Menzies Centre for Health Policy

Menzies Centre for Health Policy

Menzies Centre for Health Policy

The Menzies Centre for Health Policy (MCHP) is the leading independent scholarly voice on health policy in Australia. It brings together scholars and practitioners with broad expertise in health policy, economics and health services research to produce high-quality analyses of current health policy issues, deliver annual public seminars, education programs and undertake comprehensive research projects. MCHP’s research program addresses five themes that include policies for health futures, value in health care, serious and continuing illness, equity and governance.


New Report - Patient-centred healthcare homes in Australia: Towards successful implementation

July 2016: The Consumers Health Forum of Australia, the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP), the Menzies Centre for Health Policy and The George Institute for Global Health recently hosted a Roundtable in Melbourne to discuss the patient-centred health care home model (PCHCH) and develop consensus principles to guide implementation in the Australian context. The outcomes of the Roundtable are intended to provide a seminal contribution to future debate on building patient-centred care, by developing principles for implementation of the Australian PCHCH that have the backing of consumers, clinicians, peak bodies and researchers. Read the report: Patient-centred healthcare homes in Australia: Towards successful implementation.

New study shows dose-response relationship between newborns' TSH levels and later neuro-development

July 2016: Published in the latest issue of The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, this is the first population-based study demonstrating the association between moderately high thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in infants and their later school age neurodevelopmental outcomes. Menzies Centre for Health Policy researchers Dr Samantha Lain, Jason Bentley and Associate Professor Natasha Nassar and others found an association between neonatal TSH concentrations lower than the present newborn screening thresholds and poor educational and developmental outcomes. This association needs further investigation to assess whether assessment and treatment of these infants might improve their long-term cognitive outcomes. Read More