credit will be sought.
INMS2652 Indonesian In-Country Study C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: As prescribed by the host institution Prerequisites: INMS1102 or INMS2101 or INMS2601 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled in this unit will complete an approved program of study at a tertiary institution in Indonesia, normally through the Australian Consortium for In-Country Indonesian Studies (ACICIS). Students can earn 6 credit points for every three semester credits (sks) successfully completed at an Indonesian tertiary institution, to a maximum of 24 credit points in any one semester. Credit may also be awarded pro rata when a student has successfully completed a summer (or equivalent) in-country Indonesian-language program. Intending students must consult the Indonesian Studies Coordinator prior to undertaking any in-country program for which credit will be sought.
INMS2653 Indonesian In-Country Study D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: As prescribed by the host institution Prerequisites: INMS1102 or INMS2101 or INMS2601 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled in this unit will complete an approved program of study at a tertiary institution in Indonesia, normally through the Australian Consortium for In-Country Indonesian Studies (ACICIS). Students can earn 6 credit points for every three semester credits (sks) successfully completed at an Indonesian tertiary institution, to a maximum of 24 credit points in any one semester. Credit may also be awarded pro rata when a student has successfully completed a summer (or equivalent) in-country Indonesian-language program. Intending students must consult the Indonesian Studies Coordinator prior to undertaking any in-country program for which credit will be sought.
INMS2654 Indonesian In-Country Study E

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: As prescribed by the host institution Prerequisites: INMS1102 or INMS2101 or INMS2601 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled in this unit will complete an approved program of study at a tertiary institution in Indonesia, normally through the Australian Consortium for In-Country Indonesian Studies (ACICIS). Students can earn 6 credit points for every three semester credits (sks) successfully completed at an Indonesian tertiary institution, to a maximum of 24 credit points in any one semester. Credit may also be awarded pro rata when a student has successfully completed a summer (or equivalent) in-country Indonesian-language program. Intending students must consult the Indonesian Studies Coordinator prior to undertaking any in-country program for which credit will be sought.
INMS2655 Indonesian In-Country Study F

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: As prescribed by the host institution Prerequisites: INMS1102 or INMS2101 or INMS2601 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled in this unit will complete an approved program of study at a tertiary institution in Indonesia, normally through the Australian Consortium for In-Country Indonesian Studies (ACICIS). Students can earn 6 credit points for every three semester credits (sks) successfully completed at an Indonesian tertiary institution, to a maximum of 24 credit points in any one semester. Credit may also be awarded pro rata when a student has successfully completed a summer (or equivalent) in-country Indonesian-language program. Intending students must consult the Indonesian Studies Coordinator prior to undertaking any in-country program for which credit will be sought.
INMS2656 Indonesian In-Country Study G

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: As prescribed by the host institution Prerequisites: INMS1102 or INMS2101 or INMS2601 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled in this unit will complete an approved program of study at a tertiary institution in Indonesia, normally through the Australian Consortium for In-Country Indonesian Studies (ACICIS). Students can earn 6 credit points for every three semester credits (sks) successfully completed at an Indonesian tertiary institution, to a maximum of 24 credit points in any one semester. Credit may also be awarded pro rata when a student has successfully completed a summer (or equivalent) in-country Indonesian-language program. Intending students must consult the Indonesian Studies Coordinator prior to undertaking any in-country program for which credit will be sought.
INMS2805 Indonesian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
INMS2806 Indonesian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
INMS2807 Indonesian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
INMS2808 Indonesian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
INMS3601 Indonesian 3A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Michele Ford Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2 hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: INMS2102 or INMS2602 Prohibitions: INMS3101, INMS3102, INMS3301, INMS3302, INMS3902, INMS3602 Assessment: 10xweekly language exercises (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 2xoral assessments (equivalent to 1500wd) (30%), 1xresearch assignment (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 2xin-class tests (equivalent to 1000wd) (30%)
Indonesian 3A is designed to extend students' knowledge and understanding of Indonesian language and culture. It combines intensive Indonesian language instruction with a series of Indonesian-language lectures that extends students' knowledge of Indonesian culture and society on a variety of contemporary topics.
Textbooks
Materials may be purchased from the University Copy Centre
INMS3602 Indonesian 3B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: INMS3101 or INMS3601 Prohibitions: INMS3102, INMS3301, INMS3302 Assessment: 10xweekly language exercises (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 2xoral assessments (equivalent to 1500wd) (30%), 1xresearch assignment (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 2xin-class tests (equivalent to 1000wd) (30%)
Indonesian 3B further extends students' knowledge and understanding of Indonesian language and culture. It combines intensive Indonesian language instruction with a series of Indonesian-language lectures that extends students' knowledge of Indonesian culture and society.
Textbooks
Materials may be purchased from the University Copy Centre
INMS3605 Autonomy and Human Rights in Indonesia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Michele Ford Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: INMS3102 or INMS3602 Assessment: 10xweekly assessment tasks (equivalent to 2000wds) (40%), 2x15 minute oral assessments (equivalent to 1000wds) (20%) and 1x2000wd essay and portfolio (40%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit is designed for native speakers, near native speakers and advanced learners of Indonesian. It is one of six advanced units offered on a rotating basis, which can be taken in any order. Drawing on English and Indonesian language academic publications and other Indonesian-language resources, students will engage in research, writing and scholarly discussion on Indonesia's human rights record and the impact of regional autonomy on Indonesia's ability to accommodate its citizens' civil, political, social, cultural and economic rights.
Textbooks
Materials may be purchased from the University Copy Centre
INMS3606 Enculturating the Indonesian Nation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: INMS3102 or INMS3602 Assessment: 10xweekly tasks (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%),1xresearch presentation (equivalent to 1500wd) (30%),1xessay portfolio (equivalent to 500wd) (10%), 1xresearch essay (equivalent to 1500wd) (40%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit is designed for native speakers, near native speakers and advanced learners of Indonesian. It is one of six advanced units offered on a rotating basis, which can be taken in any order. Drawing on English and Indonesian language academic publications and other Indonesian-language resources, students will engage in research, writing and scholarly discussion on education, literature and film and their place in Indonesia's development as a nation.
Textbooks
Materials may be purchased from the University Copy Centre
INMS4011 Indonesian and Malay Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two seminars, each seminar meets weekly for 2 hours for one semester Prerequisites: Credit average or above in 48 Senior credit points from Indonesian Studies, including completion of the major. Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words and 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Indonesian Studies consists of:
1. a thesis, written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18-20,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Semester 1: Theory and Method in Asian Studies (Dr Olivier Ansart)
Semester 2: Engaging Asia (Assoc Prof Michele Ford).
For more information, contact Dr Novi Djenar, Honours coordinator.
INMS4012 Indonesian and Malay Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: INMS4011
Refer to INMS4011
INMS4013 Indonesian and Malay Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: INMS4012
Refer to INMS4011
INMS4014 Indonesian and Malay Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Novi Djenar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: INMS4013
Refer to INMS4011

International and Comparative Literary Studies

ICLS2622 Great Books 3: The Twentieth Century

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Françoise Grauby Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points from Table A, of which 12 credit points are from one subject area Assessment: 1x5 minute oral presentation and 1x1 page plan equivalent to 1000 words (10%), 2x2500wd essays (90%)
What are the great works of literature of the 20th century? How does history leave its mark on them? This unit introduces some exemplary literary works translated into English from Asian and European languages as well as works originally written in English. It studies them in the context of world history, national literatures and different narrative traditions.
ICLS2634 Literature and Revolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mats Karlsson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points from Table A, of which 12 credit points are from one subject area Assessment: 1x5 minute oral presentation with written one page plan equivalent to 1000 words (10%), 2x2500wd essays (2x45%)
This unit surveys the connection between literature and revolution by investigating the ways in which literary texts and movements across the world have influenced radical responses to the status quo, questioning, and provoking a re-conceptualisation of prevailing values and traditions. But how and when do literary experiments become revolutionary? Are they the same in different cultures? Could a pattern of synergies connecting literary with political and social revolutions emerge from a historical as well as cross-cultural investigation?
ICLS2635 Science Fiction: The Future is Now

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Vrasidas Karalis Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points from Table A, of which 12 credit points are from one subject area Assessment: 1x5 minute oral presentation with written one page plan equivalent to 1000 words (10%), 2x2500wd essays (2x45%).
Science Fiction is one of the most interesting explorations of human future. Yet it addresses a number of social, political and existential issues that refer to the present: dilemmas, phobias and hopes of a world traumatised by war, disease and internal contradictions. Through the comparative study of novels and movies, this unit explores how the future, from a promised land of a great utopia, has become the dreadful exile into a dark dystopia.
ICLS2801 Int Comparative Literary Studies Exch

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ICLS2802 Int Comparative Literary Studies Exch

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ICLS2803 Int Comparative Literary Studies Exch

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ICLS2804 Int Comparative Literary Studies Exch

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ICLS3631 What is Literature? Crosscultural Views

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points from Table A, of which 12 credit points are from one subject area Assessment: 1xtutorial presentation (10%), 2x2500wd essays (90%)
Adopting a comparative cross-cultural approach, this unit considers different cultures' responses to the questions: what is literature? what is its purpose? and what value does it have? Drawing upon literatures in both English and translation from different parts of the world and different periods in history, this unit explores conceptions of literary theory, criticism and interpretation within traditional, modern and postmodern settings. Notions such as authorship, textual integrity, literature and identity, and literature and history, will be considered.
ICLS4011 Int Comparative Literary Studies Hons A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrea Bandhauer, Assoc Prof Bronwyn Winter Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3 semester-length seminars of 2 hours per week per seminar Prerequisites: Credit average in 48 senior credit points of ICLS, of which at least 36 senior credit points should be from ICLS units including exchange units, and 12 may be from cross-listed units from the School of Languages and Cultures or the Department of English. A reading knowledge of one language other than English is also required. Students not meeting these criteria may apply for special permission from the Director of ICLS. Assessment: A thesis of 12000-15000 words (50%) and 6000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar (3x16.66%).
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in International Comparative Literary Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of two members of the ICLS academic staff
2. three seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
The thesis should be of 12000-15000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 50% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 16.66%.
Students should consult with the Director of International and Comparative Literary Studies, Assoc Prof Bronwyn Winter in semester 1 and Dr Bandhauer in semester 2, regarding seminar offerings in 2013
For more information, contact Dr Andrea Bandhauer, Director of ICLS and Honours coordinator.
ICLS4012 Int Comparative Literary Studies Hons B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ICLS4011
Refer to ICLS4011
ICLS4013 Int Comparative Literary Studies Hons C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ICLS4012
Refer to ICLS4011
ICLS4014 Int Comparative Literary Studies Hons D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ICLS4013
Refer to ICLS4011

International and Global Studies

INGS1001 Power and Money in Global Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Colin Wight Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x600wd assignment (15%), 1x400wd tutorial presentation (10%), 1x1700wd essay (35%) and 1x1.5hr exam (40%)
Note: This unit is available only to students in the Bachelor of International and Global Studies
Making sense of a rapidly-changing economic and political world is a challenging agenda. This unit introduces a range of approaches to understand global economic and political integration and shifting power. In particular, the unit focuses on how the roles of nation states, international organisations and globalising markets are changing, and the way conflicts that arise with these changes are being and might be addressed.
Textbooks
Unit reader available at the University Copy Centre
INGS1002 Global Culture and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Beatriz Carillo Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: GBST1001 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%) and 1x2500wd essay (60%) and 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%)
Note: this unit is available only to students in the Bachelor of International and Global Studies
This inter-disciplinary unit will develop students' understanding of themes in and approaches to Global Studies. It will introduce students to conceptual frameworks of 'the global' and identify the core perspectives used by anthropology and sociology to analyse issues such as: the emergence of global economic, political, cultural and social processes; population movements; national, international, and global identities; diasporas and diasporic cultures; colonialism, post-colonialism and self-determination movements; discourses of international law, human rights and cosmopolitanism, appreciating the politics of the intercultural.
Textbooks
A reader available at the University Copy Centre
INGS2601 Transnational Spaces and Networks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Bronwyn Winter Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: INGS1001 and INGS1002 Assessment: 1xjoint oral presentation (equivalent to 1200wds) (30%), 1xwritten report (1000wds) (30%), 1xtake-home exam (2300wds) (40%)
Note: This unit is available only to students in the Bachelor of International and Global Studies
What are the roles of language, culture and communications in international relations? Who are "global actors" and how do they shape the transnational public sphere? How do the politics of place and space intervene? This second year core Unit of the Bachelor of International and Global Studies will address key issues and theoretical approaches in transnational, area and diaspora studies and global communications. It is taught by the School of Languages and Cultures and the Department of Media and Communications.
INGS3601 Current Global Issues

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: INGS1001 and INGS1002 and INGS2601 Corequisites: may be completed concurrently with INGS2601 with approval of Director Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (25%) and 1x1500wd group assignment (25%) and 1x3000wd essay based on contribution to group assignment (50%)
Note: not available to students outside BIGS
This 'capstone' unit in International and Global Studies focuses on case studies of contemporary problems (e.g. wars, natural disasters, economic and diplomatic crises). Groups of students will track particular cases to analyse interactions between social, cultural, political and economic institutions (including governments, aid agencies, the United Nations and others) and informal networks at the domestic, regional and international levels. In doing so, they will acquire high-level competency in theories, ethics, and methodologies informing interdisciplinary, team-based assessments of global issues.

Italian Studies

ITLN1611 Introductory Italian 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giorgia Alù Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prohibitions: ITLN1101, ITLN1201, ITLN1301, ITLN1621, ITLN1631 Assessment: class participation (10%), written assignments (equivalent to 1000wd) (10%), 1x1000wd class test (20%), 2xaural/oral tests (30 minutes total) (25%), 1x2-hr final exam (35%)
Note: A student who is qualified to enter a higher level course may not enrol in a lower level course. Students who have taken Beginners HSC Italian proceed to ITLN2611; students who have taken Continuers and / or Extension HSC Italian proceed to ITLN2631. Students who have any formal training or previous knowledge of Italian from other sources are required to identify themselves to the department as soon as possible.
This unit of study is for absolute beginners with no previous knowledge of the language. It introduces students to the main structures of the Italian language and the basic vocabulary to communicate successfully in everyday situations. All four language skills are developed, with a particular focus on grammatical accuracy.
Textbooks
Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 1, Alma, 2006
ITLN1612 Introductory Italian 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ITLN1611 or ITLN1101 Prohibitions: ITLN1102, ITLN1202, ITLN1302, ITLN1632 Assessment: class participation (10%), written assignments (equivalent to 1000wd) (10%), 1x1000wd class test (25%), 2xaural/oral tests (30 minutes total) (20%), 1x2-hr final exam (35%)
This unit builds on the competence acquired in ITLN1611. Students are introduced to more complex grammatical structures, extend their vocabulary and ability to communicate in everyday situations, and further develop their reading ability through a range of different texts.
Textbooks
Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 1, Alma, 2006
ITLN1801 Italian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Int July,Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ITLN1802 Italian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Int July,Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ITLN2611 Intermediate Italian 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maria Cristina Mauceri Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ITLN1612, ITLN1102 or HSC Italian Beginners Prohibitions: ITLN2631, ITLN2101, ITLN2201, ITLN2301 Assessment: class participation (10%), written assignments (equivalent to 1000wd) (10%), 2x1000wd language tests (35%), 2x250wd grammar tests (20%), 3xaural/oral tests (50 minutes total) (25%)
This unit of study activates and consolidates the principal structures of the language and introduces complex structures, providing a variety of activities to suit most learning styles. It offers an up-to-date image of Italian life and culture and opportunities to discuss cross-cultural issues.
Textbooks
Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 2, Alma, 2007 textbook and workbook.
ITLN2612 Intermediate Italian 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maria Cristina Mauceri Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ITLN2611 or ITLN2101 Prohibitions: ITLN2632, ITLN2202, ITLN2302 Assessment: class participation (10%), written assignments (equivalent to 1000wd) (10%), 2x750wd language tests (35%), 1x10 minute oral presentation (10%), 2x250wd grammar tests (15%), 3xaural/oral tests (50 minutes total) (20%)
This unit of study consolidates and expands both receptive and productive skills through a variety of learning tasks, to be carried out individually and/or in group. It aims at fluency and accuracy and it fosters independent learning.
Textbooks
Gruppo Italiaidea, Italian Espresso 2, Alma, 2007 textbook and workbook.
ITLN2631 Senior Italian 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giorgia Alù Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ITLN1632, ITLN1202, ITLN1302 or HSC Continuers Prohibitions: ITLN2611, ITLN2201, ITLN2101, ITLN2301 Assessment: class participation (10%), written assignments (equivalent to 1000wd) (15%), 2x1000wd language tests (35%), 2x250wd grammar tests (20%), 2x10 minute aural/oral tests (20%)
This unit of study provides consolidation in and activation of all four language skills, with a particular emphasis on speaking and writing. It offers an up-to-date image of Italian society and opportunities to discuss cross-cultural issues. Reflection on the language system aims at introducing complex structures, developing awareness at syntactic level and self-awareness about individual language performance.
Textbooks
De Giuli, Guastalla, Naddeo, Magari!, Alma 2008.
ITLN2632 Senior Italian 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ITLN2631, ITLN2201 or ITLN2301 Prohibitions: ITLN2612, ITLN2202, ITLN2302 Assessment: class participation (10%), written assignments (equivalent to 1000wd) (10%), 2x750wd language tests (30%), 2x250wd grammar tests (20%), 1x10 minute oral presentation (10%), 2xaural/oral tests (30 minutes total) (20%)
This unit of study builds on the competence acquired in ITLN2631 and further develops the four language skills within the cultural context of contemporary Italy. It aims at fostering both fluency and accuracy as well as independent learning skills.
Textbooks
De Giuli, Guastalla, Naddeo, Magari!, Alma 2008.
ITLN2811 Italian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ITLN2812 Italian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ITLN2813 Italian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ITLN2814 Italian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ITLN2815 Italian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ITLN2816 Italian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Int July,Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ITLN2817 Italian Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Int July,Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ITLN3611 Senior Italian 5

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Antonia Rubino Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ITLN2612 or ITLN2202 Prohibitions: ITLN3631, ITLN3201, ITLN3301 Assessment: class participation (10%), written assignments (equivalent to 1000wd) (10%), 1x10 minute oral presentation (15%), 2x750wd language tests (30%), 2x250wd grammar test (15%), 2xaural/oral tests (50 minute total) (20%)
This unit of study furthers competence in all aspects of the language, with a particular focus on advanced reading and writing skills. It deals with different aspects of Italian contemporary society through a variety of text types and levels of formality, encouraging cross-cultural appreciation and discussion.
ITLN3612 Senior Italian 6

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Antonia Rubino Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ITLN3611 or ITLN3201 Prohibitions: ITLN3202, ITLN3302 Assessment: class participation (10%), written assignments (equivalent to 1000wd) (10%), 1x10 minute oral presentation (15%), 2x750wd language tests (30%), 2x250wd grammar test (15%), 2xaural/oral tests (50 minute total) (20%)
This unit of study offers opportunities for advanced and carefully planned language practice. It aims to develop the student's linguistic awareness and to reflect on the Italian language system as a whole, while dealing with different aspects of Italian contemporary society and culture.
ITLN3631 Senior Italian 7

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ITLN2632 or ITLN2302 Prohibitions: ITLN3611, ITLN3301, ITLN3201 Assessment: class participation (10%), written assignments (equivalent to 1000wd) (15%), 1x10 minute oral presentation (10%), 2x750wd language tests (35%), 2x250wd grammar test (15%), 2xaural/oral tests (30 minutes total) (15%)
This unit of study furthers competence in all aspects of the language, with a particular focus on the discourse level and on advanced reading and writing skills. It deals with different aspects of Italian contemporary society through a variety of text types and levels of formality.
Textbooks
De Giuli, Guastalla, Naddeo, Magari!, Alma 2008.
ITLN3668 Issues of Language and Society in Italy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Antonia Rubino Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: One of ITLN1612, ITLN1632, ITLN1202, ITLN1302, ITLN2611, ITLN2631 Assessment: 1xpresentation (equivalent to 1000wds) (20%), 1xclass test (equivalent to 1000wds) (20%), 1xtake-home assignment (equivalent to 1000wds) (20%), 1xfinal essay (equivalent to 3000wds) (40%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program
This unit will introduce students to current debates on language and language usage in contemporary Italy, and in particular on the changing nature of the country's multilingualism under the influence of various factors. The language impact of immigration, the decline of historical minorities, the position of dialects and Italy's role in the European Union are some of the topics that will be explored.
Textbooks
Course pack available from the University Copy Centre
ITLN3679 Filming Fiction: The Italian Experience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giorgia Alù Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: One of ITLN1612, ITLN1632, ITLN1102, ITLN1202, ITLN1302, HSC Italian Continuers or Beginners Assessment: class participation (10%), 1xoral presentation (equivalent to 1500wds) (20%), written assignments (equivalent to 2000wds) (30%), 1x2500wd final essay (40%)
An examination of the relationship between Italian cinema and fiction. Do they speak a common language? Do they employ comparable techniques? Who copies whom? This unit investigates these and other questions by analysing the adaptation of selected contemporary Italian novels into film.
ITLN3682 Fiction of Youth

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maria Cristina Mauceri Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ITLN1612 or ITLN2611 or ITLN2612 or ITLN2631 or ITLN2632 or ITLN3611 or ITLN3612 or ITLN3631 Prohibitions: ITLN3763 Assessment: class participation (10%), 1xoral presentation (equivalent to 1500wds) (20%), 1x2000wd class test (30%), 1x2500wd essay (40%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit (conducted in Italian) examines a range of Italian novels from the second half of the twentieth century whose authors or protagonists are young. We will conduct a literary analysis of the texts, considering aspects such as genre, viewpoint and style. Furthermore, we will study specific topics related to the themes of youth, paying attention to the historical and social background of the text.
Textbooks
Moravia, A., Agostino, Bompiani, 2000.
ITLN3685 Linguistic Issues in Migration

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Antonia Rubino Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ITLN2611 or ITLN2612 or ITLN2631 or ITLN2632 or ITLN3611 or ITLN3612 or ITLN3631 Prohibitions: ITLN3754 Assessment: class participation (10%), 1xoral presentation (equivalent to 1500wds) (25%), 1x2000wd class test (25%), 1x2500wd final essay (40%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit of study examines the main linguistic phenomena that occur in the contact between majority and minority languages in a context of migration, using the Italo-Australian community as a case.
Textbooks
Course pack available from University Copy Centre
ITLN3687 Focus on Writing in Italian

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Antonia Rubino Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: One of (ITLN3631, ITLN3612, ITLN3301, ITLN3202 or ITLN3611) Prohibitions: ITLN3401 Assessment: class participation (15%), written assignments (equivalent to 3500wds) (40%), 1xpresentation (equivalent to 1000wds) (20%), 1x1500wd class test (25%)
This unit of study is designed specifically for students with advanced knowledge of Italian. Students will analyse and produce written texts of varying text types and writing techniques. They will also focus on specific strategies for written communication.
Textbooks
Course pack available from University Copy Centre
ITLN3688 Advanced Italian: Translation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giorgia Alù Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: One of ITLN3612, ITLN3631, ITLN3202, ITLN3301 Prohibitions: ITLN3402 Assessment: written assignments (equivalent to 2000wds) (30%), 1xoral presentation (equivalent to 1000wds) (15%), 2x1500wd class tests (55%)
This unit of study is concerned with translating and interpreting from and into Italian, exploring modes, techniques and genres.
Textbooks
Texts available from the department
ITLN3691 Italian Literature: 1200-1860

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ITLN1612 or ITLN2611 or ITLN2612 or ITLN2631 or ITLN2632 or ITLN3611 or ITLN3612 or ITLN3631 Prohibitions: ITLN2902 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (25%), 1x3000wd essay (50%), written assignments (equivalent to 1500wd) (25%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program. It is also strongly recommended for intending Exchange students.
This unit deals with the literary cultures of Italy before it became a unified state. It analyses regional diversity while emphasising linguistic similarities. It addresses the paradox of a unique cultural and artistic civilization paralleled by a dramatically fragmented political system. Through analysis of influential texts and images in their historical context, students will gain a sound knowledge of major figures, works, and movements of one of the richest intellectual traditions in the world.
ITLN3694 Dante and the Middle Ages

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points from Table A of the Table of Units of Study Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x1500wd class test (20%), quizzes (equivalent to 1000wd) (40%) and class participation (10%)
This unit studies Dante's Divine Comedy in its entirety as an enduring work of poetry, a major text of the European literary tradition, and the most comprehensive synthesis of Medieval culture. We will look at how literature works in relation to the language and the rhetorical tradition in which it expressed on the one hand, and, on the other, the historical, philosophical and theological culture it expresses and interprets. This unit will be taught in English.
ITLN3695 Love in Italian Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Borghesi Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 Table A junior credit points Assessment: 1x3000wd final essay (40%), 1x1500wd class test (25%), 1xpresentation (equivalent to 1500wd) (25%), class participation (10%)
What is love? Italian authors throughout the centuries have provided many different interpretations. Drawing upon major works of Italian literature, this unit will explore a range of texts from the Middle Ages through to the 19th century that deal with love, its cultural and social contexts. The texts will be considered within the context of the visual culture of the time. This unit will be taught in English.
ITLN4011 Italian Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Antonia Rubino Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two seminars that meet weekly for two hours a week. Prerequisites: 48 senior credit points in Italian Studies with a credit average or better, including completion of the major and the special entry unit ITLN3691. Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words and 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Italian Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours per week for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Sem 1: Rebellion and innovation in narrative: from the Sixties to the Nineties (Dr Giorgia Alù and Dr Maria Cristina Mauceri)
Sem 2: Medieval and Renaissance Italian Culture (Dr Francesco Borghesi)
For more information, contact Dr Antonia Rubino, Honours coordinator.
ITLN4012 Italian Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Antonia Rubino Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ITLN4011
Refer to ITLN4011
ITLN4013 Italian Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Antonia Rubino Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ITLN4012
Refer to ITLN4011
ITLN4014 Italian Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Antonia Rubino Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ITLN4013
Refer to ITLN4011

Japanese Studies

JPNS1611 Japanese 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Seiko Yasumoto Session: Semester 1,Summer Main,Winter Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 2x1-hr tutorials/week Prohibitions: JPNS1111, any HSC Japanese Course Assessment: continuous class assessment (i.e. weekly quizzes, speaking, writing, listening tests) (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), 1x2hr exam (50%)
This beginners' unit introduces basic communication skills in understanding and speaking Japanese. Students will also learn to write the two Japanese syllabaries and approximately 60 kanji characters and to recognise at least 100 kanji characters in context. Relevant socio-cultural information is integrated with the language learning. This unit also includes a weekly culture lecture.
Textbooks
Genki I, Eri Banno et al,
JPNS1612 Japanese 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: JPNS1111 or JPNS1611 Prohibitions: JPNS1121 Assessment: continuous class assessment (i.e. weekly quizzes, speaking, writing, listening tests) (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), 1x2hr exam (50%)
This unit develops both the basic communication skills and the learning skills introduced in semester one. Students will continue to learn to use and understand Japanese in meaningful, everyday contexts. They will be able to write more than 150, and to recognise at least 200 kanji characters in context. Relevant socio-cultural information is integrated with the language learning.
Textbooks
Genki I, Eri Banno et al,
JPNS1801 Japanese Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JPNS1802 Japanese Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JPNS2611 Japanese 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: 65% or more in HSC Japanese Beginners or less then 70% in Japanese Continuers, or JPNS1121 or JPNS1612 Prohibitions: JPNS1114, JPNS2212 Assessment: continuous assessment (including class quizzes, tests and written assignments) (equivalent to 3000wds) (75%), 1x1hr exam (25%)
This unit consolidates basic grammar and introduces intermediate grammar, through communicative methods and reading practice. By the end of the semester, students should be able to keep up a conversation for a short time in a dialogue, to write short passages without the assistance of dictionaries, to read narrative texts, and to recognise the difference between written and spoken modes of communication in Japanese. Students will be able to write approximately 200 kanji and to recognise about 300 kanji.
Textbooks
Genki II, Eri Banno et al,
JPNS2612 Japanese 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: JPNS1114 or JPNS2212 or JPNS2611 Prohibitions: JPNS1124, JPNS2222 Assessment: continuous assessment (including class quizzes, tests and written assignments) (equivalent to 3000wds) (75%), 1x1hr exam (25%)
This unit aims to consolidate basic grammar and introduce intermediate grammar through communicative methods and reading practice. By the end of the semester, students are expected to be able to sustain a conversation about a selected topic for several minutes in a dialogue, to write a well-structured short essay without the assistance of dictionaries, and to read Japanese texts on a wide variety of topics. They will be able to write approximately 300 kanji and to recognise about 400 kanji.
Textbooks
Genki II, Eri Banno et al,
JPNS2621 Japanese 5

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: HSC Japanese Extension or Japanese Continuers 70% or above or JPNS1124 or JPNS2222 or JPNS2612 Prohibitions: JPNS2213 Assessment: Weekly online quiz and class participation (10%), 2x30min in-class quiz (10%), 1x50min mid-semester test (20%), 1x50min listening test (10%), 1x400wd communication task and presentation (20%), 1x2hr exam (30%)
This unit aims to develop students' speaking, writing and reading skills for the intermediate level of Japanese, so that they are able to use Japanese in a variety of situations. Students will be expected to achieve the following linguistic skills: switch to appropriate speech style in formal and informal situations; express opinions and thoughts; write about 350 kanji and recognise at least 600 kanji. Writing and reading practice will consolidate grammatical, lexical and cultural knowledge.
Textbooks
Intermediate Japanese, Akira Miura et al
JPNS2622 Japanese 6

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: JPNS2621 or JPNS2213 Prohibitions: JPNS2223 Assessment: Weekly online quiz and class participation (10%), 2x30min in-class quiz (10%), 1x50min mid-semester test (20%), 1x50min listening test (10%), 1x400wd communication task and presentation (20%), 1x2hr exam (30%)
This unit aims to consolidate and extend intermediate level linguistic skills, through the acquisition of conversational strategies such as notions of apology, reasoning, opinions and explanations. Besides oral practice, writing and reading practice will help strengthen grammatical, lexical and cultural knowledge. Students will be able to read about 850 kanji and write about 500 kanji by the end of the semester. The above aims will be achieved by exploring various topics relating to contemporary Japan through authentic materials.
Textbooks
Intermediate Japanese, Akira Miura et al
JPNS2660 Introduction to Japan

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Stavros Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: JPNS1121 or JPNS1612 Prohibitions: JPNS2622, JPNS3622, JPNS3632 Assessment: 1x1500wd group project (26%), 2xquizzes (1250wds each) (2x20%), 1x1000wd essay (17%), role play (equivalent to 1000wds) (17%)
This unit aims to introduce to students of Japanese language core knowledge on Japanese society, history and culture. The unit will be taught in English but will acquaint students with key words and concepts in Japanese. Themes to be covered may include: social structures; contemporary issues and their historical backgrounds; language use in Japanese society; literary and cultural trends; urban culture.
JPNS2670 Love and Death in Japanese Novels

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yasuko Claremont Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: JPNS1124 or JPNS2222 or JPNS2612 Prohibitions: JPNS3116, JPNS3621, JPNS2301, JPNS3631, JPNS3301 Assessment: 1x2hr final exam (33%), 1x1hr mid-semester exam (17%), 1x1000wd presentation (17%), 1x1500wd essay (25%), continuous assessment (equivalent to 500wds) (8%)
This unit of study aims at improving students' language skills by reading modern Japanese literature, which is expressed at a different level from daily use. The comprehension of Japanese literary texts enables students to gain an insight into the writers' themes and expressions and is relevant to contemporary life. When necessary, English translations will be used in conjunction with authentic Japanese material. Students are expected to develop a critical appreciation of Japanese literature.
JPNS2671 Japanese Sociolinguistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nerida Jarkey Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: JPNS1124 or JPNS2222 or JPNS2612 Prohibitions: JPNS3621, JPNS3622, JPNS3631, JPNS3632, JPNS2301, JPNS2302, JPNS3301, JPNS3302, JPNS3114 Assessment: 5xonline quizzes (equivalent to 200wd) (5%), class participation (5%), 1x1300wd research assignment (35%), 1x1hr class test (25%), 1x2hr exam (30%)
This unit will explore some important characteristics of the Japanese language from social perspectives. The characteristics to be explored are concerned with the ways in which Japanese people use language systems to express their own social identity and their relationships with others: both the people they are talking to and the people they are talking about. Authentic texts will be provided by selecting from a range of reading materials such as academic essays, novels and newspaper articles.
JPNS2672 Japanese Media and Popular Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Seiko Yasumoto Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: JPNS1124 or JPNS2222 or JPNS2612 Prohibitions: JPNS3106, JPNS3621, JPNS3631 Assessment: 2xclass quizzes (equivalent to 1000wds each) (34%), 1xresearch based project (equivalent to 2500wds) (41%), 1x1.5hr exam (25%)
This unit aims to explore the new Japan and its youth cultures and to guide students to understand and broaden their knowledge of changing aspects of Japanese culture and society. Topics from Japanese traditions through to contemporary popular culture will be analysed. Learning activities include reading media texts (e.g. newspaper articles), video analysis, discussion, research and video conferences. The unit also provides students with opportunities to pursue their interests and develop cultural knowledge and communication skills.
JPNS2812 Japanese Exchange 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JPNS2813 Japanese Exchange 5

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JPNS2814 Japanese Exchange 6

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JPNS2815 Japanese Exchange 7

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JPNS3621 Japanese 7

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: JPNS1123 or JPNS2223 or JPNS2622 Prohibitions: JPNS2301 Assessment: 6xgrammar and syntax quizzes (4 minutes each) (15%), 2xaural/oral tests (15 minutes each) (30%), 1x45 minute mid-term test (15%), 1x2hr examination (40%)
Classes will involve a range of learning styles for further development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. Classes are divided into two components: communication and reading. In communication classes exercises will include discussion, short surveys, role-plays, short reading and translation exercises. Reading will be focused on contemporary journalistic and sometimes literary writing. By the end of this unit of study, students will be able to read approximately 1100 kanji and write 600 kanji.
JPNS3622 Japanese 8

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: JPNS3621 or JPNS2301 Prohibitions: JPNS2302 Assessment: 6xgrammar and syntax quizzes (4 minutes each) (15%), 2xaural/oral tests (15 minutes each) (30%), 1x45 minute mid-term test (15%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit is designed to consolidate and extend skills acquired in JPNS3621. Classes are divided into two components: communication and reading. In communication classes, exercises will include discussion, short surveys, role-plays, reading passages and short translation exercises. Reading classes will be focused on a variety of contemporary writing styles. By the end of this unit of study, students will be able to read approximately 1350 kanji and write 700 kanji.
JPNS3631 Japanese 9

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: JPNS2302 or JPNS3622 Prohibitions: JPNS3301 Assessment: continuous class assessment including essay writing (equivalent to 1000wds) (17%), 1x1000wd mid-semester exam (17%), group and individual presentations (equivalent to 2000wds) (33%), 1x2hr exam (33%)
This unit aims at the further development of skills beyond the intermediate level of Japanese. The goals of the unit include the development of skills in language analysis; the understanding of unfamiliar texts of a non-specific nature; the ability to summarise, to evaluate texts critically and to appreciate authentic Japanese texts, including literary texts. At the conclusion of the unit, students will be able to write 800 kanji and recognise some 1600 kanji.
JPNS3632 Japanese 10

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: JPNS3301 or JPNS3631 Prohibitions: JPNS3302 Assessment: 1x1hr mid-semester exam (1000wds) (17%), 1x1500wd presentation (25%), 1x1000wd essay (17%), continuous assessment (equivalent to 500wds) (8%), 1x2hr exam (33%)
This unit aims at revising and extending students' language skills to a higher level in order to achieve confidence and proficiency in expressing views in written and spoken Japanese. Students are expected to develop analytical skills in reading a variety of contemporary texts from different genres, to evaluate information critically, and to express opinions through discussions on a wide range of research topics. Students will be able to write 1000 kanji and recognise some 1945 Joyo kanji.
JPNS3673 Japanese Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Chun-Fen Shao Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: JPNS2223 or JPNS1123 or JPNS2622 or JPNS1125 Prohibitions: JPNS3314 Assessment: continuous class assessment including class quizzes, tests, presentation and written assignments (equivalent to 5000wds) (83%), 1x1hr exam (17%)
Is Japan a unique country? What are the similarities and differences between Japan, Australia and other countries? This unit of study offers students the opportunity to explore various aspects of contemporary Japanese society and culture through reading Japanese texts in the original, through group discussions, and through cross-cultural comparisons. Students will develop their own opinions on a range of social and cultural issues while improving their reading, analytical, and both oral and written communication skills.
JPNS3675 Japanese Cinema

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mats Karlsson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Prerequisites: JPNS2622 OR 18 junior credits including ARHT1002 or ENGL1011 or ENGL1025 or ENGL1026 Assessment: 1x1800wd essay (30%) 1x1200wd film review (20%) 1x1000wd film blog (15%) 1x1500wd semester exam (25%) tutorial participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program
Cinema is an essential part of cultural life in Japan, which has one of the richest film traditions in the world. This unit introduces the history of Japanese cinema through lectures on important films organised according to major themes and genres. Besides weekly screenings of films, lectures will be richly illustrated with film excerpts. Students will gain an overall insight into the role of cinema in Japanese society and gain the ability to analyse films critically.
JPNS3841 Japan In-Country Study 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: 12 Junior JPNS credit points Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Approved course in a tertiary level institution in Japan.
JPNS3842 Japan In-Country Study 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: 12 Junior JPNS credit points Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Approved course in a tertiary level institution in Japan.
JPNS4011 Japanese Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Stavros Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two seminars, each seminar meets weekly for 2 hours for one semester Prerequisites: 48 senior credit points in Japanese Studies with a credit average or above, including completion of the major and ASNS3690 Approaches to Research in Asian Studies. They may include one 6-credit point Japan-related Asian Studies unit of study. Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words and 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Japanese Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The following seminars are available for 2013:
Theory and Methods in Asian Studies (Dr Olivier Ansart)
Engaging Asia (Assoc Prof Michele Ford)
For more information, contact Dr Matthew Stavros, Honours coordinator
JPNS4012 Japanese Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Stavros Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: JPNS4011
Refer to JPNS4011
JPNS4013 Japanese Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Stavros Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: JPNS4012
Refer to JPNS4011
JPNS4014 Japanese Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Stavros Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: JPNS4013
Refer to JPNS4011

Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture

JCTC1001 Palestine: Roman Rule to Islam

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Suzanne Rutland Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and class participation (10%)
How did the religion and history of the Jewish people change from the Second Temple to the rabbinic period? Explore the history and religion of the Jews during the watershed period in Palestine under Roman rule. Study the Hellenist influence on Judaism, the development of different sects, including the Dead Sea sect, and the emergence of Christianity. Lectures (2 hours a week) focus on the history of the period. Tutorials deal with broad questions such as who is a Jew and universalism and chosenness in Judaism together with a knowledge and understanding of basic Jewish belief and practice. Students will gain insights into the evolution of Judaism from pagan times to the present. At the upper level, students can study Medieval Judaism, Holocaust and Israel.
Textbooks
Ben-Sasson, H.H (ed) A History of the Jewish People, Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1976.
JCTC1002 Jewish Settlement Outside Palestine

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Suzanne Rutland Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: JCTC1001 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and class participation (10%)
Do you wish to understand the gradual dispersion of Jews from Palestine? Study this unit to understand the spread of Judaism from Palestine into Africa and Asia. Students will study the story of Muhammed and the rise of Islam; the place of the Jew under Islamic law and the rapid Islamic conquest of much of the known world. They will learn about the dispersed diaspora communities in Babylon and Egypt and the development of Jewish communities in India and China from their early origins to the present day. Lectures focus on the history of the period. The tutorials deal with moral, ethical and philosophical questions relating to Judaism. Discussions will explore the existence and nature of God, prophecy, the Messiah, Torah and the commandments, conversion to Judaism and Jewish attitudes to other faiths.
JCTC1801 Jewish Civilization Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JCTC2603 Jews Under the Crescent and the Cross

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Suzanne Rutland Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: JCTC1001 or 6 junior credit points of History or Religious Studies Prohibitions: JCTC2003 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and class participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The story of Jews living under the Crescent (Muslim rule) and the Cross (Christian rule) comprises a vibrant period of Jewish history. The unit explores Jews under Muslim rule in Spain and the experiences of Jews under Christian rule in Germany, France and England in the Medieval period, including the problems of Christian antisemitism and the Crusades. These are seminal periods in the development of Jewish thought, with the contribution of great commentators and philosophers including Moses Maimonides.
JCTC2604 From Expulsion to Regeneration

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Suzanne Rutland Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: JCTC1001 or 6 junior credit points of History or Religious Studies Prohibitions: JCTC2004 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and class participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
One of the most traumatic events in Jewish history was the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492. Explore the reasons behind the expulsion and the ways in which new centres of Jewish life emerged, especially in Eastern Europe. Light will also be shed on the establishment of Jewish communities in the Netherlands and England on the eve of emancipation when the new ideas of the Enlightenment paved the way for the rise of the modern Jew.
JCTC2605 From Emancipation to the Holocaust

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Avril Alba Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: JCTC1001 or 6 junior credit points of History Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and class participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit is designed to introduce students to the turbulent history of European Jewry, 1750 to 1933. Against the background of far-reaching transformation in almost every aspect of society and culture, the Jew's entry into the modern world will be examined. At the centre stands the process of acculturation, integration, assimilation and Zionism, as well as the responses by non-Jewish society, especially the rise of modern antisemitism.
JCTC2606 The Holocaust: History and Aftermath

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Avril Alba Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: JCTC1001 or 6 junior credit points from History Prohibitions: JCTC2006 Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x1500wd essay (30%) and class participation (20%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program
This unit provides an in-depth study of the Holocaust. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of Nazi ideology, in particular racial antisemitism, and the gradual implementation of this policy towards the Jews and other victim groups from 1933 to 1945. Other themes focus on the responses of the victims and the role of the by-standers, as well as post-war politics of memory and other issues, including Holocaust denial and war crimes prosecution.
JCTC2607 Israel in the Modern Middle East

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Suzanne Rutland Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: JCTC1001 or one of HSTY1022, HSTY1025, HSTY1031, HSTY1043, HSTY1044, HSTY1045 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of tutorial paper (20%), 1x2hr exam (40%), and class participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Israel's position in the modern Middle East and the wider world from state formation to the present has been shaped by social, political and economic processes. Study these processes in the context of the nature of Israeli society and the major foreign policy decisions taken by Israeli leaders. Topics to be studied include: the genesis and development of Zionism, democracy and religion in Modern Israel, post-Zionism, the role of the Holocaust in Israel, Jerusalem and the settlements.
JCTC2811 Jewish Civilisation Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JCTC2812 Jewish Civilisation Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JCTC2813 Jewish Civilisation Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JCTC2814 Jewish Civilisation Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JCTC2815 Jewish Civilization Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JCTC2816 Jewish Civilisation Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
JCTC4011 Judaic Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Suzanne Rutland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for each semester Prerequisites: Credit average in 48 senior credit points of Jewish Civilisation including completion of the major and 12 credit points in an associated language (Hebrew Classical OR Hebrew Modern OR Yiddish) or an Honours preparation course from an associated discipline (History, Government or Studies of Religion). Assessment: A thesis of 20000 words and 4000-5000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Jewish Civilization, Thought and Culture consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for each semester.
The thesis should be of 20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 4000-5000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
Students will choose two IV Honours options. Students can choose to specialise in either the Classical or Modern period. Their dissertation must be in their area of speciality. Seminars will be offered from the following list in 2013:
Classical Period:
Biblical Themes (Dr Ari Lobel)
Biblical Texts in Hebrew (Assoc Prof Ian Young).
Modern Period:
The Evolution of Judaism in the New World (Prof Suzanne Rutland)
Modern Hebrew Literature (Ms Yona Gilead)
For more information, contact Prof Suzanne Rutland, Honours coordinator.
JCTC4012 Judaic Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: JCTC4011
Refer to JCTC4011
JCTC4013 Judaic Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: JCTC4012
Refer to JCTC4011
JCTC4014 Judaic Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: JCTC4013
Refer to JCTC4011

Korean Studies

KRNS1621 Korean 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: KRNS1101 Assessment: 1x1-hr exam (30%), 2x5 minute oral presentations (30%), 3x30 minute quizzes (18%), 6x10wd vocabulary tests (12%), 6x30 minute homework assignments (10%)
This unit is a comprehensive beginners course which will lay the foundation for acquiring oral, aural, reading and writing skills in Korean. Students will acquire oral communication skills based on the given grammar points and topics. Various communicative approaches will be employed for the class activities. Students are required to give group presentations during the semester. On the basis of grammar introduced, the reading and writing of short texts will be done in each week.
KRNS1622 Korean 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: KRNS1621 or KRNS1101 Prohibitions: KRNS1102 Assessment: 1x1-hr exam (30%), 2x5 minute oral presentations (30%), 3x30 minute quizzes (18%), 6x10wd vocabulary tests (12%), 6x30 minute homework assignments (10%)
This unit is a comprehensive beginners course which will lay the foundation for acquiring oral, aural, reading and writing skills in Korean. Students will acquire oral communication skills based on the given grammar points and topics. Various communicative approaches will be employed for class activities. Students are required to give group presentations during semester. On the basis of grammar introduced, the reading and writing of short texts will be done in each week.
KRNS1801 Korean Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
KRNS2621 Korean 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ki-Sung Kwak Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: KRNS1102 or KRNS1622 Prohibitions: KRNS2001 Assessment: 1x2-hr exam (30%), 2x10 minute oral presentations (40%), 2x100wd quizzes (10%), 6x20wd vocabulary tests (10%), 6x30 minute assignments (10%)
As an intermediate language unit, students are expected to gain extensive language skills in a diverse range of communicative settings. Interactive exercises and activities will provide students with opportunities to practice and improve their skills in speaking, reading and writing.
KRNS2622 Korean 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ki-Sung Kwak Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: KRNS2001 or KRNS2621 Prohibitions: KRNS2002 Assessment: 1x2-hr exam (30%), 2x10 minute oral presentations (40%), 2x100wd quizzes (10%), 6x20wd vocabulary tests (10%), 6x30 minute assignments (10%)
As an intermediate language subject, students are expected to gain extensive language skills in a diverse range of communicative settings. Interactive exercises and activities will provide students with opportunities to practice and improve their skills in speaking, reading and writing.
KRNS2671 Translation and Interpretation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: KRNS1302 or KRNS1632 or native speakers of Korean Prohibitions: KRNS2400 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (30%), 1x15 minute oral presentation (15%), 10x250wd assignments (55%)
This unit aims at providing students with useful skills in Korean language such as translation and interpretation from Korean into English and vice-versa. The unit is divided into three modules: Korean-English translation, English-Korean translation and interpretation. Students will learn how to translate and interpret texts chosen from both print and audio-visual media from a wide range of fields, including society, culture, politics, economics, science and technology.
KRNS2672 Issues in Korean Language

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: KRNS1302 or KRNS1632 or native speakers of Korean Prohibitions: KRNS2515 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (35%), 1xtutorial presentation and 500wd summary (15%), contribution to tutorial discussion (10%)
This unit provides a detailed survey of issues related to the Korean language in relation to its social and cultural background. The major topics include its romanisation systems, historical development, writing systems, dialects and slang expressions, language use in the Internet, language and gender, and Korean as a foreign language. In addition to a semester-final examination, students will conduct a small project to tackle some sociolinguistic issues. Students are required to present the results of their project in the class and to submit a written report.
KRNS2673 Korean Phonology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points in KRNS or LNGS, or native speakers of Korean Prohibitions: KRNS2317, KRNS2318 Assessment: 10xweekly assignments (equivalent to 200wds each) (60%), 1x2hr final exam (40%)
This unit introduces the sound system of the Korean language - Korean phonology. Some linguistics background is recommended, although it is not necessary. In addition to the two-hour lecture, there will be a one-hour seminar in which further detailed issues are discussed in depth. From the fifth week, there will be one or two weekly problem solving assignments.
KRNS2674 Korean Grammar

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of KRNS or LNGS, or native speakers of Korean Prohibitions: KRNS2319, KRNS2320 Assessment: 1x15 minute presentation (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 5x200wd written assignments (30% total), 1x2hr final exam (50%)
This unit of study introduces the basics of Korean grammar - the word structure (morphology) and the sentence structure (syntax). In addition to a series of lectures on Korean grammar, selected papers on Korean grammar will be read and issues from the readings will be discussed in depth.
KRNS2675 Contemporary Korean Society and Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from Table A Prohibitions: KRNS2500 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (35%), 1x2hr exam (40%), 1xtutorial presentation and 500wd summary (15%), contribution to tutorial discussion (10%)
This unit will provide students with a good understanding of contemporary Korean society and culture by examining not only current issues in Korea (such as legal, political, economic, educational and family matters), but also the Korean people's living style affected by these various issues. The latter will include daily life, gender issues, business culture, entertainment, youth and popular culture. Students also look at the application and/or implication of a certain Korean culture or practice to domestic and international communities; e.g. to South Korea which pursues rapid globalisation or to a multi-cultural society like Australia.
KRNS2681 Korean In-Country Study A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: KRNS1101 or KRNS1621 or KRNS1301 or KRNS1631 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Approved course in an overseas tertiary level institution.
KRNS2682 Korean In-Country Study B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: KRNS1101 or KRNS1621 or KRNS1301 or KRNS1631 Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Approved course in an overseas tertiary level institution.
KRNS2811 Korean Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
KRNS2812 Korean Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
KRNS2813 Korean Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
KRNS2814 Korean Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
KRNS2815 Korean Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
KRNS3621 Korean 5

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: KRNS2002 or KRNS2622 Prohibitions: KRNS3001 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 8x40wd vocabulary tests (20%), 8x200wd essays (20%), 2x5 minute oral presentations (20%)
This unit aims to further develop oral and written communication skills beyond the intermediate level. Students will acquire fluency in oral communication, with particular emphasis on sophistication and formality of speech. Reading and writing skills are developed through the use of structured texts from the prescribed textbook and selections of authentic reading materials from a range of sources.
KRNS3622 Korean 6

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: KRNS3001 or KRNS3621 Prohibitions: KRNS3002 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 8x40wd vocabulary tests (20%), 8x200wd essays (20%), 2x5 minute oral presentations (20%)
This unit follows on from KRNS3621 and is designed to extend the student's command of the Korean language beyond the level completed in the previous semester. Through readings of authentic works from Korean newspapers, magazines and academic texts, and structured discussions based on these materials, this unit will introduce students to a wide range of sentence patterns, enrich their vocabulary and enable them to read advanced texts independently.
KRNS4011 Korean Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two seminars, each seminar meets weekly for 2 hours for one semester Prerequisites: 48 senior credit points in Korean Studies with a credit average or better, including completion of the major and ASNS3690 Approaches to Research in Asian Studies, and an additional 6 credit points from KRNS or cross listed ASNS units. Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words (60%) and 6000 - 8000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar (2x20%).
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Korean Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000 - 8000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
Students may choose seminars from the following areas in 2013:
Korean Language and Linguistics
Korean History and Thought
Korean Media and Communication
For more information, contact Dr Duk-Soo Park, Honours coordinator.
KRNS4012 Korean Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: KRNS4011
Refer to KRNS4011
KRNS4013 Korean Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: KRNS4012
Refer to KRNS4011
KRNS4014 Korean Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duk-Soo Park Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: KRNS4013
Refer to KRNS4011

Latin

LATN1600 Introduction to Latin 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Rogerson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: LATN2620 Assessment: 1250wd-equivalent weekly language assignments (30%), 1250wd-equivalent weekly quizzes (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit provides the essential linguistic foundation to the study of the literature, culture, history and long legacy of the Latin-speaking world ruled by Rome. No previous knowledge of any forgeign language is assumed and all grammatical concepts encountered will be explained. The unit introdces the basics of Latin through the study of grammar and, using a wide variety of short and longer readings form a range of Roman authors, provides an introduction to Latin literature.
LATN1601 Introduction to Latin 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: LATN1600 Prohibitions: LATN2621 Assessment: 1250wd-equivalent weekly language assignments (30%), 1250wd-equivalent weekly quizzes (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in LATN1600, enabling students to read more complex Latin texts. It concentrates particularly on reading skills and the syntax of the sentence, while also introducing further grammatical concepts and constructions. Grammatical knowledge is reinforced by translation from and into Latin, while reading skills are further consolidated through the study of a wide variety of longer extracts from Latin prose and verse texts.
LATN1801 Latin Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
LATN1802 Latin Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
LATN2600 Intermediate Latin 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Rogerson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSC Latin or LATN1601 or LATN2621 Assessment: 1250wd-equivalent weekly assignments (30%), 1250wd-equivalent weekly quizzes (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit consolidates the knowledge of Latin acquired in LATN1601, LATN2621 or by advanced study of Latin at school. It involves both formal language study, including practice in unseen translation, and the close reading of a wide variety of shorter and extended extracts from Latin verse and prose texts. Increasing attention will be paid to the literary qualities, style, generic and socio-historical background of the texts, as well as to their grammar and syntax.
LATN2601 Intermediate Latin 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robert Cowan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: LATN2600 Assessment: 1000wd-equivalent language assignments (30%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit develops skills in the literary study of Latin texts, and builds further on language knowledge and translation skills acquired in LATN2600. It will involve the close reading of classic works of Latin prose and/or poetry, to be advised in advance on the Department of Classics and Ancient History website. Attention will be paid to style, literary and narrative technique, and the generic and socio-historical background of the texts, as well as to the intricacies of grammar and syntax.
LATN2620 Reading Latin 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Rogerson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week,1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: LATN1600 Assessment: 1250wd-equivalent weekly language assignments (30%), 1250wd-equivalent weekly quizzes (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit provides senior-level students with the essential linguistic foundation to the study of the literature, culture, history and long legacy of the Latin-speaking world ruled by Rome. No previous knowledge of any foreign language is assumed and all grammatical concepts encountered will be explained. The unit introduces the basics of Latin through the study of grammar and, using a wide variety of short and longer readings from a range of Roman authors, provides an introduction to Latin literature.
LATN2621 Reading Latin 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: LATN2620 or LATN1600 Prohibitions: LATN1601 Assessment: 1250wd-equivalent weekly language assignments (30%), 1250wd-equivalent weekly quizzes (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in LATN2620, enabling senior-level students to read more complex Latin texts. It concentrates particularly on reading skills and the syntax of the sentence, while also introducing further grammatical concepts and constructions. Grammatical knowledge is reinforced by translation from and into Latin, while reading skills are further consolidated through the study of a wide variety of longer extracts from Latin prose and verse texts.
LATN2804 Latin Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
LATN2805 Latin Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
LATN2806 Latin Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
LATN2810 Latin Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
LATN2811 Latin Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
LATN3600 Advanced Latin

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robert Cowan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: LATN2601 Assessment: 1000wd-equivalent language assignments (30%), 2x750wd analysis exercises (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit offers advanced study and practice in the literary language of Latin. Reading and translation skills will be honed by weekly language classes and the translation of unseen passages; exercises in Latin composition will further develop knowledge and appreciation of literary Latin. The unit will also involve the close reading and analysis of classic works of Latin prose and/or poetry, paying close attention to style and diction, and to literary and narrative technique.
LATN3602 Virgil's Aeneid

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Rogerson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Corequisites: LATN2601 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (45%), 1x2hr exam (45%) and participation in class discussion (10%)
Virgil's Aeneid is the central text of Roman civilization and arguably of Western culture. This unit will examine its stylistic, literary and narrative technique, and its historical and political context, through the reading of either an entire book or selected passages from the whole epic. It is particularly suitable for students who are in their second or third year of Latin, but will be of interest, profit and enjoyment to anyone interested in Latin poetry.
LATN3603 Latin Imperial Poetry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Corequisites: LATN3600 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (45%), 5x100wd unseen translation exercises (10%) and 1x2000wd essay (45%)
This unit expands students' knowledge of the poetry of the Roman Empire through study of one or more important texts from this vital period in Rome's literary development. The focus of the unit will be on the interpretation, literary appreciation and generic and/or historical background of the texts. Language skills will continue to be tested and developed by periodic exercises in unseen translation.
LATN3605 Latin Republican Prose

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Frances Muecke Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: LATN3600 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (45%), 5x100wd unseen translation exercises (10%) and 1x2000wd essay (45%)
This unit expands students' knowledge of the prose literature of the Republic and Augustan era through study of one or more texts from this influential period of Roman literature. The focus of the unit will be on the interpretation, literary appreciation and generic and/or historical background of the texts. Language skills will continue to be tested and developed by periodic exercises in unseen translation.
LATN4011 Latin Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two seminars, each seminar meeting for 3 hours per week for one semester Prerequisites: Credit average in 42 senior credit points of Latin including two of LATN3603, 3604, 3605, 3606 plus 6 additional senior credit points of Greek, Latin or Ancient History. Assessment: a thesis of 15,000 words, 6,000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar and one exam
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Latin consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for three hours for one semester
3. one unseen exam on a Latin text.
The thesis should be of 15,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6,000 words of written work or it equivalent.
The thesis is worth 45% of the final Honours mark, each of the seminars is worth 22.5% and the unseen exam is worth 10%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Latin Imperial Poetry (Dr Paul Roche)
Latin Republican Prose (Dr Frances Muecke)
For more information, contact Dr Paul Roche, Honours coordinator.
LATN4012 Latin Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to LATN4011 Corequisites: LATN4011
Refer to LATN4011
LATN4013 Latin Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to LATN4011 Corequisites: LATN4012
Refer to LATN4011
LATN4014 Latin Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to LATN4011 Corequisites: LATN4013
Refer to LATN4011

Linguistics

LNGS1001 Structure of Language

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: LNGS1004, LNGS1005 Assessment: 10x150wd short problem based assignments (30%), 1x1hr 1000wd equivalent mid-term exam (20%), 1x2hr 2000wd equivalent final exam (50%)
This unit is a comparative look at the general structure of human language. It looks at the sounds of human language: how the speech organs make them and their variety, in particular, a detailed description of English consonants and vowels and how to transcribe them. It investigates what is a possible word in English and other languages. It looks at the way speakers put words together to form sentences and how and why is English different from Japanese or even Irish.
Textbooks
V. Fromkin, R. Rodman, N. Hyams, P. Collins, M. Amberber and Mark Harvey. 2009. 'An Introduction to Language'. Cengage Learning. Sixth Edition
LNGS1002 Language and Social Context

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof William Foley Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 5x250wd short assignments (40%), 1x1hr 1000wd equivalent mid-term exam (20%), 1x2hr 2000wd equivalent final exam (40%)
This unit introduces the study of the interrelationship between language and society. It is concerned with phenomena of language change and how that leads to varieties in a language. How are these varieties linked to social differences? What distinguishes male speech from female speech or what are the linguistic styles of different social classes or ethnic groups? What is slang, or jargon, and what distinguishes a casual conversation from an interview?
Textbooks
Mesthrie, R., Swann, J., Deumert, A., Leap, W. Edition 2. 'Introducing Sociolinguistics'. Edinburgh University Press
LNGS1801 Linguistics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Linguistics at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Linguistics.
LNGS2602 Syntax

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof William Foley Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: LNGS1001 or LNGS1005 or LNGS1004 Prohibitions: LNGS2002 Assessment: 5x2500wd problem sets (60%), 1x2hr 2000wd equivalent problem based exam (40%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Syntax deals with how we combine words into phrases, clauses and sentences and how we understand these combinations. Syntax is almost purely internal to language and plays a major role in organising the language system. We look at syntactic concepts in English, languages of Europe and Asia, and those of small traditional communities around the world. Using a problem solving approach, we develop explicit models to describe syntactic phenomena that allow generalisations leading to testable predictions about possible structures.
LNGS2604 Discourse Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ahmar Mahboob Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: One of ENGL1000, ENGL1005, ENGL2619, ENGL2647, LNGS1001, LNGS1002, LNGS1003, LNGS1004, LNGS1005, LNGS2601, LNGS2602, LNGS2603, LNGS2620, LNGS2621, MECO1001, MECO1003, WRIT1001 Prohibitions: LNGS2004 Assessment: 4x500wd term assignments (40%), 1x2500wd essay (60%)
This unit of study provides an introduction to discourse analysis, which is concerned with the way in which texts are organised in relation to their social context. In linguistics, the term 'discourse' covers both a) the organisation of linguistic units above the sentence level (cohesion), and b) language in use or context (register and genre). The unit will include analysis of texts combining language with image, from the perspective of critical discourse analysis.
Textbooks
J R Martin & David Rose, 'Working with Discourse', 2nd edn
LNGS2613 Computer Applications in Linguistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures Prerequisites: LNGS1001 Prohibitions: LNGS2027, LNGS2007 Assessment: 6x1000wd written assignments (100%)
This unit of study introduces students to the many uses of computers in the humanities with specific reference to linguistics: computer lexicography; building and searching text corpora, examining speech signals, collocations, style, authorship, discourse structure and syntactic constructions. Accessing information on languages and linguistics through library catalogues, electronic mailing lists, FTP sites and the World Wide Web. Other linguistics units (like phonetics, field methods, historical linguistics and semantics) will benefit from some basic knowledge of the use of computers.
LNGS2616 Historical Linguistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Prerequisites: LNGS2001 or LNGS2601 Assessment: Problem sets and 2x in-class exams totalling 6000 words
This unit looks at the mechanisms of change within a particular language as well as across groups of related languages. This raises the question of how languages can be related: whether through sharing a common ancestor; by being in contact for a long time or by being consciously planned. In each instance we must either rely on knowledge we can gain from languages still in use or on records of extinct languages or earlier stages of existing languages. Because the records are often sparse it becomes necessary to reconstruct earlier stages and the unit provides the tools for undertaking a reconstruction. Once we reconstruct a common ancestor language we are then able to make inferences about the culture of the people who spoke it as well as where they lived and how they moved about. Each level of linguistic structure is relevant to the study of language change so that the unit considers how sounds systems change over time as well as changes in meanings and grammatical systems.
Textbooks
Campbell, Lyle. 2004. 'Historical Linguistics, an introduction', second ed. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.
LNGS2617 Cross-Cultural Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Either (two of LNGS1001, LNGS1002, LNGS1003, LNGS1004, LNGS1005) or (Credit average in 12 Senior credit points from one of the foreign languages (French, Japanese, Chinese, Italian, Arabic, Spanish, German, Latin, Modern Greek, Ancient Greek, Indonesian, Malay, Korean, Thai, Yiddish, Hebrew, Syriac, Aramaic, Sanskrit) Prohibitions: LNGS3903, LNGS3923 Assessment: 1x1500wd presentation (25%), 1x1500wd problem set (25%), 1x3000wd essay (50%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
In today's globalized and multicultural societies, intercultural communication is common. It challenges people who engage in it, and theories of communication in different societies (i.e. cross-cultural communication). We consider approaches including conversation analysis, speech act theory, interactional sociolinguistics, the ethnography of communication, and discourse analysis. In analysing samples of cross-cultural communication we attend to how social relationships between participants are reflected in their linguistic practices. We explore applied perspectives on intercultural communication in educational, courtroom and workplace interactions.
LNGS2620 Phonetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr lab/week Prerequisites: LNGS1001 Prohibitions: LNGS2601 Assessment: 4x250wd short assessments (30%), 3x100wd transcription tasks (20%), 1x1000wd mid-term exam (20%), 1x2000wd final exam (30%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit will provide an introduction to the study of articulatory, acoustic and perceptual phonetics. Approaching the study of phonetics from both the theoretical and practical sides, students will learn about the anatomical and physiological bases of the production of speech sounds. They will learn to produce and discern a wide range of the sounds observed in human languages and have practise in transcribing these sounds as well as applying these skills to the wider field of transcription, for example song texts/musical transcription. An introduction to the physical (acoustic) properties of speech sounds provides the basis for an understanding of what acoustic factors matter in speech perception.
Textbooks
Peter Ladefoged and Keith Johnson, 6th edition, 'A Course in Phonetics'
LNGS2621 Phonology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: LNGS1001 Prohibitions: LNGS2601 Assessment: 5x400wd problem sets (45%), 1x1000wd mid-term exam (20%), 1x2000wd final exam (35%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit will provide a foundation in the principles and methods of linguistic argumentation particularly with respect to phonological analysis and the interaction of phonetics and phonology. Topics include: basic phonological analysis; distinctive features, underlying representations, abstractness, rules and constraints, the role and function of prosodic structure: the prosodic hierarchy syllables, tone and stress, markedness.
LNGS2805 Linguistics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Linguistics at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Linguistics.
LNGS2806 Linguistics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Linguistics at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Linguistics.
LNGS2809 Linguistics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Linguistics at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Linguistics.
LNGS2810 Linguistics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Linguistics at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Linguistics.
LNGS2811 Linguistics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Linguistics at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Linguistics.
LNGS2812 Linguistics Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Linguistics at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Linguistics.
LNGS3601 Semantics and Pragmatics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Riemer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: one of LNGS2602, LNGS2603, ENGL2619, ENGL2653 Prohibitions: LNGS3026, LNGS3006 Assessment: 1x500wd equivalent exercise (15%), 1x1000wd equivalent exercise (25%), 1x3000wd essay (60%)
Note: Compulsory for Honours students; other students may select as an option. This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Semantics deals with the meaning of words, phrases, sentences and texts, and the relations between those meanings. Pragmatics deals with how speakers use context and shared information to convey information additional to the semantic content of what they say, and with how hearers make inferences on the basis of this information. Our goal is to explore the diversity of ways in which meaning can be expressed linguistically in different languages, as well as of what constitutes evidence for meaning.
LNGS3605 Structure and Use of a Language

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (LNGS2620 or LNGS2621) and (LNGS2602 or LNGS2603) Prohibitions: LNGS3904 Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent tutorial paper (20%), 2x1000wd problem sets (30%), 1x3000wd essay (50%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
A language other than English is chosen for analysis (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and discourse), and for description of the ways it is used (ethnography of speaking including speech acts, speech events, registers and genres). It is examined in its areal, genetic, historical, social and typological context. We also examine sources of data and their reliability, and the way findings are presented (reference and teaching grammars and linguistic papers).
LNGS3606 Phonological Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: LNGS2601 or (LNGS2620 and LNGS2621) Prohibitions: LNGS3002 Assessment: 4x600wd problem sets (50%), 1x3500wd research paper (50%)
The course will include discussion of issues in the content and structure of phonological representations and formalisms leading to the development of Optimality Theory. Topics include: the content and structure of phonological representation; multi-tiered phonology, syllable structure, epenthesis, metrical phonology, lexical phonology and the cycle/strata, prosodic phonology, feature geometry, underspecification theory, and the interfaces between phonology other modules of the grammar.
LNGS3608 Computers, Discourse, Language

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Monika Bednarek Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: LNGS1001 and LNGS1002 Assessment: 1x1000wd corpus design, building and discussion (20%), 1x2000wd corpus analysis (30%), 1x3000wd research essay (50%)
'Language looks different when you look at a lot of it at once'. This unit of study introduces you to the use of computer software to look at a lot of language at once: Do we refer to 'men' and 'women' equally often? What are the five most frequent words in the English language? What is the difference between 'pure' and 'sheer'? How does television dialogue differ from real-world dialogue? And how does a computer help us to answer these and similar questions?
Textbooks
Baker, P. 2006. 'Using Corpora in Discourse Analysis'. London/New York: Continuum
LNGS3690 Issues in Theoretical Linguistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky/ Dr Nick Riemer Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit average in 18 senior credit points from Linguistics. The units must include (LNGS2601 or LNGS2001) and (at least one of LNGS2602, LNGS2002, LNGS2003, LNGS2603) Prohibitions: LNGS3914 Assessment: 1x4000wd paper (70%), 1x2000wd tutorial paper (30%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit introduces students to the methods of linguistic argument through careful study of a current debate in theoretical linguistics. Students learn to identify and assess the underlying assumptions, to work out what evidence would confirm or disconfirm the hypotheses made by different parties in the debate, and to draw conclusions as to which hypotheses are more likely to be useful or correct. They also learn to situate the debate within the wider contexts of linguistic theories and language description. Students are asked to contact staff members to discuss potential topics.
LNGS3696 Bilingualism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week Prerequisites: Credit average in 18 Senior credit points which may be comprised of Linguistics units and foreign language units (French, Japanese, Chinese, Italian, Arabic, Spanish, German, Latin, Modern Greek, Ancient Greek, Indonesian, Malay, Korean, Thai, Yiddish, Hebrew, Syriac,Aramaic, Sanskrit, Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse). Other language units require department permission. Prohibitions: LNGS3929 Assessment: 3x2000wd assignments (100%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The majority of the world's population are bi- or multilingual. Even so, monolingualism often gets treated as the norm. This unit explores individual and societal aspects of bilingualism, which will be defined broadly as the use of two or more languages on a regular basis.
LNGS3699 Linguistics Research Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky/Dr Nick Riemer Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit average in 18 senior credit points in linguistics, including at least 2 of LNGS2601, LNGS2001, LNGS2602, LNGS2002, LNGS2603, LNGS2003, LNGS2604, LNGS2004, LNGS2620, LNGS2621. Prohibitions: LNGS3940 Assessment: 1x6000wd research paper which will be done in stages and reported on through each stage and presented formally in seminar (100%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This seminar aims to prepare students for research in linguistics through critical reading and discussion of current issues and approaches in research and criticism, focussing on a particular subfield of linguistics.
LNGS4011 Linguistics Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit average in 48 senior credits points of Linguistics, including at least three of the five units LNGS3601, LNGS2602, LNGS2604, LNGS2620, LNGS2621 Assessment: 1x18000-20000wd thesis (50%) and 2 seminars x 6000-8000wds of written work or its equivalent per seminar (50%) OR 1x12000-15000wd thesis (40%) and 3 seminars x 6000-8000wds of written work or its equivalent per seminar (60%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Linguistics consists of:
1) a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff, which may include members of staff from other departments for students undertaking joint honours.
2) two (or three) seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
3) an unassessed support seminar that meets weekly for one hour for one semester
If you chose the two seminar option you write a thesis of 18000-20000 words. The thesis is worth 50% of the final Honours mark in this option.
If you chose the three seminars option you will write a shorter thesis of 12000-15000 words. The thesis is worth 40% of the final Honours mark in this option.

Students considering further academic work in the field should choose the longer thesis.
Each seminar requires 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent.
LNGS4012 Linguistics Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: LNGS4011
Refer to LNGS4011
LNGS4013 Linguistics Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: LNGS4012
Refer to LNGS4011
LNGS4014 Linguistics Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toni Borowsky Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: LNGS4013
Refer to LNGS4011

Media and Communications

MECO1001 Australian Media Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alana Mann Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1200wd essay (30%), 1x1800wd essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (30%)
Note: available to BA (Media and Comm), BA (Media and Comm/BLaws students only
This unit offers an introduction to the history and theory of media and communications studies. Students will gain a foundation in key concepts, methodologies and theorists in the field. They will also explore the interdisciplinary roots of media and communications studies and acquire basic research skills. By the end of the unit students should be familiar with major shifts in the history and theory of media and communications studies and with basic concepts and methodologies in the field.
Textbooks
MECO 1001 Course Reader to be purchased from the University Copy Centre.
MECO1002 Media and Communications Landscapes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Penny O'Donnell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
Note: available to BA (Media and Comm), BA (Media and Comm)/BLaws students only
The unit introduces students to the key ideas, trends, organisations and institutional bodies that shape and define the 'landscape' in which media and communications practitioners operate. It offers students an opportunity to gain a foundational understanding of the media and communication field in Australia that will be important for placing professional work done in media and communications in a social, cultural, historical, economic and political context.
Textbooks
Stuart Cunningham and Graeme Turner, (eds.), The Media and Communications in Australia, Third Edition, Allen and Unwin, 2010
MECO1003 Principles of Media Writing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alana Mann Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture, 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x300wd news story (15%), 1x600wd news story (15%), 1x1500wd news portfolio (30%), 1x2hr exam (30%), workshop participation (10%)
Note: available to BA (Media and Comm), BA (Media and Comm)/BLaws) students only
This unit will give students foundational skills in writing for the print and broadcast media. Students will learn the elements of journalistic style, how to structure news and feature articles, how to script basic broadcast and online news, and be introduced to the principles of interviewing and journalistic research.
Textbooks
MECO 1003 Course Reader to be purchased from the University Copy Centre.
MECO2601 Radio Broadcasting

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Martin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from MECO units Prohibitions: MECO2001 Assessment: 1x400wd equivalent individual radio news writing and presentation exercise (20%), 1x2000wd equivalent live group radio production and documentation (40%), 1x2100wd critical listening and reflection journal (40%) Practical field work: Students are encouraged to join the University of Sydney Radio Society. This unit will involve substantial media production project work outside of class time.
Note: available to BA (Media and Comm) and BA (Media and Comm)/BLaws students only
This unit introduces students to the history, nature and contemporary status of radio. It examines the theory and practices of radio broadcasting and online delivery, with an emphasis on broadcast journalism. Practically, the unit offers students an introduction to radio presentation and production using professional digital audio recording and editing facilities. Students will also apply critical analytical approaches to reflection on on-air and online radio texts.
Textbooks
MECO 2601 Course Reader to be purchased from the University Copy Centre. Phillips, G and Lindgren, M (2005) Australian Broadcasting Journalism Manual, 2nd edn., Oxford University Press
MECO2603 Media Relations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Stanton Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from MECO units and 6 junior credit points from either MECO1002, WRIT1001, WRIT1002, ENGL1025 or ENGL1007. Note: Students enrolling from 2010 should plan to take MECO1002 as per degree regulations Prohibitions: MECO2003 Assessment: 1x2500wd media relations campaign (40%), 1x1000wd equivalent press conference presentation (30%), 1x1000wd final exam (30%)
Note: available to BA(Media and Comm) and BA (Media and Comm)/BLaws students only
This unit of study will examine the relationships between stakeholders with an interest in public communication including the environmental groups, media, the corporate sector, government, not for profit industries and health and community relations. This unit provides an overview of media relations theory including issue framing, agenda setting, and co-relational development. It examines image, reputation and relationship building. Students learn to develop a media relations campaign strategy, budget and timeline, using tactical approaches for successful media relations. Students will learn to identify controlled and uncontrolled media, set research priorities and objectives and framing a client response.
Textbooks
Stanton, R (2007) Media Relations, Oxford University Press Melbourne
MECO2805 Media and Communications Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Alana Mann Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Media and Communications at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Media and Communications.
MECO2806 Media and Communications Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Alana Mann Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Media and Communications at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Media and Communications.
MECO2807 Media and Communications Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Alana Mann Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Media and Communications at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Media and Communications.
MECO2808 Media and Communications Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Alana Mann Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in Media and Communications at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Media and Communications.
MECO3601 Video Production

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Steven Maras Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x 2-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from MECO units and 6 junior credit points from either MECO1002, WRIT1001, WRIT1002, ENGL1025 or ENGL1007. Note: Students enrolling from 2010 should plan to take MECO1002 as per degree regulations Prohibitions: MECO3001 Assessment: 1x1300wd equivalent 80-sec news piece (25%), 1x2000wd equivalent 6-min video (50%), 1x1200wd analysis in exam format (25%) Practical field work: This unit will involve substantial group media production project work outside of class time.
Note: available to BA (Media and Comm) and BA (Media and Comm)/BLaws students only.
This is an introduction to the theory and practice of digital video production, with a strong practical component, emphasizing information-based programming (news, current affairs, corporate video, documentary and infotainment). Students will be expected to produce short video items individually and in groups, using professional standard desktop editing software.
Textbooks
MECO3601 Course Reader to be purchased from the University Copy Centre. Martha Mollison, Producing Videos: A Complete Guide. 3rd edition. AFTRS/ Allen & Unwin: Sydney, 2010
MECO3602 Online Media

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Martin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from MECO units and 6 junior credit points from either MECO1002, WRIT1001, WRIT1002, ENGL1025 or ENGL1007. Note: Students enrolling from 2010 should plan to take MECO1002 as per degree regulations Prohibitions: MECO3002 Assessment: 1x1000wd group blog feature proposal (25%), 1x2000wd equivalent group online feature (50%), 1x1500wd online essay (25%) Practical field work: This unit will involve substantial group media production project work outside of class time.
Note: available to BA(Media and Comm) and BA (Media and Comm)/BLaws students only.
This unit examines how uses of the Internet, the Web and other online media and devices, such as mobile phones and iPads, are changing the media landscape. Students will become familiar with key theoretical and professional issues in online and digital media, and learn to critically analyse online media production. They will also gain practical skills in writing and producing for the web through team development of blogs and online features.
Textbooks
MECO3602 Course Reader to be purchased from the University Copy Centre. Terry Flew (2008) New Media: an introduction. Third edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press
MECO3603 Media, Law and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Steven Maras Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from MECO units and 6 junior credit points from either MECO1002, WRIT1001, WRIT1002, ENGL1025 or ENGL1007. Note: Students enrolling from 2010 should plan to take MECO1002 as per degree regulations Prohibitions: MECO3003 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (45%), 1x1.5hr (1700wd equivalent) exam (35%), 1x800wd online posting (20%)
Note: available to BA (Media and Comm) and BA (Media and Comm) /BLaws students only.
MECO3603 will introduce students to the area of Media, Law and Ethics through discussion of key legal, ethical, and cultural issues relevant to journalism and the professional fields of public communication. Students will be given an introductory survey of the main ethical theories in Western thought to establish a framework within which to examine specific ethical issues that relate to media. They will also be introduced to those aspects of the law that impinge on the work of media professionals.
Textbooks
MECO3603 Course Reader to be purchased from the University Copy Centre. Pearson, Mark and Polden, Mark (2011), The Journalist's Guide to Media Law, 4th Ed., Crows Nest, Allen and Unwin
MECO3605 Media Globalisation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alana Mann Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from MECO units and 6 junior credit points from either MECO1002, WRIT1001, WRIT1002, ENGL1025, ENGL1027. Note: Students enrolling from 2010 should plan to take MECO1002 as per degree regulations. Prohibitions: MECO3005 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x500wd equivalent tutorial presentation/debate (20%), 1x2hr exam (40%)
Note: available to BA (Media and Comm), BA (Media and Comm/BLaws) students and, subject to departmental approval, students undertaking a major in Cultural Studies.
This unit aims to demonstrate the complexity of media globalisation and to examine in depth some of the common assumptions associated with the term. While the unit will consider the impact of global market forces (i.e. cheap labour in developing countries, environmental issues, etc), it is interested in the dynamics of globalisation more generally, and media globalisation more specifically. Students can expect to appreciate that media globalisation is a complex proposal that involves formats, localisation, symbolic currency and negotiation.
Textbooks
MECO3605 Course Reader to be purchased from the University Copy Centre
MECO3606 Advanced Media Writing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Megan Le Masurier Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from MECO units and 6 junior credit points from either MECO1002, WRIT1001, WRIT1002, ENGL1025 or ENGL1007. Note: Students enrolling from 2010 should plan to take MECO1002 as per degree regulations Prohibitions: MECO3006 Assessment: 1x500wd equivalent oral presentation (10%), 1x1200wd news feature (25%), 1x600wd review or opinion column (15%), 1x250wd equivalent oral pitch of final feature (5%), 1x2000wd long feature (40%), 1x250wd publication analysis (5%)
Note: available to BA(Media and Comm) and BA(Media and Comm/BLaws) students only.
This unit of study will build on foundational writing, research and interviewing skills acquired in MECO1003 Principles of Media Writing. The focus will be on writing for print media and will emphasise advanced feature and opinion writing genres. Students will also study the history of print media genres and consider theoretical issues relevant to feature writing.
Textbooks
MECO3606 Course Reader to be purchased from the University Copy Centre
MECO3609 Critical Practice in Media

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alana Mann Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 junior and 42 senior credit points from MECO units and 6 credit points from either MECO1002, WRIT1001, WRIT1002, ENGL1025 or ENGL1007. Note: Students enrolling from 2010 should plan to take MECO1002 as per degree regulations Assessment: 1x1000wd project proposal (20%), 1x5000wd research project (80%)
Note: available to BA(Media and Comm) and BA (Media and Comm)/BLaws students only.
This unit of study is designed to draw together the key elements of theoretical and practical knowledge and skills that students have acquired in their media and communications studies. Using historical, cultural and industry-based frameworks and case studies, this unit of study will assist students to better understand the relationship between theory and practice in the field and assist them to become critical practitioners. By the end of the unit, students will be able to identify key debates around the relationship between theory and practice and demonstrate an awareness of how critical thinking and media production are capable of mutually informing each other in practice.
Textbooks
Readings will be available online via the Library electronic reserve.
MECO3671 Media and Communications Internship

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Martin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: there are no lectures, but attendance may be required at a program of industry talks Prerequisites: 30 senior credit points from MECO units including (MECO3603 or MECO3003) and 6 junior credit points from either MECO1002, WRIT1001, WRIT1002, ENGL1025 or ENGL1007. Note: Students enrolling from 2010 should plan to take MECO1002 as per degree regulations. Prohibitions: MECO3701, MECO3702 Assessment: Students must satisfy the requirements of an internship contract with their workplace, including attendance and performance, as evaluated through a workplace supervisor report, and submit a 2000wd internship journal, assessed by the department.
Note: available to BA(Media and Comm) and BA (Media and Comm)/BLaws students only. Students may not enrol in MECO3671 prior to the second semester of their 3rd year.
The internship consists of a work placement comprising a minimum of 140 working hours in a media organisation, assisted and supervised by both the workplace and the department. Placements may include print, broadcast, online and new media, public relations and advertising organisations. Students will be required to present a 2000 word journal recounting their experiences during the internship. The internship and internship journal are assessed on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
MECO3672 Internship Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Dwyer Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x2-hr seminars/semester, 2x2-hr lectures/semester Prerequisites: 30 senior credit points from MECO units (including 12 senior credit points from MECO3602, MECO3603, MECO3002 or MECO3003) and 6 junior credit points from either MECO1002, WRIT1001, WRIT1002, ENGL1025 or ENGL1007. Note: Students enrolling from 2010 should plan to take MECO1002 as per degree regulations Corequisites: MECO3671 Prohibitions: MECO3701, MECO3702 Assessment: 1x500wd research proposal (20%), 1x4000wd research essay (70%), lecture, seminar and online participation (10%)
Note: Students may not enrol in MECO3672 prior to the first semester of their 4th year. Note: All students must attend the Week One lecture, at which they sign up for one of 3 cycles of 4x2-hr seminars.
This unit is based around the production of a 4000 word critical research essay drawn from issues encountered during and after the internship. Students are required to attend a cycle of four seminars, which they will direct (in the presence of the unit coordinator) to discuss and refine their research approaches and questions. Students will also need to submit documentation of their research question and approach before submitting their essay.
Textbooks
Stokes, Jane (2002) How to do Media and Cultural Studies, London: Sage
MECO4011 Media and Communications Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Megan Le Masurier Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Average of high credit or above in senior units within the completed BA (Media and Communications) Assessment: 1x18000-20000wd thesis on approved topic (60%), 1x12000-13000wd written works (40%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Mid year enrolment is not available. Part time enrolment is not available. Students from other institutions may be accepted into the program, and are requested to provide samples of previous academic work as well as a proposal. Please contact the Honours coordinator, ideally by early November in the year prior to intended enrolment.
In the Honours program, students are expected to attend weekly Honours seminars and also attend Departmental seminars. All students will submit a thesis of 18000-20000 words on an approved topic. Additional assessments will focus on research design, methodology and critical readings undertaken primarily in first semester. For more information, contact Dr Megan Le Masurier, Honours coordinator.
MECO4012 Media and Communications Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Megan Le Masurier Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MECO4011
Refer to MECO4011
MECO4013 Media and Communications Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Megan Le Masurier Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MECO4012
Refer to MECO4011
MECO4014 Media and Communications Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Megan Le Masurier Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MECO4013
Refer to MECO4011

Medieval Studies

MDST2612 Byzantium between East and West

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Vrasidas Karalis Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points from Table A of which 12 credit points are from one subject area Assessment: 2x2000wd essay (70%), 1x1000wd tutorial presentation (20%) and participation (10%)
Note: this unit of study may be counted towards majors in History and Modern Greek
This unit investigates the role that Byzantium played throughout the Middle Ages as the cultural interface between East and West between 330 and 1453. It examines the various forms of interaction that took place within Byzantium and because of Byzantium between Eastern and Western Europe, Europe and Asia, and Christianity and Islam. It further explores pre-modern perceptions of identity, social class, economy, and gender. Its main focus is to delineate the wide range of exchanges that took place throughout the Middle Ages between societies through cultural diffusion, military campaigns, material culture and political ideologies.
MDST2613 Sex and Sin in the Middle Ages

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Juanita Ruys Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: At least 18 Junior credit points from Part A of the Table of units of study, of which 12 credit points are from one subject Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x10min (1000 word equivalent) tutorial presentation (15%), 1x1000wd tutorial paper (25%), class participation (10%)
Note: this unit of study may be counted towards majors in History, Religious Studies, English, and European Studies
Medieval writers produced texts concerned with the definition, experience, regulation, and even celebration of sex, the body, and gender. This unit introduces students to the ways that concepts of sexual intercourse, sexual identity, gender, and the body were depicted and regulated in medieval texts from the tenth to fifteenth centuries. Students will read in English translation AngloSaxon, Old French, Germanic, and Medieval Latin texts that illustrate the complexity of views of sex in the medieval world.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Ruth Mazo Karras, Sexuality in Medieval Europe: Doing unto Others (New York and London: Routledge, 2005)
MDST4011 Medieval Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Anlezark Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week for each seminar option Prerequisites: Credit average in at least 48 senior credit points from Medieval Studies units of study or from cross-listed units of study (including at least two MDST units of study to the value of 12 credit points). Assessment: 1x18000-20000wd thesis (40%), 2x6000-8000wd seminar papers (60%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Medieval Studies consists of:
1. a thesis of 18000-20000 words in length, written under the supervision of a member of academic staff nominated by the Honours Coordinator. 2. Two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
Each seminar requires 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent. Seminars are chosen from relevant subject areas by the Honours candidate in consultation with the Honours Coordinator.
The thesis is worth 40% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 30%. It is important that prospective Honours students consult the Coordinator to ensure that their choice of senior level units of study is appropriate to their intentions for the Honours Year.
MDST4012 Medieval Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Anlezark Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MDST4011
Refer to MDST4011
MDST4013 Medieval Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Anlezark Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MDST4012
Refer to MDST4011
MDST4014 Medieval Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Anlezark Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MDST4013
Refer to MDST4011

Modern Greek Studies

MGRK1601 Junior Modern Greek 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Panayota Nazou Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr language tutorials/week, 2x1-hr practicals/week commencing week 2 Prohibitions: MGRK1101 Assessment: 2xtests (equivalent to 800wd total) (30%), 3xquizzes (equivalent to 800wd total) (30%), 1x2hr exam (equivalent to 2000wd) (30%), 1xoral exam (equivalent to 400wd) (10%)
Practical language classes for students who have very little or no prior knowledge of Greek. This unit is based both on communicative methodology and a functional approach to language. By using the Greek language in a range of contexts, students will develop spoken communication (speaking and listening) skills and to a lesser extent written communication (reading and writing) skills.
Textbooks
Supplied through the department
MGRK1602 Junior Modern Greek 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Panayota Nazou Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr language tutorials/week, 2x1-hr practicals/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: MGRK1101 or MGRK1601 Prohibitions: MGRK1102 Assessment: 2xtests (equivalent to 800wd total) (30%), 3xquizzes (equivalent to 800wd total) (30%), 1x2hr exam (equivalent to 2000wd) (30%), 1xoral exam (equivalent to 400wd) (10%)
This unit is a continuation of MGRK1601. It aims at strengthening students' oral communication skills and further developing their written skills. Having completed MGRK1602, students in their second year will normally enter MGRK2601.
Textbooks
Supplied through the department
MGRK1621 Junior Modern Greek 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Panayota Nazou Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr language tutorials/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: Modern Greek Continuers or Modern Greek Extension Prohibitions: MGRK1101, MGRK1501, MGRK1401 Assessment: 6xwritten tasks (equivalent to 1000wd total) (30%), 1x1hr final exam (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 1x1400wd short essay (35%), 1xtake home assignment (equivalent to 600wd) (15%)
This unit revises and consolidates the main structures of Greek grammar and syntax and provides an overview of recent Greek history. The language component focuses on developing writing and reading skills by introducing students to the essential morphological structure of the Greek language. The history component offers an insight to some of the most important issues of Greek history since the enlightenment.
Textbooks
Supplied through the department
MGRK1622 Junior Modern Greek 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anthony Dracopoulos Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr language tutorials/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: MGRK1621 or MGRK1401 Prohibitions: MGRK1101, MGRK1102, MRGK1402 Assessment: 6xwritten tasks (equivalent to 1000wd total) (30%), 1x1hr final exam (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 1x1400wd short essay (35%), 1xtake home assignment (equivalent to 600wd) (15%)
This unit is a continuation of MGRK1621. Enrolment into this unit without completion of MGRK1621 is possible after consultation with the chair of the department.
MGRK2601 Senior Modern Greek 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Panayota Nazou Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr language tutorials/week, 2x1-hr practicals/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: MGRK1102 or MGRK1602 Prohibitions: MGRK1501, MGRK2001 Assessment: 2xtests (equivalent to 800wd total) (20%), 3xquizzes (equivalent to 400wd total) (10%), 5xcompositions (equivalent to 1200wd total) (30%), 2xoral presentations (equivalent to 400wd total) (10%), 1xoral test (equivalent to 400wd) (10%), 1x1hr exam (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%)
The core of this unit is practical language segments aimed particularly at developing skills of listening, speaking and writing. It also provides introductory lectures on the history and culture of speakers of Greek in the post-classical world. Political and social developments described in lectures will be linked to the reading of texts; some in Greek, illustrating how Greek culture and literature have reacted to historical change and ideological repositioning.
Textbooks
Supplied through the department
MGRK2602 Senior Modern Greek 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Panayota Nazou Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr language tutorials/week, 2x1-hr practicals/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: MGRK2001 or MGRK2601 Prohibitions: MGRK1502, MGRK2002 Assessment: 2xtests (equivalent to 800wd total) (20%), 3xquizzes (equivalent to 400wd total) (10%), 5xcompositions (equivalent to 1200wd total) (30%), 2xoral presentations (equivalent to 400wd total) (10%), 1xoral test (equivalent to 400wd) (10%), 1x1hr exam (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%)
This unit is a continuation of MGRK2601, and builds upon the knowledge and skills acquired during Semester 1.
Textbooks
Supplied through the department
MGRK2603 Style and Expression

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anthony Dracopoulos Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr tutorials/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: MGRK1402 or MGRK1622 or MGRK2002 or MGRK2602 Prohibitions: MGRK2203 Assessment: 4xcompositions (equivalent to 1500wds total) (30%), 4x exercises (equivalent to 1500wds total) (30%), 1xtake home assignment (equivalent to 1500wd) (40%)
The unit builds on the structures analysed in MGRK1622 and MGRK2602. Its particular purpose is to develop students' ability to write substantial continuous passages of Greek, concentrating on different methods for the effective building of clauses into sentences and sentences into paragraphs.
Textbooks
Supplied through the department
MGRK2605 Theory and Practice of Translation B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Panayota Nazou Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr tutorials/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: MGRK1202 or MGRK1402 or MGRK1622 or MGRK2002 or MGRK2602 Prohibitions: MGRK3211 Assessment: 2xassignments (1000wd total) (20%), 2xclass tests (equivalent to 2000wd total) (50%), 1x1500wd essay (30%)
This unit focuses on translation from English to Greek. Its main focus is the study of translating strategies of specialised texts and explains changes in their structure. Students are expected to learn how translation works as a semantic transition from one language to the other and be able to understand the necessary changes they must introduce during the translation process in order to make the text semantically functional in Greek.
MGRK2633 Social Norms/Stereotypes in Greek Cinema

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Vrasidas Karalis Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: At least 18 junior credit points from Table A of the table of units of study, of which 12 credit points are from one subject area Prohibitions: MGRK2513 Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (45%), 1xclass presentation (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 1xtake home assignment (equivalent to 2000wd) (35%)
This unit examines a number of the most important Greek films of the last fifty years that give insight into developing views of Greek society. It explores gender representations, social mobility, feminist issues, value systems, significant historical events, sex roles and attitudes towards outsiders. It also discusses stereotyping and ideological constructs and investigates the relationship between cinematic technique and cultural meaning.
Textbooks
Consult the department
MGRK2811 Modern Greek Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
MGRK2812 Modern Greek Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
MGRK2813 Modern Greek Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
MGRK2814 Modern Greek Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
MGRK2815 Modern Greek Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
MGRK3633 Greekness and Hellenism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anthony Dracopoulos Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: MGRK1621 or MGRK2601 Prohibitions: MGRK2503 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1xtake home assignment (equivalent to 2500wd) (40%), 1xpresentation (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%)
How did the Greeks deal with their long and varied past? Are they Greeks, Romioi or Hellenes? This unit will critically examine the major perceptions of the Greek cultural identity put forward by Greek intellectuals and artists from the enlightenment to date, placing particular emphasis on views which arose after the formation of the modern Greek nation-state. It will deal with issues of identity, tradition, nation, cultural continuity and discontinuity and it explores their relevance to the Greek Australian experience.
MGRK3841 Modern Greek In-Country Study 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Modern Greek Assessment: As prescribed by the host institution. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will receive a "Satisfied Requirements" result at the University of Sydney.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Approved study in a tertiary level institution in Greece.
MGRK4011 Modern Greek Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Vrasidas Karalis Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week, one in Semester 1 and one in Semester 2 Prerequisites: 48 senior credit points from Modern Greek Studies with a credit average or better, including completion of the major. Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words and 6000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Modern Greek Studies consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words. Each seminar requires 6000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Greek Cinema (Assoc Prof Karalis) Semester 1
From Homer to Ritsos (Dr Anthony Dracopoulos) Semester 2
For more information, contact Assoc Prof Vrasidas Karalis, Honours coordinator.
MGRK4012 Modern Greek Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MGRK4011
Refer to MGRK4011
MGRK4013 Modern Greek Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MGRK4012
Refer to MGRK4011
MGRK4014 Modern Greek Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MGRK4013
Refer to MGRK4011

Music

MUSC1501 Extended Fundamentals of Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Hindson, Dr. Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2 x 1hr tutorials (aural & written)/wk Assumed knowledge: Material covered in MUSC1503 and MUSC1504, or advanced music theory qualifications, such Music 2 for the NSW HSC, High Level Music for the IB (or equivalent). Students will take a diagnostic in Week 1 of semester to ensure they have the required level of music theory and aural skills. Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%).
Through an integrated and research-based approach to music composition and analysis, student's knowledge of music theory and compositional techniques is extended. Skills in this area cover a range of of Western and Non-Western musical styles, from classical music to film music to noise.
MUSC1503 Fundamentals of Music 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2x 1hr tutorials (aural and written)/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1501, MUSC2693, MCGY1008 Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (60%), aural assessment (30%), attendance and participation (10%).
An introduction to basic music literacy skills, including learning to read and write music, and an understanding of fundamental aspects of its structure and composition. The material covered in this unit of study concentrates upon the basics of music theory and listening to ensure that participants have a solid grounding for a firm understanding of music notation and organisation.
MUSC1504 Fundamentals of Music 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Hindson, Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2 x 1hr tutorials (aural & written)/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1501 Assumed knowledge: Material covered in MUSC1503. Students interested in taking this unit who have not completed MUSC1503 are advised to see the co-ordinator beforehand to ascertain that they have the required knowledge. Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment including final exam (60%), aural assessment (30%), attendance and participation (10%).
A more advanced exploration of music literacy skills. The material covered in this course ranges from the broad to the specific: from an examination of musical elements and the way they are used in a variety of musical genres through to specific compositional aspects such as four-part writing or analysis of melodic writing across musical cultures. Listening skills are developed in this unit of study.
MUSC1506 Music in Western Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anne Boyd Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1 hr tut/wk Assumed knowledge: The ability to follow a musical score while listening to the music and some prior knowledge of elementary music theory. Assessment: Tutorial work including a Listening Journal (40%), 2000 word essay (40%), 60 minute listening exam (20%)
This unit will study a range of today's popular classics with a view to understanding how musical meaning is constructed in relation to the development of tonality and other European stylistic conventions from the Ancient Greeks to the present day. It will consider questions about how the Western art music tradition has been constructed through history. What are the social factors at work? How does music reflect the minds of its creators and create meaning?
MUSC1507 Sounds, Screens, Speakers: Music & Media

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1 tut/wk Assessment: Two 1,000 word assignments (2x25%); one 500 word test (10%); one 2,000 word assignment (30%), attendance and participation (10%).
Music has been dramatically shaped and reshaped by every major change in communications technology in the 20th century from vinyl discs to MP3s. In this unit of study we will analyse such issues as the ways in which the early recording industry transformed jazz, the blues and country music, how the presentation of music on radio and television changed how the music industry created new musical celebrities, and the challenges the music industry faces as digital technology transforms the creation, distribution and consumption of music.
MUSC2612 Music Performance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 contact hours/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points, AND audition (contact the Unit one week before semester begins) Assessment: 40 minute concert performance (repertoire not to be counted in any other performance course) (55%); Attendance at relevant classes, concerts and tutorials (10%); Programme notes (1500 words) (20%); Tutorial presentation and peer critique (1000 words) (15%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Not available to students currently enrolled in performance Principal Study units
This unit is meant to develop a scholarly, analytical research basis towards the practical performance of music. Performance on any instrument, in any style (classical, jazz, pop, traditional etc.) in lunch-time concerts in the Old Darlington School. Students receive a written report, an advisory interview after each concert, peer student critiques and corrections to programme notes.
MUSC2614 Composition Workshop

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anne Boyd Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hour workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in music or with permission from the co-ordinator Assessment: Attendance and participation in classes and concerts (30%), composition portfolio and process diary (60%), aural and/or written presentations (10%)
An opportunity to create a new composition in a supported environment. Students will hear their works rehearsed and performed, usually by other participating students.The outcome is a performance in a public concert at the end of the Semester. The workshops may be themed around particular genres and musical techniques such as music theatre, drone-based composition, song-writing, sound and rhythm, creating a sound space and media composition.
MUSC2651 Sounding Australia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anne Boyd Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour lecture and 1 hr tut/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: MCGY2614 Assumed knowledge: An ability to read music at a basic level and an understanding of fundamental musical terminology would be an advantage in this unit of study but is not essential. Assessment: One 3000 word essay, or individual creative project (such as a composition) (60%); a listening test (20%); 2 on-line quizzes (10%); attendance and participation (10%)
This unit of study looks at how Australian music reflects, and to some extent, shapes our national identity. How does Australia sound itself as a nation? What stories about ourselves does our music tell? What are the characteristics of Australian music that are different and unique? How does our music situate Australia in a globalised community? Some indigenous music as well as well as music by non-indigenous composers will be studied.
MUSC2653 Introduction to Digital Music Techniques

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Hindson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lecture/demonstration/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Assessment: Sound recording and editing assignment (40%); creative assignments (40%); class presentation, online assessments, attendance and participation (20%).
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: An ability to read music at a basic level and an understanding of fundamental musical terminology is an advantage in this unit of study.
This unit is an introduction to the use of digital sound and music in creative and multimedia contexts. It is a practical course in which students are introduced to tools of sound creation and manipulation. Students will undertake creative projects as a means to learning. In addition, participants will be exposed to a number of approaches to electroacoustic music across the 20th and 21st centuries.
MUSC2663 Survey of Film Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hour lecture and 1 hour tut/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points including ARHT1002 or ENGL1011 or ENGL1025 or ENGL1026 Assessment: Review assignments 2,000 wd (30%), final paper 2,500 wd (50%), participation (20%)
This unit is an introductory survey of the history and aesthetics of film music from the late 1890s to the present day. Topics for discussion will include the dramatic function of music as an element of cinematic narrative, the codification of musical iconography in cinematic genres, the symbolic use of pre-existing music, and the evolving musical styles of film composers.
MUSC2664 Popular Music and the Moving Image

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 hr lecture, 1 hr tut/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: MUSC2662 Assessment: Musical analysis (20%), industrial critique (20%), Listening and viewing test (20%), Final Project 3,000 wd (30%), Participation (10%).
The range of media channels through which we experience popular music has proliferated in recent years. The emotive power of music is used to tell stories, sell products and connect people to one another. This unit of study will analyse the use of popular music in a broad range of multimedia forms from film and television to video games and the use of digital media to disseminate a multitude of musical multimedia productions.
MUSC2666 A Global Sound: African American Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 hr lecture, 1 hr tut/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points. Assessment: Musical analysis (20%), industrial critique (20%), Listening and viewing test (20%), Final Project 3,000 wd (30%), Participation (10%).
How did the music of enslaved and marginalised people eventually become a dominant force in contemporary popular culture? This unit will examine the local reinvention of a wide variety of African American music in communities around the world. From soul and funk in West Africa to ska and reggae in the Caribbean, we will examine how music moves around the world and within local communities to make new forms of meaning.
MUSC2679 Music and Spirituality

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anne Boyd Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr/wk Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points. Assessment: Listening/short answer test (1500 words eq) (25%) Tutorial Presentation (15%) Individual Project as essay, composition or performance (3000 words eq) (50%) Attendance and Participation (10%)
This 'survey' unit of study presents a diverse range of music, written and performed as a response to spiritual traditions, using the methods of depth psychology. The survey will include examples of music created in response to Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism and Islam, as well as Earth-based religions such as Australian Indigenous traditions. The focus will be upon the music rather than religion. Listening will provide the main framework for study.
MUSC2693 Fundamentals of Music 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Hindson, Dr. Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2 x 1hr tutorials (aural & written)/wk Prerequisites: MUSC1504 Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%).
Through an integrated and research-based approach to music composition and analysis, student's knowledge of music theory and compositional techniques is extended. Skills in this area cover a range of of Western and Non-Western musical styles, from classical music to film music to noise.
MUSC2810 Music Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
MUSC2812 Music Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
MUSC3609 Musicology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr seminar/wk Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in music, or by arrangement with the coordinator Assessment: Written assessments (50%), weekly summaries of readings (30%), participation (20%)
Note: This unit is a requirement for Honours.
What do we study when we study music? What kinds of stories do we tell about the history of music? What are the central issues, questions, and concerns that drive the study of music? This unit of study will begin to answer these questions and provide an overview of historical musicology as an academic discipline. In addition, students will also learn and practice the research skills necessary to find and evaluate sources, and to define and develop an area of interest. These skills will provide a solid foundation for the independent research work necessary in the Honours year.
MUSC3639 Music Journalism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 hr lecture, 1 hr tut/week. Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: Exercises in music journalism and reviewing 4,000 wd (50%), final paper 2,000 wd (30%), participation (20%)
Even as the 'Age of Newspapers' seems to be coming to an end, human beings' need for authoritative commentary on music remains as strong as ever. Along with surveying the history of music journalism from the early eighteenth century up to the present day, this unit of study offers participants the chance to try their hands at various forms of music journalism.
MUSC3640 Rhythms and Sounds of Latin America

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hr lecture, 1 hr tut/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: Essay 2,500 wd or creative project with reflective statement (50%), Listening assessment (20%), Exam (30%)
Latin American music has become a powerful force in today's music industry, but its rich diversity and cultural contexts are not always acknowledged. This unit of study surveys a number of Latin American popular, folk and indigenous musical traditions in terms of their cultural milieu and historical development. Various musical, historical and cultural concerns are examined with a practical and creative involvement with these styles. Particular emphasis will be placed on the compositional characteristics and the repertoire pertinent to these traditions.
MUSC3699 Understanding Music: Modes of Hearing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lecture, 1 hr tut/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: Analyses eq. 1,500 words (30%), final paper 3,000 words (50%), tutorial participation (20%)
This unit of study deals with the different ways in which we comprehend music and with the different ways in which that comprehension might be explained. It deals with modes of hearing and musical analysis for the purpose of leading students towards a deeper knowledge of how music in various genres (ranging from the classical mainstream to the twentieth-century avant-garde, from Tin Pan Alley songs to punk rock and hip-hop) is understood. A good working knowledge of musical terminology and vocabulary is required. This is the required unit of study for a music major in an Arts degree.
MUSC4011 Music Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr Dissertation Seminar/week, plus fortnightly supervision Prerequisites: Credit results in MUSC3609, and either MUSC2631 or MUSC3699, plus a Music Major with credit average results in 36 senior music credit points. Assessment: 15,000 - 20,000 word thesis which may include a creative component equivalent to 6000 words (50%); Dissertation Seminar (20%); 12 credit points in Arts or Music units of study (30%).
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours BA in Music is both a completion at a high standard of an academic education in music, and a preparation for postgraduate study in music. Intending Honours students should speak to the Honours co-ordinator before enrolling. Honours requirements are: A dissertation on a topic agreed with the course coordinator, but normally negotiated by the end of the previous year in the course of MUSC3609 Musicology. A research-based creative component (performance, composition, curation) equivalent to up to 6000 words may, with permission of the supervisor, be included as an integral part of the dissertation, and a further 12 credit points in Arts or Music (subject to approval).
MUSC4012 Music Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MUSC4011
Refer to MUSC4011
MUSC4013 Music Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MUSC4012
Refer to MUSC4011
MUSC4014 Music Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MUSC4013
Refer to MUSC4011

Performance Studies

PRFM1801 Performance Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit point junior unit of study in Performance Studies at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Chair of Department.
PRFM2601 Being There: Theories of Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Dwyer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points from subject areas listed in Table A Prohibitions: PRFM2001 Assessment: 1x500wd summary of key theoretical text (10%), 8x250wd learning reflections (40%), 1x2000wd essay (50%)
What is performance, and how can we understand what it is that performance does? This unit of study will introduce students to the study of performance, and the particular problems associated with approaching a phenomenon that is often ephemeral, experiential in nature, and frequently shrouded in mystery. Students will learn key theoretical and methodological approaches to the study and practice of a range of performance genres, including, but not limited to theatre and other artistic practices.
Textbooks
Selected readings available from the University Copy Centre
PRFM2602 Performance: Production & Interpretation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Dwyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points from subject areas listed in Table A Prohibitions: PRFM2002 Assessment: 1x750wd brief semiotic analysis of a poster/flyer advertising a theatre performance and description/analysis of a moment from the actual performance (20%), 1x1250wd tutorial paper (with an appendix of brief homework tasks/research notes) arising from a performance-making exercise in workshops (30%), 1x2500wd completed performance analysis essay, including a reflective commentary on methodology (50%) Practical field work: Students will undertake some workshop exercises in their tutorials and will attend professional theatre productions outside class times
How do the members of an audience make meaning from their experience of theatrical performance? How (and to what extent) can theatre-makers guide this process through the use of text, movement, spatial design, costuming, lighting, sound and other production elements? In this unit of study, students will attend events at a number of Sydney theatres and develop a critical language for analysing live performance. Practical workshops will also provide an introduction to theatre production techniques.
Textbooks
Selected readings available through the University Copy Centre.
PRFM2603 Between Impro & Text: Making Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Dwyer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points from subject areas listed in Table A Prohibitions: PRFM3005 Assessment: 1x500wd equivalent group performance/workshop presentation (20%), 1x1500wd individual workshop report (40%), 1x2500wd essay (40%)
Some performances seem firmly text-based (a David Williamson play; the libretto/score of a Wagnerian opera). Others involve more or less spontaneous "composition-in-performance" (Commedia dell' Arte, Theatresports, "free jazz"). Yet, whatever the form, performance is always the thing you get when skilled artisans "assume a responsibility to an audience and to tradition as they understand it" (Dell Hymes). In this unit, we analyse the interactions between literary and primarily oral traditions of performance, questioning assumptions about the historical primacy of texts.
Textbooks
Selected readings available from the University Copy Centre
PRFM2604 Sociology of Theatre

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Maxwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr/week seminar Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points from subject areas listed in Table A Prohibitions: PRFM3012 Assessment: 1x1500wd take-home exercise (25%), 1x500wd equivalent group presentation (10%), 1x1500wd portfolio (40%), 1x1000wd literature summary (25%) Practical field work: Fieldwork
Theatre and performance as artistic practices are not autonomous: they take place in a complex cultural field, the effects of which necessarily influence and shape the practice itself. In this unit of study, we will develop an understanding of the field of theatrical production in contemporary Australia, both theoretically, using the sociological theory of Pierre Bourdieu, and practically, as we create our own, viable, performing arts company. Areas to be covered include production management, budgeting and programming.
Textbooks
Selected readings available through Copy Centre
PRFM2805 Performance Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit point senior unit of study in Performance Studies at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Chair of Department.
PRFM2806 Performance Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit point senior unit of study in Performance Studies at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Chair of Department.
PRFM2810 Performance Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit point senior unit of study in Performance Studies at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Chair of Department.
PRFM2811 Performance Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit point senior unit of study in Performance Studies at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Chair of Department.
PRFM2812 Performance Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit point senior unit of study in Performance Studies at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Chair of Department.
PRFM3603 Playing Politics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Dwyer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (PRFM2601 and PRFM2602) or (PRFM2001 and PRFM2002) Prohibitions: PRFM3015, PRFM3026 Assessment: 1x500wd equivalent tutorial and reading tasks (10%), 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x2000wd contribution towards a group research dossier (40%)
Many theatre practitioners and performance artists have sought to make their work an explicit cultural intervention into movements of social and political change. Here we will critique in detail, and to some extent explore practically, the strategies adopted by a number of key artists and companies, both past and present: from Brecht to Boal, from 'community theatre' to 'contemporary performance'. We will also consider the way protest actions and, indeed, mainstream processes of parliamentary democracy appear to have become increasingly theatricalised.
Textbooks
Selected readings available from the University Copy Centre
PRFM3604 Embodied Histories

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Amanda Card Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 1x1-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: (PRFM2601 and PRFM2602) or (PRFM2001 and PRFM2002) Prohibitions: PRFM3021 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (40%), 1x3500wd essay (60%) Practical field work: 1x1-hr workshop/week
Can we investigate and understand historical moments and social movements through a study of dancing bodies? In this unit we will be looking at popular dance practices in western cultures over time. From the Charleston, the Lindy and Jive, through musical comedy and jazz, to gogo, disco and hip hop we will develop an understanding of the relationship between movement, music, time and place. This will be done through a combination of observation and practical participation. No previous dance training is required.
Textbooks
Selected readings available through the University Copy Centre
PRFM3605 Cross-Cultural and Hybrid Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Amanda Card Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (PRFM2601 and PRFM2602) or (PRFM2001 and PRFM2002) Prohibitions: PRFM3023, PRFM3028 Assessment: 1x1500wd tutorial paper (40%), 1x3000wd essay (60%)
This unit will analyse the development of cross-cultural and hybrid performance in Australia, Britain and the United States. Concentrating on a range of Indigenous and non-indigenous performance practices - football mascots, contemporary dance, pop music and text based theatre - we will utilise postcolonial theories, as applied to performance, to explore diverse understandings of innovation and appropriation, ownership and copyright in colonial and post-colonial societies since the 1950s.
Textbooks
Selected readings available through the University Copy Centre
PRFM3606 Approaches to Acting

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Glen McGillivray Session: Semester 2 Classes: 13x2-hr lectures or seminars/semester, 7x2-hr workshops/semester Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points in no more than two subject areas including at least 12 from Table A of the Table of Units of Study Prohibitions: PRFM3022 Assessment: 1x3500wd essay (50%), 1x group presentation (20%), 6x80-100wd interlocutions (15%), 1x500wd formative literature summary (15%)
All theories of acting are grounded in implicit theories about the human self: to Stanislavsky, for example, the self is a repository of memories; while for Meyerhold, the self is a biomechanical resource. We will survey - and experiment with - a range of theories of acting, from Quintilian to Mamet, Zeami to Suzuki, uncovering the assumptions about human being underlying each. The unit involves a workshop component, although no experience is necessary: you will not be assessed on your acting ability.
Textbooks
A course reader will be available from the University Copy Centre
PRFM3611 Dramaturgy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Ginters Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar workshop/week Prerequisites: (PRFM2601 and PRFM2602) or (PRFM2001 and PRFM2002) Prohibitions: PRFM3010 Assessment: 1x500wd performance analysis (20%), 1x1500wd group project (30%), 1x2500wd script assessment (50%)
What is a dramaturg? How do you read a play? Write a non-text based performance? Prepare a production of a classic play? This unit of study will investigate the various roles of the dramaturg, focusing on new play dramaturgy, background research for historical texts, translation and the role of the dramaturg as co-creator in non-text-based work. This unit will include practical exercises in analysing and workshopping a new Australian play or text for performance.
PRFM3619 Documenting Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Glen McGillivray Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (PRFM2001 and PRFM2002) or (PRFM2601 and PRFM2602) Prohibitions: PRFM3002, PRFM3019 Assessment: 1x500wd performance analysis project (15%), 1x1500wd documentation project (35%), 1x2500wd essay (50%)
This unit of study deals with two of the tasks which are fundamental to the developing discipline of Performance Studies: performance analysis and the documentation of performance. Students attend theatrical performances, develop and refine their analytical skills and explore the semiotic theories which underpin the analytical practice. Video recordings and photographs of live performance are also analysed, and the opportunities and new problems that video poses for performance practitioners and scholars are discussed: aesthetic, political and ethical questions in relation to the recording of live performance are explored, students gain 'hands-on' experience in using both video and still photography to document performance, and assess the value of different modes of documentation for archival and analytical purposes.
Textbooks
Selected readings available through Copy Centre
PRFM3961 Rehearsal Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Ginters Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: PRFM2601 and PRFM2602 Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd tutorial workbook (30%), preparation for seminar discussions (10%) Practical field work: Full time attendance for 2 weeks in the mid-year break
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Rehearsal is typically off-limits to outsiders but the exceptional creativity of performance-makers in this 'hidden world' makes it a compelling focus of performance research. This unit examines accounts of rehearsal by playwrights, actors, directors, journalists and academics, as well as video recordings, prompt books and other rehearsal documentation. We will also approach the study of rehearsal through ethnographic theory, reading key texts on participant-observation fieldwork and trying out these methods through small-scale practical exercises.
Textbooks
Course Reader
PRFM3962 Inside Rehearsal

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Ginters Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar for six weeks over the first half of second semester Prerequisites: PRFM3961 Assessment: 1x500wd formative assessment and writing plan for casebook (20%), 1x4000wd casebook (80%) Practical field work: Fieldwork practicum: the equivalent of five full days attending rehearsals, typically scheduled during the last week of July vacation and/or week one of second semester (check with department during first semester for precise dates)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Over five days, students attend the rehearsals of a company of professional artists-in-residence at the department's Rex Cramphorn Studio, observing and documenting the skills and intuition that go into crafting those magic moments an audience will later encounter in performance. In the seminars following these observations, students will explore ways of interpreting their experience, deepening the principles of ethnographic research learned in PRFM3961, and developing a casebook which analyses aspects of the "culture" underpinning the creative work of rehearsals.
Textbooks
Course Reader
PRFM4011 Performance Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Amanda Card Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x2-hr seminars/week in Semester 1 Prerequisites: Credit results in (PRFM3961 and PRFM3962) or (PRFM3901 and PRFM3902) and Credit average in a further 36 senior credit points of PRFM units Assessment: 1x12000-15000wd thesis (33.5%), 1x12000-15000wd casebook (based on participant-observation fieldwork) (33.5%), 2 seminars x 4500wds of written work or its equivalent per seminar (33%) Practical field work: Workshops and placement in a theatre company to observe a creative process in progress; group supervision meeting.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Performance Studies consists of:
1. a 12000-15000 word thesis written under the supervision of a member of the academic staff
2. a 12000-15000 word casebook based on fieldwork observations of the training/rehearsal/preparation processes involved in a genre of cultural performance
3. two assessable coursework seminars - 4500 words each (Critical Theory and Performance and Contemporary Performance)
4. a research methods seminar (formative assessment only) and auditing of the departmental postgraduate/staff research seminar.
For more information, contact Dr Amanda Card.
PRFM4012 Performance Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Amanda Card Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: PRFM4011
Refer to PRFM4011
PRFM4013 Performance Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Amanda Card Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: PRFM4012
Refer to PRFM4011
PRFM4014 Performance Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Amanda Card Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: PRFM4013
Refer to PRFM4011

Philosophy

PHIL1011 Reality, Ethics and Beauty

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Besch Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: PHIL1003, PHIL1004, PHIL1006, PHIL1008 Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), on-line quizzes (10%), 1x2hr exam (50%)
This unit is an introduction to central issues in metaphysics, ethics and aesthetics. It opens with general questions about reality, God, personal identity and free will. The middle section of the unit will consider questions about values, goodness and responsibility. The final part is concerned with the question "what is art", the nature of aesthetic judgment and the role of art in our lives.
PHIL1012 Introductory Logic

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), 2x assignments (40%) and 1x2hr exam (50%)
An introduction to modern logic: the investigation of the laws of truth. One essential aspect of good reasoning or argumentation is that it is valid: it cannot lead from true premises to a false conclusion. In this unit we learn how to identify and construct valid arguments, using techniques such as truth tables, models and truth trees. Apart from being a great aid to clear thinking about any subject, knowledge of logic is essential for understanding many areas not only of contemporary philosophy, but also linguistics, mathematics and computing.
PHIL1013 Society, Knowledge and Self

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Besch Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: PHIL1010 Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), 1x2000wd essay (30%) and 1x2hr exam (60%)
This unit is an introduction to central issues in political philosophy, theories of knowledge and philosophical conceptions of the self. The first part will consider the state, freedom and political obligation. The second part will examine some of the major theories of knowledge in the modern philosophical tradition. The final section will look at conceptions of the self as a knowing and acting subject.
PHIL1016 Mind and Morality HSC

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Luke Russell Session: Summer Main,Winter Main
Note: This unit is available to HSC students only
If a robot told you that it was in pain, would you believe it? If it is wrong to kill animals, should we try to stop animals from killing each other? How do you know what the colour red looks like to your friends? What do these philosophical puzzles reveal about ourselves, our minds, and our responsibilities towards others? This one-unit HSC course focuses on contemporary disputes regarding the nature of the mind, personal identity and ethics. As you engage with these issues, you will be introduced to the philosophical theories that underpin our notion of ourselves and our place in the world, and you will improve your ability to analyse and present complex ideas and arguments.
PHIL1801 Philosophy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
PHIL2600 Twentieth Century Philosophy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael McDermott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2000 Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), 1x2500wd essay (40%) and 1x2hr exam (50%)
Main developments in philosophical thought in the twentieth century. Topics include: logical atomism; logical positivism and its attack on metaphysics; conceptual analysis; Quine, holism, behaviourism, and the overthrow of positivism; the resurgence of metaphysics; functionalism in the philosophy of mind; modal realism. Essential background for understanding how philosophy is done today in English-speaking countries.
PHIL2605 Early Modern Theories of Perception

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anik Waldow Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3005, PHIL2005 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial exercise (25%), 1x500wd essay plan (15%), 1x2500-3000wd essay (60%)
This unit will trace theories of perception and representation by looking at Locke, Gassendi, Berkeley, and Hume whose fascinating, and often controversial, approaches urge us to base our concept of the world on experience. We will investigate the interplay between sense perception, reason and imagination, explore the limits of knowledge and examine the link between expereince and self-conception. The unit aims to develop a perspective that allows students to reflect critically on central issues of the contemporary debate.
PHIL2608 Distributive Justice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Dougherty Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/wk, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2601, PHIL2508, PHIL3508 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (60%) and 1x2hr exam (40%)
Selected topics in the theory of distributive justice; the apparently conflicting goals of liberty and equality; the moral basis of the obligation to compensate those one harms; obligations to future generations. This is a unit of study in normative ethics (not conceptual analysis).
PHIL2612 History of Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Tom Dougherty Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2512, PHIL3512 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (60%) and 1x2hr exam (40%)
The nature of duty and the good: how we ought to live and what is valuable in life. A selective survey of Western normative ethical theory from Plato to Mill.
PHIL2615 Intermediate Logic

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points in Philosophy) and (PHIL1012 or PHIL2203 or PHIL2628) Prohibitions: PHIL2215, PHIL3215 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%) and weekly exercises (50%)
The axiomatic approach to classical logic. The focus is on proofs of the main metalogical results - consistency, completeness, etc - for the propositional and predicate calculi.
PHIL2616 Philosophy of Human Rights

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alexandre Lefebvre Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in Philosophy and/or Government Assessment: 1x1500wd take home exercise (30%), 1x2500wd essay (60%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit addresses central themes from the history and philosophy of human rights. Topics may include the relationship between human rights and religion, natural law, moral and aesthetic justifications of human rights, claims and challenges to universality of the part of human rights, and tensions between human rights and state sovereignty. Thinkers may include Paine, Burke, Kant, Wollstonecraft, Tocqueville, Arendt, Schmitt, and Rawls.
PHIL2617 Practical Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Tom Dougherty Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points Prohibitions: PHIL2517 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%), tutorial participation (10%), tutorial presentation (10%) and 1x2000wd take-home exam (40%)
This unit draws on contemporary moral philosophy to shed light on some of the most pressing practical, ethical questions of our time, including euthanasia, abortion, surrogacy, censorship, animal rights, genetic testing and cloning and environmental ethics. By the end of the unit, students should have a good understanding of these practical ethical issues; and, more crucially, be equipped with the conceptual resources to think through new ethical questions and dilemmas as they arise in their personal and professional lives.
PHIL2618 Aesthetics and Art

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Macarthur Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy. Prohibitions: PHIL2518 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%) and 1x2000wd take-home exam (50%)
Why is art important to us? What is an aesthetic response to something? What is the relation between art and aesthetics? Is there such a thing as objective interpretation of an artwork? Or is it all a matter of taste? Should we believe in "the death of the author"? What is the relation between art and representation, expression and emotion? We shall discuss these and other questions (e.g. modernity, metaphor) from the perspective of an historical approach to the philosophical study of aesthetics and art.
PHIL2621 Truth, Meaning and Language

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (60%) and 1x2hr exam (40%)
This unit covers central issues in contemporary philosophy of language, such as the relationship between language and the world, the nature of meaning and truth, problems involved in interpreting and understanding the speech of others, the role of context in determining meaning, and the nature of metaphor.
PHIL2622 Reality, Time & Possibility: Metaphysics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kristie Miller Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Assessment: 1x1400wd essay (33%), 1x2000wd essay (45%) and 11 short multiple choice quizzes (22%)
This is a unit in metaphysics: the discipline that tells us about the nature of the world. The unit carries on from the Reality component of first year. We engage with questions like: What is time? What is space? What makes something a person? How much change can I undergo and still be me? Are objects four-dimensional space-time worms? Do the past or future exist, and could we travel to them? Are there numbers?
PHIL2623 Moral Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2513, PHIL3513 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%) and 1x2000wd take-home exam (50%)
We go beyond the question of which actions are morally right to consider the following: How should we evaluate motives and emotions? Is anyone actually virtuous, or are we all weak-willed, self-deceived confabulators? Are any actions or persons evil? When should we feel guilty or ashamed? Should forgiveness be unconditional? Is morality the product of Darwinian natural selection, or of culture and learning? Is there any objective truth in morality, or are moral claims merely subjective or culturally relative?
Textbooks
Readings available from the University Copy Centre
PHIL2625 Hannah Arendt

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof John Grumley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2515, PHIL3515 Assessment: 1x250wd tutorial paper (5%), 1x2250wd essay (50%) and 1x2000wd take-home essay (45%)
No 20th century political philosopher has captured as much attention as Hannah Arendt. Those seeking a fresh approach beyond the traditional right and left, as well as contemporary feminists are all drawn to her vivid reading of tradition, her diagnosis of the present and path-breaking analysis of totalitarianism, human rights and refugees. This unit of study examines key concepts like natality and novel reading of politics, freedom and promising and her contemporary appropriation by Giorgio Agamben with his concept of "bare life".
PHIL2627 Philosophy and Psychiatry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dominic Murphy Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2227 Assessment: 2x2250wd essays (100%)
Can the concept 'mental illness' be a valid one? What might delusions tell us about the structure of the mind? What assumptions underlie attempts to classify mental disorder? Can we be justified in compelling people to submit to psychiatric treatment? This unit will examine philosophical questions raised by mental disorder and our attempts to understand/treat it, and will connect psychiatry to debates in philosophy such as the mind/body problem, the concept of a person, and the possibility of knowledge.
PHIL2629 Descartes and Continental Philosophy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Annette Pierdziwol Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2 hour lecture and 1x1 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2004, PHIL3004 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial exercise (30%), 1x1000wd presentation (20%), 1x2500 word essay (50%)
Descartes is generally regarded as the founder of modern philosophy, and in this unit we look both at his own contribution, and at his influence on the subsequent course of philosophical thought in the work of Malebranche, Spinoza, and Leibniz. Just over half the unit will be devoted to Descartes' own thought, and we will look at the various stages in the development of his ideas. In the second half of the unit, we will examine the ideas of his successors on selected metaphysical themes, above all on perception and the mind/body question.
PHIL2632 Modernity in Crisis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Grumley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2 hour lecture and 1x1 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2532, PHIL3532 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x2000wd take-home exam (40%)
This unit continues the themes developed in Theorising Modernity into the Twentieth Century. We will see how the new realities of free markets, democracy, the state and bureaucracy, individualism and cultural rationalisation presented new problems and opportunities and gave rise to new theoretical frameworks for their comprehension. The unit will focus on the work of Weber, The Frankfurt School, Foucault and Habermas.
PHIL2635 Contemporary Political Philosophy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Besch Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3535, PHIL2535 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%) and 1x2000wd take-home exam (40%)
This unit offers a critical introduction to the major schools of thought in contemporary political philosophy organised around the theme of inclusion and exclusion. The inclusive ambitions of liberal political theory will be confronted with objections from thinkers motivated by concern with various aspects of social and political exclusion based on categories such as gender, cultural difference, and statelessness.
PHIL2639 Heidegger's Phenomenology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Paul Redding Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2239 Assessment: 2x2250wd essays
Heidegger famously asks what it means to be. We will attempt to determine what he means by this 'question of Being', concentrating on the first division of his work "Being and Time", as well as the discussion of death and authenticity, and of temporality and everydayness, in the second division. Issues to be raised include Heidegger's critique of his teacher, Edmund Husserl, the relevance of Heidegger's work for cognitive science and whether Heidegger can be understood as an existentialist or a pragmatist - or neither.
Textbooks
Martin Heidegger, Being and Time (trans. J. Macquarie & E. Robinson).
PHIL2640 Environmental Philosophy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Mark Colyvan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from any units within the university Prohibitions: PHIL2240 Assessment: 2x2250wd essays (2x50%)
This unit presents a variety of philosophical issues associated with the study and management of the natural environment. We will look at questions such as: what does it mean to live in harmony with the environment? what is sustainability? why should we preserve biodiversity? what is the best way to achieve conservation goals? what are ecological models and how do they work? and what is the proper relationship between environmental science and the values found in environmental policy and management?
PHIL2642 Critical Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Luke Russell Session: Semester 2,Winter Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in any units within the University Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x in-class test (20%) and 1x2hr exam (50%)
An introduction to critical thinking and analysis of argument. By examining arguments drawn from diverse sources, including journalism, advertising, science, medicine, history, economics and politics, we will learn how to distinguish good from bad arguments, and how to construct rationally persuasive arguments of our own. Along the way we will grapple with scepticism, conspiracy theories and pseudoscience. The reasoning skills imparted by this unit make it invaluable not only for philosophy students but for every student at the University.
PHIL2643 Philosophy of Mind

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Braddon-Mitchell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2213, PHIL3213, PHIL2205 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (60%) and 1x2000wd take-home exam (40%)
An introduction to modern theories of the nature of mind, and some important contemporary issues in the philosophy of mind. Topics will include the problem of mental representation (how can minds think about the world?), the relationship of minds to brains, and the problem of consciousness.
PHIL2644 Critical Theory: From Marx to Foucault

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Grumley Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x2000wd take-home exam (40%), 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%)
The idea of critical theory emerged as an attempt to go beyond the alleged impasses of philosophy and actually challenge the world. This unit will consider various phases in the history of this project: from Marx, the Frankfurt School, to Foucault and Habermas. It will examine both the innovations and weaknesses of these various formulations in their historical context, as well as considering contemporary efforts to reanimate the idea of critical theory.
PHIL2645 Philosophy of Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Rick Benitez Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2510, PHIL3510 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%) and 1x2hr exam (50%)
This unit looks at fundamental issues in the philosophy of law, including the role of law, civil liberties, legal obligation, punishment, responsibility and morality. It considers questions about whether or not a legal system is necessary, arguments for anarchy, and reasons for safeguarding freedoms from the force of law. It considers arguments for obedience to law, and seeks a moral justification of punishment. The discussion of practical issues in law leads to consideration of relation between law and morality.
PHIL2646 Philosophy and Literature

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Moira Gatens Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in Philosophy Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%) and 1x2hr exam (50%)
This unit addresses the 'ancient quarrel' between philosophy and literature. We will examine arguments about the importance of imagination and sympathy to moral judgement by putting various philosophical and literary texts in dialogue with each other.
PHIL2647 The Philosophy of Happiness

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Caroline West Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (45%), 1x2000wd take-home exam (45%) and tutorial participation (10%)
We all want to be happy and to live a worthwhile life. But what is happiness? Why should we want it? And how do we get it? These are among the most fundamental questions of philosophy. We will evaluate the answers of major thinkers from ancient and modern and eastern and western traditions; and consider the implications of current psychological research into the causes of happiness for the question of how to live well, as individuals and as a society.
PHIL2648 German Philosophy, Leibniz to Nietzsche

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Paul Redding Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2641, PHIL3011 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial exercise (25%), 1x500wd essay outline (15%), 1x2500-3000wd final essay (60%)
This unit surveys German Philosophy from Leibniz via Kant and the German idealists to Nietzsche. The first half of the unit examines the main aspects of Kant's "Copernican revolution" as a response to Leibniz's "monadology". The second half examines extensions and transformations of Kant's philosophy by critical appropriators extending from Fichte to Nietzsche. Throughout, the philosophical views involved will be related more generally to questions of science, morals and politics, art, education, and religion.
PHIL2649 The Classical Mind

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Rick Benitez Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy or ANHS1600 Prohibitions: PHIL2613, PHIL3639 Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), 1x in-class test (15%), 1x1500wd essay (25%), 1x2hr exam (50%)
An introduction to the philosophical outlook, conceptions, and arguments of Classical Greek philosophy. This unit will survey the rich period of Greek thinking from 600 BCE to the beginning of the Common Era, examining the Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and Hellenistic philosophers. This unit will demonstrate the incredible originality of Greek philosophy, and reveal both its legacy in and differences from philosophy today.
PHIL2650 Logic and Computation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: PHIL1012 or PHIL2628 or permission of instructor Assessment: 2x1000wd assignments (problem sets) (2x25%) and 1x2hr exam (50%)
This unit covers central results about the nature of logic, the nature of computation, and the relationships between the two. Topics treated include basic set theory, Turing machines, the theory of computability and uncomputability, the decision problem for first order logic, Tarski's theorem on the indefinability of truth, and Gödel's famous incompleteness theorem.
PHIL2651 Bodies and Passions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anik Waldow Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Assessment: 1x tutorial presentation (20%), 1x in class test (30%) and 1x2000wd essay (50%)
This unit is an introduction to theories of the passions. Paying special attention to Descartes, Spinoza and Hume, it will explore the notion that the body is the source of error and irrationality. However, bodily passions and associations also are crucial to our wellbeing and can make positive contributions to cognitive processes. In addition to the study of central figures in the history of philosophy, this unit aims to provide historical grounding for important issues in contemporary moral psychology.
PHIL2804 Philosophy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
PHIL2805 Philosophy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
PHIL2806 Philosophy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
PHIL2810 Philosophy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
PHIL2811 Philosophy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
PHIL2812 Philosophy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
PHIL3615 Pragmatism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Macarthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3015 Assessment: 2x1000wd tutorial exercises (2x20%) and 1x2500wd essay (60%)
This unit of study will consider the emergence and recent developments of the distinctive philosophical outlook known as "American Pragmatism". We shall discuss various pragmatist approaches to central philosophical topics such as truth, mind, knowledge, logic, naturalism, apriority, and the fact/value distinction. A central theme will be the philosophical importance of the appeal to practice and the agent's point of view. Readings will include works by William James, C.S. Pierce, John Dewey, Robert Brandom, Wilfred Sellars, and Richard Rorty.
PHIL3622 Philosophy of Modern Physics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3223 Assessment: exercises (40%) and 1x2500wd essay (60%)
In this unit we will look at quantum mechanics, through a study of its central paradoxes: the EPR situation, Schrödinger's Cat, Wave-Particle duality, etc. We will work through the book by R.I.G. Hughes, using Albert's book for some additional material. The unit will involve learning the mathematical basis for QM - though the level of mathematical sophistication required will not exceed ordinary high school mathematics. Relativity theory will be discussed only insofar as it bears upon the problem of interpreting quantum theory.
PHIL4011 Philosophy Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: 48 credit points of Philosophy at Senior level, with a credit average or better, and including 6 credit points from each of the three programs (History of Philosophy; Epistemology, Metaphysics & Logic; Aesthetics, Ethics and Political Philosophy). Intending Honours students are strongly encouraged to discuss their unit choices with the Honours Coordinator at the beginning of their third year. The department places importance on the breadth of the philosophical education of its Honours graduates, and encourages intending Honours students to avoid over-specialisation at Senior level Assessment: a thesis of 12,000-15,000 words, 4,000-5,000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar and a 20 minute mini-conference presentation
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Philosophy consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. four seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
The thesis should be of 12,000-15,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 4,000-5,000 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 40% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 15%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Semester 1
Cosmopolitanism and Community (Dr Thomas Besch)
Philosophy and Genetics (Prof Paul Griffith)
Formal Semantics (Dr Nick Smith)
Happiness, Welfare and Meaning (Dr Caroline West)
Semester 2
The Philosophy of "mere Life" (Dr John Grumley)
Pragmatism: The Kantian Legacy (Dr David Macarthur)
PHIL4012 Philosophy Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to PHIL4011 Corequisites: PHIL4011
Refer to PHIL4011
PHIL4013 Philosophy Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to PHIL4011 Corequisites: PHIL4012
Refer to PHIL4011
PHIL4014 Philosophy Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to PHIL4011 Corequisites: PHIL4013
Refer to PHIL4011

Political Economy

ECOP1001 Economics as a Social Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lynne Chester Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week or equivalent intensive session. Assessment: 1x800wd mini-essay (10%); 1x1500wd essay (20%); 1x700wd reflective paper (10%); 1x1.5hr exam (50%); tutorial participation (10%)
Economic concerns are central to modern society and politics. Yet economists are deeply divided in their views about how the economy works and how it could be made to work better. This unit of study explores the principal competing currents of economic thought - classical, neo-classical, institutional, Marxian and Keynesian. It looks at how these rival economic theories shape views about economic policy and the nature of capitalism. This unit provides a solid foundation for subsequent study in political economy.
Textbooks
F. Stilwell, Political Economy: the Contest of Economic Ideas (Oxford U.P.)
ECOP1003 International Economy and Finance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bill Dunn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week or equivalent intensive session Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This Unit explores global economic integration, especially the renewed 'globalisation' from the 1980s. It considers changing historical patterns and different explanatory theories. It analyses debates about whether globalisation has been for the better or worse and who have been the winners and the losers. The Unit concurrently explores the forms of, and debates about, the regulation of economic activity on a global scale, addressing the development and changing roles of states and international agencies.
ECOP1004 Economy and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and turorial participation (10%)
This unit examines the processes by which economic activity is embedded within a broader social structure. Attention is given to the key institutions that channel economic activity, the processes by which capitalist markets are regulated, and the distinctive features of capitalist economies. The subject is organised around a range of conceptual tools which elaborate these themes, followed by analysis of particular case studies that illustrate the social constitution, dynamics and regulation of particular markets.
ECOP1551 Political Economy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOP1552 Political Economy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOP2011 Economic Theories of Modern Capitalism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joseph Halevi Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOP1001 and ( ECOP1003 or ECOP1004) Prohibitions: ECOP2001 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit of study examines the economic theory that emerged with the formation and development of capitalism. It explores the key theoretical focuses of political economy, classical, neo-classical and general equilibrium theories, before proceeding to analyze the economics of Keynes and post-Keynesian theory, and reflecting on contemporary macroeconomic debates, including production, the distribution of income and economic growth.
ECOP2550 Political Economy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOP2551 Political Economy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOP2552 Political Economy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOP2601 Analysis of Business Cycles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Susan Schroeder Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOP1001 and ( ECOP1003 or ECOP1004) Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (25%), 1x2000wd essay (35%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit examines the various political economic aspects of business cycles. It surveys the predominant strands of thought, historical and contemporary, as to what causes cycles. The unit provides students with an overview of the ways that the upper turning point of a cycle has been, and is being, detected. Finally, it critically reviews how fiscal and monetary policies have been used to thwart the onset or soften the impact of crisis, drawing the implications for today's economic challenges.
ECOP2612 Economic Policy in Global Context

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Susan Schroeder Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOP1001 and (ECOP1003 or ECOP1004) Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (25%), 1x2000wd essay (35%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%), tutorial participation (10%)
Some of the most contentious issues in political economy concern the role of the state in relation to contemporary economic problems. This unit of study examines particular economic policies, how they are shaped by competing theories, interests and ideologies, and how they operate in practice. Emphasis is placed on the Australian experience. Attention is also given to how economic policy is shaped by international economic conditions.
ECOP2911 Political Economy Honours II

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit average in ECOP1001 and (ECOP1003 or ECOP1004) Corequisites: ECOP2011 or ECOP2012 Prohibitions: ECOP2901 Assessment: 1x1200wd seminar paper (15%), 1x1500wd essay (20%), 1x2500wd research paper (40%), seminar presentation equivalent to 800wd (15%), seminar participation (10%)
This unit of study introduces students to some of the big debates in the social sciences, through an exploration of the meaning and limits of class concepts in social theory. Structure and agency, fact and interpretation, the politics of theory, and the nature of the Good Society are all considered. The unit is both an enrichment program adding breadth to the range of issues you study in Pass units of study, and an advanced program adding depth to your analytical and writing skills in Political Economy, in preparation for a third year studies and for a final honours year.
ECOP3012 Global Political Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOP1001 and (ECOP1003 or ECOP1004) Prohibitions: ECOP3002 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit of study presents a historical and institutional perspective on the development of the capitalist world economy since 1945. The analysis starts with a historical and theoretical introduction covering the determinants of profits and accumulation and the role of external markets in economic growth. It then addresses key issues in this development including: the formation of the international monetary system and its crisis following the end of the long boom; and the global role of the United States and the formation of growth poles in Europe and in Asia.
ECOP3014 Political Economy of Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Hill Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week or equivalent in intensive session Prerequisites: ECOP1001 and (ECOP1003 or ECOP1004) Prohibitions: ECOP3004 Assessment: 2x1200wd essays (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%), tutorial presentation 500wd equivalent, (10%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit of study investigates the theory and practice of economic development in low income countries. Students will be introduced to debates about the economic causes of poverty, alternative measures of poverty and development, and learn to evaluate public policy debates about how to achieve economic development. There is a particular focus on the rise of the Chinese and Indian economies and their impact on patterns and strategies of global economic development.
ECOP3015 Political Economy of the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lynne Chester Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOP1001 and (ECOP1003 or ECOP1004) Prohibitions: ECOP3005 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (25%), 1x1000wd group tutorial paper/presentation (20%), 1x3000wd case study (45%), tutorial participation (10%)
This Unit of Study examines how economic interactions with the environment are conceptualised, and the nature of environmental problems, their emergence and how they are 'managed' within capitalism. Different conceptions of the economic-environment relation are explored largely through the lectures which introduce theories of environmental economics, ecological economics and radical critiques of human interactions with ecological systems. Tutorials examine concrete economic-environment problems along with the public policies and business management practices implemented in response.
ECOP3016 Gender in the Global Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOP1001 and either (ECOP1003 or ECOP1004) Prohibitions: ECOP3006 Assessment: 5x300wd journal entries (25%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (25%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit of study examines the gender dynamics of the global economic system, both within and between rich and poor countries. What are the main gender issues in the West and in developing countries? What roles do markets, public policy, culture, and individual choice play in shaping women's and men's options and outcomes? What are the relationships between women in rich countries and women in poor countries? Case studies from around the world are used to explore these questions.
ECOP3019 Finance: Volatility and Regulation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mike Beggs Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOP1001 and ( ECOP1003 or ECOP1004) Prohibitions: ECOP3009 Assessment: 1x750wd essay (20%) 1x1750wd essay (35%) 1x1.5hr exam (35%) tutorial presentation 500wd equivalent, (10%)
Foreign exchange, international bond and derivative markets have expanded dramatically over the past 20 years. This unit of study examines reasons for the growth of these markets and their vulnerability to some form of volatility and crisis. Case studies of individual corporate financial crises and national financial crises are considered. The unit also addresses the regulation of financial markets, both on a national and international scale. It looks at the history of regulation, key regulatory and monitoring agencies, and arguments for a new international financial architecture.
ECOP3551 Political Economy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOP3552 Political Economy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOP3553 Political Economy Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
ECOP3620 Political Economy of Inequality

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOP1001 and ( ECOP1003 or ECOP1004) Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x1500wd mid-semester take-home exercise (30%), 1x1500wd end-semester take-home exercise (30%), tutorial participation (10%)
The distribution of income and wealth is unequal in all nations, but the extent of inequality varies. What determines the size of these disparities? How have they changed over time? How do governments influence the distribution of income and wealth? Are alternative economic policies feasible? This unit explores how political economic analysis can be applied to the study of these issues of economic inequality.
ECOP3622 Work in the Global Economy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Rosewarne Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOP1001 and (ECOP1003 or ECOP1004) Assessment: 1x1500wd write up/presentation (20%), 1x3000wd essay (40%) and 1x1.5hr exam (40%)
This unit of study offers students a critical examination of labour market transformations, including the interplay between formal and informal sectors of the economy and the related changes in the organisation and definition of waged and non-waged forms of work. The analysis explores the traction of economic imperatives in contemporary capitalist economies vis-a-vis social and political forces, including the role of the state and other institutional forces, in framing these processes, and how these are shaped by globalisation.
ECOP3623 The Political Economy of Neoliberalism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Cahill Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOP1001 and (ECOP1003 or ECOP1004) Assessment: 1x1000wd presentation (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and participation (10%)
Neoliberalism is a key concept in contemporary economic debates, but what does it mean? This unit of study examines the competing conceptions of neoliberalism that underpin such debates. A particular focus of the unit is the relationship between neoliberal economic theory and neoliberal economic processes, such as the rise of flexible labour and product markets and the expansion of the sphere of commodifiction in modern capitalist economies. The relationships between neoliberalism, economic growth and economic crisis are also explored.
ECOP3911 Theories in Political Economy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bill Dunn Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 24 Senior ECOP credit points with a credit average including ECOP2911 or (ECOP2901 and ECOP2902) Prohibitions: ECOP3901 Assessment: 1x1500wd paper (20%); 1x3000wd paper (40%); 1x1500wd tutorial presentation (25%); tutorial participation (15%)
Note: Third year students who have not completed the prerequisites should consult the Department of Political Economy about alternative requirements.
This unit of study looks at the various theoretical frameworks within which political economic analysis is constructed. It compares the methodologies of the principal schools of economic thought with particular emphasis on the non-neoclassical approaches to the study of economic issues. The unit is required preparation for intending honours students but is also available to pass students with a credit average in previous units.
ECOP3912 Research in Political Economy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mike Beggs Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 24 Senior ECOP credit points with a credit average including ECOP2911 or (ECOP2901 and ECOP2902) Prohibitions: ECOP3902 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x1000wd statistical exercise (20%), 1x3000wd research proposal (40%), seminar participation (10%)
Note: Third year students who have not completed the prerequisites should consult the Department of Political Economy about alternative requirements.
This unit considers the variety of research methods that can be used in Political Economy. Discussion of methodology is a principal focus. Practical consideration is also given to research materials, bibliographical access, quantitative methods, surveys and fieldwork. This is important preparation for students intending to do an honours dissertation, but the unit is also available to pass students with a credit average in previous units.
ECOP4001 Political Economy Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Rosewarne Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week in Semester 1 Prerequisites: credit average in four senior ECOP units and ECOP2011, ECOP2612 (or ECOP2012 with permission), ECOP2911, ECOP3911 and ECOP3912. Requirements for the Pass degree must be completed before entry to level 4000 honours units of study. Assessment: 1x18000-20000wd thesis and 6000 wds written work or equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Political Economy consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff;
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for first semester;
3. two day-long thesis progress workshops.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000 words of written work or its equivalent. The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
For more information, contact Dr Susan Schroeder, Honours Coordinator
ECOP4002 Political Economy Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Hill Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ECOP4001
refer to ECOP4001
ECOP4003 Political Economy Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ECOP4002
refer to ECOP4001
ECOP4004 Political Economy Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ECOP4003
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
refer to ECOP4001

Studies in Religion

RLST1002 A History of God, Deities and Demons

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iain Gardner Session: Semester 1,Summer Early Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd take-home paper (30%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x500wd early feedback (definition and referencing style) (10%), 1x1000wd tutorial presentation (20%)
This unit is a general introduction to the history of religions, beginning with the emergence of religion in pre-literate societies as evidenced in art and archaeology. It then studies the ancient religions of Egypt and Mesopotamia, Persia, India, China, Israel, Greece and Rome; before turning to the growth and spread of world religions such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Buddhism. Students are expected to specialise in traditions and themes of their own choice in writing essays.
Textbooks
Course Reader
RLST1005 Atheism, Fundamentalism & New Religions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jay Johnston Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x1000wd in-class test (30%), 1x1000wd oral presentation (20%), participation (10%)
What is the 'new' atheism? How have globalisation and new media affected religious practice? This unit considers a broad range of recent high-profile events and contemporary debates and controversies in religion. Topics include: the supposed rise of fundamentalism, arguments over 'the death of God', new forms of spirituality and enchantment. Through the use of case studies, from UFO-religions to The Gospel of Judas, students examine the overarching theme: What is the future of religion?
RLST1801 Religious Studies Exchange

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Hartney Session: Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point junior unit of study in Studies in Religion at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department.
RLST2605 Christianity and the Medieval World

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Carole Cusack Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assumed knowledge: 12 Junior credit points of Studies in Religion or their equivalent to be assessed by the department Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd take home exam (35%), tutorial presentation (25%)
This unit examines the history of Christianity from the late Roman Empire to the close of the Middle Ages. A survey of the chief landmarks of the Christian religion in its social setting, in terms of its significant beliefs, experiences and diverse cultural expressions. A tutorial hour will be devoted to an exploration of some major philosophical and theological themes from Late Antique Christianity to the Middle Ages.
Textbooks
Course Reader
RLST2612 Ancient Gnosticism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iain Gardner Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: RLST2012 Assumed knowledge: 12 junior credit points of Religion Studies, or equivalent as assessed by the Department Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1xOral Presentation (500 wd equivalent) (20%)
This unit provides an overview of the Ancient Gnostic, Hermetic and Manichaean traditions, with particular emphasis on certain topics and themes. These include: exploration of the divine and demonic worlds; the nature of gnosis or knowledge; magic, the occult sciences and alchemy; dualism and the problem of evil; cosmogony, apocalypse and eschatology. A special feature of this unit is the use of new or recently discovered texts such as the so-called gnostic gospels.
Textbooks
Course Reader
RLST2620 Religion and Violence, Faith and Blood

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Hartney Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: RLST2020 Assumed knowledge: 12 Junior credit points of Religion Studies, or their equivalent to be assessed by the Department Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial presentation (25%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd take home paper (35%)
The twentieth century faced an unprecedented range of near-global crises - wars, depressions, communist-capitalist confrontation, ethnic conflict, epidemics, ecological disasters, extraordinary technological advances, the radical questioning of traditional values (along with secularisation) followed by reactive fundamentalisms, as well as serious tensions between modern science and religious conservatism. This unit considers how these crises have been addressed in religious thought and action. It will discuss popular mentalities and new spiritualities together with responses in the thought and praxis of leading religious figures.
Textbooks
Course Reader
RLST2624 The Birth of Christianity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iain Gardner Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: RLST2024 Assumed knowledge: 12 junior credit points of Religion Studies, or equivalent as assessed by the Department Assessment: 1x1000wd oral presentation (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd take home paper (40%)
This unit discusses the textual, archaeological and socio-cultural evidence for the origins of Christianity; with a particular purpose to analyse how cults centred on the charismatic figure of Jesus of Nazareth led to the construction of such a powerful religious tradition. Tensions within that emergent tradition will be considered, and especially its struggle towards self-identity with both Judaism and the Greco-Roman world.
Textbooks
Course Reader
RLST2626 Witchcraft, Paganism and the New Age

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Carole Cusack Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: RLST2026 Assumed knowledge: 12 Junior credit points of Religion Studies, or their equivalent to be assessed by the Department Assessment: 1x1000wd book review (30%), 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x tutorial presentation (20%)
The rebirth of paganism progressed steadily throughout the twentieth century. Pagans celebrate diversity and heterogeneity, in sharp contrast to the major Western traditions which were exclusive and doctrinally prescriptive. The interrelationships between pagans, goddess worshippers and witchcraft/occultism are fascinating and labyrinthine. This unit will explore three areas of modern religion, and attempt to assess the importance of their contribution for the future of religion.
Textbooks
Course Reader
RLST2633 Religion and Television

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Hartney Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assumed knowledge: 12 junior credit points of Religion or equivalent as assessed by the Department Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd personal report on group project (30%), 1x group seminar presentation (10%)
Television is central to the daily consciousness of the world and the key to understanding sudden shifts in thinking on religion in Australia and the West in general. We will examine various examples of television, discuss and workshop through various theoretical explanations, their impact on how religion is and can be understood. Dramas, reality television, comedy and current affairs programs will be considered along with music videos, commercial advertisements and religious propaganda.
Textbooks
Course Reader
RLST2634 Religion, Media and Consumerism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jay Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assumed knowledge: 12 junior credit points of Religion or equivalent as assessed by the Department Assessment: