All future 2009 events

View All Summary Expand all
January
The photography of Professor John Smith   View Summary
25 November 2008 to 28 February 2009

Smith was Foundation Dean of the Faculty of Medicine in 1856. He was also an early Australian photographer and one of his lasting memorials to the University is an extensive collection of historic photographs of the University and Sydney surrounds. This exhibition shows his broad reaching interest in photographic technique and subject and beautifully document Smith's view of mid 19th century social life, architecture and our colonial landscape.

It's only natural: ecology in Australia   View Summary
25 November 2008 to 30 April 2009

Inspired by illustrations of creatures from new worlds, natural history texts have fired imaginations for hundreds of years.
The exhibition 'It's only natural' uses the University of Sydney's Rare Books and Special Collections to track the emergence of ecology as a scientific discipline from its foundations in natural history.

Genji - The world of the Shining Prince   View Summary
12 December 2008 to 15 February 2009

12 volumes of rare Japanese books from the Library's East Asian Collection are on display in the Art Gallery of New South Wales as part of the exhibition Genji - The world of the Shining Prince to celebrate the 1000th anniversary of the famous Japanese romance novel The Tale of Genji. Written in the early 11th century by a lady of court, Murasaki Shikibu, the story tells the life and loves of a prince known by his family name as "The Shining Genji".

The books from the Library's collection were produced from 1832 to 1864 in Japan in traditional string-bound format. They feature illustrations drawn by artists such as Utagawa Kunisada, Ichiyusai Kuniyoshi and Ichiyosai Toyokuni. Woodblock prints, paintings, screens, ukiyo-e prints and manga comics also feature in the exhibition.

Visit the Art Gallery of NSW website for more information.

Accidental Encounters (Macleay exhibition)    View Summary
19 December 2008 to 24 May 2009

This exhibition examines science, life and culture in Australia through the letters of Henrietta Heathorn and her fiance, Thomas Huxley. This exhibition commemorates the 150th anniversary of the publication of Charles Darwin's On The Origin of Species.

Small Matters (Macleay Museum Exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 February 2009

Small Matters probes the world of modern microscopy, highlighting the research and technology of the EMU. Using the fascinating and sometimes bizarre images produced by this technology the exhibition explores how these images are made and what they tell us about our everyday worlds.

Nicholson: Man and Museum (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 December 2009

A colourful exploration of some of the unearthed tales behind the extraordinary life of Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum, and the first vice-chancellor and second chancellor of the University of Sydney. Find out about Nicholson and mummies, spiritualism, trips up the Volga, grand houses, a much younger wife, retirement to England aged 53, and the loss of his house and life's work aged 90. True melodrama.

Foresight: Works from the University Union Art Collection (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 25 January 2009

This exhibition showcases some of the finest works in the collection, which is now managed by the University Art Gallery. Artists include: Emily Kngwarreye, Shaun Gladwell, Bill Henson, Del Kathryn Barton, Anne Ferran and Michael Riley.

A Small History of Microscopy   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 August 2009

Confused by the difference between compound and simple microscopes? This small display on historic microscopy and slides will bring you into this tiny but fascinating world.

Shattered Glass: Illuminating the Past   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 26 April 2009

This exhibition features 40 glass objects from the Nicholson Museum's colelction. It exoplores the discovery, working methods and use of glass through the ages, uncovering legends and highlighting archaeological discoveries.

Footprints in a Mythic Landscape: A Bark Painting Story (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 April 2009

A selection of Aboriginal bark paintings from the Macleay Museum's collection, focusing on Yolngu depictions of ancestral footprints across the landscape of eastern Arnhem Land.

University Information Day   View Summary
6 January 2009

The Macleay Museum, University Art Gallery and the Nicholson Museum will be open to the public.

Free Lunchtime Tour of University Art Gallery   View Summary
7 January 2009

Join us for a guided tour of the University Art Gallery and its current exhibition. Lunch for the mind and the soul.

Kids Museums: School Holiday Activities at Sydney University Museums   View Summary
12 January 2009 to 16 January 2009

Handling the Past: Join an archaeologist in the Nicholson Education Room to handle artefacts from Egypt, Greece and Rome.

(10am daily, $10 entry per child, parents free)

Framing the Landscape: Join us in the University Art Gallery to learn about landscapes and to create your own (11am daily, free entry)

The Microscopic World: Join us in the Macleay Museum to take a up-close look at the small world around us.

(1pm daily, free entry)

Mummies Alive: The Nicholson Museum has been taken over by mummies. Come and find out how Ancient Egyptians wrapped dead bodies.

(2pm daily, $5 per child, parents free)

Activities aimed at children aged 5-12. Bookings essential as places are limited. Each session runs for an hour. It is possible to book for a single session, or for multiple sessions in a single day. Bookings: (02) 9351 2812.

Kids Museums: School Holiday Activities at Sydney University Museums   View Summary
19 January 2009 to 23 January 2009

Handling the Past: Join an archaeologist in the Nicholson Education Room to handle artefacts from Egypt, Greece and Rome.

(10am daily, $10 entry per child, parents free)

Framing the Landscape: Join us in the University Art Gallery to learn about landscapes and to create your own (11am daily, free entry)

The Microscopic World: Join us in the Macleay Museum to take a up-close look at the small world around us.

(1pm daily, free entry)

Mummies Alive: The Nicholson Museum has been taken over by mummies. Come and find out how Ancient Egyptians wrapped dead bodies.

(2pm daily, $5 per child, parents free)

Activities aimed at children aged 5-12. Bookings essential as places are limited. Each session runs for an hour. It is possible to book for a single session, or for multiple sessions in a single day. Bookings: (02) 9351 2812.

February
The photography of Professor John Smith   View Summary
25 November 2008 to 28 February 2009

Smith was Foundation Dean of the Faculty of Medicine in 1856. He was also an early Australian photographer and one of his lasting memorials to the University is an extensive collection of historic photographs of the University and Sydney surrounds. This exhibition shows his broad reaching interest in photographic technique and subject and beautifully document Smith's view of mid 19th century social life, architecture and our colonial landscape.

It's only natural: ecology in Australia   View Summary
25 November 2008 to 30 April 2009

Inspired by illustrations of creatures from new worlds, natural history texts have fired imaginations for hundreds of years.
The exhibition 'It's only natural' uses the University of Sydney's Rare Books and Special Collections to track the emergence of ecology as a scientific discipline from its foundations in natural history.

Genji - The world of the Shining Prince   View Summary
12 December 2008 to 15 February 2009

12 volumes of rare Japanese books from the Library's East Asian Collection are on display in the Art Gallery of New South Wales as part of the exhibition Genji - The world of the Shining Prince to celebrate the 1000th anniversary of the famous Japanese romance novel The Tale of Genji. Written in the early 11th century by a lady of court, Murasaki Shikibu, the story tells the life and loves of a prince known by his family name as "The Shining Genji".

The books from the Library's collection were produced from 1832 to 1864 in Japan in traditional string-bound format. They feature illustrations drawn by artists such as Utagawa Kunisada, Ichiyusai Kuniyoshi and Ichiyosai Toyokuni. Woodblock prints, paintings, screens, ukiyo-e prints and manga comics also feature in the exhibition.

Visit the Art Gallery of NSW website for more information.

Accidental Encounters (Macleay exhibition)    View Summary
19 December 2008 to 24 May 2009

This exhibition examines science, life and culture in Australia through the letters of Henrietta Heathorn and her fiance, Thomas Huxley. This exhibition commemorates the 150th anniversary of the publication of Charles Darwin's On The Origin of Species.

Small Matters (Macleay Museum Exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 February 2009

Small Matters probes the world of modern microscopy, highlighting the research and technology of the EMU. Using the fascinating and sometimes bizarre images produced by this technology the exhibition explores how these images are made and what they tell us about our everyday worlds.

Nicholson: Man and Museum (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 December 2009

A colourful exploration of some of the unearthed tales behind the extraordinary life of Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum, and the first vice-chancellor and second chancellor of the University of Sydney. Find out about Nicholson and mummies, spiritualism, trips up the Volga, grand houses, a much younger wife, retirement to England aged 53, and the loss of his house and life's work aged 90. True melodrama.

A Small History of Microscopy   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 August 2009

Confused by the difference between compound and simple microscopes? This small display on historic microscopy and slides will bring you into this tiny but fascinating world.

Shattered Glass: Illuminating the Past   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 26 April 2009

This exhibition features 40 glass objects from the Nicholson Museum's colelction. It exoplores the discovery, working methods and use of glass through the ages, uncovering legends and highlighting archaeological discoveries.

Footprints in a Mythic Landscape: A Bark Painting Story (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 April 2009

A selection of Aboriginal bark paintings from the Macleay Museum's collection, focusing on Yolngu depictions of ancestral footprints across the landscape of eastern Arnhem Land.

Kids Museums: The Year of the Ox   View Summary
1 February 2009

Celebrate the Chinese New Year and help welcome in the Year of the Ox with a series of activities for children looking at Chinese culture and natural history. Hear talks in Mandarin and English, take part in arts and crafts sessions and help us decorate our New Year Ox.

Melt (Art Gallery Exhibition)    View Summary
1 February 2009 to 15 March 2009

This exhibition draws together three female artists and their responses to time spent in the Polar Regions - Dee Copland and Kirsten Haydon in Antarctica and Lesley Duxbury in the Canadian Arctic.

University of Sydney International Forum: "Problems of today: world of tomorrow"   View Summary
3 February 2009

Mr Aart de Geus, Deputy Secretary-General, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) will address strategic issues for a global world coming out of the current economic crisis. Two distinguished panel have been invited to provide comments leading to an open discussion.

Prior registration is required via email: international@usyd.edu.au by 23/01/09; there is no charge to attend.

Are they Chinese? Are they from China? East meets West in Chinese archaeology   View Summary
4 February 2009

Public Lecture by Dr Peter Jia (University of Sydney)

Chinese culture has a variety of historical symbols - such as Chinese New Year, Dragon boat racing and the Peking Opera - whcih have continuously developed throughout Chinese history. It used to be thought that Chinese culture developed in an isolated environment without contact from the rest of the world.

However, current archaeological study has discovered that contact between China and the West started at a very early date and continued thoughout Chinese history. These early contacts were made through two major routes: the land-based and maritime silk roads. Chinese culture would not be as diverse and well - developed without the influence of the rest of the world.

The Human and Humanities in Literature, Language and Culture   View Summary
4 February 2009 to 6 February 2009

The 35th Congress of the Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association (AULLA) has the dual aim of promoting: (1) detailed research into the human (and inhuman) in literature, languages and culture; and (2) broad-scale exploration of the past, present and future definitions of and directions for the humanities.

Is human evolution over? J Steve Jones   View Summary
5 February 2009

CHAST Distinguished Lecture
J Steve Jones is Professor of Genetics at University College London, whose research aims to determine the basis of genetic variation.

2009 CHAST lecture: Is Human Evolution Over?   View Summary
5 February 2009

The 2009 CHAST lecture will be given by Professor Steve Jones, of University College London. Steve Jones is Professor of Genetics and head of the Biology Department at University College London. He is one of the best known contemporary popular writers on evolution. In 1996 his writing won him the Royal Society Michael Faraday prize "for his numerous, wide ranging contributions to the public understanding of science in areas such as human evolution and variation, race, sex, inherited disease and genetic manipulation through his many broadcasts on radio and television, his lectures, and popular science books.

LECTURE ABSTRACT
Many people are concerned about what the future might bring and, from Thomas More's Utopia of 1516 to the latest science fiction fantasy, they have made lurid models of what may be to come. Evolution is all about understanding the past; but I will argue that we now know so much about our own biological history that it is possible to make some informed guesses about the Darwinian future. Everything we see around us suggests that, at least for the time being and at least in the modern world, the agents that lead to genetic change - mutation, natural selection, and geographic isolation - are losing their ability to do so and that human evolution is more or less over. There is, as a result, no need to worry what Utopia might be like, for we are living in it now.

Free lunchtime tour of the Art Gallery   View Summary
11 February 2009

Join us for a monthly guided tour of the University Art Gallert and its current exhibition. Lunch for the mind and the soul.

Futurescape   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 24 May 2009

'Far into the future the world's climate has radically changed. Human beings have adapted and survived to live in a simpler way. Zoologists travel to remote uninhabited lands observing the evolution of species.'

This was the brief for six intrepid student artists from Enmore Tafe, whose models and drawings for future species will be on exhibition to commemorate Darwin's ideas.

WS Macleay and the natural history circle   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 1 December 2009

William Sharp Macleay's natural history Horae Entomologicae (1819 - 21) sought God's order in nature through a system of organisation based on the affinities and analogies between organisms. This quinarian system, as it was known, was read and considered by London's young and radical naturalists in the 1820's and the 1830's, among them the promising scholar Charles Darwin.

7th ANJeL International Conference: 'Crisis and the Law in Japan and Beyond'   View Summary
14 February 2009

ANJeL will be hosting its 7th international conference on Japanese law on Saturday 14 February 2008 at the Tokyo Campus of Ritsumeikan University, tentatively from 2-5 pm. The theme of the conference is Crisis and the Law in Japan and Beyond.

The world is gripped by a financial crisis of unprecedented scale. Major financial institutions, such as Lehman Brothers, have spectacularly failed. Others, such as Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, have been saved through nationalisation. Stock markets have plunged. Consumer prices are rising. Business confidence is at all-time lows. Japan is also experiencing crises beyond the economic. Prime Minister Aso has taken over the presidency of an increasingly unstable Liberal Democratic Party after his predecessors Abe and Fukuda lasted less than a year each as leaders. A series of unprovoked murders have led to speculation that a lack of job security is leading to the alienation of Japanese youth.

What is the role of law in these (and other) crises? Is it cause or cure, solution or problem? How do Japanese institutions and processes compare with those in other countries in dealing with such crises?

ANJeL welcomes paper proposals from its members and the academic community interested in exploring these questions. Please submit inquiries and paper proposals to ANJeLinfo@gmail.com.

ANJeL Australian-Japanese Business Law CLE Seminar   View Summary
14 February 2009

This CLE Seminar will be held at the Tokyo Campus of Ritsumeikan University and will feature updates by Tokyo-based practitioners and ANJeL directors on:

1. International contract law (45 minutes);
2. International dispute resolution (45 minutes);
3. Corporate and securities law (45 minutes); and
4. International tax law, including the Australia-Japan double tax treaty (45 minutes).

The CLE Seminar will deliver academically and practically relevant up-to-date information to meet the professional needs of lawyers who work at the interface of Australian and Japanese law or who are interested in moving into this market.

Excluding refreshment breaks, the CLE will be three hours in duration and worth 3 points of MCLE (NSW) or CPD (Victoria and Queensland).

Participants are asked to check with their relevant law society as to how to have the ANJeL CLE recognised for the purposes of their professional registration.

ANJeL Workshop: 'Who Judges Japanese Law?'   View Summary
15 February 2009

In November 2008, ANJeL's edited book, Corporate Governance in the Twenty-First Century: Japan's Gradual Transformation, will be published by Edward Elgar. The book features essays by ANJeL members who are leading academics and lawyers in their respective fields.

ANJeL is now in the initial stages of planning a follow-up volume. Tentatively titled Who Governs Japanese Law? Popular Participation in Japan's Legal Process, the book examines the role of the community in adjudicative and other legal processes in Japan.

The book uses the long-standing debate about who governs Japan as its starting point, but focuses less on the bureaucratic control of the economy and more on popular constraints over elite control of the legal system. Some examples of this include the introduction of the new saiban'in system in Japanese criminal justice, the involvement of union and management representatives in the management of labour disputes as well as greater involvement of shareholders in corporate governance decision-making.

ANJeL welcomes any members who have an interest in the involvement of the community in legal matters to contribute to this book project by attending an informal workshop (time and venue to be confirmed). Participants are asked to prepare a two-page abstract of their proposed contribution so that ideas may be shared in preparation of a book proposal to be submitted to Edward Elgar or other publishers.

Inquiries and abstracts should be directed to ANJeLinfo@gmail.com.

Kids Museums: Melting in the Sun   View Summary
15 February 2009

A fun-filled day with art. Creative activities to help children explore the world of the visual arts, based around the exhibition Melt.

Opening of exhibtion: Accidental Encounters   View Summary
16 February 2009

Join us for a musical soiree for the Macleay Museum's exhibition Accindental Encounters. Featuring Victorian period music.

Health Literacy: Just what the doctor ordered?   View Summary
17 February 2009

Health literacy is a key element in building sustainable health systems. It underpins policies calling on individuals to look after their own health- nostrums such as "self care" and "self management". What are the characteristics of those who are more (and less) health literate in Australia today? Can we see relationships between ability to navigate the health care system and other social and demographic characteristics?

Clubs and Societies Conference   View Summary
18 February 2009

This is a compulsory training session for all Clubs and Societies that are participating in Orientation Week 2009.
Topics will include:
Food Safety and Handling, Catering, Treasurers Training Session, Sponsorship, Advertising, How to organise an event, How to book a venue & catering, Hermann's & Manning Bars, Equipment Hire, RSA, USU Merchandise buying power, Harassment & Discrimination.

Parents' Network Meeting   View Summary
20 February 2009

Dr Susan Colmar of the Faculty of Education and Social Work has kindly agreed to give a short talk at the meeting - 'Child and adolescent psychology: latest headlines'.
A light lunch will be provided so RSVP by 6/2/09 is essential.

USU O-Week 2009 Flashback Fastforward   View Summary
25 February 2009 to 27 February 2009

O-Week is when new students familiarise themselves with new surroundings and where returning students celebrate the new academic year with parties, food and lots of free stuff.

O-Week is a festival of entertainment, market stalls, food, drink, music and fun.

Classical Fantasies: The age of beauty from Naples to Capri (exhibition)   View Summary
25 February 2009 to 1 July 2009

The 19th Century saw the blossoming of the 'Classical Ideal'. The Mediterranean, especially Italy, provided inspiration for an army of classicists, archaeologists, writers, poets, artists and early photographers. At the heart of this was the idea of the beauty and purity of the Classical past. The exhibition will explore this fantasy as well as look at how the morals of the past were used to explain and justify the morals of the time.

The Parsons Centre and Sport Knowledge Australia present: Player Contract Sanctity   View Summary
26 February 2009

Recent events involving Sonny Bill Williams' defection from Rugby League in New South Wales to Rugby Union in France raise fascinating legal and practical questions about the ability of our contract law to protect legitimate interests of teams and players.

This seminar will provide a provocative insight into the ability of existing principles of Australian contract law to provide workable solutions to a range of issues such as strategies for dealing with breach of contract by players, legal rules providing protection to individual players, legal remedies available for breach of contract (for both player/team), comparisons with similar problems in other sports, assessing the legality of existing rules limiting freedom of contract of both team and player (salary caps and league entry drafts).

To register, pleaseclick here

To review the brochure, pleaseclick here

Guest Speakers include:

Mr Tony Dempsey is both Chief Executive Officer and Legal Counsel for the Rugby Union Players' Association Inc ("RUPA").

Tony regularly speaks on matters of international importance on the game of rugby at various rugby conferences around the world including the IRB endorsed International Rugby Summits held in Johannesburg and London.

Professor Joellen Rileyholds degrees in law from the Universities of Sydney and Oxford, and has been teaching and researching in the field of employment and labour law since 1998.


Joellen is on the Advisory Board of the Australian Institute of Employment Rights; she is on the executive organising committee of the Australian Labour Law Association, and is a Fellow of the Commercial Law Association. Since 2008, she has been a co-editor of the Australian Journal of Labour Law.


Mr Simon Rofe practised in corporate/commercial law with a particular interest in the sports and entertainment industry. Over thirty years,he acted on behalf of Australian national sporting organisations, the Australian Olympic Committee and the Australian Commonwealth Games Association as well as having advised the International Olympic Committee and the Commonwealth Games Federation on an ad hoc basis.

He has also been a member of the Court of Arbitration for Sport since 1994 and was a member of its ad hoc Division for the 2002 Commonwealth Games in Manchester.

The Alumni Discussion Dinner with The Hon Justice Michael Kirby   View Summary
28 February 2009

The Alumni Discussion Dinner with Justice Michael Kirby is to be a black tie affair, held in the Great Hall on Saturday 28 February 2009 and will present an exciting opportunity for alumni, students and guests to enjoy a three course meal whilst listening to Sydney's "enfant terrible" reflect on the lessons and experiences of his stellar and multi-faceted career.
Justice Michael Kirby was both a dissenter and a traditionalist, a public intellectual and an internationalist, Justice Kirby conforms to no stereotype, save as a quintessential child of Sydney University. It was from here that his public career was launched. As he defended troublesome students in the1960s, his own modus operandi was defined by impeccable courtesy and formality. It is to his alma mater that he returns for an evening of celebration, paradox and debate.

Michael Kirby graduated with a Sydney BA in 1958, LLB in 1962, BEc in 1966 and as the only LLM student to receive first class honours in 1967. His fifth Sydney degree conferral was in 1996, when he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Laws. He is now the one of the seven Justices of High Court of Australia, the nation's highest court and holder of twelve honorary doctorates from universities in Australia and overseas.

March
It's only natural: ecology in Australia   View Summary
25 November 2008 to 30 April 2009

Inspired by illustrations of creatures from new worlds, natural history texts have fired imaginations for hundreds of years.
The exhibition 'It's only natural' uses the University of Sydney's Rare Books and Special Collections to track the emergence of ecology as a scientific discipline from its foundations in natural history.

Accidental Encounters (Macleay exhibition)    View Summary
19 December 2008 to 24 May 2009

This exhibition examines science, life and culture in Australia through the letters of Henrietta Heathorn and her fiance, Thomas Huxley. This exhibition commemorates the 150th anniversary of the publication of Charles Darwin's On The Origin of Species.

Nicholson: Man and Museum (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 December 2009

A colourful exploration of some of the unearthed tales behind the extraordinary life of Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum, and the first vice-chancellor and second chancellor of the University of Sydney. Find out about Nicholson and mummies, spiritualism, trips up the Volga, grand houses, a much younger wife, retirement to England aged 53, and the loss of his house and life's work aged 90. True melodrama.

A Small History of Microscopy   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 August 2009

Confused by the difference between compound and simple microscopes? This small display on historic microscopy and slides will bring you into this tiny but fascinating world.

Shattered Glass: Illuminating the Past   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 26 April 2009

This exhibition features 40 glass objects from the Nicholson Museum's colelction. It exoplores the discovery, working methods and use of glass through the ages, uncovering legends and highlighting archaeological discoveries.

Footprints in a Mythic Landscape: A Bark Painting Story (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 April 2009

A selection of Aboriginal bark paintings from the Macleay Museum's collection, focusing on Yolngu depictions of ancestral footprints across the landscape of eastern Arnhem Land.

Melt (Art Gallery Exhibition)    View Summary
1 February 2009 to 15 March 2009

This exhibition draws together three female artists and their responses to time spent in the Polar Regions - Dee Copland and Kirsten Haydon in Antarctica and Lesley Duxbury in the Canadian Arctic.

Futurescape   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 24 May 2009

'Far into the future the world's climate has radically changed. Human beings have adapted and survived to live in a simpler way. Zoologists travel to remote uninhabited lands observing the evolution of species.'

This was the brief for six intrepid student artists from Enmore Tafe, whose models and drawings for future species will be on exhibition to commemorate Darwin's ideas.

WS Macleay and the natural history circle   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 1 December 2009

William Sharp Macleay's natural history Horae Entomologicae (1819 - 21) sought God's order in nature through a system of organisation based on the affinities and analogies between organisms. This quinarian system, as it was known, was read and considered by London's young and radical naturalists in the 1820's and the 1830's, among them the promising scholar Charles Darwin.

Classical Fantasies: The age of beauty from Naples to Capri (exhibition)   View Summary
25 February 2009 to 1 July 2009

The 19th Century saw the blossoming of the 'Classical Ideal'. The Mediterranean, especially Italy, provided inspiration for an army of classicists, archaeologists, writers, poets, artists and early photographers. At the heart of this was the idea of the beauty and purity of the Classical past. The exhibition will explore this fantasy as well as look at how the morals of the past were used to explain and justify the morals of the time.

The 2009 Rex Cramphorn Lecture at Sydney Ideas   View Summary
2 March 2009

Creativity and Flexibility:

The Nexus between Infrastructure, Space and Art

Fiona Winning, independent Australian producer and writer

Introduction by Associate Professor Tim Fitzpatrick, Department of Performance Studies

Contemporary artists are committed to developing new ideas and practices and presenting their artworks to diverse audiences. Variously reflecting, contesting, interrogating and transforming social and cultural conditions, artists work in contexts of accelerated change.

And the infrastructures that support them? Infrastructures that often pre-exist and remain long after the artists and their work have disappeared. How are they adapting to the ever-changing world of new technologies, shrinking investment from public and private investors, increased competition for audience leisure time and higher expectations of participation?

Using the example of CarriageWorks, Sydney's newest contemporary arts facility and looking at Performance Space's programs presented there, this lecture discusses the often problematic relationship between the hard and soft infrastructure of arts buildings and the artists and organisations that work in them. How does the physical space impact on the practice and on the art produced? What are the economies of scale? What environments enable artists to create their best work and audiences to actively participate?

Fiona Winning is a writer and producer, newly independent after nearly a decade at the helm of Performance Space, an international contemporary arts hub based in Sydney. Fiona has conceived and produced events in theatres, galleries and public spaces, collaborating with artists and communities. She was instrumental in negotiating the development of the new CarriageWorks contemporary arts space in Redfern.

The Rex Cramphorn Lecture

The late Nick Enright described Rex Cramphorn as "that rare and important figure, a philosopher and visionary of the arts." Rex Cramphorn was one of the leading figures in the renaissance of Australian theatre in the 1960s and '70s. His oeuvre was characterised by his commitment to the idea of artists working together, sharing and developing their skills.

Following his untimely death in 1991, the Rex Cramphorn Lecture was established to encourage honest and provocative discourse about Australian theatre and culture and to offer our theatre artists the opportunity to speak about their practice in a way that reflects Rex's own passion for ideas.

Workplace Research Centre: Essential Employee Relations   View Summary
3 March 2009 to 4 March 2009

For several years the Workplace Research Centre's (www.wrc.org.au) two-day course has been successfully supporting line managers, Human Resources professionals and others requiring an overview of ER and its application in the workplace.

Content includes:
* an overview of the Australian industrial relations system;
* awards, agreements and contracts;
* managing employee grievances,
* managing performance, discipline and lessening the risk of unfair & unlawful dismissal claims.

Participants share experience with practitioners from a range of other organisations via the course's interactive delivery. There is an emphasis on resolving and, where possible, pre-empting workplace issues.

Sydney Uni Monthly Markets   View Summary
4 March 2009

Have a browse, grab something to eat or snatch up a bargain at the Sydney Uni Monthly Markets.

Wilcox Debate: Transition for the Building and Construction Industry   View Summary
4 March 2009

The Australian Building and Construction Commission (ABCC) set up by the former Howard government has come in for criticism on the basis that it imposes particularly onerous controls on industrial activity in the construction industry. The new ALP government has appointed Justice Murray Wilcox to investigate these concerns, with a view to making recommendations about the regulation of the construction industry following the enactment of new Fair Work legislation. This discussion forum at Sydney Law School is one of three around the country, and has been organized to assist Justice Wilcox in his consultations.

Speakers from a range of organisations with a special interest in the regulation of the construction industry will address the forum on four essential issues raised by Justice Wilcox:

  • Is there a need for special rules and penalties for industrial action and rights of entry in the construction industry?
    Should the proposed specialist division of the Office of the Fair Work Ombudsman be given the interrogation powers currently available to the ABCC?
    If so, should there be controls on the exercise of those powers?
    Should the ABCC Code Implementation Guidelines be preserved in the current or amended form?

The forum will provide an opportunity for participants to join in this important debate.

Speakers:

Richard Calver, National Director IR and Legal Counsel, Master Builders Australia Inc

Tom Roberts, Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union

Associate Professor Peter Sheldon, Australian School of Business, UNSW

Nicola McGarrity, Gilbert and Tobin Centre of Public Law

Brian Seidler, Master Builders Association of NSW

Chair: Professor Joellen Riley, Sydney Law School

Welcome: Professor Ron McCallum AO, Sydney Law School

FREE EVENT

RSVP required: email law.events@usyd.edu.au

EU Student Mobility: Erasmus Mundus and Bologna Update    View Summary
5 March 2009

THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY INTERNATIONAL FORUM: EU STUDENT MOBILITY

Erasmus Mundus 2009-2013 and Bologna Update

2:30 pm - 3.30 pm, Thursday 5 March 2009 Education Lecture Theatre 351, Education Building (A35), Manning Road Camperdown Campus

On Thursday 5 March 2009 the University of Sydney will host the International Forum "EU Student Mobility - Erasmus Mundus 2009-2013 and Bologna Update" with guest speakers Mr Bodo Richter, Program Manager for Canada, Australia and New Zealand and Ms Barbara Nolan, Head of Higher Education and Erasmus Programs from the European Commission.


Erasmus Mundus 2009-2013 is a cooperation and mobility program in the field of higher education that aims to enhance the quality of European higher education and to promote dialogue and understanding between people and cultures through cooperation with third countries including Australia.


Erasmus Mundus 2009-2013 continues and extends the scope of the activities already launched during the first phase (2004-2008) and new features include; the support for joint doctoral programmes and award of three year fellowships for doctoral candidates, the award of full scholarships/fellowships to European students in addition to those provided to third country nationals, the full participation of third country institutions in consortia implementing joint programs. There is an increased focus on quality assurance, employability prospects and joint program sustainability.


The Bologna Process aims to create a European Higher Education Area by 2010, in which students can choose from a wide and transparent range of high quality courses and benefit from smooth recognition procedures. The Bologna Declaration of June 1999 put in motion a series of reforms needed to make European Higher Education more compatible and comparable, more competitive and more attractive for Europeans and for students from around the world.


Join us to hear from both Mr Bodo Richter as he launches the second phase of the Erasmus Mundus program in Sydney and provides details on the opportunities available for Australian students and universities to be involved in the 2009-2013 scheme and from Ms. Barbara Nolan on how European countries are tracking to realise the Bologna Process goals.


To attend this event, please rsvp to international@usyd.edu.au by Friday 27 February 2009.

Disciplines of Inquiry - Methodology Colloquia 09   View Summary
5 March 2009

The Research Division, Faculty of Education and Social Work invites you to participate in the launch of a colloquia series on new approaches to research and interdisciplinarity across the education and social work domains.

Opening Plenary:

Linking Research and Practice in Education & Social Work: Some Implications for Methods of Inquiry

Dr John Ainley,
Deputy CEO (Research), Australian Council for Educational Research.

University of Sydney Institute of Marine Science (USIMS) Showcase 2009   View Summary
6 March 2009

Are you interested in all the exciting developments in marine science at Sydney University? Come along to the USIMS showcase to get a flavour of the research as presented by USyd scientists. Topics range from autonomous underwater vehicles to visualisations of the ocean floor and from the deep sea to estuaries.

Nicholson Museum Study Day: The Parthenon: Art, Archaeology, Architecture and Ownership   View Summary
7 March 2009

This study day is devoted to the Parthenon - the Classical temple of Athens dedicated to the goddess Athena. The day will explore the architectural achievement and beauty of the sculptural adornments, as well as the building's less well-known later history. We also look at the Parthenon in its historical context amd provide an overview of the controversy surrounding the Elgin marbles held in the British Museum, including an examination of the question of cultural repatriation.

Kids Museums: Parthenon and Ancient Greece Family Day   View Summary
8 March 2009

Explore ancient Greek culture at the Nicholson with a family day featuring talks on Greek archaeology and the Acropolis, a chance to handle archaeological material and take part in our mock archaeological excavations. See what life was like in ancient Athens.

Business Events Sydney Seminar on Conference Management   View Summary
9 March 2009

On 9th March 2009, Business Events Sydney (formerly known as the Sydney Convention and Visitors Bureau) are hosting a luncheon and information session on 'The Why and How of Hosting an International Conference'.
The session has been designed to provide advice and real case studies on how to attract, win and host an International Conference.
This event is open to all Academic Staff.

Victorian Bushfire Benefit Concert   View Summary
10 March 2009

A special concert hosted by the University of Sydney to provide support for the Victorian communities devastated by the recent bushfires. All proceeds will be donated to the Red Cross Victorian Bushfire Appeal.

Coding Rules - National Centre for Classification in Health Conference 2009   View Summary
11 March 2009 to 13 March 2009

The principal conference for health classification systems, theory and practice in the Asia Pacific region.

Sydney Science Forum: Dr Karl's Science is Golden   View Summary
11 March 2009

Australia's favourite science "guy", Dr Karl Kruszelnicki, will be kicking off the 2009 Sydney Science Forum with his latest swag of super science stories. If you like your science dished up with a big serving of humour, then don't miss this opportunity to see Dr Karl live at the University of Sydney. Get the lowdown from Dr Karl, as he shows us just why Science is Golden. At the end of the talk, you'll have the opportunity to ask Dr Karl those burning science questions that you've been pondering for years!

Free lunchtime tour if the Art Gallery   View Summary
11 March 2009

Join us for a monthly guided tour of the University Art Gallery and its current exhibition. Lunch for the mind and the soul.

BeachBall   View Summary
12 March 2009

March at Sydney Uni means one thing, the legendary start of year party, Beachball, featuring the hottest acts in dance and live music hitting the stage at a capacity 3500 crowd.

Every year Beachball presents a stellar line up of Australian talent; previous years have seen acts like Sneaky Sound System, Ajax, Midnight Juggernauts, the Mess Hall, Pnau, Expatriate, Gus Da Hoodrat & Jaime Doom plus a tonne more.

Don't miss the two other biggest parties on campus: Sounds in the Grounds and Snowball!

The Rowan Nicks Russel Drysdale Fellowships Award Ceremony - Invite Only   View Summary
12 March 2009

The Rowan Nicks Russell Drysdale Fellowships in Indigenous Health and Welfare are awarded to individuals working to improve Australian Indigenous Health and Welfare. Since its establishment in 2004, the Fellowship has provided support and funding to enable people to conduct projects, establish programs, or undertake research that benefit Indigenous health. The Fellowship specifically targets the development of projects, ideas and education programs that have tangible and sustainable effects at the grass-root community level. The Fellowship also aims to develop Indigenous leadership which it achieves through the personal and professional development of the Fellows it nurtures and supports. This event is by invitation through the Alumni Relations Office. If you are interested in attending, please contact the Alumni relations office for Invitation details.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Phil Scraton PhD, Queens University, Belfast   View Summary
12 March 2009

Hearing Voices: The Violence of Women's Incarceration

Dr Phil Scraton

Professor of Criminology, Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice, School of Law, Queen's University, Belfast

Phil Scraton is a Professor in Criminology, Institute of Criminology and Social Justice, School of Law at Queens University Belfast. He is visiting under the Sydney Law School Visiting Fellow Scheme.
His areas of research include deaths in controversial circumstances (public inquiries, inquests, criminal investigation); disasters analysis ('rights' of the bereaved and survivors); politics and processes of truth and acknowledgement; regulation and criminalisation of children and young people; children's rights; politics of imprisonment and prisoners' resistances; critical theory and critical research (from the structural to the personal).

His currently funded research includes: 'The Imprisonment of Women and Girls'; 'Understanding the Lives of Children and Young People in the Context of Conflict and Marginalisation; A Rights-based Approach'; 'Childhood, Transition and Justice'.

Register Online

Click hereto register now

Click herefor the seminar brochure.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.


A Celebration of Tanka   View Summary
14 March 2009

A Celebration of Tanka, featuring the book launch of rick rack: collected tanka by Julie Thorndyke; readings by eucalypt editor Beverley George and special guest Japanese performance poet Mariko Kitakubo.

The Seventeenth Annual Kingsley Laffer Memorial Lecture   View Summary
16 March 2009

Presented by Professor Russell Lansbury 'Workplace Democracy in an Era of Global Financial Crisis'

Free tours of the Quadrangle and Sydney University Museums for NSW Seniors Week   View Summary
17 March 2009 to 18 March 2009

Discover the history of the University of Sydney with a free walking tour - explore the heritage of the Quadrangle and learn about the rich history of the scholars and students, stonemasons and gargoyles!

The Graduate Connections Breakfast with Allan Moss AO   View Summary
17 March 2009

The Graduate Connections Breakfasts were established in 2005, and designed to offer Sydney alumni the opportunity to develop lasting relationships with each other and the University, whilst showcasing the achievements of notable alumni.
The breakfasts are open to all public, with a discount for The University of Sydney alumni.
Our first Graduate Connections Breakfast for 2009 will be hosted by Allan Moss, AO, who will be speaking on the topic of 'What's going on in the financial markets'.
Allan graduated from Sydney University in Arts with a major in Economics and in Laws with Honours. Allan is also a graduate of Harvard University with a Masters Degree in Business Administration with High Distinction.
He was with Macquarie Group from 1977 until his retirement from Macquarie in May 2008, serving as Chief Executive Officer for 15 years from 1993.
Allan was made an Officer in the Order of Australia in 2005.
He is currently Principal of Allan Moss Investments Pty Ltd, a private investment company.

Reporting on the Environment: A study of science or power?   View Summary
17 March 2009

A Walkley Foundation Lecture at Sydney Ideas
Mark Schapiro, investigative journalist and Editorial Director of the Center for Investigative Reporting, US

The Obama administration came into office stating that there would be a return to scientific principles in its application of environmental laws. The Bush administration said the same thing when it came into office eight years before. Both have access to the same scientific evidence, but the results look likely to be very different.

Schapiro, a veteran environmental journalist and Editorial Director of the California-based Center for Investigative Reporting, explores the intersection between two very different forces: the inherent uncertainties of the scientific method and the demand for clarity by those in power. Whose science? And what informs the government's willingness to respond to it? It is ultimately these questions which confront every environmental reporter. Schapiro discusses where the real drama lies in environmental journalism: in the hidden interests that lie behind how science is understood and acted upon. He also considers the implications of the US' long retreat from global environmental leadership, what may be coming from the Obama administration, and what other countries' approach to this critical dynamic can tell us about the potency, and utility, of scientific evidence.

Mark Shapiro is the Editorial Director of the Center for Investigative Reporting, a California-based non-profit group of journalists producing stories for all media. He has been an investigative journalist for more than two decades and has built an award-winning track record with a focus on environmental and international affairs. His work has appeared in publications such as Harper's, The Nation, Mother Jones, and The Atlantic Monthly; on television, as a correspondent for NOW with Bill Moyers and FRONTLINE/World; and on radio, as a correspondent for Marketplace. His cover story in December for The Nation, "New Power for 'Old Europe,'" and series for public radio's Marketplace, "Brussels Clout," attracted wide interest and served as the springboard for an expanded investigation into the growing influence of the European Union insetting international environment, health and safety regulations. The resulting book, Exposed, was published by Chelsea Green Publishing in September 2007. His investigation for Frontline/World into the sinking of the Prestige oil tanker and the maritime system that made it possible was disseminated widely inside the European Parliament, and received an award from the Society of Environmental Journalists. Mark has worked and lived in and out of Europe for some 20 years, as a reporter and as founding editor of InterNation, a consortium of journalists producing international investigative stories.

Public Lecture: Dr Elizabeth Bollen   View Summary
18 March 2009

Join Nicholson Museum Curatorial Assistant Dr Elizabeth Bollen for a lecture on ancient glass presented in conjunction with the exhibition Shattered Glass.

Workplace Research Centre: Managing Discrimination, Harassment & Bullying (Best Practice Workshop)   View Summary
18 March 2009

As with all our Best Practice workshops, this session has a strong focus on practical workplace application - identifying when unacceptable behaviour occurs, intervening to reduce the risk of escalation and having a preventive mindset. The legal context - respective liabilities, responsibilities and rights - will be explained, including as these relate to organisational policies and procedures. Recommended options for responding to allegations will be explored - priority actions, what to avoid and strategies to avert future incidences of discrimination, bullying and harassment in your workplace.
The Beauty Queen of Leenane   View Summary
18 March 2009 to 4 April 2009

Writen by Martin McDonagh
Directed by Maeliosa Stafford

In the remote Irish village of Leenane rain is as common as Catholics and the most exciting pasttime is watching cows pass by. Lonely spinster, Maureen, is trapped taking care of her elderly, cantankerous mother, Mag. When Maureen finally discovers romance, things get horribly out of hand.

This modern classic is full of clever twists, bitter tragedy and scathing black comedy leading up to its stunning conclusion.

Martin McDonagh's Tony Award-winning black comedy unleashes all the dark humor and rich language for which he has been internationally praised.

"This little gem of a production is an auspicious debut...the kind of taut theatre we would all love to see more often" The Daily Telegraph

Workplace Research Centre: Managing Ill & Injured Workers (Best Practice Workshop)   View Summary
19 March 2009

Employees can be affected by illness and injury arising from employment or from activities outside of work. This can lead to reduced capacity to work, even substantial absence from work. What are the various laws which can come into play? What practical steps should be taken in difficult situations, such as the prospect of ongoing employment being diminished by injury? This session addresses practical issues around return to work, impact on other staff, risk minimisation strategies and the relevant legal framework - including with respect to compensation, health and safety, discrimination, privacy and termination.

LPD Seminar: Credit Derivatives & the Credit Crunch: a weapon of mass destruction after all?   View Summary
19 March 2009

Presented by the Ross Parsons Centre of Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law

Speaker: JJ de Vries Robbé, Dutch Development Bank FMO

Chair: Th Hon Justice RP Austin, Justice of the Supreme Court of NSW

Commentator: John Currie, Henry Davis York

This seminar discusses the role of credit derivatives in the financial crisis. Credit derivatives (a very common type of derivative that in some aspects resembles an insurance contract) have come under heavy criticism. They are alleged to have contributed to the severity of the credit crunch because of their lack of transparency and because they facilitated the shorting of credit. Is this criticism justified, and is strict regulation the answer? Or are credit derivatives simply a scapegoat? What have credit derivatives done for our country?

JJ de Vries Robbé has been active in structured finance in private practice and as in-house counsel, both in Europe and in Australia. His practice comprises debt capital markets, derivatives and structured finance generally, with a particular interest in credit derivatives and microfinance. He has published various books on securitisation and derivatives, and contributed to domestic and international legal journals. He has lectured at the universities of Amsterdam, Melbourne and Sydney. His most recent book is Securitization Law and Practice in the Face of the Credit Crunch (International Banking & Finance Law Series), Kluwer Law International, 2008.

Pleasesee the website below for more information on registration.

Does Neighbourhood Matter in the Development of Low-Income, Minority Children?   View Summary
19 March 2009

Does Neighbourhood Matter in the Development of Low-Income, Minority Children? New Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Denver.
George Galster
Prof Galster's presentation will report on research which aimed to quantify how a variety of outcomes (health, education, employment, behavioral and demographic) for low-income, black and Latino children residing in Denver public housing for a substantial period are statistically related to various conditions in the neighborhoods in which they were raised.

Because the initial allocation of households on the Denver Housing Authority waiting list to units throughout the City and County of Denver mimics a random assignment to a wide range of neighborhood environments, this program represents a natural experiment for overcoming parental selection bias in estimating neighborhood effects.

The findings inform a longstanding debate about the aims and consequences of affordable housing policy for increasing opportunities for self-sufficiency through the location of subsidized households in places that enhance positive developmental impacts on low-income children.

2009 International Exchange Fair   View Summary
19 March 2009

A unique opportunity to meet representatives from our world-wide network of partner universities. Programs for undergraduate & postgraduate students are available at over 220 partner universities in 30 countries. Courses in English & other languages. Scholarships & loans available. Come find out how you can apply & prepare for the experience of a lifetime!

2009 International Exchange Fair   View Summary
19 March 2009

A unique opportunity to meet representatives from our world-wide network of partner universities. Programs for undergraduate & postgraduate students are available at over 220 partner universities in 30 countries. Courses in English & other languages. Scholarships & loans available. Come find out how you can apply & prepare for the experience of a lifetime!

In the wake of the Beagle - Science in the southern oceans from the age of Darwin   View Summary
20 March 2009 to 21 March 2009

Headed by Professor Iain McCalman, In the wake of the Beagle is a major symposium in conjunction with the Australian National Maritime Museum's exhibition Charles Darwin - Voyages and ideas that shook the world. Internationally acclaimed speakers provide new insights into the world of collecting, surveying and cross-cultural exchange in the antipodes in the age of Darwin and take a modern look at Darwin and his contemporaries' influence on today's cutting-edge scientific research.

The Past, Present and Future of Reality Television   View Summary
20 March 2009

David Lyle is President of Fox Reality Channel and a globally-renowned, reality television expert, whose career spans 25 years across more than 20 countries. David's talk will be an overview of the last ten years of international TV. As well as looking at the history, the genres and some of the extremes of 'reality TV', he will reflect on the changing economics in television and its necessary dependence on reality for the foreseeable future. The talk is part of Media at Sydney, a series of seminars and public talks presenting the best of contemporary media and communications research, thinking and perspectives.

Please also see this website: http://www.usyd.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/2009/reporting_environment.shtml

Artists in the Library   View Summary
20 March 2009 to 30 April 2009

This exhibition showcases the creativity of some of the artists and photographers working in the Library.

Carillon performance: Classical Fantasies   View Summary
22 March 2009

In conjunction with the Nicholosn Museum exhibition Classical Fantasies, join us for a carillon program of themed-music.

Resort Nadir: Irene Hanenbergh (exhibition)   View Summary
22 March 2009 to 10 May 2009

Netherlands born, Melbourne based artist Irene Hanenbergh's work consists of painting, printmaking, (Zundprints on aluminium) and drawing. The stylistic form of her work relates to the origins of marginalised fantastic and visionary painting, outsider and subcultural folk art.

By using marginalised forms merged with contemporary techniques, she creates work that slips between 'low' and 'high' culture. In this exhibition Hanenbergh will show recent drawings and Zundprints drawing on the supernatural, landscape and mysterious realms.

Organ Recital and Mini-lecture on the Great Hall Windows   View Summary
22 March 2009

A Touch of Glass:

University Organist Amy Johansen opens the 2009 Organ Recital series with music by Mendelssohn, Bach, Mulet, Widor and Glass. A mini-lecture on the stained glass windows in the Great Hall by Robijn Alexanda will precede the recital at 3:10pm.

The disorder of things: Darwin and controversies over classification   View Summary
23 March 2009

Public Lecture by Dr Jim Endersby (University of Sussex)

During the early 19th Century, there were bitter disputes among experts about the right system that should be used to classify living things. These disagreements were vital evidence for Darwin's theory of evolution, and in 'On the Origin of Species', he suggested that evolution would help to end them.

See also http://www.usyd.edu.au/museums

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor John Tiley CBE LLD FBA, University of Cambridge   View Summary
23 March 2009

Tax Seminar Series - CGT Reform: Policy and Rhetoric

Professor JohnTiley CBE LLD FBA

Emeritus Professor of the Law of Taxation and Deputy Director of the Centre for Tax Law, University of Cambridge

John Tiley is Professor of Tax Law and a Fellow of Queens' College in the University of Cambridge, where he has taught tax law since 1967. He has been Director of the Law Faculty's LLM program on several occasions and is currently Director of the Centre for Tax Law. He was made a CBE for services to tax law in 2003, and is the author of the leading UK academic work on tax law - Revenue Law (5th ed 2005 Hart Publishing, Oxford). He is a founding member of the European Association of Tax Law Professors, is Deputy Chair of the Academic Committee, and served as a part-time judge from 1983 to 1997. Professor Tiley has a keen interest in the tax systems of other countries and has been a visiting professor in many countries.

Click herefor the seminar brochure.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.

International collaborative health research: making partnerships a reality   View Summary
24 March 2009

This seminar will comprise a panel of international health researchers who will share their experiences on setting up, conducting, managing and funding research projects across countries. This interactive seminar will feature Australian and international experts and will provide attendees with opportunities to learn from researchers who have worked in Europe, Russia, the Middle East, the Asia Pacific region and elsewhere.

RSVP is required.

Annual Careers Fair. Your Career. Get Connected.   View Summary
24 March 2009

Aimed at all current students, this gala event brings recruiters from all fields to the Quadrangle to talk with students about public and private sector employment opportunities.

Transformational Change: where has it happened and what made it possible?   View Summary
24 March 2009

This seminar is being given by Professor Steven Lewis of the University of Calgary (Health Policy). Visit http://www.health.usyd.edu.au/news/sph_seminar_series.php for a complete abstract of the presentation

Guangzhou 2010 Asian Games - More Than Sport!   View Summary
25 March 2009

The Guangzhou 2010 Asian Games will see 12,000 athletes from 45 nations compete in 42 sports. Billions has already been spent on massive infrastructure investment in preparation for the event. This follows hot on the heels of the successful Beijing Olympic Games and reflects China's increasing interest in hosting major international events.

Dr Liu Jiangnan, Executive Director of Guangzhou Municipal Sports Bureau and Deputy Secretary General of the Asian Games, will provide insights into the event itself and the broader role it will play for Guangzhou, Guangdong Province and China more generally. The Australian companies will gain an insight into the delivery model and timelines for the 2010 Asian Games and to meet a key influencer within the organising committee.

RhiZomic Poetry   View Summary
25 March 2009

John Bennett winner of 2008 Harold David Tribe award reads this month. Hear amongst others the winning poem 'Kitchen Music' then over to open mic.
Come listen and read your own poetry to a supportive audience.

SU Arts Association Welcome 2009   View Summary
26 March 2009

Summary: Everyone is invited to the SU Arts Association's 2009 Welcome reception, at which the Dean of Arts, Professor Stephen Garton, will give a talk on the achievements of the Faculty and the challenges that it faces.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Peter Garling SC   View Summary
26 March 2009

HGLE Oration 2009: Sharing Caring in a Time of Budget Insufficiency - Is There an Ethical Reform Paradigm?

Peter Garling SC

Commissioner, Special Commission of Inquiry into Acute Care Services in NSW Public Hospitals

Peter Garling SC is a graduate of the University of Sydney with degrees in Arts and Law. He was admitted to the Bar of the Supreme Court of NSW in 1979, and in 1990 was appointed as a part-time Acting Judge of the District Court of NSW for a period of two years. He was appointed a senior counsel in 1994.

Mr Garling regularly appears in Courts throughout Australia including Norfolk Island in a wide range of civil and criminal cases. He has also been involved in a wide range of public inquiries including, recently, those relating to the Thredbo landslide, the Glenbrook and Waterfall Railway accidents, the collapse of the HIH Insurance Company and the affairs of the Medical Research and Compensation Foundation. At present, he is the Commissioner conducting the Special Commission of Inquiry into Acute Care Services in NSW Public Hospitals.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.

Disciplines of Inquiry - Methodology Colloquia 09   View Summary
26 March 2009

The Research Division, Faculty of Education and Social Work invites you to participate in the launch of a colloquia series on new approaches to research and interdisciplinarity across the education and social work domains.

The detailsfor thisweek'sproceedings are to be released shortly - please check this website for updates.

Public Lecture: David Elliott   View Summary
26 March 2009

Artistic Director of the 17th Biennale of Sydney speaks on contemporary art

The inaugural opening of the Callan Park Gallery Event   View Summary
26 March 2009

The inaugural opening of the Callan Park Gallery, José dos Santos, will be held at Sydney College of the Arts on Thursday 26 March, 6 to 8pm.

In mid-2008, a unique Self-Taught & Outsider Art Research Collection (STOARC) came into being with the acquisition of a highly significant collection of work by Portuguese self-taught artist, José dos Santos (1904-96), thanks to the philanthropy of Sydney curator and collector Peter Fay. The work was assembled by Rogelio Vallejo and Hugh Adams from the artist and his heirs.

A new homeostatic mechanism in soil?   View Summary
26 March 2009

Prof. John Crawford, Judith and David Coffey Chair in Sustainable Agriculture, will present a seminar ona new homeostatic mechanism in soil?

Exhibition of Leonardo da Vinci's Codex Atlanticus   View Summary
26 March 2009 to 30 April 2009

Leonardo da Vinci's Codex Atlanticus is a collection of notes, jottings, designs, engineering projects and draughts, mostly of machines, ballistic devices, and geometrical analyses, spanning the years 1478 to 1519. The codex, compiled originally in the late 16th century, was later partially dispersed, and gathered together again in the 1960s, and in this current form is held at the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan, although many of the original manuscripts are still held in various collections throughout the world.

This exhibition comprises illustrations from a limited edition facsimile of the codex which was published in 12 volumes by Giunti-Barbera, Firenze in 1973. It was acquired by Fisher Library in 1974 and is held in Rare Books and Special Collections (RB 5473.1 Folio).

Windeyer Exhibition   View Summary
26 March 2009 to 30 April 2009

An exhibition of some of the items from the legal collection of W.J.V.Windeyer, a notable graduate of the University and author of several well known legal texts. The collection was recently presented to the University by the members of his family.

In Praise of Process - Exhibition Launch   View Summary
27 March 2009

The Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Alumni Association is proud to present a showcase of work by notable Alumni over the last 50 years. See how architecture as a medium has evolved from the fifties to the 21st century.

The often invisible modes of production and processes, or perhaps the specific activity which resides somewhere between the mind of thedesigner and his/her hand, is the focus of an exhibition to be held at the Tin Sheds Gallery, University of Sydney from March 27 to April 18, 2009.

Entitled In Praise of Process, the exhibition seeks not to posit one specific mode of process over another, nor argue their respective advantages and draw-backs, but celebrate artefacts which contain evidence of the thought that resides the mind of the author.

The individuals exhibiting in this show are alumni of the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning at the University of Sydney. Theyparticipate in vocational activities which are wide and varied such that the work exhibited is that of artists, technicians, architects, planners and writers.

Exhibitors include:
Andrew Andersons AO
Paul Berkemeier
Bricks and Cartwheels
Philip Cox AO
Richard Francis Jones
Brian Griffin
Peter Hall
Robert Hughes
Chris Johnson
Genevieve Lilley
Rachel Neeson and Nick Murcutt
Peter Poulet
Emanuel Raft
Gerard Reinmuth
Garry Rothwell
Penelope Seidler AM
Michael Pomeroy Smith
Philip Thalis
Dr Ross Thorne
Hannah Tribe
Marcus Trimble
Alec Tzannes
Peter Webber
Ken Woolley AM

In Praise of Process - Exhibition Launch   View Summary
27 March 2009

The Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Alumni Association is proud to present a showcase of work by notable Alumni over the last 50 years. See how architecture as a medium has evolved from the fifties to the 21st century.

The often invisible modes of production and processes, or perhaps the specific activity which resides somewhere between the mind of thedesigner and his/her hand, is the focus of an exhibition to be held at the Tin Sheds Gallery, University of Sydney from March 27 to April 18, 2009.

Entitled: 'In Praise of Process', the exhibition seeks not to posit one specific mode of process over another, nor argue their respective advantages and draw-backs, but celebrate artefacts which contain evidence of the thought that resides the mind of the author.

The individuals exhibiting in this show are alumni of the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning at the University of Sydney. They participate in vocational activities which are wide and varied such that the work exhibited is that of artists, technicians, architects, planners and writers.

Exhibitors include:
Andrew Andersons AO
Paul Berkemeier
Bricks and Cartwheels
Philip Cox AO
Richard Francis Jones
Brian Griffin
Peter Hall
Robert Hughes
Chris Johnson
Genevieve Lilley
Rachel Neeson and Nick Murcutt
Peter Poulet
Emanuel Raft
Gerard Reinmuth
Garry Rothwell
Penelope Seidler AM
Michael Pomeroy Smith
Philip Thalis
Dr Ross Thorne
Hannah Tribe
Marcus Trimble
Alec Tzannes

The Con Open Day   View Summary
29 March 2009

Sydney Conservatorium of Music opens its doors for a unique day of entertainment, tours, talks, masterclasses, musical performance and much more.

Lady Black Memorial   View Summary
30 March 2009

Alumni, friends, donors and staff are invited to attend the memorial service for Lady Black to honour her life.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Yoshihiro Masui, University of Tokyo   View Summary
31 March 2009

Tax Seminar Series - Japanese International Tax Reform

Professor Yoshihiro Masui

University of Tokyo

Yoshihiro Masui is a Professor of Law at the University of Tokyo, where he teaches taxation. He is a member of the steering committee of the Japanese Society for Tax Law and a member of the Permanent Scientific Committee of the International Fiscal Association. His monograph Taxation of Corporate Groups won the Institute of Tax Research and Literature Award.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.

Setting the New Planning Agenda   View Summary
31 March 2009

Resilient Cities: Responding to Peak Oil and Climate Change

Half of the worlds inhabitants now live in cities. In the next 20 years, the number of urban dwellers will swell to an estimated five billion people. With inefficient transportation systems and poorly designed buildings, many cities consume enormous quantities of fossil fuels and emit high levels of greenhouse gases. But our planet is rapidly running out of carbon based fuels that have powered urban growth for centuries and we seem unable to curb our greenhouse gas emissions.

Are the world's cities headed for inevitable collapse?

Green Urbanism Down Under: Learning from sustainable communities in Australia

Australia's per capita greenhouse gas emissions are second only to those of the U.S.A. A similar percentage of residents live in cities (85% in Australia) and it suffers from parallel problems of air and water pollutions, a national reliance on automobiles and high fossil fuel consumption. Still Timothy Beatley finds there are a myriad of creative responses to these problems.

Green Urbanism Down Under reports on th current state of "sustainability practice" in Australia, and the many lessons people can learn from the best Australian programs and initiatives.

Peter Newman, Professor of Sustainability at Curtin University

Timothy Beatley, Teresa Heinz Professor of SustainableCommunities at the University of Virginia.

This event is a must for all urban planners and designers, social researchers, housing industry professionals and anyone interested in developing sustainable futures for urban areas. Come armed with questions for discussion during an extended Q&A session following the talk.

The creativity discourse in China: four perspectives on social transformation   View Summary
31 March 2009

Associate Professor Michael Keane is a Centre Fellow at the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation (CCI) at Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane. He will be discussing the uptake of the creative industries in China and will ask: can they really change China, or are they just rearranging the cultural landscape in some cities? This event is free and no RSVP is required. Please forward this invitation onto your contacts and lists. The talk is part of the Media At Sydney series of seminars and public talks presenting the best of contemporary media and communications research, thinking and perspectives.

April
It's only natural: ecology in Australia   View Summary
25 November 2008 to 30 April 2009

Inspired by illustrations of creatures from new worlds, natural history texts have fired imaginations for hundreds of years.
The exhibition 'It's only natural' uses the University of Sydney's Rare Books and Special Collections to track the emergence of ecology as a scientific discipline from its foundations in natural history.

Accidental Encounters (Macleay exhibition)    View Summary
19 December 2008 to 24 May 2009

This exhibition examines science, life and culture in Australia through the letters of Henrietta Heathorn and her fiance, Thomas Huxley. This exhibition commemorates the 150th anniversary of the publication of Charles Darwin's On The Origin of Species.

Nicholson: Man and Museum (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 December 2009

A colourful exploration of some of the unearthed tales behind the extraordinary life of Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum, and the first vice-chancellor and second chancellor of the University of Sydney. Find out about Nicholson and mummies, spiritualism, trips up the Volga, grand houses, a much younger wife, retirement to England aged 53, and the loss of his house and life's work aged 90. True melodrama.

A Small History of Microscopy   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 August 2009

Confused by the difference between compound and simple microscopes? This small display on historic microscopy and slides will bring you into this tiny but fascinating world.

Shattered Glass: Illuminating the Past   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 26 April 2009

This exhibition features 40 glass objects from the Nicholson Museum's colelction. It exoplores the discovery, working methods and use of glass through the ages, uncovering legends and highlighting archaeological discoveries.

Footprints in a Mythic Landscape: A Bark Painting Story (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 April 2009

A selection of Aboriginal bark paintings from the Macleay Museum's collection, focusing on Yolngu depictions of ancestral footprints across the landscape of eastern Arnhem Land.

Futurescape   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 24 May 2009

'Far into the future the world's climate has radically changed. Human beings have adapted and survived to live in a simpler way. Zoologists travel to remote uninhabited lands observing the evolution of species.'

This was the brief for six intrepid student artists from Enmore Tafe, whose models and drawings for future species will be on exhibition to commemorate Darwin's ideas.

WS Macleay and the natural history circle   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 1 December 2009

William Sharp Macleay's natural history Horae Entomologicae (1819 - 21) sought God's order in nature through a system of organisation based on the affinities and analogies between organisms. This quinarian system, as it was known, was read and considered by London's young and radical naturalists in the 1820's and the 1830's, among them the promising scholar Charles Darwin.

Classical Fantasies: The age of beauty from Naples to Capri (exhibition)   View Summary
25 February 2009 to 1 July 2009

The 19th Century saw the blossoming of the 'Classical Ideal'. The Mediterranean, especially Italy, provided inspiration for an army of classicists, archaeologists, writers, poets, artists and early photographers. At the heart of this was the idea of the beauty and purity of the Classical past. The exhibition will explore this fantasy as well as look at how the morals of the past were used to explain and justify the morals of the time.

The Beauty Queen of Leenane   View Summary
18 March 2009 to 4 April 2009

Writen by Martin McDonagh
Directed by Maeliosa Stafford

In the remote Irish village of Leenane rain is as common as Catholics and the most exciting pasttime is watching cows pass by. Lonely spinster, Maureen, is trapped taking care of her elderly, cantankerous mother, Mag. When Maureen finally discovers romance, things get horribly out of hand.

This modern classic is full of clever twists, bitter tragedy and scathing black comedy leading up to its stunning conclusion.

Martin McDonagh's Tony Award-winning black comedy unleashes all the dark humor and rich language for which he has been internationally praised.

"This little gem of a production is an auspicious debut...the kind of taut theatre we would all love to see more often" The Daily Telegraph

Artists in the Library   View Summary
20 March 2009 to 30 April 2009

This exhibition showcases the creativity of some of the artists and photographers working in the Library.

Resort Nadir: Irene Hanenbergh (exhibition)   View Summary
22 March 2009 to 10 May 2009

Netherlands born, Melbourne based artist Irene Hanenbergh's work consists of painting, printmaking, (Zundprints on aluminium) and drawing. The stylistic form of her work relates to the origins of marginalised fantastic and visionary painting, outsider and subcultural folk art.

By using marginalised forms merged with contemporary techniques, she creates work that slips between 'low' and 'high' culture. In this exhibition Hanenbergh will show recent drawings and Zundprints drawing on the supernatural, landscape and mysterious realms.

Exhibition of Leonardo da Vinci's Codex Atlanticus   View Summary
26 March 2009 to 30 April 2009

Leonardo da Vinci's Codex Atlanticus is a collection of notes, jottings, designs, engineering projects and draughts, mostly of machines, ballistic devices, and geometrical analyses, spanning the years 1478 to 1519. The codex, compiled originally in the late 16th century, was later partially dispersed, and gathered together again in the 1960s, and in this current form is held at the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan, although many of the original manuscripts are still held in various collections throughout the world.

This exhibition comprises illustrations from a limited edition facsimile of the codex which was published in 12 volumes by Giunti-Barbera, Firenze in 1973. It was acquired by Fisher Library in 1974 and is held in Rare Books and Special Collections (RB 5473.1 Folio).

Windeyer Exhibition   View Summary
26 March 2009 to 30 April 2009

An exhibition of some of the items from the legal collection of W.J.V.Windeyer, a notable graduate of the University and author of several well known legal texts. The collection was recently presented to the University by the members of his family.

Sydney Uni Monthly Markets   View Summary
1 April 2009

Have a browse, grab something to eat or snatch up a bargain at the Sydney Uni Monthly Markets.

Asia Pacific Symposium on Entrepreneurship & Innovation   View Summary
1 April 2009 to 3 April 2009

From the 1st - 3rd of April 2009, The University of Sydney will present its first Asia Pacific Symposium on Entrepreneurship & Innovation. The theme of the inaugural Symposium is "New Thinking & Practice".

The Symposium will involve academia, industry and policymakers, in bringing together theory and practice on entrepreneurship and innovation. Particular emphasis is placed on international dimensions within the Asia Pacific region.

The Symposium is a joint initiative of the International Entrepreneurship Research Group in the Faculty of Economics and Business and the United States Studies Centre.

For more information please visit our website.

Location: The University of Sydney - The main Symposium presentations and discussions will be held at The Refectory, The MacCallum-Cullen and Holme-Sutherland rooms of the the Holme Building.

Seminar Series: Employment Relations & the Law 2009 - Week One   View Summary
1 April 2009 to 3 June 2009

Sydney Law School and the Faculty of Economics and Business jointly offer this popular seminar series (previously known as Industrial Relations and the Law). The series aims to give a thorough background on employment relations law in Australia, and to discuss the proposed new Fair Work Bill 2008, introduced to Parliament in November last year. The seminars are presented by a range of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including Professor Ron McCallum, Professor Russell Lansbury and Professor Joellen Riley.

Week 1: Introduction to the Series

Week 2: Common Lawand Industrial Relations

Week 3: Employment Contracts

Week 4: Termination of Employment

Week 5: Collective Bargaining and the New Fair Employment Laws

Week 6: Discrimination in Employment

Week 7: Occupational Healthand Safety

Week 8: Unionsand Employers

Week 9: Key Developments in Workplace Law in 2009

Week 10: Future Issues

Workplace Research Centre: Managing in Non-Union and Unionised Workplaces (Masterclass Workshop)   View Summary
1 April 2009

The Workplace Research Centre, with Australian Business Lawyers and other invited experts, is pleased to present its new Masterclass workshops. These unique sessions aim to provide you with a professional networking environment in which to analyse and benchmark key issues in your own workplace. Participants will have the opportunity to hear about the legal, research, policy, strategy and implementation aspects of each issue. Workshops are led by experienced facilitators who will introduce real business case studies, as well as promote reflection and discussion about live operational issues.

Managers from all areas with employee relations responsibilities, also HR and other practitioners with experience are especially welcome to register for these half-day sessions. To maintain learning quality, numbers attending each open workshop must unfortunately be limited.

Zero-adjusted and random sum models: mean and dispersion modelling    View Summary
2 April 2009

Seminar series, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

A/Prof Gillian Heller from the Statistics Department at Macquarie University will present a seminar with the title: Zero-adjusted and random sum models: mean and dispersion modelling.

Climate Change @ Work: Creating the Sustainable Workplace   View Summary
3 April 2009

The Workplace Research Centre (WRC) at the University of Sydney, is organising the 2nd Climate Change @ Work conference to be held on Friday the 3rd of April 2009 at the Hilton Sydney. The theme of this conference is: Creating the Sustainable Workplace and it focuses on the impact of sustainability on the internal workplace environment as well the external/carbon emissions aspect of this imperative issue. The WRC Climate Change @ Work conference will address how more sustainable approaches to energy and resource efficiency is changing operations, jobs, human resource management, workplace relations and skill formation.

We already have a range of high profile speakers lined up for Climate Change @ Work 2009 including, Amanda Keogh (Environment and Sustainability Manager, Fuji Xerox), Ken Hickson (Director, ABC Carbon), Heinz Schandl (CSIRO, Sustainable Ecosystems), Caroline Alcorso (Department of Education and Training), Andrew Petersen (Partner, PWC), and Duncan Campbell (Director, Employment Strategy, International Labour Office, Geneva).

Price: $695 incl GST. Early Bird Price $600 incl GST Available until 27th Feb. Academic/Student price $200 also available.

For every booking that is made a tree will be planted in NSW. Your step to helping offset carbon emissions in the workplace!

Do we simply accept the Australian Internet filtering scheme or do we need to ask hard questions?   View Summary
3 April 2009

Basser Seminar Series

The Australian government is currently planning to introduce mandatory Internet content filtering. The move would clearly set Australia aside from all other democratic nations in the world. The initial purpose of this scheme was to protect Australian children from accessing unsuitable material such as child pornography.

Even though there is widespread consensus in society that such material is undesirable and potentially harmful, the issue of filtering is extremely complicated and it is far from evident that the proposed scheme will achieve its goal. In addition, over the past few months evidence has been presented indicating that the side effects of such filtering could have severe negative impact on society.

Associate Professor Bjorn Landfeldt was part of a team that studied the feasibility of implementation of Internet filtering at the ISPs. The report was commissioned by the Howard government and handed to the current minister in charge of this issue, Senator Stephen Conroy.

In this talk, Professor Landfeldt will detail some of the major difficulties associated with ISP level content filtering, some of the possible side effects and discuss why such filtering may not be effective. He will also give examples of the many difficult moral questions such filtering inevitably raises and demonstrate the need for a comprehensive public debate an the issue before legislation and implementation takes place.

Department of Classics Study Day - Crossing the Rubicon: civil war among the Romans   View Summary
4 April 2009

What led the Romans of the last century of the Republic to "an orgy of self-destruction" that violently changed the course of Rome's history? In this study day we interrogate the great figures of the era who fought -and wrote - including figures suh as Ceaser, Cicero and Pompey. We shall follow their fortunes and trace with Lucan the lasting impact of this conflict into the Empire.

Featuring Dr. Kathryn Welch, Associate Professor WJ Tatum, Dr Paul Roche and others.

"Who Built the Pyramids?", a talk by Dr Sophie Winlaw   View Summary
5 April 2009

Afree lecture on recent excavations in the area the Great Pyramids of Giza.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Sir Kenneth Keith ONZ KBE QC   View Summary
7 April 2009

Judging in the International Court of Justice and Other National and International Courts and Tribunals

Sir Kenneth Keith ONZ KBE QC

Judge of the International Court of Justice

Sir Kenneth Keith has been a judge of the International Court of Justice since 2006. He was appointed Barrister and Solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand (1961) and Queen's Counsel (1994), and was a judge of the New Zealand Court of Appeal and Supreme Court (1996-2006). Sir Keith was also a judge of appeal in Samoa, the Cook Islands, Niue and Fiji; a member of arbitration tribunals; a law commissioner in New Zealand; and a member of the legal offices of the United Nations and the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He was also a law faculty member at the Victoria University of Wellington for almost thirty years, including five years as Dean, and is now a Professor Emeretus.

In 1988, Sir Keith was awarded the title of Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire for services to legal education and law reform.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.

Sydney Ideas lecture on Did the Buddha invent Asia?   View Summary
7 April 2009

Sydney Ideas lecture by Peter Skilling, Ecole francaise École française d'Extrême-Orient (Bangkok and Paris) and 2009 University Buddhist Education Foundation Visiting Professor, School of Languages and Cultures, University of Sydney

The Buddha was born in a small kingdom in the foothills of the Himalayas over two thousand years ago. Within five hundred years of his death, his teaching has spread far beyond the confines of India, and were beginning to find a foothold in China and the Far East. At its height Buddhism flourished across much of Asia. Buddhist monks and nuns established networks of intellectual exchange that for centuries linked Asian societies, inspiring literature and philosophy, art and architecture, and social and ritual practice and affecting conceptions of time, cosmology, and governance.

How did the teaching of one man influence Asia so profoundly? What was the role of Buddhism in the geography of ideas in the pre-modern period? What were the unifying principles or ideologies that brought distant cultures into close relation? The fascinating diversity of Buddhism and its dynamic cultural transformations lead us to examine the role played by Buddhism in the construction and imagination of an interactive trans-regionalism. Was Buddhism in Asia the vanguard of globalisation?

Sydney Science Forum: Out of Sight - The Science of Invisibility   View Summary
8 April 2009

This event is now fully booked.

Invisibility has always been the stuff of science fiction - until now. Thanks to physics, researchers are a step closer to perfecting a real invisibility cloak, capable of hiding people and objects from plain view. But what secret ingredients do scientists need in order to make this fantasy a reality?

Find out at the Sydney Science Forum, where you will disappear into the exciting world of optical science and metamaterials with internationally renowned physicist, Professor Sir John Pendry of Imperial College, London. Sir John and his team rocked the science world with their prototype invisibility cloak, and now you have the chance to learn all about the amazing materials they are creating to bend light and make objects disappear.

With science, anything is possible - come along and see invisibility for yourself!

In 2008, Professor Pendry's distinguished career as a scientist was celebrated at PendryFest, a UK event which paid homage to the extraordinary depth and breadth of Prof Pendry's contribution to physics over the past 40 years.

Free Lunchtime Tour of University Art Gallery   View Summary
8 April 2009

Join us for a guided tour of the University Art Gallery and its current exhibition. Lunch for the mind and the soul.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Conor Gearty, London School of Economics   View Summary
8 April 2009

An Australian Bill of Rights? Learning from the British Experience

Professor Conor Gearty

Professor of Human Rights Law and Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights, London School of Economics

Conor Gearty is Professor of Human Rights Law and Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights at the London School of Economics. He is a founding member of the barristers' chambers Matrix, from where he practices law, specialising in public law and human rights. He has appeared in the High Court, the Court of Appeal and the House of Lords.

Professor Gearty's scholarship is mainly in the fields of human rights, terrorism and civil liberties. His most recent work focuses on the dilemma that terrorism poses to civil liberties. During the 1990s, Professor Gearty advised Tony Blair on terrorism law, and was also an executive committee member of the British-Irish Association, involved in facilitating informal discussions between the various parties and members of civil society in Northern Ireland.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.

Forthcoming historic event   View Summary
8 April 2009

PRESS RELEASE: Forthcoming historic event

Emeritus Professor Dame Leonie Kramer, Professor of Australian Literature (1968- 1990) and Chancellor of the University (1991-2001), will receive an Honorary Doctorate of Letters at the University of Sydney graduation ceremony on Wednesday 8 April.

To celebrate this special occasion the English department, which Dame Leonie served for so many years with great distinction, will host an afternoon tea in her honour.

All four Professors of Australian Literature (Professor G.A. Wilkes, Professor Kramer, Professor Elizabeth Webby, and Professor Robert Dixon) will be together at this event and Professor Dixon, the current professor, will give a short address as a tribute to Dame Leonie. Family members, current and past members of staff and postgraduate students will also attend.

The afternoon tea would commence at 3.30 pm in the Woolley Common Room, John Woolley Building.

Planning in New South Wales: Responding to the Global Economic Crisis   View Summary
8 April 2009

Sunset Seminar Series - 2009

As the global economic crisis begins to take effect in NSW, a key question on the minds of developers, planners and policy makers is what impact this will have on urban and regional development and planning policy.

The Minister for Planning, the Hon. Kristina Keneally, will present an informative, no-nonsense, discussion on the State's responses, including Part 3A reforms to the planning and assessing regime and the short and long-term impacts this will have in speeding up of approval processes and in stimulating economic activity in NSW.

About the Sunset Seminar Series

The Planning Research Centre's Sunset Seminars offer a platform for informed dialogue between politicians and planners, developers, urban designers and other related industry professionals on the key issues facing urban and regional planning in NSW and Australia.

Who is this event for? Planning, Development & Housing Industry professionals and students; Economists; Public Policy specialists; Media

John M. Ward Memorial Lecture   View Summary
8 April 2009

The 2009 John M. Ward Memorial Lecture will be delivered by Jack Greene, Andrew W. Mellon Emeritus Professor, John Hopkins University.

The Lecture is called 'Exclusionary Empire: The Spread of
British Liberty Overseas 1600-1900'.

As early of the middle ages, English people celebrated themselves as a people devoted to liberty, and from the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries, metropolitan and colonial Britons throughout the settler empire took pride in the belief that they were creating a free empire wherever British settlers went in large numbers. Examining the operation and policies of the principal settler polities within the empire, this stresses the extent to which Britain's free settler empire was also a highly exclusionary one. Jack Greene ranks among the foremost historians of early America and has produced numerous monographs and many important articles on the problem of colonial governance and comparative colonial history.

Painting Grounds:Rethinking Early Papunya Boards   View Summary
8 April 2009

Prof Roger Benjamin, will discuss the history & theories behind 'Icons of the Desert' a landmark exhibition of Aboriginal Art. Noted Aboriginal Art Curator, Djon Mundine, will launch the exhibition catalogue.

Shaun Gladwell | Eva Koch | Sahar Hosseinabadi   View Summary
8 April 2009

During April, SCA graduate Shaun Gladwell, Danish artist Eva Koch and Master of Visual Arts candidate Sahar Hosseinabadi will present a series of video installations in the SCA Galleries. The exhibitions will open on Wednesday 8 April, 6:00pm to 8:00pm.

Tangara (2003) - Video installation by Shaun Gladwell.
Headwind - Digital video installations by Eva Koch H2O's Carrier Presents Blind Knotted - Mixed media and video installations by Sahar Hosseinabadi

Tangara (2003), Headwind and H2O's Carrier Presents Blind Knotted will be on display at Sydney College of the Arts from Thursday 9 April to Sunday 3 May 2009.
Gallery hours: Wednesday to Friday, 11:00am to 5:00pm.
Saturday to Sunday, 11:00am to 4:00pm.
Closed Good Friday, Easter Saturday and Sunday.

Microbial biofilms as biofertilisers for field crops   View Summary
9 April 2009

Seminar series Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources: Professor Gamini Seneviratne from the Institute of Fundamental Studies in Sri Lanka will present a seminar with the title: Microbial biofilms as biofertilisers for field crops

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Yuval Shany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem   View Summary
15 April 2009

Israel's War in Gaza and International Law

Professor Yuval Shany

Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Professor Yuval Shany is the Hersch Lauterpacht Chair in International Law at the Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He also serves as the academic director of the Minerva Center for Human Rights at the Hebrew University and as a Director in the Project on International Courts and Tribunals.

Professor Shany has published a number of books and articles on international courts and tribunals, as well as on other international law issues such as international human rights and humanitarian law. He has taught in a number of law schools in Israel, and has been in recent years a research fellow in Harvard and Amsterdam University and a visiting professor at the Georgetown University Law Center and Michigan Law School.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

Degree in a Day   View Summary
15 April 2009

Year 11 students from across NSW and ACT are inivited to attend. These students will be given the oppurtunity to experience what university is really like. Take part in hands-on tutorials, presentations, demonstrations and practical sessions, plus speak to current students and tour the campus all in one day!

Degree in a Day   View Summary
16 April 2009

Year 11 students from across NSW and ACT are inivited to attend. These students will be given the oppurtunity to experience what university is really like. Take part in hands-on tutorials, presentations, demonstrations and practical sessions, plus speak to current students and tour the campus all in one day!

Breast Wishes   View Summary
16 April 2009 to 2 May 2009

Written by Merridy Eastman, Jonathan Gavin, Richard Glover, Wendy Harmer, Sheridan Jobbins, James Millar, Debra Oswald. Directed by Jason Langley.

A small musical about big issues.

Breast Wishes is a new Australian musical about love, loss, life and silicon; a witty and heart-warming journey of courage and determination through laughter to triumph.

Meet four women: sisters, mothers, daughters, cousins. Add a fumbling boyfriend, a well-meaning husband, a bra-fitter who’s seen it all, some showstopping numbers and a brilliant cast and you have a musical celebration of breasts and those who support them.

A sophisticated and hilarious glimpse of cleavage and beyond which promises to make your heart sing.

Proudly supporting the National Breast Cancer Foundation.

Tickets: Sat Evening: Premium (limited) $75, Adult $60,
All Other Performances: Premium (limited) $70, Adult $55, Concession (excl Fri Sat & Sun) $38, Senior/Industry (excl Fri Sat & Sun) $48

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Dr Jonathan Jackson, London School of Economics   View Summary
17 April 2009

Trust in Justice and the Legitimacy of the Criminal Justice System

Dr Jonathan Jackson

Methodology Institute and Manneheim Centre for Criminology, London School of Economics

Online Registration

To register for this event, pleaseclick here

Jonathan Jackson is Lecturer in Research Methodology in the Methodology Institute at the London School of Economics, and member of the Mannheim Centre for Criminology. He has held visiting appointments at the University of Oxford and New York University. Jonathan completed his doctoral and postdoctoral work in the Institute of Social Psychology at the London School of Economics.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

Degree in a Day   View Summary
17 April 2009

Year 11 students from across NSW and ACT are inivited to attend. These students will be given the oppurtunity to experience what university is really like. Take part in hands-on tutorials, presentations, demonstrations and practical sessions, plus speak to current students and tour the campus all in one day!

Carillon performance: Greek day   View Summary
19 April 2009

Celebrate Orthodox Easter Sunday with a program of Greek music performed on the University of Sydney's historic carillon.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Andrew Dickenson   View Summary
20 April 2009

The New European Private International Law of Obligations: Marvel or Monstrosity?

Online Registration

To register pleaseclick here

The European Community Regulations on the law applicable to contractual (Rome I) and non-contractual (Rome II) obligations, adopted in 2008 and 2007 respectively, have been described as a European conflicts revolution and as providing, with the Brussels I Regulation on jurisdiction and judgments, the foundations for a European Private International Law Code. Andrew Dickinson will outline the key provisions of the Regulations and address whether they can truly be described as revolutionary, whether theyare to be considered a "good thing", their likely effect on non-Member States (including Australia) and whether common law jurisdictions have anything to learn from the new European private international law of obligations and the processes leading to their adoption.

About the speaker

Andrew Dickinson is a solicitor advocate, consultant to Clifford Chance LLP and visiting fellow at the British Institute of International and Comparative Law. His main area of practice and research interest is private international law, but his practice involves other aspects of civil litigation, commercial and banking law and public international law.

Andrew was closely involved in the discussions leading to the adoption of theRome I and Rome II Regulations, and his commentary (The Rome II Regulation: The Law Applicable to Non-Contractual Obligations) is published by Oxford University Press.

Andrew is a member of the North Committee (the Ministry of Justice's advisory committee on private international law) and of the editorial board of the Journal of Private International Law.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.

Arts Postgraduate Information Evening   View Summary
21 April 2009

An opportunity to visit the Faculty of Arts and to find out about the wide range of postgraduate degree opportunities on offer.

Frank Hurley's Synchronised Lecture   View Summary
21 April 2009

Professor Robert Dixon, Professor of Australian Literature, will give his Inaugural Lecture on the topic: "Travelling Mass-Media Circus: Frank Hurley's Synchronised Lecture Entertainments".

he shows that Australian photographer and film-maker FrankHurley put on at the height of his fame in the 1910s and 1920s were performances exploiting a number of media: he called them 'synchronized lecture entertainments'. Typically, they involved a combination of photographic exhibition; newspaper and magazine coverage; the presence of a celebrity lecturer; silent cinema projection; painted tableaux and drop screens; live musical accompaniment; advertising posters, illustrated programs and themed theatre decorations; displays of historical or ethnographic artefacts; and finally radio broadcasts and mainstream book publication, all coordinated, syndicated and, in the industry jargon, 'tied-in' to achieve maximum publicity.

Poems Old and New: Les Murray and Judith Beveridge   View Summary
21 April 2009

This is the second year that Les Murray has held a poetry reading in Fisher Library since he was appointed as a visiting Professor to the University of Sydney in 2008. This year he will be joined by Judith Beveridge, poet, editor and teacher of poetry writing at the University of Sydney. It is wonderful to have two such fine poets contributing to the cultural life of the University.

Les Murray will read from his collection of poetry - something old and something new. Judith Beveridge will read from her forthcoming collection and also some of her older poems.

Lucy Lippard: Three Escape Attempts    View Summary
21 April 2009

Lippard will discuss three moments in which artists tried to escape or by-pass the artworld: Conceptualism, Feminism and what she calls the "collaborative" moment in the 1980s.

Institute of Criminology Book Launch   View Summary
21 April 2009

Professor Gillian Triggs, Dean of the Sydney Law School, invites you to join Professor Pat O'Malley and Dr Murray Lee to celebrate the launch of their recent publications.

Launched by: Professor Janet Chan, University of NSW.

RSVP: Tuesday 14 April

Online registration form
About the publications

The Currency of Justice: Fines and Damages in Consumer Societies

Pat O'Malley

The Currency of Justice investigates the nature and implications of the dominance of money - in the form of fines and damages - as the legal sanction par excellence of modern law.
Fear of Crime: Critical Voices in an Age of Anxiety

edited by Murray Lee and Stephen Farrall

The essays in Fear of Crime: Critical Voices in an Age of Anxiety challenge the ways in which 'experts', politicians, the public understand fears and anxieties about crime.

View invitation
Navigation and the interplanetary superhighway   View Summary
22 April 2009

Public Lecture: Fred Watson (Anglo-Australian Observatory)

Fred Watson brings the interplanetry superhighway to life, and illustrates how it is being used to navigate around every corner of the solar system, from Mercury to Pluto an beyond.

The lecture will take place in the Old Geology lecture theatre, followed by a reception in the Macleay Museum.

A Sydney Ideas lecture on Rewriting the Narrative of American History   View Summary
22 April 2009

Distinguished presidential scholar Annette Gordon-Reed puts American race relations in a historical context, with an emphasis on the third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson's, complicated relationship with African Americans. The man who doubted that blacks and whites could live together as equal citizens in the American nation wrote the document that blacks look to as the promise of their right to equal citizenship in the country, the Declaration of Independence. Obama, as have other blacks, has referred to this promise and invoked the founders on many occasions. Gordon-Reed will discuss his uses of history and talk about how having a black president and black first lady " and black children" in the White House may change the racial landscape in America and the ways in which it may not change the narrative.

Faculty of Economics & Business Postgraduate Information Evening   View Summary
22 April 2009

Talk with our leading academics and learning support staff for detailed advice on postgraduate study options.

Documentation, Dominance and the Photography of People in Native America   View Summary
22 April 2009

US anthropologist, Professor James Faris, will present a talk at Sydney College of the Arts on Wednesday 22 April, 1 to 2pm. Faris is the recipient of various grants and awards, including the Fulbright and Ford Foundation scholarships. He has taught at the University of Maryland, McGille University in Montreal, University of Connecticut and in the past, was a visiting professor at the University of Khartoum in Sudan.

Faris is being hosted by Casula Powerhouse and will present a talk titled: Documentation, Dominance and the Photography of People in Native America.

Rights to on's own image are governed by a myriad of peculiar laws, commonly different for every country. These, however, hardly ever serve indigenous people, and they remain fodder for the West's imperialist ocular consumption. This lecture traces some of these laws, their application to the photography of indigenous people and offers a critique of their use. Given these framing mechanisms, it will be argued the camera is not and can never be a simple technological device that offers a truthful visual record of a past moment in time.

IPOS Symposium: Faster Further Smarter   View Summary
23 April 2009

The IPOS Symposium - Faster, Further, Smarter - will provide national and international perspectives on photonics and optical science, providing context for the IPOS mission and opportunities. It will explain the impact this enabling technology will have on the technological pillars of our society (health, energy, environment, ICT, defence) and how it will allow us to understand our universe on the largest and smallest scales (astronomy to nanotechnology). It will also provide insights on photonics from a government and industry / economic perspective.

Public Lecture by Professor Sam Lieu: "The Original Gallipoli: Kallipolis (434? BC-AD 1453)   View Summary
23 April 2009

Few Australians are aware that the iconic name Gallipoli is derived from Kallipolis - an ancient Graeco-Roman city on the Dardanelles.

This lecture will look at the literary and archaeological evidence for a city that was to become a vital crossing-place between Asia and Europe in the Middle Ages, heavily contested by Byzantines, Catalan adventurers, Venetians and the Ottoman Turks.

The Gr8 Debate   View Summary
23 April 2009

RSVP to be part of the most controversial debate ever contested on campus! Special guests and speakers include Triple J's Steve Cannane, Adam Spencer and USU's own Pat Bateman. RSVP via the sydneytalent website.

Public diplomacy, media and the battle for global supremacy   View Summary
24 April 2009

The Media and Communications Department at University of Sydney invites you to join us on Friday 24 April, at 4pm, hear about some of the very latest thinking on the challenges of developing a global voice in an increasingly cluttered and fragmented media market.

Bruce Dover has been involved in media for over 30 years. An award winning foreign correspondent and 1986 Australian Journalist of the Year; Dover has been a senior executive with some of the world's largest print, broadcast and online media companies. He is also the author of Rupert Murdoch's China Adventures.

Prior to his 2007 appointment as Chief Executive of the Australia Network, the ABC's international television service to Asia and the Pacific, Bruce headed up News Corporation's Australian interactive operations from 1998 to 2001, edited The Australian and was Senior Vice President, News Corporation (China) reporting to Rupert Murdoch.

Dover will be discussing public diplomacy, media and the battle for global supremacy.

Media At Sydney is series of seminars and public talks presenting the best of contemporary media and communications research, thinking and perspectives.

We have the maps but can we follow the tracks? Our journey to being the healthiest country by 2020.   View Summary
28 April 2009

Please join us on Tuesday 28 April to hear a range of expert perspectives on what needs to be done to bring about the recommendations of the following reports:

  • Australia: the healthiest country by 2020, prepared by the National Preventative Health Taskforce
  • Closing the gap in a generation: Health equity through action on the social determinants of health, Final Report of the Commission on Social Determinants of Health, Geneva, World Health Organization.
Book Launch: Treason on the Airwaves   View Summary
28 April 2009

The School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry in the Faculty of Arts is delighted to host the launch of Judith Keene's book, Treason on the Airwaves:
Three Allied Broadcasters on
Axis Radio during World War II.
The book will be launched by
Richard Walsh, commentator & publisher and Professor Stephen Garton, Dean of Arts at University of Sydney.

Workplace Research Centre: Performance, Discipline & Terminations Management   View Summary
29 April 2009

Workplace Research Centre: Performance, Discipline & Terminations Management (Best Practice / Masterclass Workshops)

In order to complement your organisational policies and procedures, this session aims to bolster people in positions of responsibility lacking the ability to act with full confidence when faced with workplace disciplinary and performance issues. The need is especially acute where conduct or performance issues may lead to termination of employment (whether initiated by the employee or employer). Content includes unfair and unlawful terminations, ensuring substantive and procedural fairness and the impact of the new legislation.

The Masterclass 'session will provide an opportunity to analyse and benchmark key issues in your workplace. Learn from real business case studies and discuss live operational issues with leading experts.

RhiZomic poetry   View Summary
29 April 2009

Poetry Reading and open-mic
Featuring:Nicolette Stasko.
Nicolette has published five volumes of poetry; the latest being: Glass Cathedrals: New and Selected Poems.
Followed by the opportunity to read your own poetry.

Gene Therapy, Genetic Risk and Cancer   View Summary
29 April 2009

An introduction to gene therapy: successes and challenges by Dr Gerald W Both, President, Australasian Gene Therapy Society and Chief Scientific Officer, Biotech Equity Partners

The Sydney Law School Building Official Launch - By Invitation Only   View Summary
30 April 2009

The official opening of the new Sydney Law School Building will mark the historic move of the law faculty from Phillip St in the Sydney CBD to the heart of the University's Camperdown Campus.

The building itself is a state-of-the-art complex for research and teaching equipped with world class facilities, and it's location will bring law staff and students into a closer relationship with the broader academic community at Sydney.

On Thursday 30 April 2009, the Vice-Chancellor and Principal Dr Michael Spence and the Professor Gillian Triggs, Dean, faculty of Law, will host alumni, staff, students, friends and members of the legal community to share in this momentous occasion- an open day of music, tours, mock trials, a barbeque and lots of family friendly activities.

The open day is from 10am- 3pm and is open to all interested members of the community.

Sydney Law School Building Opening   View Summary
30 April 2009

On Thursday 30 April, staff and students of the Sydney Law School come together to publicly launch our brand new light-filled and elegant building on the University's Camperdown Campus.

From 10am-3pm, there will be events, activities and exhibitions happening throughout the building - all with a focus on showcasing the diversity of the law and its application in everyday life in an entertaining and thought-provoking way. There will be moots, debates, talk shows, hypotheticals, seminars and exhibitions, bringing to life contemporary legal issues.

The Forecourt Stage will play host to a Theatresports® demo, with law-themed improvised hilarity presented by University of Sydney students. Grab some lunch and a patch of lawn to check out triple j darlings and Sydney Uni Band Comp 2006 winners Cloud Control, as they bring their alt-folk pop-infused sounds to the stage.

Law Cinema will be in session, with screenings of two comedies that show the lighter side of the law, with Legally Blonde showing at 10.30am and The Castle, showing at 1.15pm.

There will be guided tours of the building, showbags, free food, and much more… so come along and be part of the new Law School building's history in the making.

Please click here to go to the Sydney Law School Building Opening website.

Workplace Research Centre: Contracts of Employment & Organisational Policies   View Summary
30 April 2009

Workplace Research Centre: Contracts of Employment & Organisational Policies (Best Practice Workshop)

The employment relationship is essentially contractual in nature and the rules regarding employment should be clear and complete. Both employer and the employee need to know where they stand. It makes good business, legal and industrial sense to set out in writing the employment relationship - and how this will be implemented. This session covers preparing and implementing effective employment contracts and policies in support of the organisation's vision and strategic objectives - in particular: fundamental terms; special conditions such as confidential information; the relationship with awards and agreements and the use of offset provisions; probationary clauses; organisational policies; termination.

Disciplines of Inquiry - Methodology Colloquia 09   View Summary
30 April 2009

The Research Division, Faculty of Education and Social Work invites you to participate in the launch of a colloquia series on new approaches to research and interdisciplinarity across the education and social work domains.

The detailsfor theweek'sproceedings are to be released shortly - please check this website for updates.

Pollock Memorial Lecture: The Universe from Beginning to End   View Summary
30 April 2009

Despite hundreds of years of dedicated scientific research, we only know what 4% of the Universe is made up of. In the last 15 years we have realised that there is another 96% of missing stuff that we just can't see. This missing stuff is made up of two mysterious substances, Dark Matter and Dark Energy, that are battling for domination of the Universe.In the Pollock Memorial Lecture, Professor Brian Schmidt of the Australian National University will describe exciting new experiments, including those using the SkyMapper telescope, that are monitoring the struggle between these two dark forms. The aim is to predict the ultimate fate of the Cosmos!

Professor Brian Schmidt is a Federation Fellow at The Australian National University's Mount Stromlo Observatory. While at Harvard University in 1994 he formed the High Z SN Search team, a group of 20 astronomers on five continents who used distant exploding stars to trace the expansion of the Universe back in time. This group's discovery of an accelerating Universe was named Science Magazine's Breakthrough of the Year for 1998. Brian is continuing his work using exploding stars to study the Universe, and is leading Mt Stromlo's effort to build the SkyMapper telescope, a new facility that will provide a comprehensive digital map of the southern sky from ultraviolet through near infrared wavelengths. Presented jointly by the University of Sydney and the Royal Society of NSW.

The Enigma of Albert Louden   View Summary
30 April 2009

After two decades of artistic practice with no thought of an audience, Albert Louden was discovered by art dealer Victor Musgrave in 1979. Well-known throughout Europe and the USA, this will be Louden's first exhibition in Australia.

May
Accidental Encounters (Macleay exhibition)    View Summary
19 December 2008 to 24 May 2009

This exhibition examines science, life and culture in Australia through the letters of Henrietta Heathorn and her fiance, Thomas Huxley. This exhibition commemorates the 150th anniversary of the publication of Charles Darwin's On The Origin of Species.

Nicholson: Man and Museum (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 December 2009

A colourful exploration of some of the unearthed tales behind the extraordinary life of Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum, and the first vice-chancellor and second chancellor of the University of Sydney. Find out about Nicholson and mummies, spiritualism, trips up the Volga, grand houses, a much younger wife, retirement to England aged 53, and the loss of his house and life's work aged 90. True melodrama.

A Small History of Microscopy   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 August 2009

Confused by the difference between compound and simple microscopes? This small display on historic microscopy and slides will bring you into this tiny but fascinating world.

Futurescape   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 24 May 2009

'Far into the future the world's climate has radically changed. Human beings have adapted and survived to live in a simpler way. Zoologists travel to remote uninhabited lands observing the evolution of species.'

This was the brief for six intrepid student artists from Enmore Tafe, whose models and drawings for future species will be on exhibition to commemorate Darwin's ideas.

WS Macleay and the natural history circle   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 1 December 2009

William Sharp Macleay's natural history Horae Entomologicae (1819 - 21) sought God's order in nature through a system of organisation based on the affinities and analogies between organisms. This quinarian system, as it was known, was read and considered by London's young and radical naturalists in the 1820's and the 1830's, among them the promising scholar Charles Darwin.

Classical Fantasies: The age of beauty from Naples to Capri (exhibition)   View Summary
25 February 2009 to 1 July 2009

The 19th Century saw the blossoming of the 'Classical Ideal'. The Mediterranean, especially Italy, provided inspiration for an army of classicists, archaeologists, writers, poets, artists and early photographers. At the heart of this was the idea of the beauty and purity of the Classical past. The exhibition will explore this fantasy as well as look at how the morals of the past were used to explain and justify the morals of the time.

Resort Nadir: Irene Hanenbergh (exhibition)   View Summary
22 March 2009 to 10 May 2009

Netherlands born, Melbourne based artist Irene Hanenbergh's work consists of painting, printmaking, (Zundprints on aluminium) and drawing. The stylistic form of her work relates to the origins of marginalised fantastic and visionary painting, outsider and subcultural folk art.

By using marginalised forms merged with contemporary techniques, she creates work that slips between 'low' and 'high' culture. In this exhibition Hanenbergh will show recent drawings and Zundprints drawing on the supernatural, landscape and mysterious realms.

Seminar Series: Employment Relations & the Law 2009 - Week One   View Summary
1 April 2009 to 3 June 2009

Sydney Law School and the Faculty of Economics and Business jointly offer this popular seminar series (previously known as Industrial Relations and the Law). The series aims to give a thorough background on employment relations law in Australia, and to discuss the proposed new Fair Work Bill 2008, introduced to Parliament in November last year. The seminars are presented by a range of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including Professor Ron McCallum, Professor Russell Lansbury and Professor Joellen Riley.

Week 1: Introduction to the Series

Week 2: Common Lawand Industrial Relations

Week 3: Employment Contracts

Week 4: Termination of Employment

Week 5: Collective Bargaining and the New Fair Employment Laws

Week 6: Discrimination in Employment

Week 7: Occupational Healthand Safety

Week 8: Unionsand Employers

Week 9: Key Developments in Workplace Law in 2009

Week 10: Future Issues

Breast Wishes   View Summary
16 April 2009 to 2 May 2009

Written by Merridy Eastman, Jonathan Gavin, Richard Glover, Wendy Harmer, Sheridan Jobbins, James Millar, Debra Oswald. Directed by Jason Langley.

A small musical about big issues.

Breast Wishes is a new Australian musical about love, loss, life and silicon; a witty and heart-warming journey of courage and determination through laughter to triumph.

Meet four women: sisters, mothers, daughters, cousins. Add a fumbling boyfriend, a well-meaning husband, a bra-fitter who’s seen it all, some showstopping numbers and a brilliant cast and you have a musical celebration of breasts and those who support them.

A sophisticated and hilarious glimpse of cleavage and beyond which promises to make your heart sing.

Proudly supporting the National Breast Cancer Foundation.

Tickets: Sat Evening: Premium (limited) $75, Adult $60,
All Other Performances: Premium (limited) $70, Adult $55, Concession (excl Fri Sat & Sun) $38, Senior/Industry (excl Fri Sat & Sun) $48

Keast Lecturer 2009: Dr Peter Weston   View Summary
1 May 2009

The distribution of organisms is the result of both contemporary ecological constraints and the history of evolutionary and environmental change. Evolutionary biogeography is the attempt to infer the historical processes from reconstructed historical patterns. This discipline can be traced back to the seminal works of Joseph Hooker and Charles Darwin in the mid-nineteenth century. Darwin and Hooker were close colleagues who proposed radically different methods and explanations for biotic distributional patterns in the southern hemisphere. Hooker asserted that the distributional patterns of southern plant groups demonstrated the existence of a previously widespread ancestral "Antarctic" flora that had been fragmented by geological and/or climatic changes. Darwin preferred to explain intercontinental distributional patterns as the result of repeated long distance dispersals across stable oceans. Molecular dating is the shiny new toy in biogeography's tool kit, allowing us to compare the inferred age of a disjunct clade with the inferred geological age of its geographic disjunction. The results of these techniques point towards a synthesis in which Hooker and Darwin are both partially vindicated. Does this represent scientific progress, an example of Marxist science in action or merely a change of scientific fashion?

Beyond Everest The Ongoing Climb, a documentary about the Sherpa people of Nepal   View Summary
2 May 2009

The film documents Sir Edmund Hillary's projects to help the Sherpa people of Nepal. Michael Dillon, a leading director of adventure and expedition documentaries, will introduce the film which will be followed by refreshments and a panel discussion.

Edmund Hillary's work in Nepal inspired Dr Nuli Lemoh to raise funds to set up a Children's Hospital in Bo, Sierra Leone, West Africa.

All proceeds from the evening will help build the Outpatients' Clinic of the hospital.

The Sky's The Limit: Astronomy In Antiquity (exhibition)   View Summary
3 May 2009 to 15 August 2009

Many ancient religions and their myths revolve around the planets and the stars. Ancient people looked to the stars to make sense of the world. Following the stars allowed people to predict the change of the seasons, track timeand create calendars. Sailors, as they struck across the seas, used the night sky to guide their path. Architects designed tombs and temples to align with celestial beings for superstitious and practical reasons. This exhibition forms part of the University of Sydney's program to mark the International Year of Astronomy (IYA).

"Hieroglyphs: From Rosetta Stone to Ramses", a talk by Mary Demovic   View Summary
3 May 2009

Mary Demovic gives a free Sunday talk on Egyptian hieroglyphs. This presentation will take us on a practical journey of discovery that will hone our understanding of our own language and leave us mesmerised by the astounding sophistication of this ancient script in relation to it.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor James Crawford SC LLD FBA   View Summary
4 May 2009

Current issues in International Commercial Arbitration

Professor James Crawford, SC LLD FBA

Whewell Professor of International Law, University of Cambridge

James Crawford SC is Whewell Professor of International Law at the University of Cambridge and Chair of the Faculty of Law. He was a Member of the Australian Law Reform Commission until 1992, and is a member of the International Law Commission, where he was responsible for the Draft Statute for an International Criminal Court (1994) and the Articles on State Responsibility (2001).

Professor Crawford has an extensive practice in international law and international arbitration, and is author of numerous books, as well as co-editor of the British Yearbook of International Law. Along with Philippe Sands QC and Ralph Wilde, he prepared an opinion on the question of the compatibility of Article 98(2) and the 1998 Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC Statute) for the Lawyers' Committee on Human Rights and the Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torture.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

Artists in the Library   View Summary
4 May 2009 to 31 May 2009

This exhibition showcases the creativity of some of the artists and photographers working in the Library.
Website: Fisher Library opening hours: http://www.library.usyd.edu.au/about/openhrs.html#fisher

Exhibition of Leonardo da Vinci's Codex Atlanticus   View Summary
4 May 2009 to 31 May 2009

Leonardo da Vinci's Codex Atlanticus is a collection of notes, jottings, designs, engineering projects and draughts, mostly of machines, ballistic devices, and geometrical analyses, spanning the years 1478 to 1519. The codex, compiled originally in the late 16th century, was later partially dispersed, and gathered together again in the 1960s, and in this current form is held at the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan, although many of the original manuscripts are still held in various collections throughout the world.

This exhibition comprises illustrations from a limited edition facsimile of the codex which was published in 12 volumes by Giunti-Barbera, Firenze in 1973. It was acquired by Fisher Library in 1974 and is held in Rare Books and Special Collections (RB 5473.1 Folio).

Treasures of the Mitchell Library   View Summary
5 May 2009

The Power Institute Alumni & Friends Assoc. invites you to attend a behind the scenes tour by Richard Neville (Mitchell Librarian) of rare treasures in the Mitchell Library. (Meet on the marble map in the entrance foyer.)

Political Economy Now! - book launch   View Summary
5 May 2009

Conversations and reminiscences with Frank Stilwell, Gavan Butler, Evan Jones and former political economy student activists at the launch of Political Economy Now! The struggle for alternative economics at the University of Sydney.
Political Economy Now! is the story of one of the most substantial and enduring conflicts in the history of Australian universities. Beginning in the late 1960s, it pitted those committed to the teaching of mainstream economics at the University against the proponents of an alternative program in political economy. The dispute continued for decades until the Department of Political Economy was established in the Faculty of Arts in 2008. The story of the struggle for alternative economics, told from the political economists' perspective, weaves together a general historical narrative with illustrations and interpretations of the causes and consequences of the conflict, and personal recollections of 11 former student activists.
Political Economy Now! is a fascinating read for those concerned about how a discipline of great social and political significance is understood and taught to its would-be practitioners.

Music and the Cosmos   View Summary
6 May 2009

This event is now fully booked.

To celebrate the International Year of Astronomy, the Sydney Science Forum and Sydney Conservatorium of Music are proud to present Music and the Cosmos, a special event featuring leading astronomers from the University of Sydney's School of Physics, and an SCM Chamber Music Ensemble.

In this unique presentation of science meeting the arts, enjoy a moving, celestially-inspired performance from our musicians at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music in concert with images from the farthest reaches of the universe. Then take a journey across the cosmos as some of Sydney's most talented astronomers explore the latest in astronomy research.

This special event will feature Radio National's Robyn Williams as MC, the Sydney Conservatorium Ensemble Orchestra, and Sydney astronomers Professor Bryan Gaensler, Professor Tim Bedding and Associate Professor Geraint Lewis.

A cocktail reception in the University's Nicholson Museum will follow the event, were guests will have the opportunity to continue the astronomy experience with the museum's Ancient Astronomy exhibit.

Sydney Uni Monthly Markets   View Summary
6 May 2009

Have a browse, grab something to eat or snatch up a bargain at the Sydney Uni Monthly Markets.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Michael Furmston, Singapore Management University   View Summary
6 May 2009

This seminar is part of the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial Series for 2009.

Entry is free however registration is essential.

Register Online

Professor Michael Philip Furmstonstudied law at the University of Oxford and taught at the University of Birmingham, Queen's University, Belfast and University of Oxford before moving to Bristol in 1978. He was appointed as Dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of Bristol for two terms and also served as Pro Vice-Chancellor from 1986 to 1989 before retiring in 1998. He was appointed Emeritus Professor and Senior Research Fellow at Bristol.

Professor Furmston is a member of the UNIDROIT (International Institute for the Unification of Private Law) working group which has produced a set of General Principles for International Commercial Contracts. He sits on the editorial boards of the Journal of Contract Law and Construction Law Journal, amongst others.

About the presentation

Professor Michael Furmston will present an analysis of the recent House of Lords decision in Transfield Shipping Inc v Mercator Shipping Inc ("The Achilleas") [2008] UKHL 48, the most important decision on the assessment of damages in contract since Hadley v Baxendale.

Details regarding the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial series are included in the series brochure. To view the brochure, pleaseclick here.

Barbie, Trademarks and Free Speech   View Summary
7 May 2009

The Sydney University Arts Association is delighted to announce that the Vice Chancellor and Principal, Dr Michael Spence, is to give an entertaining talk on "Barbie, Trademarks and Free Speech".

The issue of the extent to which trademark law inhibits freedom of speech has often been addressed by commentators. However, in this talk, Dr Spence will propose that a commitment to freedom of speech may actually justify certain types of trademark protection. He will do so with reference to an American case involving the mutilation of Barbie dolls by a visual artist!

After Israel's Attack on Gaza: How do we work for peace and justice?    View Summary
7 May 2009

The Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies will be hosting a special event, After Israel's Attack on Gaza: How do we work for peace and justice? The event will address what we can do to help Palestinians and Israelis working for peace.

Mellon Sawyer Seminar Sessions 2009    View Summary
8 May 2009

The Impact of the Antipodes on Ecological Thought: Landscape, Evolution, and Sustainability

Convenor: Prof. Iain McCalman
Presenters: Julia Horne (University of Sydney), Peter Denney (University of Sydney), Martin Thomas (University of Sydney), Richard Waterhouse (University of Sydney)

Since at least the late seventeenth century - long before the field of ecology was officially named by the German evolutionist Ernst Haeckel in 1866 - policies and theories about mankind's relationship to nature were framed in Europe under the Linnaean term of 'the natural economy'. From the late eighteenth century, such debates rose in concert with, and were stimulated by, the growth of modern British science, empire and trade in the new world. Within the southern hemisphere, the discovery by Europeans of new landforms, species, mineral resources, and indigenous cultures prompted intense and continuing debate about natural economies on both sides of the world. A succession of explorers, scientists, traders, writers, painters, anthropologists, missionaries, government administrators and colonial settlers argued about whether and how these newly-discovered natural resources should be viewed, exploited, managed, protected or conserved. Distinctive local and international ecolo!
gical challenges have been thrown up by the fragility of Pacific island ecosystems, by the degradation of the Great Barrier Reef, by Australia's devastating species losses due to wildfires and drought, by the deforestation of large parts of South East Asia and New Guinea, and by the rapidity of the erosion of the Antarctic ice-cap under the impact of ozone layer destruction and climate change. We will explore these and related issues through papers on comparative art, aesthetics and landscape; on the rise of Darwinian evolutionary ecological theory in two hemispheres; and on European scientific and Indigenous Aboriginal conceptions of nature and of environmental management in the twenty and twenty-first centuries.

Sydney University Graduate Choir: Mendelssohn's Elijah   View Summary
9 May 2009

Enjoy an evening of superb choral music in the majestic Great Hall.

The Sydney University Gradaute Choir will perform Elijah ... Mendelssohn's powerful and dramatic oratorio about the Old Testament prophet, for soloists, choir, and orchestra.

Experience the vivid imagery of Elijah's ascent to heaven in a fiery chariot.

Online bookings can be made here: http://secure.seymourboxoffice.com.au/tickets/production.aspx?PID=42304

Mummies Day on Mother's Day!   View Summary
10 May 2009

Celebrate Mother's Day with a series of family events and kids activities looking at ancient Egyptian mummies. Wrap yourself up, help us excavate our archaeological site and handle artefacts found in Egyptian tombs.

At 2pm, join us for a free musical performance of scary mummy music played on the University of Sydney's historic carillon.

Sydney University Graduate Choir: Mendelssohn's Elijah   View Summary
10 May 2009

Enjoy an evening of superb choral music in the majestic Great Hall.

The Sydney University Gradaute Choir will perform Elijah ... Mendelssohn's powerful and dramatic oratorio about the Old Testament prophet, for soloists, choir, and orchestra.

Experience the vivid imagery of Elijah's ascent to heaven in a fiery chariot.

Online bookings can be made here: http://secure.seymourboxoffice.com.au/tickets/production.aspx?PID=42304

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Malcolm Gammie CBE QC   View Summary
12 May 2009

Tax Seminar Series - Tax Reform in the UK: Mirrlees et al

Malcolm Gammie CBE QC

One Essex Court/Institute for Fiscal Studies, London

Malcolm Gammie QC was among the first lawyers to work in the tax field with a leading accounting firm, and was the first Director of the National Tax Office of the firm KMG Thomson McLintock (now part of KPMG), becoming its Director of National Tax Services. Since 1997 he has been in practice at the Revenue Bar, and was appointed Queen's Counsel in 2002.

Malcolm was appointed a deputy Special Commissioner and part-time Chairman of the VAT and duties Tribunal in 2002, and was also appointed to serve as a member of the arbitral panel under the EC Arbitration Convention on transfer pricing disputes within the European Union.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

Official Opening of the Liz Kernohan Conference Centre   View Summary
12 May 2009

The new environmentally friendly Conference Centre has state-of-the-art equipment and facilities, enabling us to deliver the best services to students, staff and the community. The special guest of honour Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC CVO, Chancellor, University of Sydney will open the Centre.

Victor Coppleson Continuing Medical Education Seminar:The Mental Health of Nations   View Summary
12 May 2009

The Mental Health of Nations:

Ian Hickie AM MD FRANZCP, Professor of Psychiatry, University of Sydney Executive Director, Brain & Mind Research Institute, Camperdown

Most Governments of Developed Nations have now recognised that a key issue for future health, social and economic policy is the lifetime mental health of citizens. Forty per cent of the current health-related disability burden is due to brain and mind disorders. This burden is greatest in early adulthood and later-life. To advance mental health, deliberate applications based on new understandings of the critical genetic and social determinants are required. Further, the way in which key opportunities exist across the whole life cycle is now more fully understood. Developing a framework for capitalising on these opportunities relies on partnerships across health, education, social welfare and other broad community supports. Specific examples of the ways in which strategies in the pre-natal period, early childhood, primary school, adolescence, early adulthood, mid-life and later life will be presented.
This Seminar is organised jointly by the Medical Alumni Association and Faculty of Medicine. Professor Hickie talk will be preceded by welcomes by Paul Lancaster, President, Medical Alumni Association, and Professor Bruce Robinson, Dean, Faculty of Medicine, and by some introductory remarks about Victor Coppleson.

Refreshments: 5.00-5.50pm view a new exhibition on the plague, Ground Floor, Anderson Stuart Building entrance opposite Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Inside Out   View Summary
13 May 2009 to 30 May 2009

Written by Mary Rachel Brown,
Directed by Carol Woodrow.

Inside Out is a ground breaking new drama exploring the impact of mental illness on the relationship between a mother and her son.

One in five Australians will directly experience a mental illness in their lifetime, an experience which is deeply personal, often misunderstood and always leaves its mark.

Inside Out is an honest, courageous and compassionate journey into one young man's mind, to the place where borders are shifting and battle lines are drawn; and into his mother's struggle to understand what is happening, to maintain her loving relationship with her son, and somehow find a way to help.

What do you do when life abruptly turns you upside down, grabs your heart and squeezes it tight? When you need to find all the love, strength and resilience possible? Courageous, heartbreaking and yet surprisingly funny, Inside Out is a compelling story of love and insight, where realities collide and lives are transformed.

Obama: The First 100 Days   View Summary
14 May 2009

Thomas Mann, Senior Fellow Brookings Institute and presidential scholar, assesses the start of the Obama Administration, its relationship with Congress and likely developments for the rest of 2009.

Sabina Wolanski: "Destined to Live: One Woman's War, Life, Lives Remembered"   View Summary
14 May 2009

On 10 May 2005, the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe opened in Berlin. At the opening ceremony, Sabina Wolanski was chosen to speak as the voice of the six million dead. What was the journey that took a little girl from the Polish town of Boryslaw to Paris, Sydney and so to Berlin?

Poets as Thoughtwriters; Music without Personae   View Summary
14 May 2009

The Department of Philosophy and the School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry presents the public lecture by Professor Kendall Walton, Visiting Professor from the University of Michigan

Speaking Volumes - the Three Decker Novel   View Summary
14 May 2009 to 30 November 2009

What did people in nineteenth century England really read? Explore the books from the Three Decker Novel Collection and be entertained by historical and sporting fiction, thrilled by adventure and romance and enlightened by novels on social issues.

Loud Shirt Day 2009   View Summary
15 May 2009

Turn up the volume, register for LOUD SHIRT DAY 2009 and get "deaf kids talking" !

Loud Shirt Day is about having fun and incorporating colour and craziness into your ordinary day. Participate by hosting your own Loud Shirt Day event at work or at university. Wear your loudest shirt, tie or socks on 15 May 2009 to get "deaf kids talking"!

Loud Shirt Day is a fundraising initiative of The Shepherd Centre, a not-for-profit organisation based in NSW and ACT. The organisation assists children who are deaf or hearing impaired to develop spoken language. Since its inception in 1970, 90% of children who have graduated from The Shepherd Centre have successfully entered mainstream schooling alongside their peers. For an organisation which provides services free of charge and only receives approximately 28% in government funding, the results are phenomenal.

Assist The Shepherd Centre in providing exceptional services to children with hearing impairments into the future. Support LOUD SHIRT DAY 2009 !

To participate, choose one of the four easy steps:
Visit our website at
www.loudshirtday.com.au
Fax your registration form to 02 9351 7880
Email:
LSD.2009@shepherdcentre.usyd.edu.au
Contact us on 1800 020 030 (toll free)

17th Annual Labour Law Conference - The Emerging Framework: Change in Australian Labour Law    View Summary
15 May 2009

This is an important time in the development of Australian labour law and the 17th Annual Labour Law Conference is designed to make sense of extensive and complex information.
This year's conference brings together Australia's leading labour law and IR researchers and practitioners to discuss the emerging industrial relations framework and the consistency of the current and proposed developments with previous Australian labour law.
The conference Keynote speaker is the recently retired Justice Michael Kirby.
Professor Andrew Stewart (University of Adelaide) will provide all of the information that is needed regarding the Fair Work Bill including unfair dismissal, unlawful termination, enterprise agreement content, and the new national employment standards. He will also discuss the Fair Work Bill timetable and transitional arrangements.
17th Annual Labour Law Conference - The Emerging Framework: Change in Australian Labour Law    View Summary
15 May 2009

This is an important time in the development of Australian labour law and the 17th Annual Labour Law Conference is designed to make sense of extensive and complex information.
This year's conference brings together Australia's leading labour law and IR researchers and practitioners to discuss the emerging industrial relations framework and the consistency of the current and proposed developments with previous Australian labour law.
The conference Keynote speaker is the recently retired Justice Michael Kirby.
Professor Andrew Stewart (University of Adelaide) will provide all of the information that is needed regarding the Fair Work Bill including unfair dismissal, unlawful termination, enterprise agreement content, and the new national employment standards. He will also discuss the Fair Work Bill timetable and transitional arrangements.
Bosch Institute - Distinguished Seminar   View Summary
15 May 2009

Professor Jonathan Stone will talk on "The Stability and Death of Neurones: Observations on the Neuropathology of Retinal Dystrophies and Age-related Dementia"

Timor Leste Interest Group Meeting - Office for Global Health   View Summary
15 May 2009

The first five people to participate in the Office for Global Health's Timor-Leste Health Leadership Program are currently in Sydney for up to twelve weeks of intensive training. To coincide with this we will be holding a Timor Leste Interest Group Meeting on Friday 15th May from 4.30-6pm in the Norman Gregg Lecture Theatre (Edward Ford Building, University of Sydney).

Four of the Fellows will attend the meeting and will present an overview of Timor Leste, their roles in the health system, what they are doing in Sydney during their fellowships and their hopes for the future. The meeting will be chaired by Dr Lyndal Trevena (Associate Dean - International).
The four Timor Leste Fellows attending the meeting are:

Ms Manuela Soares Pereira - Chief of Staff for the Minister of Health Mr Joaquim Soares - Director, Klibur Domin Tibar (Rehabilitation Centre) Dr Lucio Babo Soares - Senior Dentist, Centro Community Health Centre Mr Moises Andrade - Nursing Director, Maubisse Hospital

A bit of background regarding the Leadership Program: it is an initiative of the Office of Global Health aimed at strengthening health capacity by training current and future leaders in health care, health management, health policy and health education. All of the Timor-Leste Fellows participating already occupy significant leadership roles in their country's health system. Candidates are provided six-to-twelve week placements in Australia, in institutions and organisations that can offer practical training in their field. Programs have been developed individually, with emphasis on exposing participants to methods, theories, techniques and approaches that they can implement and use to train and lead others when they return to Timor-Leste. The program is funded through AusAID's Australian Leadership Award Fellowship (ALAF) funding.

The Gruffalo   View Summary
16 May 2009

The magical musical adaption of the award winning picture book by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler.

The Gruffalo is one of the most popular picture story books in the world, and has been adapted to a musical play LIVE ON STAGE. This staging by Londons Tall Stories Theatre Company has played to West End and Broadway sell-out season and comes to Australia for the first time.

Whether their favourite food is roasted fox, owl ice cream, scrambled snake or Gruffalo crumble, audiences eat up this delectable tale about the adventures of a clever little mouse in a forest full of predators.

Join Mouse on an adventurous journey through the deep, dark wood in this big scary monster of a show. Mouse can scare hungry animals away with tall stories of the terrifying Gruffalo, but what happens when she comes face to face with the very creature she imagined?

Let your imagination run wild with songs, laughs and fun for children aged 3 and up, and their adults.

Carillon Performance: The Arches Swing   View Summary
17 May 2009

A performance on the University's carillon by guest carillonist Lyn Fuller.

Poesia Visiva: Italian Concrete and Visual Poetry of the 1960's and 1970's   View Summary
17 May 2009 to 19 July 2009

Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, 'concrete poetry' was one of the most active movements in the visual arts. Treating the poem as an object, artists combined language and pictorial elements to create compelling works of art. In Italy it also became an effective medium to portray political concerns. Using works from the University Art Collection, this exhibition showcases the medium's techniques, such as the use of collage, the typewriter, mass media and popular culture.

ICOM International Museums Day   View Summary
18 May 2009

Join us at the Sydney University Museums to celebrate ICOM International Museums Day for 2009. With the theme of "Museums and Tourism", join us for one-hour guided tours of the collections of Sydney University Museums at 12 noon and 2 pm.

The Gruffalo   View Summary
18 May 2009

The magical musical adaption of the award winning picture book by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler.

The Gruffalo is one of the most popular picture story books in the world, and has been adapted to a musical play LIVE ON STAGE. This staging by Londons Tall Stories Theatre Company has played to West End and Broadway sell-out season and comes to Australia for the first time.

Whether their favourite food is roasted fox, owl ice cream, scrambled snake or Gruffalo crumble, audiences eat up this delectable tale about the adventures of a clever little mouse in a forest full of predators.

Join Mouse on an adventurous journey through the deep, dark wood in this big scary monster of a show. Mouse can scare hungry animals away with tall stories of the terrifying Gruffalo, but what happens when she comes face to face with the very creature she imagined?

Let your imagination run wild with songs, laughs and fun for children aged 3 and up, and their adults.

Climate Coolers 'One million Woman Campaign'   View Summary
19 May 2009

This event will launch a Campaign run by which seeks to enlist one million women across Australia, to each abate at least one tonne of carbon.

The Institute for Sustainable Solutions has formed a strategic partnership with the One Million Women Campaign and it will be launched by the University Chancellor.

Climate Coolers is a not for profit, women-led initiative to cut CO2 pollution and are building a network of women across the country to engage Australians everywhere to take action on climate change.

Climate Coolers aim is to inspire women everywhere to get involved through our national campaign and through local community and household projects. They aim to:

- Raise awareness across the country

- Create social change

- Cut CO2 NOW through energy efficiency and renewable energy projects

- Give every person and every household a planned strategy to cut their CO2 consumption.

The 'Ins and Outs of getting published'   View Summary
19 May 2009

SENIOR EDITOR SUZANNE RYAN manages the music books program for Oxford University Press, developing and acquiring book projects in the wide range of music-related fields from the highly theoretical to the most practical. Suzanne holds degrees from The University of Chicago (history of religions and linguistic anthropology), DePaul University School of Music (vocal performance) and The New England Conservatory of Music (vocal performance) where she was a member of the Graduate Opera Program.
She performed professionally as a lyric mezzo for a number of years before moving into the publishing field, beginning what became her current career during an extended temp gig at Harvard University Press. Suzanne was editor of the anthropology list at Columbia University Press, and was Music Editor at Indiana University Press prior to her move to Oxford in New York City. During her tenure at OUP, Suzanne has grown the music books program significantly, publishing in new areas of music scholarship and supporting a number of burgeoning fields, promoting new technologies and online capabilities to break the boundaries of the traditional print book, and adding to the list of awards and accolades generously given to Oxford music books.

Sydney Writers' Festival event on science biography   View Summary
20 May 2009

How does a biographer wrestle with complex subject areas while informing readers about their subject's personality? In this Darwin-themed event find out how four of The University of Sydney's professors cope with the challenge in their most recent biographies at this Sydney Writers' Festival event.

Free lunchtime tour if the Art Gallery   View Summary
20 May 2009

Join us for a monthly guided tour of the University Art Gallery and its current exhibition. Lunch for the mind and the soul.

Workplace Research Centre: Investigating Grievances and Other Issues   View Summary
20 May 2009

Workplace Research Centre: Investigating Grievances and Other Issues (Best Practice / Masterclass Workshop)

Recent court decisions show that employers can place themselves at legal risk if they ignore complaints and grievances, or do not respond promptly and appropriately. Day-to-day issues can include employee performance and conduct, interpersonal conflict, complaints arising from allegations of harassment etc. Whatever the cause of a formal grievance, it requires investigation. This session covers the skills and techniques for successfully investigating employee complaints and grievances such as: responsiveness, asking the right questions; making findings based upon the evidence; ensuring procedural fairness and natural justice. The Masterclass 'session will provide an opportunity to analyse and benchmark key issues in your workplace. Learn from real business case studies and discuss live operational issues with leading experts.

Controversies in Public Health Lecture Series - Testing to monitor chronic disease: less is more?   View Summary
20 May 2009

Presented by Professor Les Irwig, Professor of Epidemiology Screening and Test Evaluation Program, School of Public Health, University of Sydney.

Monitoring patients with chronic conditions - for example, high blood pressure or high cholesterol is a common reason for repeat visits to health practitioners; yet there is little evidence about what monitoring should be done and how often. This talk presents new research which suggests that visits to monitor changes in some chronic conditions are too frequent and, besides wasting resources, may result in poorer health.

Professor John Harris: "Nicholson, Sydney and Surgery. Under the knife: then and now"   View Summary
20 May 2009

Tracing the medical history of early Sydney through to the present, this presentation will focus on the brief medical career of Sir Charles Nicholson, the improvements in public hygiene, hospitals and education, and show how some surgical procedures have evolved.

Workplace Research Centre: Retrench/Retain/Recruit : Where next with Workforce Planning?   View Summary
21 May 2009

Workplace Research Centre: Retrench/Retain/Recruit : Where next with Workforce Planning? (Masterclass Workshop)

The Workplace Research Centre, with Australian Business Lawyers and other invited experts, is pleased to present its new Masterclass workshops. These unique sessions aim to provide you with a professional networking environment in which to analyse and benchmark key issues in your own workplace. Participants will have the opportunity to hear about the legal, research, policy, strategy and implementation aspects of each issue. Workshops are led by experienced facilitators who will introduce real business case studies, as well as promote reflection and discussion about live operational issues.

Managers from all areas with employee relations responsibilities, also HR and other practitioners with experience are especially welcome to register for these half-day sessions. To maintain learning quality, numbers attending each open workshop must unfortunately be limited.

The Gruffalo   View Summary
21 May 2009 to 23 May 2009

The magical musical adaption of the award winning picture book by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler.

The Gruffalo is one of the most popular picture story books in the world, and has been adapted to a musical play LIVE ON STAGE. This staging by Londons Tall Stories Theatre Company has played to West End and Broadway sell-out season and comes to Australia for the first time.

Whether their favourite food is roasted fox, owl ice cream, scrambled snake or Gruffalo crumble, audiences eat up this delectable tale about the adventures of a clever little mouse in a forest full of predators.

Join Mouse on an adventurous journey through the deep, dark wood in this big scary monster of a show. Mouse can scare hungry animals away with tall stories of the terrifying Gruffalo, but what happens when she comes face to face with the very creature she imagined?

Let your imagination run wild with songs, laughs and fun for children aged 3 and up, and their adults.

Faculty of Health Sciences Prize Night    View Summary
21 May 2009

The Faculty of Health Sciences Prize Night is an annual event held to celebrate the academic excellence and achievements of our students. The Student Prize Winners and Dean's Scholars will be awarded on the evening.

A Global Standard for Conflict Reporting: Resolving the Structure/Agency Debate in Peace Journalism?   View Summary
22 May 2009

The Media and Communications Department at University of Sydney invites you to join us on Friday 22 May, at 4pm,to hear about some of the latest thinking on peace journalism.

Associate Professor Jake Lynch is Director of the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Sydney. He is the author of Debates in Peace Journalism in addition to numerous other publications. He convened the inaugural peace journalism commission of the International Peace Research Association, and is an Executive member of the Sydney Peace Foundation.

Prior to his academic career, Jake was a professional journalist, having worked as a presenter for BBC World television news, a Political Correspondent for Sky News and the Sydney correspondent for the Independent.

Jake's talk explores Peace Journalism and a global standard for reporting conflict.

Many involved in conflicts round the world have cause for complaint about media influence, from Rwandan hate radio to the distortions of the New York Times and Washington Post in covering the debate over the invasion of Iraq. But how could accountability be increased? Not by strengthening regulation, perhaps, but by devising a global standard for assessing the reporting of conflict. Jake Lynch puts forward the credentials of peace journalism, as the basis for such a standard, and explains how it could work.

Media At Sydney is series of seminars and public talks presenting the best of contemporary media and communications research, thinking and perspectives.

SUSO and SUMS present "Carmina Burana"   View Summary
24 May 2009

The Sydney University Symphony Orchestra (SUSO) and the Sydney University Musical Society (SUMS) kick off their 2009 season with an exciting partnership, performing the dramatic work of Carl Orff, "Carmina Burana".

Performance dates and times:

*Sunday, 24th May, 3:00 p.m. at The Great Hall, Sydney University Main Campus

*Thursday, 28th May, 7:30 p.m. at Verbrugghen Hall, Sydney Conservatorium of Music

Purchase tickets online at http://www.trybooking.com or at the Access Office (USYD Manning House). Alternatively, tickets may be purchased at the door before each performance.

2 performances only, so do not miss out!!!

(SUSO and SUMS are proudly supported by the University of Sydney Union - USU)

The Gruffalo   View Summary
25 May 2009

The magical musical adaption of the award winning picture book by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler.

The Gruffalo is one of the most popular picture story books in the world, and has been adapted to a musical play LIVE ON STAGE. This staging by Londons Tall Stories Theatre Company has played to West End and Broadway sell-out season and comes to Australia for the first time.

Whether their favourite food is roasted fox, owl ice cream, scrambled snake or Gruffalo crumble, audiences eat up this delectable tale about the adventures of a clever little mouse in a forest full of predators.

Join Mouse on an adventurous journey through the deep, dark wood in this big scary monster of a show. Mouse can scare hungry animals away with tall stories of the terrifying Gruffalo, but what happens when she comes face to face with the very creature she imagined?

Let your imagination run wild with songs, laughs and fun for children aged 3 and up, and their adults.

Reconciliation Week   View Summary
25 May 2009 to 29 May 2009

Each year Reconciliation Week is held between 27 May and 3 June to commemorate two very important dates in Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian relations:

27 May is the Anniversary of the 1967 referendum when 90% of Australians voted to remove clauses, which discriminated against Indigenous Australians, from the Australian Constitution. This also gave the Federal Government power to make laws on behalf of Indigenous Australians.
During Reconciliation Week each year the Koori Centre works in collaboration with the Student Union to celebrate this week with special events.

Parsons Seminar Series with Professor Dana Muir   View Summary
25 May 2009

The Effect of the Financial Crisis on U.S. Pensions - A Perspective on Financial Services Regulatory Reform?
This seminar is part of the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial Series for 2009.
PleaseRegister Online.
About the speaker

Professor Dana M. Muir is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Business Law at the Stephen M. Ross School of Business, University of Michigan.Professor Muir's research interests are in employment law and securities law, particularly as they relate to employee benefits. Professor Muir's employee benefits research has been cited by the U.S. Supreme Court and other federal courts. She is the Editor-in-Chief of the annual Supplement to Employee Benefits Law. She also is a member of the Board of The Aerospace Corporation where she chairs the Compensation and Personnel Committee and is a member of the Executive Committee. She was a delegate to the first and second White House/Congressional National Summit on Retirement Savings and has served as a Congressional Fellow. Sheserved from 2002-2004as a member of the Department of Labor's Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans where she chaired the working group on Defined Benefit Plan Funding and Discount Rate Issues. Her book, A Manager's Guide to Employment Law: Protecting Your Company and Yourself, was published by Jossey-Bass in April 2003 as part of the Business School's Pressing Problems series.

About the presentation

The financial crisis almost certainly will result in far-reaching reform of the regulatory system affecting the U.S. financial services industry, financial markets, and government interactions with the markets. This paper considers the effect that regulatory reform will have on pension accounts, which have been devastated by market losses. The paper compares the U.S. system to Australia's approach to financial services regulation and the context of that regulation within the Australian superannuation system. It concludes that reform of the U.S. regulatory structure is unlikely to sufficiently address the factors that inhibit accumulation of pension assets.

Details regarding the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial series are included in the series brochure. To view the brochure, pleaseclick here.

Tai Chi class   View Summary
25 May 2009

Are you stressed from your study? Poor sleep? Back and shoulder stiff? Headache? Interested in Chinese traditional martial art? Come to experience the most wonderful Chinese medicine Qi healing with Confucius Institute's Tai Chi class!

Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese martial art that is today one of the world's most popular and effective forms of exercise offering life-enhancing benefits.
It is a fantastic way to reduce stress, to create a sense of balance, relaxation, well-being and calm in your life and to improve mental energy and focus.

The class is an easy-to-learn 10 weeks program suitable for anyone. The instructor is a champion of international Tai Chi Competition.

Learn to Speak Chinese   View Summary
25 May 2009

Have you ever wanted to learn Chinese, the language of the world's most dynamic economy, spoken by more than 1.3 billion people? Now is the perfect time to begin your journey into this fascinating language with the University of Sydney Confucius Institute's Chinese for Beginners course, starting 25 May.
This course is designed for people who have no prior knowledge of Chinese. Our expertise ensures that students will gain familiarity and confidence in using Chinese, in a stimulating, interactive and enjoyable environment.

Reconciliation Sea of Hands   View Summary
25 May 2009 to 29 May 2009

Show your support for Reconciliation Week by planting a hand on the lawn to help form the Sea of Hands design.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Carson McNeill, International Monetary Fund   View Summary
27 May 2009

Tax Seminar Series - Trends in Tax Administration in DevelopingCountries

Carson McNeill

International Monetary Fund

Carson McNeill is the tax administration and policy advisor with the Pacific Financial and Technical Centre (PFTAC), a donor-based organisation based in Suva, Fiji, where he provides technical assistance and support for Pacific Island countries to modernise and improve their tax systems and administrations. McNeill also facilitates the Pacific Island Tax Administrators Association, an active regional tax organisation in the Pacific.

Prior to becoming part of PFTAC, McNeill worked with the New Zealand Inland Revenue Department in diverse range of senior responsibilities at the regional and national level, including operational and organisational design and management and human resource strategy and design. McNeill has participated in a number of international fora, including Inland Revenue New Zealand delegations to Commonwealth Association of Tax Administrators (CATA) and Study Group on Asian Tax Administration and Research (SGATAR).

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.

India's Search for Energy Security   View Summary
27 May 2009

Join CISS and the Alumni Relations Office for the Third Annual Michael Hintze Lecture in International Security. Dr Ligia Noronha from The Energy and Resources Institute in New Delhi will discuss how India's growing energy needs are shaping its foreign, security and trade policies. Addressing issues such as the Non-Proliferation Treaty, the uranium trade and the environment, she will explore the consequences of a rising India for Australia and the world.

Reconciliation Flag Raising   View Summary
27 May 2009

All staff welcome to attend Flag Raising Event to mark the start of Reconciliation Week 2009.
Refreshments to follow.

Light Walk - Sydney Conservatorium of Music   View Summary
27 May 2009 to 13 June 2009

The Con's Songlines installation is an integral part of the Smart Light Festival's Light Walk route, which will lead participants from Observatory Hill, through The Rocks and Circular Quay, up to The Con and then onto Sydney Opera House, nightly from this Tuesday 26 May until 14 June.

A series of free and ticketed after dark concerts at The Con will provide a musical addition for people walking the route.

Performances will range from mini recitals to major works.

Most recitals will be held in The Con Music Cafe, adjacent to Songlines, from 6.00pm.

Public Lecture: Roman Beast Spectacles   View Summary
28 May 2009

Donald G Kyle of the University of Texas takes us on a journey through Roman spectacles and wild beast displays in this thrilling talk. Professor Kyle is the author of 'Sport and Spectacle in the Ancient World' (2006) and 'Death in Ancient Rome' (1998).

Disciplines of Inquiry - Methodology Colloquia 09   View Summary
28 May 2009

The Research Division, Faculty of Education and Social Work invites you to participate in the launch of a colloquia series on new approaches to research and interdisciplinarity across the education and social work domains.

The detailsfor thisweek'sproceedings are to be released shortly - please check this website for updates.

The Gruffalo   View Summary
28 May 2009 to 30 May 2009

The magical musical adaption of the award winning picture book by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler.

The Gruffalo is one of the most popular picture story books in the world, and has been adapted to a musical play LIVE ON STAGE. This staging by Londons Tall Stories Theatre Company has played to West End and Broadway sell-out season and comes to Australia for the first time.

Whether their favourite food is roasted fox, owl ice cream, scrambled snake or Gruffalo crumble, audiences eat up this delectable tale about the adventures of a clever little mouse in a forest full of predators.

Join Mouse on an adventurous journey through the deep, dark wood in this big scary monster of a show. Mouse can scare hungry animals away with tall stories of the terrifying Gruffalo, but what happens when she comes face to face with the very creature she imagined?

Let your imagination run wild with songs, laughs and fun for children aged 3 and up, and their adults.

SUSO and SUMS present "Carmina Burana"   View Summary
28 May 2009

The Sydney University Symphony Orchestra (SUSO) and the Sydney University Musical Society (SUMS) kick off their 2009 season with an exciting partnership, performing the dramatic work of Carl Orff, "Carmina Burana".

Performance dates and times:

*Sunday, 24th May, 3:00 p.m. at The Great Hall, Sydney University Main Campus

*Thursday, 28th May, 7:30 p.m. at Verbrugghen Hall, Sydney Conservatorium of Music

Purchase tickets online at http://www.trybooking.com or at the Access Office (USYD Manning House). Alternatively, tickets may be purchased at the door before each performance.

2 performances only, so do not miss out!!!

(SUSO and SUMS are proudly supported by the University of Sydney Union - USU)

Graduate Options in Architecture, Design and Planning Event   View Summary
28 May 2009

Our Information Night is an opportunity for you and your colleagues to discover the perfect academic program to meet your professional and personal needs and meet with academics and students to discuss flexible learning options and gain an understanding of how our programs work.

We will also be holding mini-lectures:
5.30pm The Future of Urban and Regional Planning

6.00pm Heritage Conservation - applying modern thinking to heritage structures

6.00pm Sustainable Design and Architectural Science

6.30pm The Future of Interaction Design

Poesia Visiva Symposium   View Summary
29 May 2009

A symposuim marking the exhibition "Poesia Visiva" which showcases the University Art Collection's Italian concrete and visual poetry works from the 1960s and 1970s. Speakers include: Judith Blackall (MCA), Associate Professor Tim Fitzpatrick and Emerita Professor Nerida Newbigin (USYD), Connie Tornatore - Loong (UAG) and a performance by Barbara Campbell.

Out of the Dust: Life in Afghanistan   View Summary
29 May 2009 to 26 June 2009

This exhibition is a collection of striking photos by Dutch photographer Hans Stakelbeek that document the on-going reconstruction effort in Afghanistan, to which the Netherlands and Australia are jointly contributing.

June
Nicholson: Man and Museum (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 December 2009

A colourful exploration of some of the unearthed tales behind the extraordinary life of Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum, and the first vice-chancellor and second chancellor of the University of Sydney. Find out about Nicholson and mummies, spiritualism, trips up the Volga, grand houses, a much younger wife, retirement to England aged 53, and the loss of his house and life's work aged 90. True melodrama.

A Small History of Microscopy   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 August 2009

Confused by the difference between compound and simple microscopes? This small display on historic microscopy and slides will bring you into this tiny but fascinating world.

WS Macleay and the natural history circle   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 1 December 2009

William Sharp Macleay's natural history Horae Entomologicae (1819 - 21) sought God's order in nature through a system of organisation based on the affinities and analogies between organisms. This quinarian system, as it was known, was read and considered by London's young and radical naturalists in the 1820's and the 1830's, among them the promising scholar Charles Darwin.

Classical Fantasies: The age of beauty from Naples to Capri (exhibition)   View Summary
25 February 2009 to 1 July 2009

The 19th Century saw the blossoming of the 'Classical Ideal'. The Mediterranean, especially Italy, provided inspiration for an army of classicists, archaeologists, writers, poets, artists and early photographers. At the heart of this was the idea of the beauty and purity of the Classical past. The exhibition will explore this fantasy as well as look at how the morals of the past were used to explain and justify the morals of the time.

Seminar Series: Employment Relations & the Law 2009 - Week One   View Summary
1 April 2009 to 3 June 2009

Sydney Law School and the Faculty of Economics and Business jointly offer this popular seminar series (previously known as Industrial Relations and the Law). The series aims to give a thorough background on employment relations law in Australia, and to discuss the proposed new Fair Work Bill 2008, introduced to Parliament in November last year. The seminars are presented by a range of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including Professor Ron McCallum, Professor Russell Lansbury and Professor Joellen Riley.

Week 1: Introduction to the Series

Week 2: Common Lawand Industrial Relations

Week 3: Employment Contracts

Week 4: Termination of Employment

Week 5: Collective Bargaining and the New Fair Employment Laws

Week 6: Discrimination in Employment

Week 7: Occupational Healthand Safety

Week 8: Unionsand Employers

Week 9: Key Developments in Workplace Law in 2009

Week 10: Future Issues

The Sky's The Limit: Astronomy In Antiquity (exhibition)   View Summary
3 May 2009 to 15 August 2009

Many ancient religions and their myths revolve around the planets and the stars. Ancient people looked to the stars to make sense of the world. Following the stars allowed people to predict the change of the seasons, track timeand create calendars. Sailors, as they struck across the seas, used the night sky to guide their path. Architects designed tombs and temples to align with celestial beings for superstitious and practical reasons. This exhibition forms part of the University of Sydney's program to mark the International Year of Astronomy (IYA).

Speaking Volumes - the Three Decker Novel   View Summary
14 May 2009 to 30 November 2009

What did people in nineteenth century England really read? Explore the books from the Three Decker Novel Collection and be entertained by historical and sporting fiction, thrilled by adventure and romance and enlightened by novels on social issues.

Poesia Visiva: Italian Concrete and Visual Poetry of the 1960's and 1970's   View Summary
17 May 2009 to 19 July 2009

Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, 'concrete poetry' was one of the most active movements in the visual arts. Treating the poem as an object, artists combined language and pictorial elements to create compelling works of art. In Italy it also became an effective medium to portray political concerns. Using works from the University Art Collection, this exhibition showcases the medium's techniques, such as the use of collage, the typewriter, mass media and popular culture.

Light Walk - Sydney Conservatorium of Music   View Summary
27 May 2009 to 13 June 2009

The Con's Songlines installation is an integral part of the Smart Light Festival's Light Walk route, which will lead participants from Observatory Hill, through The Rocks and Circular Quay, up to The Con and then onto Sydney Opera House, nightly from this Tuesday 26 May until 14 June.

A series of free and ticketed after dark concerts at The Con will provide a musical addition for people walking the route.

Performances will range from mini recitals to major works.

Most recitals will be held in The Con Music Cafe, adjacent to Songlines, from 6.00pm.

Out of the Dust: Life in Afghanistan   View Summary
29 May 2009 to 26 June 2009

This exhibition is a collection of striking photos by Dutch photographer Hans Stakelbeek that document the on-going reconstruction effort in Afghanistan, to which the Netherlands and Australia are jointly contributing.

Yr 10 Subject Selection Evenings   View Summary
1 June 2009

Year 10 Information Evening 2009 Subject selections and the path to University

click hereto register online


If you're planning on heading to university after your HSC you might already have a few questions:

  • Where can I find info on the UAI, scaling and university entrance?
  • Which subjects should I choose for year 11 and 12?
  • What sort of career should I aim for?
  • What is studying at uni like?

The Year 10 Information Evening is designed to help you make choices about your future.

Online registration opens 5pm on Monday 18th May and are allocated on a first come, first served basis. Numbers are limited so be sure to get in early so you don't miss out!

Learn to Speak Chinese   View Summary
1 June 2009

Have you ever wanted to learn Chinese, the language of the world's most dynamic economy, spoken by more than 1.3 billion people? Now is the perfect time to begin your journey into this fascinating language with Confucius Institute's Chinese for Beginners course.

This course is designed for people who have no prior knowledge of Chinese. Our expertise ensures that students will gain familiarity and confidence in using Chinese, in a stimulating, interactive and enjoyable environment.

New course commences 1 June

Parsons Commercial Series with Professor Randall Thomas   View Summary
2 June 2009

International executive pay: Current practices and future trends
This seminar is part of the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial Series for 2009.

Please Register Online

About the speaker

Randall Thomas has earned a reputation of being one of the most productive and thoughtful corporate and securities law scholars in the nation. His recent work addresses issues such as hedge fund shareholder activism, executive compensation, corporate voting, corporate litigation and the structure of firms. He joined the Vanderbilt law faculty in 2000 to develop and direct the Law & Business Program, having served previously in on the law faculties of the University of Iowa, the University of Michigan, Duke University, Boston University, and the University of Washington. Prior to teaching law, Professor Thomas was in private practice for four years, and clerked for U.S. District Judge Charles Joiner of the Eastern District of Michigan. An acclaimed teacher, Professor Thomas teaches courses in the area of corporate law, including corporations and securities regulation and directs the law school's LL.M. program and its Summer in Venice academic program.

Details regarding his presentation will provided shortly.
Details regarding the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial series are included in the series brochure. To view the brochure, pleaseclick here.

Sydney Ideas Lecture by Darius Rejali    View Summary
2 June 2009

In his lecture for Sydney Ideas, Darius Rejali traces the development and application of one torture technique after another in the last century, and he reaches startling conclusions. As the twentieth century progressed, he argues, democracies not only tortured, but set the international pace for torture. Dictatorships may have tortured more, and more indiscriminately, but the United States, Britain, and France pioneered and exported techniques that have become the lingua franca of modern torture: methods that leave no marks.

Sydney Uni Monthly Markets   View Summary
3 June 2009

Have a browse, grab something to eat or snatch up a bargain at the Sydney Uni Monthly Markets.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Peer Zumbansen   View Summary
4 June 2009

The evolution of the corporation: Organsiation, finance, knowledge and corporate social responsibility
This seminar is part of the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial Series for 2009.
Please Register Online.

Professor Peer Zumbansenhas been the Canada Research Chair in the Transnational and Comparative Law of Corporate Governance at Osgoode since July 1, 2004. Prior to joining the faculty, he researched and taught at the University of Frankfurt and spent the academic year 2001-02 as a Jean Monnet Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy ( http://www.iue.it ). He has also held Visiting Professorships at the University of Idaho College of Law and at Osgoode.

His current research in private law focuses on corporate governance, comparative company law and the implications of different political economies in shaping the 'constitution of the firm'.
About the presentation

The evolution of the corporation: organsiation, finance, knowledge and corporate social responsibility.

This paper, which selectively focuses on the contested concept of Corporate Social Responsibility [CSR], forms part of a larger research project on the evolution of corporate governance. This research posits the evolution of corporate governance along three historical paradigms: first, the economic/industrial organisation paradigm, second, the financial paradigm, and third, the knowledge paradigm.

With regard to CSR, the paper explores the promises and shortcomings of the concept against the background of an evolutionary theory of corporate governance. The identification of three historical-conceptual paradigms allows us to trace the development of the relation between a general discourse on corporate governance regulation [CGR] on the one hand and a more specialised, often polemic debate over corporate (social, environmental, human rights) responsibilities on the other.

On the basis of the review of the three paradigms of CSR over the course of more than one hundred years, the paper concludes that there is no convincing justification to separate the general Corporate Governance from the more specific CSR discourse when assessing the nature of the corporation. Instead, it is argued that a more adequate understanding of what defines a corporation is gained when capturing its embedded nature in a continuously changing domestic, global and functional environment. Besides being both a legal fiction and an economic actor, the business corporation is assuming a host of other roles in a functionally differentiated global society. The paper suggests that the generation and dissemination of knowledge, both internally and externally, has become the defining feature of the firm. The corporation as a knowledge actor succeeds the prior stages of assessing it as a private, political or financial actor, without however erasing these dimensions of the firm. In that, the history of the corporation - as concept and reality - shares important features with that of the state - as concept and as fact.
Details regarding the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial series are included in the series brochure. To view the brochure, pleaseclick here.

Yr 10 Subject Selection Evenings   View Summary
4 June 2009

Year 10 Information Evening 2009 Subject selections and the path to University

click hereto register online


If you're planning on heading to university after your HSC you might already have a few questions:

  • Where can I find info on the UAI, scaling and university entrance?
  • Which subjects should I choose for year 11 and 12?
  • What sort of career should I aim for?
  • What is studying at uni like?

The Year 10 Information Evening is designed to help you make choices about your future.

Online registration opens 5pm on Monday 18th May and are allocated on a first come, first served basis. Numbers are limited so be sure to get in early so you don't miss out!

Steel Magnolias   View Summary
5 June 2009 to 28 June 2009

Written by Robert Harling; Directed by Darren Yap.

Cast: Ana Maria Belo, Marian Frizelle, Jennifer Hagan, Debra Lawrance, Geraldine Turner & Jacki Weaver.

The quintessential story of friendship, Steel Magnolias serves up a slice of life in Louisiana that's as warm and comforting as sweet potato pie. In the haven of Truvy's beauty salon, six very different women come together to share their secrets and bare their souls, facing their lives with grace, determination, and perfectly coifed hair. When tragedy strikes, it is in the familiar comfort of Truvy's salon where they seek the solace and support that carries them through.

Fans of Robert Harling's smash hit film can enjoy this enduring comedy and heart-felt celebration of love, loyalty, and the bonds of sisterhood live on stage with some of Australia's best loved actresses of stage and screen.

Curator's Tour: Griffith Taylor   View Summary
7 June 2009

Dr Jude Philp will take a curator's tour of the exhibition Griffith Taylor: Global Geographer.

Griffith Taylor: Global Geographer (exhibition)   View Summary
7 June 2009 to 18 September 2009

Foundation Professor of Geography at the Uniersity of Sydney, Griffith Taylor (1880 - 1963) was a remarkable man - a driven intellectual and a superb self-publicist. Taylor's career in Australia, the United States and Canada encompassed Antarctic exploration, ethnography and nation planning. His frank assessments of Australia's arid country and concern for the environmental limits of settlement derided in his own lifetime, have earned him renewed respect. This exhibition, curated by historian Carolyn Strange, explores the extraordinary world of a talented draftsman, teacher and provocative explorer of places and ideas.

Death on the Nile: Agatha Christie in Egypt   View Summary
7 June 2009

A free talk looking at Agatha Christie and the writing of the novel Death on the Nile

The Chancellor's Committee Antique Fair   View Summary
7 June 2009

You are warmly invited to come to the Chancellor's Committee's 13th Annual Antique Fair. Held in Sydney's finest antique building, the Great Hall will be full of beautiful treasures from over 20 diverse dealers.

Antique Fair Features:
•Sydney's emergent and most energetic antique dealers
•Identifications and evaluations
•Quality entertainment (singing, organ, carillon)
•Minilectures
•Refreshments
•Walking tours
•Opportunities to buy and collect

The funds raised by the University's voluntary fundraising group, the Chancellor's Committee, will be spent on meeting its primary objective: to fund projects of University-wide significance and which may not have access to mainstream funding sources..

The Fair will have something for everyone from furniture, ceramics, glassware and paintings to pens, toys, tools, handbags, watches, silverware, jewellery, maps and other antiques and collectables from various periods.

Bring your own family heirlooms, weird or wonderful, and have them appraised by our antiques expert. This fair covers most items of interest and tastes. Chat with the stallholders, many of whom are regulars: an indication that they believe this to be a fair of quality.

And stay for morning or afternoon tea and lunch: home made scones, sausages on the grill, and sandwiches will be available.

Lectures given by antiques experts will be presented throughout the day lasting about 20 minutes followed by question time.

Delightful music will add to the festivities, with an organ and grand piano plus the University's War Memorial Carillon in the afternoon, and singing by the University Choir.

Join the walking tour led by Jeremy Steele, the Chancellor's Committee's own expert on the University's history. Be initiated into the secrets of the heritage precinct, its architectural and art treasures and the stories that lie behind them.

And while in the Great Hall Precinct enjoy the delights of the University's Nicholson and Macleay Museums and the Sydney University Art Gallery (Open every Sunday from 12 - 4pm)
Here you can browse the treasures displayed in their current exhibitions.

Unveiling of plaque for Archibald Lang McLean   View Summary
7 June 2009

Medical alumnus Archibald Lang McLean was Chief Medical Officer for Mawson in the first Australian expedition to Antarctica.

Yr 10 Subject Selection Evenings   View Summary
9 June 2009

Year 10 Information Evening 2009 Subject selections and the path to University

click hereto register online


If you're planning on heading to university after your HSC you might already have a few questions:

  • Where can I find info on the UAI, scaling and university entrance?
  • Which subjects should I choose for year 11 and 12?
  • What sort of career should I aim for?
  • What is studying at uni like?

The Year 10 Information Evening is designed to help you make choices about your future.

Online registration opens 5pm on Monday 18th May and are allocated on a first come, first served basis. Numbers are limited so be sure to get in early so you don't miss out!

Free Lunchtime Tour of University Art Gallery   View Summary
10 June 2009

Join us for a guided tour of the University Art Gallery and its current exhibition. Lunch for the mind and the soul.

Bosch Annual Scientific Meeting   View Summary
11 June 2009

"New Horizons in Biomedical Research" with special guests Professor Chris Parish & Professor Peter Lay

The Global Talent Search and Challenge International Forum   View Summary
11 June 2009

The University of Sydney's International Forum series brings together leaders and thinkers from around the world to present their views on strategic international issues and the way in which these issues may impact on Australia and the world.

The next Forum will focus on 'The Global Talent Search and Challenge'. This Forum will be delivered in collaboration with SydneyTalent, a new initiative of the University of Sydney providing tailored recruitment services and a range of employment options to ensure that our students are adequately matched to business needs. This Forum will consider the importance of international mobility and management of talent.

Principal speakers at this Forum are Mr Andrew Banks, Managing Director, Talent2 International who will discuss the issue on 'The Global Talent Search' and Professor Lesleyanne Hawthorne, Associate Dean International & Director, Faculty International Unit, University of Melbourne on 'The Global Talent Challenge'. Two distinguished panellists, Ms Anne Moore, CEO SydneyTalent and Professor Bruce Robinson, Dean, Faculty of Medicine will provide additional comments. These presentations will be followed by an open discussion and debate.

The Forum will be held on Thursday 11 June, in the MacLaurin Hall, Quadrangle building. Registration begins at 3.00pm for a 3.30pm start followed by a reception at 5.00pm.


To register for the International Forum, please email international@usyd.edu.au by Friday 29 May 2009.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Henry Hu, University of Texas   View Summary
12 June 2009

The Ross Parsons Address in Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law:

'Decoupling', Governance, and the World Financial Crisis
This seminar is part of the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial Series for 2009.
About the speaker

Henry Hu holds the Allan Shivers Chair in the Law of Banking and Finance at the University of Texas Law School. Interested in law and modern finance, he has written on such matters as bank, derivatives, hedge fund, and mutual fund regulation, corporate governance, 'decoupling' of debt and equity rights from economic interests, financial rationality and sophistication, global competitiveness of U.S. derivatives markets, model risk, risk management, swaps and other financial innovations, and Warren Buffett.
Professor Hu teaches corporate law and securities regulation at the University of Texas, and has also taught at Harvard Law School. He has testified before Congress on the role of credit default swaps in our financial crisis, on the New York Stock Exchange's going public, and on the collapse of Long Term Capital Management. He has also testified before the Securities and Exchange Commission on hedge funds' use of derivatives-based 'decoupling' to try to avoid 13D disclosure.
This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.


Details regarding the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial series are included in the series brochure. To view the brochure, pleaseclick here.

Agriculture: Can it be Sustainable?   View Summary
12 June 2009

In our problematic world faced with crises of food, water, energy and climate security the need for a sustainable agriculture is fast becoming of paramount importance. But the question is, can agriculture be sustainable? Our researchers and key invited speakers will address and debate this critical question and hopefully will give us some clues to the way ahead.

Current Thinking Series - Making Sydney's Future Sustainable   View Summary
17 June 2009

In an age when the buzzword is 'sustainability', why do we continue to build unsustainable cities and regions? Are there alternatives to car-clogged streets, suburban McMansions and degraded natural environments?

This presentation celebrates the launch of 'Dialogues in urban planning: towards sustainable regions' by Sydney University Press, a book showcasing research by staff and doctoral research candidates at the University of Sydney. The event will feature a panel of well-known Sydney scholars. The 'Q&A' format should encourage a lively debate.

If you have questions you would like the panel to consider, please forward them to Sue Lalor when you RSVP. The panel will include:

Professor Richard Hyde, international sustainable architectural design specialist;

Professor Peter Phibbs, pioneer of urban sustainability and climate change initiatives in western Sydney;

Professor Ed Blakely, recent 'reconstruction tsar' for New Orleans and prime mover behind Sydney's metropolitan strategy;

Associate Professor Nicole Gurran, land use planner and expert on the growth of sea-change communities;

Tony Gilmour, affordable housing expert and lead editor of Dialogues in Urban Planning.

Sun, Moon and Stars: The development of the Classical Athenian Calendar   View Summary
18 June 2009

Public Lecture by Professor Robert Hannah (University of Otago)

Societies throughout the ancient world used the sun, moon and stars to mark, measure and tell the time through the days, months and years. One problem they faced is that months measured by the moon do not easily coordinate with seasons measured by the sun. Ancient Greek civic calendars were moon-based and yet also had to provide appropriate dates for seasonal festivals. At the end of the 5th century BC the Athenian astronomer Meton successfully devised a cycle that coordinated lunar and solar time over periods of 19 years. This lecture will examine how Meton achieved this.

Anna Tibaijuka at Sydney Ideas   View Summary
18 June 2009

Dr Anna Tibaijuka, United Nations Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director, UN-HABITAT

Sustainable Urbanisation, Climate Change and the Global Financial Crisis

Welcome by Dr Michael Spence, Vice Chancellor and Principal

Introduction by Associate Professor Anna Rubbo, Faculty of Design Architecture and Planning

Today we are faced with many challenges in our quest for sustainable human settlements but among the most compelling ones are rapid urbanisation, climate change and the global financial crisis. By 2030, three quarters of the world's population is projected to be urban. The bulk of this rapid urban population growth will take place in developing countries, countries which are least able to cope resulting in massive growth of slums and squatter settlements. Dr. Anna Tibaijuka's lecture will discuss these issues with reference to the potential for academic and other partnerships to help address them, and outline the role of UN-Habitat as it relates to the implementation of the Habitat Agenda with the twin objectives of shelter for all and sustainable human settlements development.

Focus on the Future - transport after crude oil   View Summary
18 June 2009

The Institute for Sustainable Solutions will be hosting a discussion on the future of transport after crude oil.

In this lecture two experts will provide their views on the two technology pathways most likely to take us beyond our present reliance on crude oil to power transport.

Daily Arrival Information Sessions (for International Students)   View Summary
22 June 2009 to 7 August 2009

These sessions cover the following important information for international students: health cover - on campus services - security - concession and discounts - tax information - banking - public transport - enrolment . The sessions also provide an opportunity to ask other questions you may have. The sessions are run daily (no sessions on weekends).

Housing Information Sessions (for International Students)   View Summary
22 June 2009 to 7 August 2009

All you need to know about finding accommodation in Sydney. The sessions begin at 1pm daily, Monday to Friday. Attendance is required to make an appointment with the housing officer.

Bang   View Summary
23 June 2009 to 18 July 2009

Written by Jonathan Gavin; Directed by Kim Hardwick.

An urban fairy tale in a world gone mad.

The creative team who brought you The Hatpin (with Neil Gooding Productions) and LoveBites presents a new Australian work by award winning playwright Jonathan Gavin.

On the platform of a suburban railway station stands a young woman with a mission. Its a mission that will take more lives than her own. Some will find it glorious. Others will brand it the work of pure evil. Her brother will simply try to live with what his sister has done.

A university lecturer, a drag queen, a nun, and a vibrant cast of characters are drawn together by being blown apart. The debris will be more than tiles and concrete; the dust of exploded beliefs.

BANG is a prayer for a heartbroken world. It is an uplifting story of terror, of finding your life's purpose, of being wrong, and of the redemptive power of love.

Disciplines of Inquiry - Methodology Colloquia 09   View Summary
25 June 2009

The Research Division, Faculty of Education and Social Work invites you to participate in the launch of a colloquia series on new approaches to research and interdisciplinarity across the education and social work domains.

The detailsfor thisweek'sproceedings are to be released shortly - please check this website for updates.

New Illusions of Colour and Motion   View Summary
25 June 2009

Speaker: Stuart Anstis, Psychology Department, University of California, San Diego

Abstract and Bio: Dr. Stuart Anstis was born in England and was a scholar at Winchester and at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. He took his PhD at Cambridge with Prof. Richard Gregory. He has taught at the University of Bristol, UK, and at York University, Toronto, Canada. Since 1991 he has taught at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). He has been a visiting scientist at the Smith-Kettlewell Institute, San Francisco, the San Francisco Exploratorium, and at IPRI in Japan. He has published about 120 papers on visual perception, including the perception of real and apparent motion, Pulfrich's Pendulum, movement aftereffects, contingent aftereffects, coloured afterimages, normal and defective colour vision in babies, adaptation to gradual change in luminance, and the apparent size of holes felt with the tongue. Has also worked on hearing, including adaptation to frequency-shifted auditory feedback, hearing with the hands, adaptation to gradual change in loudness, and perfect pitch! and on motor aftereffects after jogging on a treadmill. With George Mather and Frans Verstraten he edited a book on the motion aftereffect. He has given over 250 invited presentations on his research throughout the USA, Europe and Japan, including an invited address in the President's Symposium at the annual meeting of the Society for Neurosciences a few years back, the 1998 Max Wertheimer Lecture in Frankfurt, and an invited address to mark the opening of a new exhibit of Visual Illusions at the University of Nevada, Reno in 2008. His work has been featured in Discover magazine and in occasional television programs. He has won awards as an outstanding teacher at York University and at Earl Warren College, UCSD, where he was invited to give the commencement speech to 8000 people at the graduation ceremony in June 1999.

Managing the New Uncertainties: Strategies to respond to the Fair Work Act in the Economic Crisis   View Summary
26 June 2009

Learn about the critical issues emerging from the Fair Work Act and their implications for workplaces, find out about emerging bargaining strategies and how power relations is changing in the current uncertain economic context. Numbers have been limited and the program has been designed to give attendees maximum opportunity to ask speakers questions. Speakers include Workplace Research Centre (Faculty of Economics and Business) Director John Buchanan, Clayton Utz IR experts and leading public and private union and employer representatives.

Seminars will take place in Perth (16 June), Melbourne (18 June), Brisbane (23 June), Sydney (26 June) and Canberra (1 July).

Lee Felsenstein - One Laptop Per Child - the View from 1978   View Summary
26 June 2009

The talk would take the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) project as an example of the old paradigm for computer use - created by a priesthood, closed off from those who wish to experiment with it, marketed through huge bureaucracies with no feedback from the user, and packaged with a set of myths that make no sense. These sort of tactics were attacked successfully in the 1970's by the movement that created the personal computer industry. Lee Felsenstein will explore how the lessons learned in the development of the PC industry were ignored by the OLPC project, how the result was failure to meet the project's stated goals, and how the project is changing under the influence of the same types of computer enthusiasts who built the PC industry. He will offer a somewhat broader picture of possibilities for computers at the village level in the developing world and discuss how some of them are currently being implemented and will present a more detailed picture of how the rest could be implemented.

My Name Is Rachel Corrie   View Summary
27 June 2009 to 30 June 2009

The Seymour Centre presents a BITE and Bareboards production.

Don't miss this powerful true story.

From the writings of Rachel Corrie.

Edited by Alan Rickman and Katharine Viner. Directed by Shannon Murphy.

Why did a 23-year-old woman leave her comfortable American life to stand between a bulldozer and a Palestinian home?

My Name Is Rachel Corrie tells the story of her short life and sudden death, from the words she left behind.

Much akin to the diaries of Anne Frank, the diaries of Rachel Corrie allow us to look past what is occurring in our backyards and into the battles for social justice.

Here is a play where the real dialogue begins when the curtain comes down. Rachel Corrie was a powerful writer- charming, quirky, funny- and given to painting strong images in a memorable voice. Artfully adapted by Alan Rickman and Katharine Viner, My Name Is Rachel Corrie is theatre that not only stirs our hearts but sticks in our heads. Newsweek

Belinda Bromilow gives a stunning performance The Australian

Nominated Best Direction Sydney Theatre Awards.
Nominated Best Actress Sydney Theatre Awards.
Winner Best Production Sydney Theatre Awards.

The Seymour Centre is proud to present the return season of this powerful and controversial celebration of one young woman's moral strength and passionate mind.

Margaret Levi at Sydney Ideas   View Summary
30 June 2009

A Challenge to the Hip Pocket: Evoking Commitments to Social Justice

Margaret Levi, Professor of Political Science and Bacharach Professor of International Studies, University of Washington, and Professor of US Politics, US Studies Centre, University of Sydney

Almost all Australian unions ask members to contribute personal time and money or approve organisational resources for charitable purposes, electoral campaigns, and lobbying. Some also advocate political and social justice causes that seem unrelated to the achievement of better wages or working conditions. Historically, some Australian unions have even induced members to take costly personal actions that do not seem to have connection to the reasons people joined the union initially. The green bans of the NSW Builder Labour Federation in the early 1970's are the best known example. How were some unions able to do this, and what is about membership of an organisation that can change the beliefs of constituents about the nature of the world and challenge long-held views? In religious, political, and labour organizations, altruism is common enough, as are volunteering, political commitment, and unselfish service to others. But what is the unique structure of some organisations' culture and leadership that can produce member self-sacrifice on behalf of a wide range of political and social justice issues, and can indeed transform political preferences of the members?

In her Sydney Ideas lecture, Margaret Levi lecture will trace the development of the labor movements' participation in social justice campaigns (global and domestic), comparing the US experience to the activities of Australian unions; and reveal how organisations can provoke members' willingness to act beyond material interest.


Margaret Levi is the Jere L. Bacharach Professor of International Studies, Department of Political Science, University of Washington, Seattle and, jointly, Professor of US Politics, US Studies Centre, University of Sydney. She is Director of the CHAOS (Comparative Historical Analysis of Organizations and States) Center and formerly the Harry Bridges Chair and Director, the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies. Levi earned her B.A. from Bryn Mawr College in 1968 and her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1974, the year she joined the faculty of the University of Washington. She became a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001 and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow in 2002. She was a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar (2006-7) and recipient of the S. Sterling Munro Public Service Teaching Award in 2001. She served as President of the American Political Science Association (2004-5).

Australian Portraiture and the National Portrait Gallery   View Summary
30 June 2009

Taking in the histories of sculpture, drawing, print-making, photography and painting, Andrew Sayers (Director, National Portrait Gallery) will look at the way in which the National Portrait Gallery has created a new framework for our appreciation of Australian portrait traditions.

July
Nicholson: Man and Museum (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 December 2009

A colourful exploration of some of the unearthed tales behind the extraordinary life of Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum, and the first vice-chancellor and second chancellor of the University of Sydney. Find out about Nicholson and mummies, spiritualism, trips up the Volga, grand houses, a much younger wife, retirement to England aged 53, and the loss of his house and life's work aged 90. True melodrama.

A Small History of Microscopy   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 August 2009

Confused by the difference between compound and simple microscopes? This small display on historic microscopy and slides will bring you into this tiny but fascinating world.

WS Macleay and the natural history circle   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 1 December 2009

William Sharp Macleay's natural history Horae Entomologicae (1819 - 21) sought God's order in nature through a system of organisation based on the affinities and analogies between organisms. This quinarian system, as it was known, was read and considered by London's young and radical naturalists in the 1820's and the 1830's, among them the promising scholar Charles Darwin.

Classical Fantasies: The age of beauty from Naples to Capri (exhibition)   View Summary
25 February 2009 to 1 July 2009

The 19th Century saw the blossoming of the 'Classical Ideal'. The Mediterranean, especially Italy, provided inspiration for an army of classicists, archaeologists, writers, poets, artists and early photographers. At the heart of this was the idea of the beauty and purity of the Classical past. The exhibition will explore this fantasy as well as look at how the morals of the past were used to explain and justify the morals of the time.

The Sky's The Limit: Astronomy In Antiquity (exhibition)   View Summary
3 May 2009 to 15 August 2009

Many ancient religions and their myths revolve around the planets and the stars. Ancient people looked to the stars to make sense of the world. Following the stars allowed people to predict the change of the seasons, track timeand create calendars. Sailors, as they struck across the seas, used the night sky to guide their path. Architects designed tombs and temples to align with celestial beings for superstitious and practical reasons. This exhibition forms part of the University of Sydney's program to mark the International Year of Astronomy (IYA).

Speaking Volumes - the Three Decker Novel   View Summary
14 May 2009 to 30 November 2009

What did people in nineteenth century England really read? Explore the books from the Three Decker Novel Collection and be entertained by historical and sporting fiction, thrilled by adventure and romance and enlightened by novels on social issues.

Poesia Visiva: Italian Concrete and Visual Poetry of the 1960's and 1970's   View Summary
17 May 2009 to 19 July 2009

Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, 'concrete poetry' was one of the most active movements in the visual arts. Treating the poem as an object, artists combined language and pictorial elements to create compelling works of art. In Italy it also became an effective medium to portray political concerns. Using works from the University Art Collection, this exhibition showcases the medium's techniques, such as the use of collage, the typewriter, mass media and popular culture.

Griffith Taylor: Global Geographer (exhibition)   View Summary
7 June 2009 to 18 September 2009

Foundation Professor of Geography at the Uniersity of Sydney, Griffith Taylor (1880 - 1963) was a remarkable man - a driven intellectual and a superb self-publicist. Taylor's career in Australia, the United States and Canada encompassed Antarctic exploration, ethnography and nation planning. His frank assessments of Australia's arid country and concern for the environmental limits of settlement derided in his own lifetime, have earned him renewed respect. This exhibition, curated by historian Carolyn Strange, explores the extraordinary world of a talented draftsman, teacher and provocative explorer of places and ideas.

Daily Arrival Information Sessions (for International Students)   View Summary
22 June 2009 to 7 August 2009

These sessions cover the following important information for international students: health cover - on campus services - security - concession and discounts - tax information - banking - public transport - enrolment . The sessions also provide an opportunity to ask other questions you may have. The sessions are run daily (no sessions on weekends).

Housing Information Sessions (for International Students)   View Summary
22 June 2009 to 7 August 2009

All you need to know about finding accommodation in Sydney. The sessions begin at 1pm daily, Monday to Friday. Attendance is required to make an appointment with the housing officer.

Bang   View Summary
23 June 2009 to 18 July 2009

Written by Jonathan Gavin; Directed by Kim Hardwick.

An urban fairy tale in a world gone mad.

The creative team who brought you The Hatpin (with Neil Gooding Productions) and LoveBites presents a new Australian work by award winning playwright Jonathan Gavin.

On the platform of a suburban railway station stands a young woman with a mission. Its a mission that will take more lives than her own. Some will find it glorious. Others will brand it the work of pure evil. Her brother will simply try to live with what his sister has done.

A university lecturer, a drag queen, a nun, and a vibrant cast of characters are drawn together by being blown apart. The debris will be more than tiles and concrete; the dust of exploded beliefs.

BANG is a prayer for a heartbroken world. It is an uplifting story of terror, of finding your life's purpose, of being wrong, and of the redemptive power of love.

The Graduate Connections Breakfast with Professor Penny Pether   View Summary
1 July 2009

The Graduate Connections Breakfasts were established in 2005, and designed to offer Sydney alumni the opportunity to develop lasting relationships with each other and the University, whilst showcasing the achievements of notable alumni.
The breakfasts are open to all public, with a discount for The University of Sydney alumni.
Our July Graduate Connections Breakfast will be hosted by Professor Penny Pether who will be speaking on the topic of 'How America got the bad common law'.
Penny earned her BA, LLB and PhD from the University of Sydney, and holds a MLitt in English Literature from the University of New England.
Having started her career as a practising solicitor at the Sydney office of Freehill, Hollingdale & Page, Penny is currently Professor of Law at Villanova University School of Law, where she teaches Comparative Constitutional Law, Constitutional Criminal Procedure, Criminal Law and Law and Literature in which she has an international profile as a scholar.

The Social History of the Personal Computer   View Summary
1 July 2009

SPEAKER: LEE FELSENSTEIN

ABSTRACT:

We all know that personal computers and the Internet did not arise on

their own. But how could technology with its roots in military budgets,

the stunted culture of technologists, and hierarchical corporate culture

have spawned such a subversive set of products and practices?

With hindsight, drawing upon my own personal experiences as the designer

of several early personal computers and peripherals, as well as

moderator of the seminal Homebrew Computer Club in Silicon Valley, I

will explore competing mythologies about the genesis of personal

computing as well as discuss come conclusions that may illuminate not

only the historical questions but also the dialectic of work versus play

and how it operates different for differing personality types.

Stewart Brand, through his Whole Earth Catalog did the most to enable

those who created the PC. Probing the web of interconnections in the

hotbed of the San Francisco Bay area political, social and technological

countercultures, we will examine the interactions that produced such

unlikely results.

Those who expect a story of predictable progress from point A through

point B terminating at C will be disappointed. Rather, expect to hear of

chaotic activity, past and present, within environments in which play is

encouraged, a high degree of feedback is maintained, and mechanisms

exist for reaping the benefit of unexpected technological progress.

To conclude, there will be a look at the new wave of institutions being

designed to support environments today that are conducive to chaotic

development for the current generation in collaboration with older ones.

BIO:

Lee Felsenstein received a B.S. in EECS from the University of

California, Berkeley in 1972. He entered UC Berkeley first in 1963,

joined the Co-operative Work-Study Program in Engineering in 1964 and

dropped out at the end of 1967, working as a Junior Engineer at the

Ampex Corporation from 1968 through 1971, when he re-enrolled at

Berkeley. Lee has been employed at Osborne Computer Corporation from

1981 - 1983, at Interval Research Corporation from 1992 - 2000, and at

Pemstar Pacific Consultants from 2001 - 2005. All other times he has

worked either as a free-lance consulting designer or for his own design

firm.

Ayioi Pente: a new Early Christian site at Yeroskipou, Cyprus    View Summary
1 July 2009

Public Lecture: Professor Demetrios Michaelides (University of Cyprus)

The chance discovery in 2002 of Early Christian remains north of Yeroskipou (a township adjacent to Paphos), in an area renowned for its Late Bronze Age and Hellenistic tombs, came as a complete surprise.
After a small-scale investigation by the Department of Antiquities, the University of Cyprus undertook the systematic excavation and study of the site.
Although the remains are extremely poorly preserved, it is clear that the focal point was a basilica around which there was a funerary and a monastic(?) complex. The basilica as well as many of the adjacent rooms were originally paved with mosaics. All of these were destroyed by either plough or bulldozer, save two that survive intact. Both are associated with burials- a very unusual feature for Cyprus. A room nearby housed four large ossuaries, which, even though looted, yielded important material including a considerable number of gold jewellery and around 900 bronze coins. The remains span the period from the 5th to the 7th centuries AD.

Ayioi Pente: a new Early Christian site at Yeroskipou, Cyprus    View Summary
1 July 2009

Public Lecture: Professor Demetrios Michaelides (University of Cyprus)

The chance discovery in 2002 of Early Christian remains north of Yeroskipou (a township adjacent to Paphos), in an area renowned for its Late Bronze Age and Hellenistic tombs, came as a complete surprise.
After a small-scale investigation by the Department of Antiquities, the University of Cyprus undertook the systematic excavation and study of the site.
Although the remains are extremely poorly preserved, it is clear that the focal point was a basilica around which there was a funerary and a monastic(?) complex. The basilica as well as many of the adjacent rooms were originally paved with mosaics. All of these were destroyed by either plough or bulldozer, save two that survive intact. Both are associated with burials- a very unusual feature for Cyprus. A room nearby housed four large ossuaries, which, even though looted, yielded important material including a considerable number of gold jewellery and around 900 bronze coins. The remains span the period from the 5th to the 7th centuries AD.

Sydney Democracy Forum Presents: Human Rights, Democracy and Rule of Law   View Summary
3 July 2009

Sydney Democracy Forum Presents:

Human Rights, Democracy and Rule of Law

Michael Kirby - Retired High Court Judge “International Law and the Democratic Deficitâ€

One of the biggest debates in the judiciary, and in politics, in the United States, with some resonances in Australia, is whether international law may be cited by national judges in resolving constitutional controversies. Justice Scalia, in the Supreme Court of the United States, is strongly opposed. A Bill was introduced into Congress to forbid the practice. The issue has also arisen in Australian cases in the High Court, including Al-Kateb and Roach (the prisoners’ voting case).

In this talk, the Hon. Michael Kirby, former Justice of the High Court of Australia, will examine the argument against the use of international law on the footing that it lacks democratic legitimacy.

Australian courts, at least, have long used foreign legal material for reasoning by analogy. This has no local democratic legitimacy. Yet no democratic deficit has been supposed. This will be explored as will be the parochialism that lies behind the resistance to the incoming tide of international law in domestic decision-making.

Prof. Duncan Ivison - Professor of Political Philosophy, University of Sydney “Is There a Human Right to Democracy?â€

Democracy and human rights seem to be two sides of the same coin, or are they fundamentally different things? Democracies regularly violate human rights, but they also seem to be the best hope for their protection. What is the basic relationship between democracy and human rights? If human rights are supposed to constrain democracy then upon what grounds can they do so?

If democracy is the fundamental source of legitimate political authority, then what role should human rights play in making sense of democratic legitimacy? Is there a human right to democracy?

Are the rights enumerated in our most prominent human rights instruments today only genuinely realizable under democratic conditions? If so, then just how universal are they? And what do we mean by democracy anyway?

Date: 3rd July 2009

Time: 3pm to 5pm

Place: Room 104, Law Auditorium, New Law Building, University of Sydney

RSVP: Zoe Morrison - sdf@usyd.edu.au

Pyramids and Excavations in the Faiyyum   View Summary
5 July 2009

A talk by David Down of Archaeological Diggings magazine. El Faiyyum is the largest oasis in the land of Egypt. It is about 100 km south west of Cairo and supports a population of some two million people. It was a major centre of the powerful 12th dynasty of Egypt and boasts two large pyramids, one at Hawarra built by Amenemhet III, the other built at Lahun by Sesostri II. These pyramids were once faced with stone blocks but the interior consisted of millions of sun-dried mud bricks. The stone facing has long since been stolen but the brick core remains. Adjoining the Hawarra pyramid was the mysterious labyrinth. Near the Lahun pyramid was the city of Kahun, which was occupied by the workmen who built the pyramids. Sir Flinders Petrie excavated this city and made some amazing discoveries. Because the Faiyyum is so remote and these pyramids are not well known, very few tourists visit them, but David takes his group there every year and has made a detailed study of them. His illustrated lecture will explain their many unusual features.

Successful Learning Conference 2009   View Summary
6 July 2009 to 7 July 2009

This annual conference will appeal to all concerned with the education of students K-12 who experience difficulties learning in the mainstream classroom setting. SLC aims to advance the provision of quality education programs for these students with additional learning needs.

Areas addressed during this conference will include accountability and assessment, behaviour management, literacy and numeracy, social skills instruction, and results of research projects being conducted in schools. Presentations will be made by academics, consultants, and practitioners from all education sectors within New South Wales and invited speakers from interstate and overseas.

Keynote speaker: Professor Mary Brownell, College of Education, University of Florida

Participants may attend the conference as a stand alone event, or as part of the Certificate in Educational Studies (Learning Support).

For more information please visit the conference webpage.

Clive Hamilton at Sydney Ideas   View Summary
7 July 2009

The Rebirth of Nature and the Climate Crisis

Clive Hamilton, author, public intellectual and former head of the Australia Institute, has been writing and thinking about climate change for the last two decades. He now turns his attention to the metaphysical side of our relationship with the Earth. To prevent climate catastrophe, he asks, do we need a shift to a new consciousness, one based on a rediscovery of the idea of a living Earth? How might such a philosophical transition occur? Hamilton takes us back to the last great historical transformation of consciousness, the one that gave us the modern view of the Earth; the emergence of the mechanical philosophy in the second half of the 17th century. He examines the philosophies of Duns Scotus, Renée Descartes, Isaac Newton, James "Gaia" Lovelock and others, and contemplates a conception of a living Earth with the methods of modern science and ultimately provides the seeds for a new ecological consciousness.

Poesia Visiva: A free Art Gallery tour   View Summary
8 July 2009

A free lunchtime tour of the University Art Gallery's exhibition Poesia Visiva by Lea Mai.

SCA Mid-Year Postgraduate Degree Show   View Summary
8 July 2009

The 2009 Mid-Year Degree Show will showcase the work of graduating students from the Sydney College of the Arts Graduate School.

Opens Wednesday 8 July, 6 to 8pm.

Exhibition continues to Friday 17 July.

Monday to Friday 11am to 5pm.

Saturday to Sunday 11am to 4pm.

The 6th Biennial Conference of KSAA: Global Korea: Old a   View Summary
9 July 2009 to 10 July 2009

The 6th Biennial KSAA Conference:

The School of Languages and Cultures is hosting the 6th Biennial KSAA Conference, 9-10 July, 2009. 56 papers will be presented in various fields in Korean studies, which include politics and government, international relations, economics and business, language and linguistics, religion, history, film studies and pop culture, art history, gender studies, sociology, information services, and North Korea. For the conference program, visit the web site provided.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Peter Singer, Princeton University   View Summary
13 July 2009

Ethics and World Poverty

Professor Peter Singer

Ira W DeCamp Professor of Bioethics, University Center for Human Values, Princeton University

Peter Singer has taught at the University of Oxford, La Trobe University and Monash University, as well as holding several visiting appointments. He has been Ira W DeCamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University since 1999, and since 2005 has also held the part-time position of Laureate Professor in the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at the University of Melbourne.

Professor Singer first became well-known internationally after the publication of Animal Liberation, and has since authored and co-authored many works that have appeared in more than 20 languages. He was the founding President of the International Association of Bioethics, and founding co-editor of the journal Bioethics.

Outside academic life, he is the co-founder and president of The Great Ape Project, an international effort to obtain basic rights for chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans. He is also President of Animal Rights International.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.

IDIERI 6: The 6th International Drama in Education Research Institute   View Summary
14 July 2009 to 19 July 2009

IDIERI, the International Drama in Education Research Institute, is the pre-eminent drama education research conference held triennially in centres of excellence for drama education throughout the world. Previous conferences have been held in Brisbane, Australia (1995), Canada (1997), the USA (2000), England (2003) and Jamaica (2006). In 2009 the event will be hosted by the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney, Australia.

The theme of IDIERI 6 is "Drama Research Futures: Examining our past, critiquing our present, imagining tomorrow" and examines the shifting conditions in schools and society generally. The theme begs a discussion of the current state of drama education and applied theatre, and engages with the future of the field. While speculative in some ways, it seeks reflection on the past as a way to examine our research agendas, contexts, methodologies and practices. The conference aims to provide fresh perspectives on familiar debates and engage in a critical examination of emerging issues.

Please visit the IDIERI 6 website for full program information.

Moving from the Old to the New: Research on Teaching Reading in and for the 21st Century   View Summary
14 July 2009

Symposium with Professors Peter Freebody, Scott Paris and P. David Pearson

This symposium will be of interest to all teachers K-12, tertiary educators and educational consultants.

Important topics to be covered include:

  • Reading research in the 21st century and its implications for innovative pedagogical practice and assessment
  • Special challenges facing English language learners and culturally diverse students
  • Implications for teachers' training, policy and future research
  • The role of literacy in enhancing all areas of the curriculum
  • The impact of the digital revolution.

For more information please visit thesymposium webpage

Simon Singh at Sydney Ideas   View Summary
15 July 2009

Trick or Treatment? Alternative Medicine on Trial Simon Singh, UK journalist and television producer and author

Introduction by Professor David Day, Dean of the Faculty of Science Presenting the conclusions of his book Trick or Treatment?, co-authored with Professor Edzard Ernst, the world's first professor of complementary medicine, Singh relies on the large amount of scientific evidence that has been accumulated to investigate which alternative therapies are safe and effective, and which are useless and even downright dangerous. Singh will also look at the origins of these therapies, their rapid growth in popularity and their supposed modes of action. His conclusions about effectiveness vary from good to bad (including downright dangerous), so he will discuss why so many ineffective alternative therapies have become so popular, and will consider how those that have been shown to be effective can be incorporated within conventional medicine.

Exhibition: Tina Modotti: A Fresh Look   View Summary
15 July 2009 to 24 July 2009

Photographer, political activist and model Tina Modotti was an outstanding artist and a remarkable woman, friend of the likes of Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and David Alfaro Siqueiros.

Born in Italy in 1896, Modotti moved to San Francisco, U.S.A. at the age of 16 to live with her father, who had a small photography shop.

She embarked on a Hollywood film career and married the artist Roubaix (Robo) de l'Abrie Richey. While in Los Angeles she began a relationship with highly regarded United States photographer, Edward Weston.

Mr. Robo travelled to Mexico to mount an exhibition but died suddenly of smallpox two days before Modotti could join him. She presented a selection of his works in Mexico City and included works by Weston, her photographic mentor and lover.

Modotti's photographic career can be divided into two parts: the romantic on her early years and the revolutionary, after she joined the Communist Party in 1927.

The strength and emotion depicted in her work is both powerful and impressive.

This collection of invaluable historic worth is composed of 26 originals of her more distinctive pictures, which capture social and political life in Mexico during the 1920's.

Presented by University Art Gallery and the Embassy of Mexico.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Professor Philip Pettit, Princeton University   View Summary
16 July 2009

A Republican Law of Peoples

Professor Philip Pettit

LS Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and Human Values, Princeton University

Philip Pettit is the LS Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and Human Values at Princeton University, where he has taught political theory and philosophy since 2002. He has also held teaching and research positions at University College in Dublin, University of Cambridge, University of Bradford, and the Australian National University.

Professor Pettit works in moral and political theory and on background issues in philosophical psychology and social ontology, and is widely published in his field.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.

Global Health Governance - A Search for Meaning   View Summary
16 July 2009

The Menzies Centre for Health Policy is pleased to invite you to the inaugural S. T. Lee Lecture on Thursday, 16 July from 5 pm. The lecture will be delivered by Dr. Tikki Pang (Pangestu), Director, Research Policy & Cooperation (RPC/IER), World Health Organization. Responder: Roger Magnusson, Professor of Health, Law and Governance, Sydney Law School. Seminar chair: Robert Cumming, Professor of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Sydney.

Sydney Sawyer Seminar   View Summary
17 July 2009

Session Three: Atlantic Justice in the Pacific World: Property, Rights, and Indigeneity

Convenors:Duncan Ivison and Andrew Fitzmaurice
Presenters: Sankar Muthu University of Chicago
Jennifer Pitts University of Chicago
Andrew Fitzmaurice University of Sydney

As Europeans turned to the Pacific they brought with them a well-established Atlantic framework for thinking about rights. And, indeed, thinking about the Pacific helped to inspire some of the most prominent Enlightenment philosophers and historians. But by the nineteenth century this whole edifice was falling apart. The understanding of what it was to have a right underwent dramatic changes, which often had devastating consequences for colonized peoples. The aim of this seminar will be to examine the role of the Pacific in the transformation of our understanding of rights.

Residential Sydney Through the Downturn: Retrospect and Prospect   View Summary
17 July 2009

A one day professional development seminar focusing on residential development in Sydney hosted by the Planning Research Centre at Sydney University.

Coinage from Japan to the Mediterranean and under the auspices of the Oriental Society of Australia   View Summary
17 July 2009

International Numismatic Conference on Coinage from Japan to the Mediterranean and under the auspices of the Oriental Society of Australia

Conference Theme
Coins are ideas. There are two traditions of coinage, the Chinese in the east and the Greek in the west. These traditions meet in a line roughly stretching from Iran to Nepal, through eastern India and Burma, and down south-east Asia to Indonesia. Along this line there are coins which reveal a mixture of both traditions. When two ideas meet, we get a better understanding of each idea, and in turn new ideas are created. This conference, involving papers considering coinage on either side of and on this line, as well as non-monetary economy, aims to investigate the nature of human ideas and the very nature of coinage.
The conference will comprise seven papers by international speakers on aspects of oriental coinage and economy from Japan to the Mediterranean.
There will be a numismatic exhibition of coins and books illustrating the theme of the conference, which will open shortly and be on view for a few weeks.

The speakers include:
Keynote Lecture

Professor Walter Scheidel, Head, Department of Classics, Stanford University. USA, 'Coin quality, coin quantity, and coin value in early China and the Roman world'.

Society of Antiquaries of London Keynote Speech (5.00 pm)

Professor Kevin Butcher, Department of Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick, UK, 'Coinage and Communal Memory in the Roman East'.

Although there is a registration fee for the conference, Fellows of the Society of Antiquaries of London will be admitted for free to the Keynote Speech.

Other Papers

Dr Nicholas Hardwick, University of Sydney, 'Introduction: Numismatics from East to West'.

Ms Noriko Fujii, Senior Researcher and Director, The Currency Museum, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, The Bank of Japan, 'The history of Japanese copper coins illustrated by the collection of the Currency Museum of the Bank of Japan'.

'Dr Niv Horesh, Chinese Studies, School of Languages and Linguistics, University of New South Wales, 'The transition from coinage to paper money in East Asia: hallmarks of statehood in global perspective, 8th century BC-AD 2010'.

Dr Michael Vickery, Cambodia/University of Sydney (overview of the issue of the lack of money in the Khmer empire).

Mohammad Younis, Faculty of Archaeology, Fayyum University, Egypt/ Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany, The Salghurid coinage of Fars, Iran, citing the Mongols: the varieties of overlordships, form and content (AH 628-685/AD 1231-86).

Conference Events

Thursday 16 July 2009

Viewing of the numismatic collection of the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney (hosted by Dr Paul Donnelly, Curator, Design, History, and Society, Powerhouse Museum).

Saturday 18 July 2009

Tour of the Coining Complex, The Mint, Macquarie Street, Sydney (hosted by Mr Robert Griffin, Curator of The Mint, Historic Houses Trust).

Kid's Museum: Hieroglyphs   View Summary
19 July 2009

A fun day for the family in the Nicholson Museum in which you will be taught hieroglyphs and explore ancient Egyptian culture and mummies. Children's activities all afternoon.

Dr Karl and Adam Spencer debate on the Apollo 11 Moon Landing   View Summary
20 July 2009

NB: This event has reached full capacity and bookings have closed

To mark the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Sleek Geeks Dr Karl and Adam Spencer will deliver a special presentation to tackle the myths surrounding man's first voyage to the moon.

In 2001, the American Fox TV Network broadcast a program called "Conspiracy Theory: Did We Land on the Moon?" X-Files star Mitch Pileggi hosted this hour-long show, which claimed that NASA had faked the entire Apollo Moon project by filming it in a movie studio. This myth has a small but dedicated following - according to both a 1995 Time Poll and a 1999 Gallup Poll, about 6% of Americans do not believe that 12 astronauts walked on the Moon.

The hoax believers or conspiracy theorists cite all kinds of evidence. Did they or didn't they??

Watch the Sleek Geeks, Dr Karl and Adam Spencer, as they debate each other For & Against the Apollo 11 moon landing.

Celebrating Apollo at 40 Exhibition   View Summary
20 July 2009 to 10 September 2009

In July 1969, the world watched in wonder during the Apollo 11 mission as Neil Armstrong took "one small step", becoming the first human being to set foot on the Moon.

This historic spaceflight represented a "giant leap for Mankind": the first time that human beings had explored another world in person. The Apollo 11 lunar landing was one of the most significant scientific and technological events of the Twentieth Century, and the program that made it possible inspired the best and brightest students to seek out careers in the exciting fields of space exploration, astronomy and aeronautical engineering. In July 2009, the University of Sydney's School of Physics and the Science Foundation for Physics will present an exhibition commemorating the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11's historic lunar landing.

Combining contemporary artefacts and memorabilia, this display will present the history of the Apollo Project and explore the relationship between the US space program and the University of Sydney's School of Physics.

International Student Orientation Program   View Summary
20 July 2009 to 23 July 2009

The Study Abroad and Exchange student's program runs 20 and 21 July, and Full Degree student's program runs 22 and 23 July.

If you are a new International student, it is essential that you attend your Orientation Program as it will give you information, and answer many of the questions you have, about Sydney and the University.

See the website below for full details.

Jill Tarter at Sydney Ideas   View Summary
21 July 2009

Extremophiles and Exoplanets: Expanding the Potentially Habitable Real Estate in the Galaxy

Professor Jill Tarter, astronomer and Director of the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Life) Institute's Center for SETI Research Introduction by Professor Don Nutbeam, Provost and Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Public Health We discovered the very first planetary worlds in orbit around a body other than the Sun in 1990. Today we know of more than 300 planetary bodies, or exoplanets, in orbit around hundreds of stars in the prime of their life cycle. At the same time that we have been developing the capabilities to detect distant Earths, we have also been finding that life on Earth occurs in places that earlier scientists would have considered too hostile to support life. Scientists were wrong. We now know that extremophiles (or microbes that live in conditions that would kill other creatures) can exist (and sometimes thrive) in the most astounding places; at the bottom of the ocean around hydrothermal vents, in ice, in pure salt, in boiling acid, and irradiated by massive doses of UV and X-rays. Since life-as-we-know-it is so extraordinarily hardy, might it exist today (or in the past) on any of the exoplanets that are being found? A group of scientists known as astrobiologists are trying to answer that question.

Jill Tarter at Sydney Ideas    View Summary
21 July 2009

Extremophiles and Exoplanets:

Expanding the Potentially Habitable Real Estate in the Galaxy Professor Jill Tarter, astronomer and Director of the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Life)

Introduction by Professor Don Nutbeam, Provost and Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Public Health.

We discovered the very first planetary worlds in orbit around a body other than the Sun in 1990. Today we know of more than 300 planetary bodies, or exoplanets, in orbit around hundreds of stars in the prime of their life cycle. At the same time that we have been developing the capabilities to detect distant Earths, we have also been finding that life on Earth occurs in places that earlier scientists would have considered too hostile to support life. Scientists were wrong. We now know that extremophiles (or microbes that live in conditions that would kill other creatures) can exist (and sometimes thrive) in the most astounding places; at the bottom of the ocean around hydrothermal vents, in ice, in pure salt, in boiling acid, and irradiated by massive doses of UV and X-rays. Since life-as-we-know-it is so extraordinarily hardy, might it exist today (or in the past) on any of the exoplanets that are being found? A group of scientists known as astrobiologists are trying to answer that question.

ISS 2009 Gala Reception   View Summary
22 July 2009

A free reception celebrating the Professor Harry Messel International Science School - Genes to Galaxies. ISS and University of Sydney alumni and friends all welcome. RSVP essential.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Yasuhei Taniguchi, Senshu University Law School   View Summary
23 July 2009

Crossing Boundaries: Reflections of a Civil Procedure Professor, International Commercial Arbitrator, and WTO Judge

Professor Yasuhei Taniguchi

Professor of Law, Senshu University Law School; Former chair of the Appellate Body of the WTO

Professor Taniguchi served as a member of the Appellate Body of the World Trade Organization Dispute Settlement Body from 2000 until 2007. He is currently Professor of Law at Senshu University Law School and Attorney at Law in Tokyo.

Teaching principally at Kyoto University for 39 years, and subsequently appointed Professor Emeritus in 1998, his teaching engagements have also included visiting professorial roles at University of Michigan, University of California at Berkeley, Duke University, Stanford University, Georgetown University, Harvard University, New York University, University of Richmond, Murdoch University, University of Melbourne, the University of Hong Kong and the University of Paris XII.

Currently president of the Japan Association of Arbitrators, Professor Taniguchi was also former president of the Japanese Association of Civil Procedure, and until 2007 was Vice-President of the International Association of Procedural Law.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.

Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory   View Summary
23 July 2009

The Civil War was the most divisive and destructive event in American history. This lecture will explore how conflicting memories of the war have dominated, poisoned, and sometimes inspired the formation of a national memory in the US.

Speaker: David Blight is Professor of American History at Yale University and Director, Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance & Abolition.

Introduced by Bob Carr, Former Premier of NSW

Booking essential on 9273 1770 or bookings@sl.nsw.gov.au

Price includes light refreshments.

In co-operation with the Department of History and the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney.

Booking essential on 9273 1770 or bookings@sl.nsw.gov.au

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Wojciech Sadurski, Sydney Law School   View Summary
28 July 2009

Challis Chair of Jurisprudence Inaugural Lecture: Reasonableness in Law and Politics

Professor Wojciech Sadurski

Challis Professor of Jurisprudence, Sydney Law School

Wojciech Sadurski is Professor of Legal Philosophy (Personal Chair) at the University of Sydney, and is currently also Professor of Legal Theory and Philosophy of Law in the Department of Law, European University Institute in Florence. He has taught as visiting professor at a number of universities in Europe, Asia and the United States, and has written extensively on philosophy of law, political philosophy and comparative constitutional law.

Professor Sadurski is a member of a number of editorial committees and councils of non-governmental associations and think-tanks including the Institute of Public Affairs in Poland.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.

Curating Australian Art in Biennial Context   View Summary
28 July 2009

Felicity Fenner will discuss the themes and curatorial strategies that informed her role as Curator of the 2008 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art and of 'Once Removed', the current exhibition of early-career Australian artists at the 2009 Venice Biennale.

Corrupt behaviour in the US & Australia: risks and countermeasures    View Summary
28 July 2009

Corruption is written about extensively in the context of political and economic development. Wealthy countries like the US and Australia have their share of corruption scandals, and because of the protective factors in place, these corrupt activities are often greeted with disbelief.

In our July seminar Dr Graycar will examine some types of corruption and their contexts in both countries, and identifies risk factors, and means of combating corruption.

Professor Adam Graycar is Dean, School of Criminal Justice, Rutgers University (New Jersey, USA), a post he took up in 2007. He is also the Director of RICS - the Rutgers Institute on Corruption Studies.

Disciplines of Inquiry - Methodology Colloquia 09   View Summary
30 July 2009

The Research Division, Faculty of Education and Social Work invites you to participate in the launch of a colloquia series on new approaches to research and interdisciplinarity across the education and social work domains.

The detailsfor thisweek'sproceedings are to be released shortly - please check this website for updates.

A resilience approach to resource management   View Summary
30 July 2009

Dr. Brian Walker from CSIRO Ecosystems will give a seminar in the AgroEcosystems Research Group Seminar series in the Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

CPACS Event: Keeping Up With Nuclear Armageddon   View Summary
31 July 2009

Lecture/Seminar
Steven Starr (University of Missouri)
23,000 Warheads, Launch on Warning and Nuclear Winter:
Keeping up with Armageddon

Technologies of disability   View Summary
31 July 2009

In 'The History of Sexuality' Foucault introduces his notion of bio-power as a technology of social control that has developed with capitalism. He states: 'bio-power was without question an indispensible element in the development of capitalism; the latter would not have been possible without the controlled insertion of bodies into the machinery of production' (1978, pp. 140-1). As disability studies scholars such as Tremain (2005), Goggin and Newell (2005), Corker and Shakespeare (2002) and many others have shown, the concept of bio-power informs contemporary understandings of disability in at least two ways. Firstly, as a mode of governance that supports capitalism, bio-power has produced the disabled body as being without great financial value because it can be difficult to insert into the 'machinery' of capitalist production. Secondly, as a result of the former process, material technological developments for users with disabilities have largely been limited to rudimentary 'assistive technologies' that do not extend, for example, to easily accessible mobile phones or Second Life interfaces. Today's seminar approaches the notion of 'technologies of disability' from this understanding of a technology as an act of thought (subjectivation) and a material craft. The speakers explore physical technologies such as film, virtual worlds and other communication mediums through modes of thought that are intended to open up bio-political conceptualizations of disability.


** Speakers:
*Professor Gerard Goggin: Gerard is Professor of Digital Communication, and Deputy Director of the new Centre for Social Research in Journalism and Communication, University of New South Wales. He has research expertise in disability research and policy, especially relating to technology and media. With Christopher Newell he is author of Digital Disability (Rowman & Littlefield, 2003), and many other papers on technology, disability, and society. Their second book Disability in Australia: Exposing a Social Apartheid (University of New South Press, 2005) was awarded the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission Arts Non-Fiction prize.

* Dr Densie Wood: Denise is the Program Director and Senior Lecturer responsible for the Bachelor of Media Arts program at the University of South Australia. She has extensive experience in the multimedia industry as both a producer and educator. Denise was a founding member of the Information Policy Advisory Council established by the Communications Minister in 1996 and the Director of an organisation specialising in multimedia production and training for young people with disabilities, from 1994 to 1997. Her research now combines new media and disability studies with a focus on Web .2 and Second Life.

*Dr Anna Hickey-Moody: Anna is a lecturer in the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney. She is interested in how we can re-frame questions of social justice, and as such, her research intersects across cultural studies of youth, disability and gender. Anna is interested in how bodies marked as somehow being disadvantaged might be thought in new ways. She is co-author of Masculinity beyond the Metropolis (Palgrave, 2006), co-editor of Deleuzian Encounters (Palgrave, 2007) and author of Unimaginable Bodies (Sense, 2009).

August
Nicholson: Man and Museum (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 December 2009

A colourful exploration of some of the unearthed tales behind the extraordinary life of Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum, and the first vice-chancellor and second chancellor of the University of Sydney. Find out about Nicholson and mummies, spiritualism, trips up the Volga, grand houses, a much younger wife, retirement to England aged 53, and the loss of his house and life's work aged 90. True melodrama.

A Small History of Microscopy   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 August 2009

Confused by the difference between compound and simple microscopes? This small display on historic microscopy and slides will bring you into this tiny but fascinating world.

WS Macleay and the natural history circle   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 1 December 2009

William Sharp Macleay's natural history Horae Entomologicae (1819 - 21) sought God's order in nature through a system of organisation based on the affinities and analogies between organisms. This quinarian system, as it was known, was read and considered by London's young and radical naturalists in the 1820's and the 1830's, among them the promising scholar Charles Darwin.

The Sky's The Limit: Astronomy In Antiquity (exhibition)   View Summary
3 May 2009 to 15 August 2009

Many ancient religions and their myths revolve around the planets and the stars. Ancient people looked to the stars to make sense of the world. Following the stars allowed people to predict the change of the seasons, track timeand create calendars. Sailors, as they struck across the seas, used the night sky to guide their path. Architects designed tombs and temples to align with celestial beings for superstitious and practical reasons. This exhibition forms part of the University of Sydney's program to mark the International Year of Astronomy (IYA).

Speaking Volumes - the Three Decker Novel   View Summary
14 May 2009 to 30 November 2009

What did people in nineteenth century England really read? Explore the books from the Three Decker Novel Collection and be entertained by historical and sporting fiction, thrilled by adventure and romance and enlightened by novels on social issues.

Griffith Taylor: Global Geographer (exhibition)   View Summary
7 June 2009 to 18 September 2009

Foundation Professor of Geography at the Uniersity of Sydney, Griffith Taylor (1880 - 1963) was a remarkable man - a driven intellectual and a superb self-publicist. Taylor's career in Australia, the United States and Canada encompassed Antarctic exploration, ethnography and nation planning. His frank assessments of Australia's arid country and concern for the environmental limits of settlement derided in his own lifetime, have earned him renewed respect. This exhibition, curated by historian Carolyn Strange, explores the extraordinary world of a talented draftsman, teacher and provocative explorer of places and ideas.

Daily Arrival Information Sessions (for International Students)   View Summary
22 June 2009 to 7 August 2009

These sessions cover the following important information for international students: health cover - on campus services - security - concession and discounts - tax information - banking - public transport - enrolment . The sessions also provide an opportunity to ask other questions you may have. The sessions are run daily (no sessions on weekends).

Housing Information Sessions (for International Students)   View Summary
22 June 2009 to 7 August 2009

All you need to know about finding accommodation in Sydney. The sessions begin at 1pm daily, Monday to Friday. Attendance is required to make an appointment with the housing officer.

Celebrating Apollo at 40 Exhibition   View Summary
20 July 2009 to 10 September 2009

In July 1969, the world watched in wonder during the Apollo 11 mission as Neil Armstrong took "one small step", becoming the first human being to set foot on the Moon.

This historic spaceflight represented a "giant leap for Mankind": the first time that human beings had explored another world in person. The Apollo 11 lunar landing was one of the most significant scientific and technological events of the Twentieth Century, and the program that made it possible inspired the best and brightest students to seek out careers in the exciting fields of space exploration, astronomy and aeronautical engineering. In July 2009, the University of Sydney's School of Physics and the Science Foundation for Physics will present an exhibition commemorating the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11's historic lunar landing.

Combining contemporary artefacts and memorabilia, this display will present the history of the Apollo Project and explore the relationship between the US space program and the University of Sydney's School of Physics.

Cleopatra: Queen of the Nile   View Summary
2 August 2009

Dr Elizabeth Bollen (Nicholson Museum) talks on Cleopatra.

Public talk: "Cleopatra: Queen of the Nile"   View Summary
2 August 2009

Dr Elizabeth Bollen (Nicholson Museum) talks on Cleopatra.

Carillon recital "The Auld Country" by Lucy Koe   View Summary
2 August 2009

Sunday afternoon carillon recital, followed by belfry tour. Watch the player on closed-circuit TV under the Western Tower.

Ken Yeang - Retrofitting Using Bioclimatic Principles: Looking for Value Adding    View Summary
3 August 2009

The Architectural Disciplines of the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning is pleased to present this conference looking at the use of a bioclimatic approach to retrofitting office and multi-residential buildings. It is common to apply sustainable principles to new buildings and this has produced very good results. But what about our existing building stock? Can the same sustainability principles be applied when existing buildings are renovated? These are important questions for all architects and related professionals. This conference will bring together local experts and internationally renowned architect Dr Ken Yeang from Malaysia and the UK to look at the current research and its application to warming climates.

What will the workshop discuss?

* Bioclimatic design principles for renovation of office and multi residential buildings
* Green technologies available for retrofitting
* Retrofitting Comfort
* Trend analysis of environmental performance
* Building performance modelling
* Financial Modelling
* Value adding through sustainable retrofitting
* Case studies - success stories

Genealogies of Resilience - From Systems Ecology to the Political Economy of Crisis Adaptation   View Summary
3 August 2009

Department of Sociology and Social Policy Seminar. A talk by Jeremy Walker, Social Inquiry, UWS and Melinda Cooper, SSP, University of Sydney.

Genealogies of Resilience - From Systems Ecology to the Political Economy of Crisis Adaptation   View Summary
3 August 2009

Department of Sociology and Social Policy Seminar. A talk by Jeremy Walker, Social Inquiry, UWS and Melinda Cooper, SSP, University of Sydney

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Stafford Smiley, Georgetown Law Centre   View Summary
4 August 2009

Tax Seminar Series - Tax Reform Under President Obama

Professor Stafford Smiley

Georgetown Law Centre

Stafford Smiley is a member of the law firm Caplin & Drysdale's Washington office. He specialises in the taxation of partnership and other pass-through entities and in the taxation of property transactions generally. His practice includes planning matters, controversy work, and both domestic and international transactions. Previously, he served as a law clerk to the Honorable Arnold Raum, of the United States Tax Court.

Professor Smiley has taught in the Graduate Tax Program at Georgetown University Law Center as an Adjunct Professor since 1996 and became a Visiting Professor in 2008. He teaches and lectures extensively in tax programs at universities abroad.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

Imagining Savage Piety in Romanesque Sculpture   View Summary
4 August 2009

Monsters in medieval art have drawn much scholarly attention as moral guides indicating the bestial and the evil "other". Prof Kirk Ambrose (U.Colorado) will argue that in some cases these monsters could embody ideals worthy of emulation.

Faculty of Arts Research Strategy   View Summary
4 August 2009

This session will present an overview of the Faculty of Arts Research Strategy.

Richard Waterhouse is Bicentennial Professor of Australian History and the Chair of the Faculty of Arts Research Committee.

Sydney Uni Monthly Markets   View Summary
5 August 2009

Have a browse, grab something to eat or snatch up a bargain at the Sydney Uni Monthly Markets.

The 2009 JD Stewart Address   View Summary
5 August 2009

The JD Stewart Address for 2009 "Charles Darwin: traveller in Australia, and biological revolutionary" will be presented by Emeritus Professor Frank Nicholas.

Sydney Democracy Forum present Ben Kiernan   View Summary
5 August 2009

Ben Kiernan - Yale University, USA

Whitney Griswold Professor of History, Professor of International and Area Studies and S.T. Lee Visiting Fellow

An Illustrated Lecture on:

Blood and Soil: Genocide in World History

Australian-born Prof. Ben Kiernan is a prolific writer on the matter of Genocide and in particular, the Cambodian Genocide.

He is the author of Blood and Soil: A World History of Genocide and Extermination from Sparta to Darfur which won the 2008 Gold Medal for Best Book in History awarded by the Independent Publishers Association.

In this illustrated lecture, Prof. Kiernan examines the ideologies behind outbreaks of mass violence from the classical era to the present, focusing on worldwide colonial exterminations from the Caribbean to Korea, and twentieth-century case studies including the Nazi Holocaust and genocides in Cambodia, Dafur and Rwanda. He identifies connections, patterns, and recurring features that often gave early warning of the catastrophe to come:

racism or religious prejudice, territorial expansionism, and cults of antiquity and agrarianism. A range of historical evidence thus offers telltale signs for predicting and preventing future genocides.

Public Lecture: "Griffith Taylor - a contemporary geographic perspective"   View Summary
5 August 2009

A talk by Professor Bruce Thom (Faculty of Geosciences). Griffith Taylor was a geographer schooled in the 1900s. Does his geography hold up today? Do we have anything to learn about our own times from his times and battles? Join Professor Thom as he guides us through a geographer's view of the energetic scholar.


A Griffith Taylor series lecture presented in association with the Faculty of Geosciences.

Free lunchtime art talk with Professor Roger Benjamin    View Summary
5 August 2009

Join us for a floor talk on the University Art Gallery's exhibition "Collecting Passions" with Professor Roger Benjamin, Research Professor in the History of Art, the University of Sydney.

The Art Gallery is through the archway opposite the Nicholson Museum.

Free lunchtime art talk with Professor Roger Benjamin   View Summary
5 August 2009

Join us for a floor talk on the University Art Gallery's exhibition "Collecting Passions" with Professor Roger Benjamin, Research Professor in the History of Art, The University of Sydney.

Controversies in Public Health Lecture Three - The kindest cut of all: did we get it wrong on c   View Summary
5 August 2009

Dr Alex Wodak, Director of the Alcohol and Drug Service, St Vincent's Hospital

Australia should encourage infant male circumcision. Male circumcision reduces the incidence of female to male HIV transmission by about two thirds. The proportion of new HIV infections in Australia accounted for by heterosexual transmission is steadily increasing while infections attributed to male to male sex is dropping. Australia should do this in 2009 to help control HIV in 2029. The case for infant male circumcision on other grounds is also very strong and getting stronger. The considerable benefits far exceed the small risks and costs.

Key Thinkers Series - John Maynard Keynes   View Summary
5 August 2009

Speaker: Professor Tony Aspromourgos, Discipline of Economics, Faculty of Business and Economics

John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) was the most distinguished British economist and an extraordinarily energetic public intellectual of his time. His enduring contribution to economic theory was focused on the level of economic activity as a whole, thereby providing a new approach to explaining aggregate employment and unemployment. Keynes' demand-side economics theory became the basis for his policy dealing with the Great Depression. This lecture will provide an account of Keynes' life and activities, his theory of economic activity, and his views on economic policy. The current global financial crisis and associated contractions of the global economy naturally have revived interest in Keynes' thought.

For full details consult the website : http://www.usyd.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/thoughts_thinkers/index.php

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Global Health Beyond the Millenium Development Goals   View Summary
6 August 2009

Global Health Beyond the Millennium Development Goals

Speakers will include:

Professor Lawrence Gostin

Linda D and Timothy J O'Neill Professor of Global Health Law, Georgetown University Law Centre

Lawrence O Gostin is an internationally acclaimed scholar, and has led major law reform initiatives in the U.S., including the drafting of the Model Emergency Health Powers Act (MEHPA) to combat bioterrorism and the "Turning Point" Model State Public Health Act. He is also leading a drafting team on developing a Model Public Health Law for the World Health Organization. In the United Kingdom, he was the Legal Director of the National Association for Mental Health, Director of the National Council of Civil Liberties (the UK equivalent of the ACLU), and a Fellow at Oxford University. He helped draft the current Mental Health Act (England and Wales) and brought several landmark cases before the European Commission and Court of Human Rights.

Professor Daniel Tarantola

Professor of Health and Human Rights, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, The University of New South Wales

Daniel Tarantola is a former senior advisor to the World Health Organisation (WHO), and was most recently with the Harvard School of Public Health, as Instructor with the Department of Population and International Health and as Senior Associate with the Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Centre for Health and Human Rights. Of French nationality, Dr Tarantola was involved in the creation of Medecins Sans Frontieres and during a long and distinguished career with WHO supervised the team responsible for eradicating smallpox. As a researcher, he is best known for his work in the area of HIV/AIDS and human rights.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

Top down modelling and ungauged basins   View Summary
6 August 2009

Dr. Barry Croke from Australian National University will give a seminar in the AgroEcosystems Research group seminar series, Faculty of Agriculture Food and Natural Resources. The seminar will highlight new ways of the challenging task of hydrological modelling in ungauged basins.

Sustainable Futures Forum - Carbon, Water, Food   View Summary
6 August 2009

The Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources has significant research activity, links and relationships with the Snowy Rivers and Monaro region and is excited to engage with local partners, stakeholders and the public in order to discuss sustainability today.
The purpose of this forum is to showcase the latest scientific research knowledge and expertise on sustainability. The forum intends to address sustainable futures for regional areas with a particular focus on the importance of agriculture.

Beware the Best of Govt Intentions: Planning and Paying for Planning in the US   View Summary
6 August 2009

This talk will look at the ways in which the American planning system has changed over the past quarter century, in particular, the move away from direct planning regulation towards a more flexible system based on incentives, outcomes and the creation of quasi-markets.

Included in the talk are the tools US planners now use to encourage economic growth locally. This is now the most expensive part of the state and local planning system but is quite bizarrely complex and riddled with unintended consequences.

The State in the Economy: Neoliberalism or Neoactivism?   View Summary
6 August 2009

Department of Government and International Relations Seminar. A talk by Professor Linda Weiss, GIR, University of Sydney.

International House Foundation Day   View Summary
7 August 2009

Guest talk from Dr Michael Roberston on "Professional ethics and globalization"

Please join us for drinks in the Wool Room to celebrate International House Foundation Day.

Drinks will be followed by a guest talk from Dr Michael Robertson on "Professional ethics and globalization"

A professional of any stripe now faces a career constrained by local laws and a set of values that appear to be universally held. In reality, professional ethics reside in the form of a contract between a professional group and the community who depend upon their contribution to the well being of the group. The notion of a "global village" or an international community is a quaint notion that reflects the aspirations of Western culture, however most ethics are local and contextual.

Using the example of the medical profession, and in particular psychiatry, this presentation will critique the notion of a universal or global set of ethical norms and argue for a more communitarian view of professional ethics.

After the talk you are invited to join IH residents for dinner at 6.30pm for $10.

Launch of Project Magic Australia with Magician David Copperfield    View Summary
8 August 2009

Renowned American magician David Copperfield will be helping to launch a program that uses magic to encourage therapeutic rehabilitation among the disabled and handicapped when he visits the University of Sydney on August 8th.

"Physical rehab is often very, very hard work," Copperfield has said. "But as they learn magic, people can get through tasks that may otherwise seem painful, intimidating, or in which they've simply lost interest." Copperfield will be headlining a seminar that will mark the official Australian launch of Project Magic, a program that teaches magic tricks to the physically and mentally disabled in order to build self-confidence and stimulate recovery. "Everybody thinks magic is just making things disappear," says Ross Rahman, a practicing magician who is part of the organising committee for Project Magic in Australia, "but by teaching basic magic principles to patients in rehabilitation we are able to stimulate the recovery process and engage patients in a fun environment." Project Magic extends upon established rehabilitation techniques which stimulate simple physical movements and gradually progress to more complex motor skills. The program engages patients through the repeated practice of illusions that can often seem more exciting to patients than the menial tasks repeated in conventional physical therapy. Patients are taught magic skills and principles that enable them to perform sleight of hand tricks which can bring joy and entertainment to the hospital environment as well as build social skills. "Magic is a very social activity and requires the magician to perform and interact with an audience, providing patients with an opportunity to engage with others and enjoy the pleasure of magic," says Mr Rahman. "It's good therapy all round." The program not only encourages physical development among patients but also develops cognitive function as those with brain injuries must practice planning and sequencing in order for the trick to succeed. Less mobile or quadriplegic patients are also involved the program and are taught to perform 'mind-reading' tricks. "Even something as simple as a memory trick can bring joy to a dementia patient while also stimulating brain development," says Mr Rahman. Copperfield first established Project Magic in the United States in the early 1980s and for the Australian launch he will be training magicians and health-care workers on how to interact with and teach magic to recovery patients. He will be joined by Dr Julie DeJean, administrative director of Kansas behavioural medicine hospital Stormont-Vail West, who will be speaking on her experience of using magic to stimulate the recovery process.

Guests interested in attending the August 8th seminar at the University of Sydney's Holme Lecture Theatre are invited to register online at www.projectmagicaustralia.com.

In addition to magicians, health-care workers are particularly welcome in the wheel-chair accessible venue. Photographic opportunities will be available for visiting journalists.

Launch of Project Magic Australia with Magician David Copperfield    View Summary
8 August 2009

Renowned American magician David Copperfield will be helping to launch a program that uses magic to encourage therapeutic rehabilitation among the disabled and handicapped when he visits the University of Sydney on August 8th.

"Physical rehab is often very, very hard work," Copperfield has said. "But as they learn magic, people can get through tasks that may otherwise seem painful, intimidating, or in which they've simply lost interest." Copperfield will be headlining a seminar that will mark the official Australian launch of Project Magic, a program that teaches magic tricks to the physically and mentally disabled in order to build self-confidence and stimulate recovery. "Everybody thinks magic is just making things disappear," says Ross Rahman, a practicing magician who is part of the organising committee for Project Magic in Australia, "but by teaching basic magic principles to patients in rehabilitation we are able to stimulate the recovery process and engage patients in a fun environment." Project Magic extends upon established rehabilitation techniques which stimulate simple physical movements and gradually progress to more complex motor skills. The program engages patients through the repeated practice of illusions that can often seem more exciting to patients than the menial tasks repeated in conventional physical therapy. Patients are taught magic skills and principles that enable them to perform sleight of hand tricks which can bring joy and entertainment to the hospital environment as well as build social skills. "Magic is a very social activity and requires the magician to perform and interact with an audience, providing patients with an opportunity to engage with others and enjoy the pleasure of magic," says Mr Rahman. "It's good therapy all round." The program not only encourages physical development among patients but also develops cognitive function as those with brain injuries must practice planning and sequencing in order for the trick to succeed. Less mobile or quadriplegic patients are also involved the program and are taught to perform 'mind-reading' tricks. "Even something as simple as a memory trick can bring joy to a dementia patient while also stimulating brain development," says Mr Rahman. Copperfield first established Project Magic in the United States in the early 1980s and for the Australian launch he will be training magicians and health-care workers on how to interact with and teach magic to recovery patients. He will be joined by Dr Julie DeJean, administrative director of Kansas behavioural medicine hospital Stormont-Vail West, who will be speaking on her experience of using magic to stimulate the recovery process.

Guests interested in attending the August 8th seminar at the University of Sydney's Holme Lecture Theatre are invited to register online at www.projectmagicaustralia.com.

In addition to magicians, health-care workers are particularly welcome in the wheel-chair accessible venue. Photographic opportunities will be available for visiting journalists.

Sunday carillon recital "Fantasia" by Stacey Xiao Yu Yang   View Summary
9 August 2009

Explore the quadrangle while the carillon plays. Watch the player on CCTV under the Western Tower. Meet the player and take a belfry tour after the recital.

Recovering infrastructure as a public domain in the city: reconstituting the flows of finance   View Summary
10 August 2009

Department of Political Economy Seminar. A talk by Professor Phil O'Neil, Urban Research Centre, UWS.

Reconstructing Human Nature   View Summary
11 August 2009

Professor Paul E. Griffiths,Department of Philosophy and Sydney Centre for the Foundations of Science, will give, for the Sydney University Arts Association,his Inaugural Lecture on the topic "Reconstructing Human Nature".

The idea of human nature is the locus of longstanding disputes about the relevance of the biological sciences to the humanities and social sciences. But the ideas of "human nature", "instinct", and "innateness" are not derived from the biological sciences. They originate in intuitive, pre-scientific thought about living things, sometimes known as "folkbiology". In this lecture Professor Griffiths will present a model of the folkbiological understanding of human nature, based on empirical research conducted with biologically naive subjects in Australia and North America. This folkbiological understanding of human nature is fundamentally inconsistent with current biology. This raises the pressing issue of what a biologically credible account of human nature would look like, and he will try to address this question.

Sword and Sandal Movies: Three Evenings of Film   View Summary
11 August 2009

The Last Days of Pompeii
Join Dr Estelle Lazer and Dr Craig Barker as they take you through the ancient history of Hollywood in a series of three talks. Book for one or all three. Tonight explore the way film makers have depicted the destruction of Pompeii.

Michael Ward Symposium on "Resilience and Health"   View Summary
12 August 2009

This symposium will explore the factors which contribute to the resilience and health of individuals, communities, populations and the systems which serve them.

* How does resilience work in a complex system?

* What role does early development play in long term outcomes?

* Can empathy, care and nurture influence health and education outcomes?

* Can health policy promote more resilient health?

Moderator: Ms Geraldine Doogue AO

An evening of poetry with Les Murray, Judith Beveridge and Stephen Edgar   View Summary
12 August 2009

An evening of poetry with Les Murray, Judith Beveridge and Stephen Edgar

Join us for an evening of poetry amongst antiquities.

Research Leader's Seminar: Health communication and advocacy   View Summary
12 August 2009

Presented by Professor Simon Chapman

The Future of Public Health Research Leaders Seminar Series 2009, hosted by the School of Public Health, is all about providing an opportunity for us collectively to chart our research future. The purpose of the seminar series is to stimulate ideas, promote debate and make clear the research themes that will define what research we do, how we do it and what makes our School, and affiliated centres, a leader in the field.

Key Thinkers Series - Karl Marx   View Summary
12 August 2009

Speaker: Professor John Buchanan, Director, Australian Workplace Research Centre, Faculty of Business and Economics

Whether you agree with him or not, Karl Marx has had an enduring impact on modern intellectual and political life. From the fall of the Berlin Wall to the collapse of Wall Street today, contemporary thinkers continue to draw on Marx's writings for ideas and insights. This lecture will provide an overview and assessment of the core features of his analytical legacy. Particular attention will be devoted to his social philosophy, theory of history and political economy. Professor Buchanan will argue that while there are some limits in aspects of Marx's analysis, these are not so fundamental as to compromise his relevance today. Moreover, most of the limitations in his intellectual schema have been overcome by subsequent researchers who have built on his core categories and used his underlying method of inquiry. The relevance of Marx's insights will be explored with references to recent research into the changing nature of work in contemporary Australia.

For full details consult the website : http://www.usyd.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/thoughts_thinkers/index.php

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Rt Hon the Lord Walker of Gestingthorpe KB   View Summary
12 August 2009

Please Register Online

Rt Hon the Lord RobertWalker of Gestingthorpe KB

The Developing English Law of Privacy

The lecture discusses the rapid development in England of a law of privacy. This development stems from the UK Human Rights Act 1998, and has been influenced by the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights at Strasbourg, but is "horizontal" in that it mainly concerns the citizen and the media (rather than the citizen and the state). So far English courts have approached the problem of reconciling free speech and privacy as one requiring an "intense focus" on the particular facts rather than the application of fixed presumptions, an approach that raises many issues for debate.

About the speaker

Robert Walker (Lord Walker of Gestingthorpe) is 71. He read classics and law at Trinity College, Cambridge, graduating in 1959. After two years' military service in the Royal Artillery he practised at the chancery bar from 1961 to 1994, specialising in trusts, pension schemes and tax. He became a QC in 1982.

He was appointed as a High Court Judge in 1994 and as a Lord Justice of Appeal in 1997. He was made a Law Lord in 2002 and in October 2009 he will become one of the first Justices of the new Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. He is also a judge of the Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

St Andrew's College Halse Rogers Lecture   View Summary
13 August 2009

St Andrew's College Annual Lecture, this year in honour of Sir Percival Halse Rogers, Judge in the Supreme Court of NSW, Chancellor of this University and Andrewsman, to be delivered by Mr Nicholas Cowdery AM QC, Director of Public Prosecutions for NSW.

An Australian Bill of Rights?

Is Australia doing enough?

A 30 Year Public Transport Plan for Sydney   View Summary
13 August 2009

Thursday Night Lecture by Dr Garry Glazebrook.

Sydney has suffered in the last decade from the lack of a comprehensive and well-supported plan for public transport. Sydney has already missed out on the first round of infrastructure Australia funding, and is in danger of losing its world city status as its transport performance falls behind our competitors. With the challenges of peak oil and global warming looming, the time is ripe for such a plan. In this talk, Dr Garry Glazebrook puts forward his views on how such a plan can be developed, and some of its key components, including options for finance and implementation

Gender and the problem of symmetry   View Summary
13 August 2009

Anthropology Seminar. A talk by Andrew Moutu, the University of Adelaide.

Symposium - WTO Litigation: Issues and Reforms   View Summary
14 August 2009

The Sydney Centre for International Law presents a symposium considering various issues arising in WTO dispute settlement including treaty interpretation, burden of proof, standard of review and retaliation procedures; and also the WTO negotiations reviewing the WTO Understanding on Dispute Settlement.


Speakers include:

Professor Yasuhei Taniguchi
Former Chair of the WTO Appellate Body, Geneva

Andrew Stoler, Institute for International Trade

Mark Jennings, Office of International Law, Attorney General's Department
Patricia Holmes, WTO Disputes Section, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Jo Feldman and Jessica Giovanelli, Office of International Law, Attorney General's Departmnet

Chair:
Dr Brett Wiliams, Sydney Law School

BIRD CRY from the Grassy Box Woodlands   View Summary
15 August 2009 to 5 September 2009

Alison Clouston & Boyd

a sound & sculpture installation

To be opened Friday 14th August 6 - 8pm, by Bernie Hobbs Environmentalist and science broadcaster from New Inventors and ABC Radio

"3D X-ray: Microscopic Wonder"   View Summary
16 August 2009

A talk by Dr Allan S Jones (Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis). Presented during National Science Week 2009. Using techniques from animation, photography and microscopy Allan Jones will take you on a magical journey 3D. A fun and beautiful presentation for all ages.

Sunday carillon recital "The Age of Beauty" by Jill Forrest   View Summary
16 August 2009

Let the carillon serenade you as you explore the quadrangle. See the player on CCTV under the Western Tower. Take a belfry tour and meet the player after the recital.

Sword and Sandal Movies: Three Evenings of Films   View Summary
18 August 2009

"Gladiators". Join Dr Estelle Lazer and Dr Craig Barker as they take you through the ancient history of Hollywood in a series of three talks. Book for one or all three. Tonight explore how film makers have depicted gladiatorial contests in Rome.

Building a Research Network - Associate Professor Catherine Waldby   View Summary
18 August 2009

This presentation will consider practical strategies Early Career Researchers can use to build a research network, with an emphasis on developing international networks.

Catherine Waldby is an International Research Fellow with the Department of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Sydney. She also currently holds an ARC Linkage Project for Human Oöcytes for Stem Cell Research: Donation and Regulation in Australia.

National Science Week: Swine flu lecture   View Summary
18 August 2009

"Solving swine flu with science: a vaccine victory?"


Come and learn about the latest research into swine flu presented by Professor Robert Booy from the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, the Children's Hospital at Westmead.


When a new influenza virus emerges that the great majority of the population has no immunity to, a pandemic, world-wide outbreak results. Theoretically, a new vaccine can be produced within 3 months but practically it takes at least 6 months before widespread distribution of the new vaccine can occur. In the meantime, there are many issues to address, such as physical means of preventing infection (eg. hand washing, masks), provision of clear and accurate public information, appropriate use of antiviral drugs and designing/implementing high quality surveillance and research. This lecture will focus on the best means to control and manage the new pandemic.


About the speaker:
Professor Robert Booy is Head of Clinical Research at the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS). He is a medical graduatewith Honoursof the University of Queensland (1984) & trained in Paediatrics at the Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane. He has worked in the UK as a Research Fellow in Oxford, a Lecturer in Paediatric Infectious Diseasesin Oxford & London, a Wellcome Training Fellow in Genetic Epidemiology & from 1999 Professor of Child Health at Queen Mary's School of Medicine & Dentistry,University of London. His research interests include epidemiology & prevention of influenza, varicella, HPV, Hib, pneumococcal and meningococcal disease.

Sydney Democracy Forum Presents: Prof. George Perlin   View Summary
18 August 2009

The Growing Concern About the Effectiveness of International Assistance to Democratic Development

George Perlin is a Professor Emeritus in the School of Policy Studies.

Queens University, Canada, whose research and teaching are focused on international assistance to democratic development. He has been a consultant on Canadian and international policy for democratic development in projects with the Democracy Council of Canada, the International Development Research Centre, and the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs. He has also had experience as a practitioner in the delivery of democracy assistance as director of a CIDA-funded project to establish a program of professional and post-secondary education on the study of democracy in the in the universities and technical colleges of Ukraine.

RSVP: Zoe Morrison - sdf@usyd.edu.au

Australian Economic Forum 2009 (AEF09)   View Summary
19 August 2009 to 20 August 2009

On 19 - 20 August 2009, Sydney will play host to the inaugural Australian Economic Forum (AEF09). Under the auspices of the Economic Society of Australia (NSW Branch), the 2 day conference will bring together some of Australia's greatest economic minds, offering participants a unique opportunity to discuss and debate the country's current and future economic policies.

Although there are a number of forums that focus on different aspects of the Australian economy, the AEF09 will offer new opportunities for discussions, whilst also facilitating an open forum for rigorous economic debate.

"After identifying a gap in the market place, the concept to host the Australian Economic Forum came about in a bid to offer industry an annual opportunity to come together, hear from some of our leading economic and business minds, and discuss issues of national interest. The economic downturn of 2009 may prove to be the opportune starting point for the AEF, as we hope to see Australia's economy start to make a recovery over the coming year" Assoc. Professor Ed Wilson, President, Economic Society of Australia (NSW Branch)

The Australian Economic Forum will provide a yearly opportunity for economists, business professionals, academics and public servants from all levels of Government to come together to discuss and debate current and future economic policies surrounding health, welfare, climate and water security.

Our presenters include:
The Hon. Bob Carr, Former Premier of NSW Quentin Dempster AM, Presenter, ABC Stateline Dr Malcolm Edey, Assistant Governor, Reserve Bank of Australia Distinguished Professor Ross Garnaut, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, College of Asia and the Pacific Dr Ken Henry AC, Secretary, The Treasury Professor David Hensher, Director, Institute of Transport and Logistic Studies, (The University of Sydney) Dr John Laker AO, Chairman, Australian Prudential Regulation Authority David McInnes, Group Manager, Environment and Climate Change, LinFox pty ltd Prof. Warwick McKibbin, Director, Centre for Applied Macroeconomics, Australian National University Michael Stutchbury, Economics Editor, The Australian Dr Judy Yates, Associate Professor, University of Sydney (To name just a few)

With the Australian economy continuing to face serious challenges there is no time to waste in discovering new ways to move beyond crisis and shape a recovery that is both effective and sustainable.

The inaugural 2 day forum, AEF09, will be held at Dockside Sydney, on Darling Harbour on the 19th and 20 August 2009.

Forum highlights include keynote addresses and concurrent sessions on:
Sharing the Tax Effort
Better Public Services
Climate Change and Emissions Trading
Reforming Infrastructure
Housing Affordability
Water Security and Energy Supply

For further information about the conference hosts, registration details, a full conference programme and sponsorship opportunities, please visit the website.

Anne Summers in Conversation with Ann Stephen: "The Lost Mother: A Story of Art and Love"   View Summary
19 August 2009

Writer and editor Anne Summers talks about her new book "The Lost Mother" which explores her journey to recover the stories behind the Constance Stokes protraits of her mother as a child, and her broader relationship with her mother.

Emerging Health Policy Research Conference   View Summary
19 August 2009

The conference will showcase the work in progress of current doctoral and early career research workers.

Keynote Speakers:

*John Wyn Owen, Chair, Board of Governors, University of Wales Institute, Cardiff; former Secretary of the Nuffield Trust; and former Director-General of NSW Health
* Dr Christine Bennett, National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission
* Ms Mary Ann O'Loughlin, Executive Councillor and Head of the Secretariat of the COAG Reform Council, and a member of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission.

Registration is essential.

Screening and Test Evaluation Program: improving the evaluation and use of tests for screening, diag   View Summary
19 August 2009

Medical tests - for screening, diagnosis, and monitoring - are often poorly evaluated and poorly used. The Screening and Test Evaluation Program [STEP], run by an established team with skills in public health, clinical epidemiology, biostatistics, health economics and behavioural science, addresses the under-researched issues of whether, when and how to use medical tests. STEP has been a major international contributor to research on the evaluation of tests and has been funded by 2 NHMRC Program Grants, for which the School Chief Investigators are Les Irwig [Epidemiology], Glenn Salkeld [Health economics], Petra Macaskill [Biostatistics] and Jonathan Craig [Clinical Epidemiology].

In this presentation, by several STEP academics, we will briefly outline the research we have done, explore the issues that still need to be addressed, and discuss how we intend to do so in the coming years. This will be done for each of the three main areas for which medical tests are commonly used: Screening; diagnosis, prediction and prognosis; and monitoring. Opportunities for research students and for wider collaboration will be discussed.

Key Thinkers Series - Galileo   View Summary
19 August 2009

Speaker: Dr Ofer Gal, Director, Unit for History and Philosophy of Science, Faculty of Science

Exactly 400 years ago, in the fall of 1609, an aging university professor in Padova, Galileo Galilei, took a little optical toy he had improved and turned it to the sky. What he saw literally changed the world: the planets, it turned out, were just like the earth, while the fixed stars were very much further. There were many more stars than we thought, and other planets had moons, just like us. Galileo's discoveries, published in the vernacular with spectacular drawings for all to read and observe, were embraced and heralded, until the excitement got out of hand and Galileo was called to account. What were Galileo's intellectual motives and drives? What was the excitement about? And what went wrong?

For full details consult the website : http://www.usyd.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/thoughts_thinkers/index.php

National Science Week: Childhood obesity   View Summary
19 August 2009

Come and learn about the latest research into childhood obesity.

"Bigger but not better- the growing problem of childhood obesity"
Dr Sarah Garnett and Ms Susie Burrell, from the Departments of Endocrinology and Nutrition and Dietetics, the Children's Hospital at Westmead.

Childhood obesity is a significant and increasing problem in Australia, raising concerns about future trends of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This lecture will discuss how to determine if a child is obese, the health implications of obesity and present evidence from research on some of the determinants of obesity that relate not only to individuals and families but the wider community. The talk will conclude with recommendations for both the management and prevention of weight problems in children.

About the speakers:
Dr Sarah Garnett is an NHMRC Australian Clinical Research Fellow and research dietitian in the Kids Research Institute at the Children's Hospital at Westmead. She has extensive research experience in children, nutrition and obesity. Her current research is aimed at preventing type 2 diabetes in high risk children, by implementing a comprehensive lifestyle (diet and exercise) intervention.
Ms Susie Burrell is one of Australia's leading dietitians. Susie holds both nutrition and psychology degrees and has specialised in weight management for children at The Children's Hospital at Westmead since 2003. Susie regularly appears in both print and electronic media and has a weekly column in The Sunday Telegraph.

Hunting for Antimatter   View Summary
20 August 2009

Why is there something instead of nothing? Why are there so many different elementary particles?

Last year's Nobel Laureates in Physics have presented theoretical insights that give us a deeper understanding of what happens far inside the tiniest building blocks of matter.

Dr Kevin Varvell, recently seen on the Todayshow at the launch of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will give an entertaining overview of the science behind last year's Nobel Prize in Physics.

Public lecture: "Torah: Ancient scroll and modern tree"   View Summary
20 August 2009

A public lecture by Rabbi Jeremy Lawrence (Great Synagogue, Sydney). Sir Charles Nicholson taught himself Hebrew late in life and he collected numerous Torahs. In this talk, Rabbi Jeremy Lawrence discuss what the Torah is, and its role in the Jewish faith. Presented in conjunction with the Sydney Jewish Museum.

Asking the hard questions: Indigenous Knowledges and Anthropology/Ethnography in Australia   View Summary
20 August 2009

Anthropology Seminar. A talk by Vicki Grieves, the University of Sydney.

Abstract



This paper explores the obvious problematic in the relationship between academic researchers, in this case anthropologists, who research and write from within the western episteme and rely on developing collaborative relationships with Aboriginal people who live within a settler colonial regime. In many ways the situation is similar to that of the emerging Aboriginal intelligentsia and the theory that informs colonial relationships is instructive for all scholars of the context of Aboriginal peoples' personhood and lived lives. This paper argues that critical Indigenous theory is of paramount importance and it is imperative that scholars who work with Aboriginal people are moving to a position of working from out of this theoretical base as well as assisting in the development of the emerging Indigenous Knowledges discipline.

The starting point for this discussion is a critical analysis of recent celebrated publications in anthropological research into Aboriginal groups in Australia, with particular reference to the depiction of conflict and violence in Aboriginal lives. This paper is delivered with one eye on what it has meant to be an Aboriginal person located within a Department of Anthropology for the past 18 months.

The Anthropology Research Seminar provides a forum for anthropologists to present their research to an audience of interested and critical thinkers. We meet each Thursday of semester (apart from the first Thursday of each month). The talk starts at 3, questions at 4, and informal discussion over drinks and nibbles at 5. We meet in room 148 Level 1, RC Mills Building (A26), The University of Sydney. It is an open event: all are welcome.

CPACS Seminar: Burma's Border Conflict   View Summary
20 August 2009

This seminar will examine the conflict in Burma and how we as individuals can help. The keynote speaker is Dr Cynthia Maung, who established and runs the Mae Tao Clinic on the Thai-Burma border that treats hundreds of thousands of civilians affected by the conflict each year.

CPACS Seminar: Burma's Border Conflict   View Summary
20 August 2009

This seminar will examine the conflict in Burma and how we as individuals can help. The keynote speaker is Dr Cynthia Maung, who established and runs the Mae Tao Clinic on the Thai-Burma border that treats hundreds of thousands of civilians affected by the conflict each year.

Interfaith Dialogue in Israel Event   View Summary
20 August 2009

Dr Debbie Weissman, Issa Jaber and Rula Shubeita from the Inter-religious Coordinating Council in Israel.

Religiously-motivated violence has been a significant deterrent to the progress of the Middle East peace process, and yet little to no attention has been paid to the Israeli and Palestinian religious communities, and few attempts have been made to utilise religion as a tool for peace and reconciliation.

The mission of the Interreligious Coordinating Council in Israel (ICCI) is, therefore, to harness the teachings and values of the three Abrahamic faiths and transform religion's role from a force of division and extremism into a source of reconciliation, coexistence, and understanding. To accomplish this, ICCI works with youth, women, and religious leaders to promote Jewish-Arab coexistence and peace-building projects.

Ted Wheelwright Memorial Lecture: 'Beyond the Economic Crisis' by Dr Jim Stanford   View Summary
20 August 2009

Dr Jim Sandford is a visiting economist from Canada. He is the author of the best-selling book Economics for Everyone. In this public lecture he will be analysing the lessons from the global financial crisis from a labour movement perspective. He will consider how the economic system may be changed to make it more stable, equitable and sustainable.

Carnival of the Animals   View Summary
21 August 2009

The Sydney University Symphony Orchestra (SUSO) and the Australian Children's Music Foundation (ACMF) present 'Carnival of the Animals' in an hour of children's musical delights! Come along to meet a full symphony orchestra and enjoy an hour of fun with some of Australia's most popular children's entertainers.

Programme:
HUMPERDINCK - Hansel & Gretel: Overture
SAINT-SAENS - Carnival of the Animals (narrated by Australian film and TV actor, John Waters) DON SPENCER - A selection of Australian children's classics composed and performed by Don himself, backed by the full orchestra

Conducted by: George "The Big G" Ellis

Date: Friday, 21st August 2009
Time: 6.30pm
Venue: The Great Hall, Main Quadrangle, University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW.

Admission:
$15 Adult
$10 Children (up to 12 years)
$40 Family Rate (2 adults and 2 children) Seating is unreserved.

Bookings:
www.trybooking.com/BHE or purchase at the door

Enquiries:
suso_soc@hotmail.com or 0410711901

Sydney Sawyer Seminar: The Experience of the Ocean: Transformative Voyages in the Antipodes   View Summary
21 August 2009

Convenors:

Cassandra Pybus and Emma Christopher

Presenters: Jeff Bolster (University of New Hampshire), 'Sea Changes: Maritime Histories with the Ocean Included'

Hamish Maxwell Stewart (University of Tasmania), 'Shipmates unto death? The convict voyage and convict life in early 19th century Australia'

Iain McCalman (University of Sydney),

'A Laboratory of Islands: Charles Darwin's Pacific Project'

Cindy McCreery (University of Sydney), 'Loyalties and Royalty: HMS Galatea's visit to Australia, 1867-68'

For those who made the long voyage to the Antipodes, the ocean was a transformative space. This seminar will consider the disparate experience of sailors on long-haul whaling expeditions; convicted felons exiled from family and home for the term of their natural lives; inquisitive gentlemen like Charles Darwin on a mission of scientific exploration; and Prince Alfred testing his personal boundaries during the first royal voyage to the Antipodes in 1867-8. By placing these very different perspectives alongside each other, this seminar will examine how the southern oceans were critical sites of historical change.

Back to Holme 2009 Annual Reunion Cocktail Reception    View Summary
21 August 2009

The University of Sydney Union Board Directors and the Council of its Alumni and Friends invite you "Back to Holme" for the 2009 Annual Reunion Cocktail Reception.

Speaker Ms Dorothy Hoddinott

Dorothy is a leading educator who has played a significant part in the lives of students both within the community and the University of Sydney. She has propelled refugees from illiteracy to the University of Sydney resulting in numerous awards bestowed to recognise her tremendous impact on education. She is quoted: "Education gives people a future, and purpose and meaning in their lives. It frees people to make choices they would not otherwise be able to make, and to realise their potential." To read more about this amazing leader [Click Here]

This year's 'Back to Holme' is looking to display some of the highlights of the USU's archives. If any of you have any photos, books, member cards or other memorabilia that you would like to share with the USU for the 'Back to Holme' and beyond, please contact USUAF on the details below.

Dress: Cocktail

Emissions Trading for Dummies   View Summary
21 August 2009

The Institute for Sustainable Solutions invites you to attend their Emissions Trading for Dummies seminar. Three presenters will discuss the ideas behind carbon emissions trading, and the advantages and potential risks of introducing an emissions trading scheme within Australia. Following the presentation, there will be a panel Q & A session.

Emissions Trading 101, presented by Dr. Michael Harris.

Michael is the leader of the Agricultural and Resource Economics Group in the Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources at the University of Sydney. He has worked for ABARE and various Australian universities, and has recently worked on a collaborative project with CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems and the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics in Sweden on the economics of ecological resilience, as well as projects in Vietnam and Indonesia.

Designing an emissions trading scheme in the real world, presented by Dr. Frank Jotzo.

Frank is an environmental and resource economist at the ANU, specialising in the economics and policy of climate change. He has worked and consulted for several governments and international organizations, and was an economic advisor to the Garnaut Climate Change Review during 2008.

Experimenting with carbon markets, presented by Dr. Andy Reeson.

Andy is an experimental economist in the Markets, Incentives & Institutions team in CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems, and an adjunct researcher in the Resources, Energy and Environmental Markets Laboratory (REEML) of the Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources at the University of Sydney. His work involves developing and applying experimental economics to address environmental and natural resource governance issues, including the operation of emissions markets.

To RSVP or for further enquiries, please contact Tracy Hicks of the Institute for Sustainable Solutions, whose contact details are below.

Kid's Museum: Reconciliation   View Summary
23 August 2009

Get involved in a range of children's activities on the theme of reconciliation to mark the opening of the exhibition "Living and Working, Learning and Playing Together: Children's Reconciliation Artworks".

Sunday carillon recital "Everlasting Melodies" by June Catchpoole   View Summary
23 August 2009

Enjoy an hour of carillon music as you explore the main quadrangle and front lawns. Watch the player on CCTV under the Western Tower. Take a belfry tour after you meet the player.

National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee   View Summary
24 August 2009 to 28 August 2009

NAIDOC celebrations provide an opportunity for Indigenous Australians to share the richness of their culture and heritage with the rest of the Australian community.

Green Collaring a Capital Crisis?   View Summary
24 August 2009

A talk by Dr Helen Masterman-Smith, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Charles Sturt University.

GLOBAL POVERTY PROJECT'S PUBLIC LECTURE & PANEL DISCUSSION   View Summary
24 August 2009

Simon Moss from Make Poverty History & the Oaktree Foundation will present "1.4 billion reasons" - an inspiring presentation to catalyse the movement to end extreme poverty.

Gadigal Radio Outside Broadcast   View Summary
24 August 2009

Gadigal Radio will be broadcasting live from Eastern Avenue as part of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Week Celebrations at USYD.

Sword and Sandal Movies: Three Evenings of Film   View Summary
25 August 2009

"Hercules the Strongman". Join Dr Estelle Lazer and Dr Craig Barker as take you through the ancient history of Hollywood in a series of three talks. Book for one or for all three. Tonight explore the way film makers have depicted Hercules, the Classical hero.

Sex in the kitchen: The social iconography of male bodies during the Renaissance    View Summary
25 August 2009

By examining the wider erotic sense of cooking utensils and of preparing a feast in early modern culture, this lecture contributes to rethinking both the phallic model of masculinity and the way in which we investigate the meaning of images.

Sex in the kitchen: The social iconography of male bodies during the Renaissance   View Summary
25 August 2009

By examining the wider erotic sense of cooking utensils and of preparing a feast in early modern culture, this lecture contributes to rethinking both the phallic model of masculinity and the way in which we investigate the meaning of images.

Indigenous Film Screening   View Summary
25 August 2009

"A Bit of Black Business" 13 short films to be screened as part of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Week Celebrations at USYD.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Jinyan Li, York University, Toronto   View Summary
26 August 2009

Tax Seminar Series - Chinese Taxation: The Great Leap Forward?

Professor Jinyan Li

Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, Toronto

Professor Jinyan Li joined Osgoode Hall Law School in 1999, having previously taught for eight years on the Faculty of Law at the University of Western Ontario. She has been a Visiting Professor at Harvard Law School, a Greenwoods and Freehills Visiting Professor of International Taxation at the University of Sydney, and Visiting Professor at Kenneth Wang Law School, Suzhou University, China. Her research interests include taxation law and policy, electronic commerce, social security law, pension law, and Chinese law.

Professor Li has served as a legal consultant to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Auditor General of Canada, Department of Justice of Canada, as well to several leading law firms. She was also a member of an advisory committee for the Minister of National Revenue on the issue of e-commerce taxation. In 2004, she won the teaching award at Osgoode. In 1999, she received the Douglas J. Sherbaniuk Distinguished Writing Award.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

Key Thinkers Series - Beethoven   View Summary
26 August 2009

Speaker: Associate Professor Peter McCallum, Musicology and Deputy Chair Academic Board

The music of Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) became an evolving symbol of the modern, from its invocation by Wagner in sketching a Zukunfstmusik - a music of the future - to the particular prestige it enjoyed among the creators of various twentieth century modernisms: in literature, TS Eliot, and Thomas Mann; in the visual arts Klinger, Klimpt and Bourdelle; in philosophy in the writings of Adorno, and of course in the dominant streams of musical modernity from Schoenberg to Boulez. This lecture looks at how these aspects of Beethoven's music encouraged this identification with progressive modernity. Using examples from his works, it examines key themes that have been linked with the modern - liberation and heroic defiance, spiritual alienation and transcendence, inscrutable autonomy and self-sufficiency and a new conception of musical time that, as one of his first critics, ETA Hoffmann noted, projects the listener forward into an apprehension of the infinite.

For full details consult the website : http://www.usyd.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/thoughts_thinkers/index.php

Koori Centre - Trivia Night   View Summary
26 August 2009

To Celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Week at USYD the Koori Centre will be organising a Trivia Night for all Students and Staff to attend.

Please RSVP before the 24th of August as space is limited.

Art & Craft Practice versus Art History   View Summary
26 August 2009

Dr Damian Skinner's talk ''Art & Craft Practice versus Art History'' will be presented in Seminar Room 1, Sydney College of the Arts on Wednesday 26 August, 1 to 2pm.

Four stories from the frontline of art and craft practice versus art history

What happens when the fluidity of an artist's practice hits the brick wall of art history's desire for order? How does art history translate making into textual narrative, and what are the opportunities, challenges and politics behind this process? In this talk art historian Damian Skinner considers the value, the purpose, the politics, and the limits, of art history's encounter with objects and art and craft practices.

Sydney College of the Arts

The Visual Arts Faculty of the

University of Sydney

Balmain Road Rozelle (enter at Cecily St)

02 9351 1104 enquiries@sca.usyd.edu.au

Further information: www.usyd.edu.au/sca

Disciplines of Inquiry - Methodology Colloquia 09   View Summary
27 August 2009

The Research Division, Faculty of Education and Social Work invites you to participate in the launch of a colloquia series on new approaches to research and interdisciplinarity across the education and social work domains.

The detailsfor thisweek'sproceedings are to be released shortly - please check this website for updates.

Free lunchtime art gallery talk   View Summary
27 August 2009

Join us for a floor talk on the exhibition "Collecting Passions" with Senior Curator of the University Art Collection, Dr Ann Stephen.

BEing Collected Public Lecture: "From paradise to prison: Palm Island"   View Summary
27 August 2009

A lecture by Dr Thalia Anthony of the Sydney Law School. Thalia writes on legal issues and developments pertaining to Australian Indigenous people - especially stolen wages, sentencing and policy. In this talk she will focus on the enduring effects of Indigenous segregation to Palm Island since the 1920s.

IPE's Split Brain: American vs British Schools of International Political   View Summary
27 August 2009

Department of Government and International Relations Seminar. A talk by Dr Kate Weaver, University of Texas.

Stalked by Malignant Father's Spirit: A Case of Parricide amoung the Yagwoia   View Summary
27 August 2009

Anthropology Seminar. A talk by Jadran Mimica, the University of Sydney.

CONCERT - Songs of Ascents: Barefoot in Venice   View Summary
27 August 2009

A small choral group of Sydney University students will be performing the Hebrew works of the 17th century Jewish composer Salamone Rossi of Mantua, on several nights. The group, known as Barefoot, brings a passion and movement to these remarkable works seldom seen in other early music groups. The concert will also feature new arrangements of traditional Jewish songs by current members of Barefoot.

War Art in Asia and the Representation of War    View Summary
28 August 2009

War Art in Asia and the Representation of War will be a one-day international workshop which will focus on Japanese War Art, art and photography representing conflicts in Korea, Vietnam, Indonesia, East Timor and Iraq, art of the Chinese Civil War and revolutionary periods and some issues concerning War Art and Human Rights. The project will bring together specialists in history of war art and photography from Japan, Korea, Indonesia, China, the USA and Australia for the first time. The period under investigation will be post-World War II to the present with emphasis on the period 1995-2005. Topics to be discussed include the concept of war, aesthetics, sacrifice, anti-war art, photography and the historical perspective on war.

Global Health Day at the University of Sydney   View Summary
28 August 2009

Please Register Online

The Sydney Law School and the Sydney Medical School present

Global Health Day 2009 at the University of Sydney

This full day symposium brings together leading national and international experts on the key health issues facing the global community. Topics to be addressed during the morning plenary sessions include HIV/AIDS, disease surveillance and response, pandemic preparedness, the power of advertising, tobacco control and chronic diseases and injuries. In the afternoon session attendees will have a choice of one of three concurrent interactive workshops on the Millennium Development Goals and development; epidemic and emerging infections; and chronic diseases and injury.

Presenters include:

The Hon Michael Kirby AC CMG

The third phase of the HIV/AIDs Pandemic: Prevention

Professor Lawrence Gostin, Linda D and Timothy J O'Neill Professor of Global Health Law, Georgetown University Law Centre.

Influenza A (H1N1) (Swine Origin):Pandemic preparedness under the rule of international law

Professor Simon Chapman, School of Public Health, University of Sydney.

Ethico-legal challenges posed by leading edge tobacco control developments

Professor Patricia Peppin, Professor of Law, Queens University, Ontario.

Drug imagery and legal imaginary: Assessing the power of advertising

Professor John MacKenzie, Chair of the IHR Emergency Committee for Influenza H1N1.

Emerging disease surveillance and response: the role of the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) and the World Health Organization

Professor Robyn Norton, Principal Director, The George Institute for International Health; Professor Public Health and Associate Dean (Global Health), Sydney Medical School.

Chronic diseases and injuries: a major but neglected component of the global health agenda

A choice of three workshops (limited to 100 participants each) will run throughout the afternoon:

Workshop 1:Millennium Development Goals and Development

Panellists:

Facilitator:Ms Jane Halton, PSM, Secretary of the Department of Health and Ageing

Professor Stephen Leeder, Director, the Menzies Centre for Health Policy, University of Sydney

Professor Lawrence Gostin, O'Neill Professor of Global Health Law, Georgetown University

Professor Robyn Norton, Principal Director, The George Institute for International Health; Professor Public Health and Associate Dean (Global Health), Sydney Medical School

Mr Joel Negin, Lecturer in International Public Health, School of Public Health, University of Sydney

Workshop 2:Epidemic and Emerging Infections: The whys, the wherefores and what now

Panellists:

Facilitator: Professor Tania Sorrell, Director, Centre for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Sydney Medical School - Western, and Director, Infectious Diseases, HIV and Sexual Health Services, Sydney West Area Health Service

Professor Belinda Bennett, Professor of Health and Medical Law and Director, Centre for Health Governance, Law & Ethics, University of Sydney

Professor Simon Chapman, School of Public Health, University of Sydney

Professor Peter Curson, Professor in Population and Security, University of Sydney

Professor Dominic Dwyer, Public Health Microbiology and Infectious diseases, University of Sydney

Professor Lyn Gilbert, Director of Centre for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Westmead Hospital

Professor Michael Ward, Chair, Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, University of Sydney

Professor Richard Russell, Medical Entomology, University of Sydney

Workshop 3:Chronic Diseases and Injury

Panellists:

Facilitator: Professor John Chalmers, The George Institute for International Health

Professor Glenn Salkeld, Professor of Public Health, The University of Sydney

Professor Rebecca Ivers, Associate Professor, the University of Sydney and Director, Injury Division, The George Institute for International Health

Professor Roger Magnusson, Professor of Law and Associate Dean (Postgraduate coursework), University of Sydney

Professor Patricia Peppin, Professor of Law, Queens University, Ontario

Professor Anthony Rogers, Professor of Global Health Sciences, University of Sydney, and Professorial Fellow , The George Institute for International Health

The Women in Law Dinner   View Summary
28 August 2009

You are cordially invited to join us for the Women's College 'Women in Law' Dinner. Guest speakers for the evening are the Honourable Acting Justice Jane Mathews AO (LLB '62, LLD '00) and the Honourable Justice Julie Ward (BA '80, LLB '82). All welcome: please RSVP by Wednesday 26 August.

The Honourable Acting Justice Jane Mathews AO

The Honourable Acting Justice Jane Mathews spent seventeen years in private practice before being appointed a judge of the District Court in 1980, the fi rst woman judge in NSW. In 1987 she was appointed to the Supreme Court of NSW, the fi rst woman judge on that court. In 1994, she became a judge of the Federal Court of Australia and was also President of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal and Deputy President of the National Native Titles Tribunal. In 2001 she retired from the Federal Court and became an Acting Judge on the NSW Supreme Court, a position which she still holds.

Justice Mathews also holds honorary LlD degrees from Sydney and Wollongong Universities. Justice Mathews has served on The Women's College Council since 2002 and is the Patron of the Women Lawyers' Association of NSW.

The Honourable Justice Julie Ward

The Honourable Justice Julie Ward was admitted as a solicitor of the Supreme Court of New South Wales in 1982 and in 1988, at the age of 28, became the youngest female partner at Mallesons Stephen Jaques. Justice Ward held a number of roles in her twenty years as a partner and acquired extensive experience in commercial litigation and alternative dispute resolution, acting in matters in a number of States and in the Federal jurisdiction.

In 2008, Justice Ward was the fi rst woman solicitor to be appointed directly to the Supreme Court of NSW. She sits in the Equity Division. Justice Ward has been a Director of Pricewaterhouse Coopers Charitable Foundation.

Sydney Uni LIVE! - Courses & Careers Day   View Summary
29 August 2009

The University of Sydney throws open its doors and offers you the chance to discover more about study opportunities and Sydney Uni life.

From courses to career prospects, clubs and societies to accommodation and student services - this public open day will ensure all your questions are answered.

On the day you can:

-look around at the various campuses and facilities of Sydney Uni -talk with academic advisers -attend mini lectures on courses and admission -visit faculty activities -visit our museums and galleries -take a campus tour -discover social and sports groups -find out about student services

and much, much more.

University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Pet Fair   View Summary
29 August 2009

The Veterinary Teaching Hospital's Pet Fair will be held on Saturday 29th August 2009 on the University grounds that surround the Veterinary Faculty precinct.

Apart from the free entertainment, we are planning a number of special attractions:

Pet counselling- for pets with animal behaviour problems, a wildlife and exotic pet display as well as other pet health and information stalls, free pet health checks (bring along any type of animal) by senior veterinary students (under supervision) and a variety of pet owner and animal-oriented entertainment. Throughout the day there will be hospital tours, NSW Police Dog Unit demonstrations and this time a fantastic cat show including 15 different breeds. We also will have a jumping castle, a face painter and even a celebrity vet at the fair. It will be a fun day out for everyone involved.

CONCERT - Songs of Ascents: Barefoot in Venice   View Summary
29 August 2009

A small choral group of Sydney University students will be performing the Hebrew works of the 17th century Jewish composer Salamone Rossi of Mantua, on several nights. The group, known as Barefoot, brings a passion and movement to these remarkable works seldom seen in other early music groups. The concert will also feature new arrangements of traditional Jewish songs by current members of Barefoot.

Sunday carillon recital "Winter's End" by Liz Cartwright   View Summary
30 August 2009

Celebrate the end of Winter as the bells play. Watch the player on CCTV under the Western Tower. Meet the player and take a belfry tour after the recital.

CONCERT - Songs of Ascents: Barefoot in Venice   View Summary
30 August 2009

A small choral group of Sydney University students will be performing the Hebrew works of the 17th century Jewish composer Salamone Rossi of Mantua, on several nights. The group, known as Barefoot, brings a passion and movement to these remarkable works seldom seen in other early music groups. The concert will also feature new arrangements of traditional Jewish songs by current members of Barefoot.

USU VERGE Arts Festival   View Summary
31 August 2009 to 11 September 2009

Verge is the annual Arts Festival of the University. Held in the first two weeks of September each year, the campus comes alive with music, art, film and theatre, all highlighting and encouraging the creativity of the University of Sydney community.

September
Nicholson: Man and Museum (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 December 2009

A colourful exploration of some of the unearthed tales behind the extraordinary life of Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum, and the first vice-chancellor and second chancellor of the University of Sydney. Find out about Nicholson and mummies, spiritualism, trips up the Volga, grand houses, a much younger wife, retirement to England aged 53, and the loss of his house and life's work aged 90. True melodrama.

WS Macleay and the natural history circle   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 1 December 2009

William Sharp Macleay's natural history Horae Entomologicae (1819 - 21) sought God's order in nature through a system of organisation based on the affinities and analogies between organisms. This quinarian system, as it was known, was read and considered by London's young and radical naturalists in the 1820's and the 1830's, among them the promising scholar Charles Darwin.

Speaking Volumes - the Three Decker Novel   View Summary
14 May 2009 to 30 November 2009

What did people in nineteenth century England really read? Explore the books from the Three Decker Novel Collection and be entertained by historical and sporting fiction, thrilled by adventure and romance and enlightened by novels on social issues.

Griffith Taylor: Global Geographer (exhibition)   View Summary
7 June 2009 to 18 September 2009

Foundation Professor of Geography at the Uniersity of Sydney, Griffith Taylor (1880 - 1963) was a remarkable man - a driven intellectual and a superb self-publicist. Taylor's career in Australia, the United States and Canada encompassed Antarctic exploration, ethnography and nation planning. His frank assessments of Australia's arid country and concern for the environmental limits of settlement derided in his own lifetime, have earned him renewed respect. This exhibition, curated by historian Carolyn Strange, explores the extraordinary world of a talented draftsman, teacher and provocative explorer of places and ideas.

Celebrating Apollo at 40 Exhibition   View Summary
20 July 2009 to 10 September 2009

In July 1969, the world watched in wonder during the Apollo 11 mission as Neil Armstrong took "one small step", becoming the first human being to set foot on the Moon.

This historic spaceflight represented a "giant leap for Mankind": the first time that human beings had explored another world in person. The Apollo 11 lunar landing was one of the most significant scientific and technological events of the Twentieth Century, and the program that made it possible inspired the best and brightest students to seek out careers in the exciting fields of space exploration, astronomy and aeronautical engineering. In July 2009, the University of Sydney's School of Physics and the Science Foundation for Physics will present an exhibition commemorating the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11's historic lunar landing.

Combining contemporary artefacts and memorabilia, this display will present the history of the Apollo Project and explore the relationship between the US space program and the University of Sydney's School of Physics.

BIRD CRY from the Grassy Box Woodlands   View Summary
15 August 2009 to 5 September 2009

Alison Clouston & Boyd

a sound & sculpture installation

To be opened Friday 14th August 6 - 8pm, by Bernie Hobbs Environmentalist and science broadcaster from New Inventors and ABC Radio

USU VERGE Arts Festival   View Summary
31 August 2009 to 11 September 2009

Verge is the annual Arts Festival of the University. Held in the first two weeks of September each year, the campus comes alive with music, art, film and theatre, all highlighting and encouraging the creativity of the University of Sydney community.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Deborah DeMott, Duke Law School   View Summary
1 September 2009

Legal Perspectives on Dealing in Art and Objects of Cultural Heritage

This seminar is part of the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial Series for 2009.

About the speaker

Professor DeMott served as articles editor of the New York University Law Review, and began her professional career with a judicial clerkship in a federal court in New York City, later practicing with a large law firm before joining Duke University's Law School in 1975. In 1989, she received the Scholar/Teacher of the Year Award from Duke University.

Professor DeMott has held a secondary appointment as Centennial Visiting Professor in the Law Department of the London School of Economics, and has also taught at the Universities of Sydney, Melbourne, Texas, Colorado, San Diego, the Hastings College of Law of the University of California, and at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, Toronto. In 1986 she was a Fulbright Senior Scholar at Sydney and Monash Universities in Australia. In Spring 1996 Professor DeMott held the Hurst C. Huber Visiting Chair at the University of Florida College of Law. In Spring 1998 she was the Scholar in Residence at the Frances Lewis Law Center, Washington and Lee University School of Law. In Spring 1999 she was in residence at the University of Auckland as the New Zealand Legal Research Foundation Visiting Fellow. She is the author of a treatise, Shareholder Derivative Actions, published in 1987 and a casebook, Fiduciary Obligation, Agency and Partnership, published in 1991. Her other writing concerns corporate law, takeovers and acquisitions, and fiduciary obligation.

About the presentation

Contexts in which legal institutions must determine whether a particular object is a work of 'art' or art of a particular type; artists' rights, including statutory and non-statutory moral rights and resale rights; problems of authenticity; legal rights and duties of auctioneers and art dealers; legal structures of art museums, including issues of internal management and governance; stolen art; developments in law and industry practice relevant to cultural heritage.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009.Click herefor more details.

Details regarding the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial series are included in the series brochure. To view the brochure, pleaseclick here.

Using the News Media for Research   View Summary
1 September 2009

Rod Tiffen is one of Australia's leading scholars of the media. His teaching and research interests are in the mass media, Australian politics, comparative democratic politics, democratisation and Australian relations with Asia.

Launch of the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery's 1st International Policy and Research Roundtable    View Summary
1 September 2009

Access, Influence and Innovation: Launch of the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery's 1st International Policy and Research Rountable

Join Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery Alumni and friends to launch the 1st International Policy and Research Roundtable.


Panel discussion includes our international guests:


Professor Anne-Marie Rafferty, Kings College, London; Jane Salvage, Independent health consultant and author; Professor Marla Salmon, University of Washington, Seattle; Sandra MacDonald-Rencz, Chief Nurse of Canada

Alumni At The Nicholson Museum   View Summary
1 September 2009

Alumni at the Nicholson

In the International Year of Astronomy, world-leading astrophysicist Professor Bryan Gaensler will give a special alumni talk on his amazing insights into astronomy today and tomorrow.

Professor Gaensler, who previously worked at the Center for Space Research at MIT, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Department of Astronomy at Harvard, is a leading member of the team for the Square Kilometre Array, the next-generation radio telescope capable of surveying the sky 10,000 times faster than at present and once launched, expected to revolutionise our ability to observe the universe.

Bryan is a vastly knowledgeable and fascinating speaker. You will come away astounded and inspired!

The presentation is being held in the Nicholson Museum surrounded by the exhibition "The Sky's the Limit: Astronomy in Antiquity", an introduction to which will precede the main talk.

Refreshments will be available and you will be able to view the exhibition and meet and mingle with other alumni and guests.

Using the News Media for Research   View Summary
1 September 2009

Professor Rod Tiffin will focus on some of the main challenges in researching the mass media, in particular the news media, and then briefly touch on the implications of this for those who want to use the media as a source of data in their own research.

Sydney Uni Monthly Markets   View Summary
2 September 2009

Have a browse, grab something to eat or snatch up a bargain at the Sydney Uni Monthly Markets.

Key Thinkers Series - Mao Zedong   View Summary
2 September 2009

Speaker: Professor David Goodman, Professor of Chinese Politics, and Director, Institute of Social Sciences

Mao Zedong (1893-1976) is best known as the founder of the People's Republic of China. He led the Chinese Communist Party from 1935 until his death, and brought it to political power in 1949. Mao is well known as a revolutionary, a guerrilla leader, a political and military strategist and icon for post-modern art. During the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution that started in the mid-1960s he attacked the establishment of the new party-state in China for "succumbing to the sugar coated bullets of the bourgeoisie", though his motives have always been a matter of controversy inside as well as outside the People's Republic of China. Mao himself was always anxious to be seen as an ideologist, as well as an active revolutionary. This lecture will introduce the different and often competing strands in his ideology, which remain an important legacy for China today.

For full details consult the website : http://www.usyd.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/thoughts_thinkers/index.php

Weird Animal Genomes and Sex by Professor Jennifer A. Marshall Graves   View Summary
2 September 2009

Whether a baby develops as a boy or girl depends on a single gene on the Y chromosome. In humans and other mammals, females have two X chromosomes, but males have a single X and a Y that bears the testis-determining gene (SRY) that induces testis differentiation and switches on hormones that masculinize the embryo. The human X is a middle-sized, ordinary chromosome, though it is rich in genes involved in reproduction and intelligence (often both). But the tiny Y is a genetic wasteland - full of genetic junk and bearing only 45 genes, most active only in testis. How did human sex chromosomes get to be so weird?

Our strategy is to compare the chromosomes, genes and DNA in distantly related mammals and even birds and reptiles (which have completely different sex determining systems). The genomes of Australia's unique kangaroos and platypus, now being completely sequenced, are a goldmine of new information. Kangaroo sex chromosomes reveal the original mammal sex chromosomes, while the bizarre platypus sex chromosomes (more related to those of birds) tell us that our sex chromosomes are relatively young.

Our work shows that the human X and Y evolved from an ordinary chromosome pair just 150 million years ago. It is degrading progressively and I predict it will disappear in just 5 million years. If humans don't become extinct, new sex determining genes and chromosomes must evolve, maybe leading to the evolution of new hominid species.

CONCERT - Songs of Ascents: Barefoot in Venice   View Summary
2 September 2009

A small choral group of Sydney University students will be performing the Hebrew works of the 17th century Jewish composer Salamone Rossi of Mantua, on several nights. The group, known as Barefoot, brings a passion and movement to these remarkable works seldom seen in other early music groups. The concert will also feature new arrangements of traditional Jewish songs by current members of Barefoot.

Parsons Seminar Series with Professor Eric Talley   View Summary
3 September 2009

Allocating Risk and Uncertainty M&A Agreements

This seminar is part of the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial Series for 2009.

Register Online

PleaseRegister Online.

About the speaker

Eric Talley is a leading authority on corporate law, and law and economics. In addition to teaching corporate law, he serves as faculty co-director of Boalt's Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy. He joined the faculty in 2006.

Talley was previously at University of Southern California Law School from 1995 to 2005. He held the Theodore and Ivadelle Johnson Chair in Law and Business in 2005, having become a full professor in 2000. Talley led two of the law school's respected research centers, and was director both at the USC Center in Law, Economics and Organization and the USC/Caltech Olin Center for the Study of Law and Rational Choice from 2002 to 2004.

Talley has also taught both law and economics classes at Georgetown Law Center, the California Institute of Technology, the RAND Graduate School and Stanford University.

Details regarding this presentation will be provided shortly.

Details regarding the Ross Parsons Corporate and Commercial series are included in the series brochure. To view the brochure, pleaseclick here.

Graduate Options Expo   View Summary
3 September 2009

Is graduate study your next move? Discover all your options at the Graduate Options Expo.

If you're ready for graduate study but can't find the time to research all the options available to you, you're not alone. Come to a special event at the University of Sydney where you can:

- Speak one-on-one with someone about your career and study options.

- Find out how to 'study now, pay later' with Fee-HELP.

- Leave with the information you need to make an informed choice.

Whether you're considering a career change or looking to up-skill and gain the 'employability edge' that comes with postgraduate qualifications, you'll discover all the answers you need at Graduate Options Expo.

Southeast Asian Studies after Edward Said   View Summary
3 September 2009

The Sydney University Arts Association is pleased to announce the Inaugural Lecture of Professor Adrian Vickers, Professor of Southeast Asian Studies, School of Languages and Cultures, on the topic: "Southeast Asian Studies after Edward Said".

Southeast Asian Studies after Edward Said   View Summary
3 September 2009

The Sydney University Arts Association is pleased to announce the Inaugural Lecture of Professor Adrian Vickers, Professor of Southeast Asian Studies, School of Languages and Cultures, on the topic: "Southeast Asian Studies after Edward Said".

Sydney Democracy Event - Democracy and in the Pacific and Divided Societies   View Summary
4 September 2009

Stewart Firth

College of Asia and the Pacific

Australian National University

"The Fiji Military Forces and Democracy in Fiji"

The 2006 coup and the "New Legal Order" introduced in April 2009 have brought more radical change to Fiji than earlier coups. The military commander and prime minister Frank Bainimarama has militarized government, giving the military direct control of the prime minister's department, the police, prisons, immigration, justice, the postal service, fisheries and other government services. Senior officers now have a direct personal stake in the new order, a military council under the complete domination of the Bainimarama governs the country, and opposition to the regime is suppressed. The regime promises elections by September 2014, but, even if they were to be held, the military forces would remain the final holders of political power. This paper examines the rise to dominance of the Republic of Fiji Military Forces, the reasons for the 2006 coup and the 2009 seizure of power, and the prospects for democracy in Fiji.


Stephanie Lawson
Politics and International Relations
Macquarie University

"Indigenous Nationalism and the Politics of Ethnicity in Fiji"

The Republic of the Fiji Islands has experienced more changes of government via coups than by constitutional processes. On the first three occasions, the rhetoric of justification centered on indigenous rights vis-Ã-vis perceived encroachment by Indo-Fijians. Images of politics in Fiji have therefore been dominated by ethnically based struggles for dominance with indigenous Fijians generally winning out by virtue of their control of the military. The coup of December 2006, however, has confounded explanations of Fiji's politics based on a simple dichotomy of interests between indigenous Fijians and Indo-Fijians. In this instance, Fiji's military commander toppled a government dominated by Fijian nationalists claiming, among other things, that it operated on racist lines and that Fiji needed a new way forward. This paper considers a range of factors surrounding Fiji's coups and assesses prospects for the future of constitutional rule.

"Scandals, Crime & Corruption" on the carillon   View Summary
6 September 2009

Hear Edward Grantham illustrate "Scandals, Crime & Corruption" on the carillon, as part of NSW History Week. Watch him play on the CCTV under the Western Tower. Meet him after the recital, and inspect the bells in the clock tower.

2nd International Workshop on POF modelling   View Summary
7 September 2009 to 8 September 2009

International researchers will discuss and present the last ideas and results on the theory and modelling of polymer optical fibres.
Space is limited. This workshop is held in conjunction with The 18th International Conference on Plastic Optical Fibers September 9-11, 2009 Dockside, Cockle Bay Wharf, Darling Harbour

Plenary speakers are Professor John Love (Australian National University) and Professor Martijn de Sterke (University of Sydney). Prof Love is well known as one of the authors of the classic text Optical Waveguide Theory, while Prof de Sterke is a world authority on microstructured fibres, and current editor of Optics Express.

Investing in YOU! the hoarding economy of commercial stem cell storage   View Summary
7 September 2009

Department of Sociology and Social Policy Seminar. A talk by Maria Fannin, School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol.

Inversting in YOU! the hoarding economy of commercial stem cell storage   View Summary
7 September 2009

Department of Sociology and Social Policy Seminar. A talk by Maria Fannin, School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol.

John Clark: Modern & Contemporary Chinese Art: 3 Issues   View Summary
7 September 2009

This lecture points to wider historical questions which have tended to be passed over in presentation of modern and contemporary Chinese art.

Dreams from the Motherland   View Summary
7 September 2009

University of Sydney Senior Lecturer Clare Corbould, author of "Becoming African Americans", examines the long varied and fascinating relationship between black Americans and Africa from slavery to the election of Barack Obama. Co-sponsored by the Department of History in conjunction with the History Council of NSW, "History Week"

Andrew Shoben: greyworld: playing in the city   View Summary
8 September 2009

Andrew Shoben is the founder of greyworld, a world renowned artists' collective who create art in public spaces. His primary objective is to create public art that involves the human in an urban context.

Scandalous Revelations: A History Week 2009 Event   View Summary
8 September 2009

Scandals often reveal changes and challenges to social, sexual, and political mores in unique ways. In this discussion, scholars from The University of Sydney will present new research into 'scandal' and explore how different incidents have illuminated diverse societies, past and present. Co-sponsored by Museums Sydney and the Department of History. Discussants include Amanda Kaladelfos, Sophie Loy-Wilson, Agnieszka Sobocinska, and Briony Neilson

51st Annual Lambie-Dew Oration   View Summary
8 September 2009

Since its inauguration in 1958, the Lambie Dew Oration is the most prestigious event in the Sydney University Medical Society's academic calendar, commemorating the first Professors of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Sydney. This annual public lecture presents a forum for a speaker of significant national or international standing to speak on a topic representative of their personal endeavour and achievement. Past speakers have included distinguished persons such as Ian Frazer, Fred Hollows, Justice Michael Kirby and the late Dr. Chris O'Brien.

This year, the University of Sydney Medical Society is honoured to present Dr. Rowan Gillies as the 2009 orator.

Dr. Gillies is currently completing surgical training in Sydney in the speciality of plastic surgery. He was previously the youngest ever International President of Medecins Sans Frontieres and worked in the field in Sudan, Sierra Leone, Afghanistan, Liberia and many other places of conflict.

We are looking forward to hearing Dr. Gillies share his experiences and warmly invite all members of the public to attend what will be a most memorable evening.

Public Talk: Women along the Silk Road   View Summary
8 September 2009

For many years, the world has had a fascination with the Silk Road for a big part due to its intercultural importance. The Silk Road is an extensive interconnected network of trade routes across the Asian continent connecting East, South, and Western Asia with the Mediterranean world, as well as North and Northeast Africa and Europe. Dunhuang in China was the gateway to the Silk Road and is home to a historic grotto complex, regarded as the world's largest and best-preserved treasure house of Buddhist scriptures, murals, and architectural designs.

At this free public talk, Dr Lily Lee who specialises in Chinese women's history and literature, will reveal attitudes and perceptions relating to women and, more importantly, will provide an insight into the everyday life of actual women along the Silk Road depicted in artworks and archaeological findings.

Controversies in Public Health Lecture Four - Is the genetic revolution overhyped?   View Summary
9 September 2009

Professor Wayne Hall, NHMRC Australia Fellow and Professor of Public Health Policy, School of Population Health, University of Queensland

"Genomic medicine" was the phrase used by Francis Collins to describe what he predicted would be the transformation of medicine by the use of genomic knowledge to increase our ability to prevent and treat human disease. In 1999 he predicted that within 10 years "predictive genomic medicine" and personalised medicine or "pharmacogenomics" would be a routine part of medical practice. The predictions about predictive genomic medicine have yet to come to pass; personalised medicine is withus but primarily based on the genetics of cancer cells than on the genomes of their hosts, the patients. New genetic discoveries are regularly featured in the media. We are also being exposed to a new form of DNA knowledge called Much is promised about the benefits of genetic knowledge but is it all hype or is there real potential for health benefits?

Key Thinkers Series - Konrad Lorenz   View Summary
9 September 2009

Speaker: Professor Paul Griffiths, Professorial Research Fellow, Sydney Centre for the Foundations of Science

The Nobel prize-winning Austrian biologist Konrad Lorenz initiated the modern, Darwinian science of animal behaviour. In the 1960s Lorenz's popular writings on Darwinism and human affairs, and particularly his 1966 book, On Aggression, had the same high public profile that Richard Dawkins' books have today. Modern sociobiology, behavioural ecology and evolutionary psychology are all descended, both intellectually and often sociologically, from Lorenz and his collaborators. This lecture will explain why Lorenz's work, and that of his Dutch collaborator Niko Tinbergen, represented a radical break with earlier Darwinian accounts of the mind, examine the young Lorenz's involvement with Nazism and explain his hostility to the emergence of sociobiology in the 1970s.

For full details consult the website : http://www.usyd.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/thoughts_thinkers/index.php

Research Leader's Seminar: Cancer Control   View Summary
9 September 2009

After outlining a conceptual framework for cancer control, Professor Armstrong will describe the School's present engagement in cancer control research. It is a diverse program extending from research into the genetic and environmental causes of cancer through cancer screening and treatment research, and informed decision making regarding both, to follow-up and supportive care after cancer treatment and the determinants of cancer outcome. There are many players; they are loosely organised into a number of overlapping teams and play according to different sets of "rules".

Faced with present realities and a range of future plans we will ask ourselves the question: What can we do that will make our cancer control research more innovative and give it a bigger impact?

Bruce Armstrong is a Professor of Public Health at The University of Sydney and is known internationally for his research into the causes and prevention of skin cancer and melanoma. His present research covers genetic and environmental causes of cancer and the quality and performance of cancer services. Bruce is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science and received the inaugural New South Wales Premier's award for Outstanding Cancer Researcher of the Year in 2006.

"Australian Modernism from the Roddy Meagher Collection": Lunchtime Art Tour   View Summary
9 September 2009

A floor talk with Dr Ann Stephen, Senoir Curator of the University Art Collection on the exhibition "Collecting Passions".

Space, Place and Humanity: back to the future with Griffith Taylor   View Summary
9 September 2009

A free lecture on this historical implications of the work of Griffth Taylor and what it means for modern geography.

Fauvette Loureiro Memorial Artists Travel Scholarship Finalists Exhibition   View Summary
9 September 2009

FAUVETTE LOUREIRO MEMORIAL ARTISTS TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP FINALISTS EXHIBITION

2009 FINALISTS: Suzan Liu / Lara O'Reilly / Kenzee Patterson / Stefan Popescu / Teo Treloar.

To be opened by Dr Michael Spence, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Sydney.

The winner will be announced at the SCA Awards and Scholarships Presentation Ceremony at 5.30pm on Wednesday 9 September.

Opening Wednesday 9 September, 6 to 8pm
Exhibition continues to Sunday 27 September

Sydney College of the Arts
The Visual Arts Faculty of the
University of Sydney
Balmain Road Rozelle (enter at Cecily St)
02 9351 1008 scagallery@sca.usyd.edu.au

Gallery hours:
Wednesday to Friday, 11am to 5pm
Saturday to Sunday, 11am to 4pm

Travers Twiss and Territorium Nullius Event   View Summary
10 September 2009

Department of Government and International Relations Seminar. A talk by Associate Professor Andrew Fitzmaurice.

Shifting Grounds: Opposition to coalmining among Hunter Valley communities   View Summary
10 September 2009

Anthropology Seminar. A talk by Linda Connor.

40 years of Kaldor Public Art Projects   View Summary
10 September 2009

Anthony Bond (Assistant Director, Art Gallery NSW) and John Kaldor will present a preview of a survey exhibition, opening on 2 October at AGNSW, celebrating 40 years of the Kaldor Art Projects. Kaldor has instigated ground-breaking projects with some of the most iconic contemporary artists of his time.

Scandal in the Quadrangle: The Nicholson Museum and Great Hall Walking Tour (A History Week Event)   View Summary
10 September 2009

A chance to explore the early history of the University of Sydney and hear the gossip and rumour that surround the beginnings of the Nicholson Museum and Great Hall. Meet Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum and the University's first Vice Chancellor (from 1851 to 1854). A rare tour of the University of Sydney's Great Hall, which celebrates its sesquicentenary this year. Led by Craig Barker and Julia Horne. Co-sponsored by Museums Sydney and the Department of History.

Future Directions in Literacy Conference 2009   View Summary
11 September 2009 to 12 September 2009

Keynote Speakers
Professor Allan Luke, Queensland University of Technology
Professor Peter Freebody, The University of Sydney

This year's program aims to stimulate professional conversations about future developments in literacy pedagogy and practice in a national and international context.The scope of papers, workshops and presentations will cover issues pertinent to the age range K-8: infants to the middle years. Our new approach will support early career teachers who have teamed up with school mentors.

The program will:

  • thematically link keynotes to other presentations and workshops to clearly establish links between theory and practice. This will be modelled through the work of successful research-based partnerships
  • add fresh perspectives on current issues.

For more information please visit theFDL Conference 2009 webpage

Bookfest 2009 - the bookfair Sydney waits for!   View Summary
12 September 2009 to 16 September 2009

The bookfair Sydney waits for!

Bookfest offers a splendid range of rare and collectable books as well as a great variety of titles in categories which include Art, Australiana, Film, History, Literature and Philosophy. Foreign language dictionaries and magazines such as the New Yorker, National Geographic will be on sale alongside a large selection of sheet music, LPs, CDs, prints and posters.Your choice of thousands of books at tiny prices.

Proceeds from Bookfest are used to assist the Chancellor's Committee fund special projects within The University of Sydney.

"Wondrous Antiquities: The Histories of Herodotus": Nicholson Museum Course In A Day   View Summary
12 September 2009

Leading University of Sydney scholars bring to life the writings of Herodotus.

Kids Museums: Scandalous History   View Summary
13 September 2009

Free children's activities in the University Museums for NSW History week.

National Threatened Species tour with Curator Liz Jefferys   View Summary
13 September 2009

Macleay Museum Natural History Curator, Elizabeth Jefferys will take family tours through the Macleay Museum exhibitions talking about issues affecting animal species in Australia today. An event for National Threatened Species Week.

Visit Sydney's Offical Residences   View Summary
13 September 2009

This is a fundraising event for the Australiana Fund

The Noble Vernacular: Primitivist Retentions in Architectural Discourse   View Summary
14 September 2009

In recent years, in response to the manifold environmental challenges, scholars have started to stress the sustainable character of vernacular architecture, emphasising its ecological friendliness and appropriateness. Increasingly, vernacular architecture is represented as a more sustainable alternative, or at least predecessor, to contemporary built environments. Rather than looking at the validity of this assumption, the lecture will explore the ideas, assumptions and value judgements that underlie it. It will argue that essentialist and romanticised notions of the vernacular (of which 'the noble ecological vernacular' is only one manifestation) are part of a wider cultural discourse dealing with the boundaries between 'us' and 'them'. It will also argue that a better understanding of this discourse and its relationship to the vernacular concept helps expose the essentially primitivist notions inherent in much architectural discourse.

Dr Marcel Vellinga holds a PhD in cultural anthropology from Leiden University. He has research and teaching experience in the fields of anthropology of architecture and international vernacular architecture studies. He has published books and articles on Indonesian vernacular architecture, sustainable building and the position of vernacular architecture in the twenty-first century. He has most recently co-authored, with Paul Oliver and Alexander Bridge, the /Atlas of Vernacular Architecture of the World/ (Routledge, 2007).

Resurrecting Pompeii: A book launch    View Summary
15 September 2009

The Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning at The University of Sydney will be hosting the official booklaunch of Resurrecting Pompeii by Dr Estelle Lazer. The evening includes a 30 minute talk, Romancing the bones: The impact of popular culture on archaeological research since 1748.

New Worlds and the Borders of Self: Individualism, America and the Making of Australia   View Summary
15 September 2009

Dr Harris' current research project, New Worlds and the Borders of Self: Individualism, America and the Making of Australia, takes the form of a comparative literary study of the important role of individualism in the historical relationship between the United States and Australia.

His approach to this topic hinges on a critical reassessment of the alleged difference between these two nations - a fundamental difference defined in terms of contrasting foundational myths: the American "myth" of individualism and Australia's "myth" of communalism.

NSW Dairy Science Award.    View Summary
16 September 2009 to 17 September 2009

Summary: The Symposium theme this year is 'Feeding for the Future'.

The program includes a variety of technical sessions, an Annual Dinner and a farm visit amongst other items.

The Annual Dinner is also the forum for presenting the Milk Marketing NSW Dairy Science Award.

The four main technical sessions are as follows:

Feeding for maximum dry matter intake

This session features Dr Fernando Bargo, Elanco in South America and Santiago Farina, FutureDairy

Feeding for maximum profit

Speakers within this session include Joanne Bills from Dairy Australia and Basil Doonan, a private consultant from Tasmania

Feeding and reproduction

A highlight of this session will be Professor John McNamara from Washington State University and the University of Sydney's, Associate Professor John House.

Feeding in the future

Featured in this session is Associate Professor Ian Yule from Massey University, New Zealand, Dr Kendra Kerrisk from the FutureDairy Project and Mark Billing a farmer from Victoria.

The Young Scientists session has become a tradition of our Annual Symposium and this comprises short presentations by a dozen young scientists. Both students and farmers are given the opportunity to interact more directly through this.

A new feature this year will be a 'workshop' session in which the attendees will have the opportunity to meet in small groups to discuss key points, messages and issues in relation to what was presented in the technical sessions.

"Planet Earth": a public lecture by Professor Dietmar Muller   View Summary
16 September 2009

To celebrate the International Year of Astronomy Professor Muller will take us through four and a half billion years of history of the planet called Earth.

Research Leader's Seminar: Global health and ageing   View Summary
16 September 2009

Global health is a "hot topic" - but what is it? How does it differ from international health? On Wednesday, 16th September, Professor Bob Cumming will address this question and provide an overview of the field of global/international health. A key feature of global health in the 21st century is population ageing. The number of older people is rising rapidly throughout the world, even in sub-Saharan Africa, and is driving an epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). How can we contribute to the control of NCDs in developing countries? Recent research conducted in low and middle income countries by staff of the School of Public Health's Master of International Public Health group and by staff of the George Institute will be presented, as well as some research on ageing conducted in Australia. *More* Where: Marjorie Oldfield Lecture Theatre, Edward Ford Building (A27), Camperdown RSVP: essential

Research Leader's Seminar Series: Global Health and Ageing   View Summary
16 September 2009

Global health is a 'hot topic' - but what is it? How does it differ from international health? This seminar will address this question and then provide an overview of the field of global/international health, including its history since the establishment of WHO in 1948. A key feature of global health in the 21st century is population ageing. The number of older people is rising rapidly throughout the world, even in sub-Saharan Africa, and is driving an epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). How can we contribute to the control of NCDs in developing countries?

Recent research conducted in low and middle income countries by staff of the School of Public Health's Master of International Public Health group and by staff of the George Institute will be presented, as well as some research on ageing conducted in Australia.

This seminar will be present by Bob Cumming who is Professor of Epidemiology and Geritaric Medicine in the School of Public Health at the University of Sydney. Best known internationally for his work on osteoporosis, falls and fractures, Bob has also done important research on eye diseases in older people. Current research projects include one of the world's most comprehensive studies of the health of older men, the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP). Over the last few years Bob has become increasinly involved in international health, culminating in his appointment in 2009 as Director of the Master of International Public Health (MIPH) program at the University of Sydney. He has been a WHO Advisor in Cambodia and Indonesia and recently completed a 5 month sabbatical at Makerere University in Uganda.

Targets, Technologies and the Till: An effective global climate agreement   View Summary
17 September 2009

Walter Westman Lecture on Science, Humanity and the Environment: Jonh Connor will speak on Targets, Technologies and the Till: An effective global climate agreement.

John's address will come in the week before world leaders gather at a special climate change focused UN leaders summit in New York and immediately afterwards at a meeting of G-20 in Pittsburgh. John will do a stocktake on Australian and international commitments to key elements of an effective global climate agreement which include emissions reduction targets, technology transfer and financing agreements. The address will also cover the extent to which Australia's climate diplomacy and economic growth capacity remains monopolized by coal and energy intensive industries, and commentary on the dangerous game of chicken being played by developed and developing country negotiators as the December Copenhagen deadline looms.


RSVP: Friday 11 September, 2009

Anything new? Marriage, love, magic and adultery: Warlpiri relationships as seen by three generation   View Summary
17 September 2009

Anthropology Seminar. A talk by Yasmine Musharbush

Seminar Agroecosystems research group   View Summary
17 September 2009

Dr. Chris Waring

Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Hydrogeology and in-situ measurement of soil composition, moisture, and carbon by neutron activation analysis

Measuring civic design: The case of the Sydney desalination project   View Summary
17 September 2009

Attention to community engagement in the design civic works ranging from urban amenities to large-scale infrastructure is making the community ipso facto designers. The underlying assumption is that participation is tantamount to design. However, asking the community to participate in design is not the same as asking the community to do design. The latter is not possible without understanding the parameters and conditions under which this can take place and makes the potentially naive assumption that the community can do design. Participation is only one dimension of a set of capabilities for design. In this talk, I present an instrument to quantify the public's capability to design based on six dimensions derived from cognitive studies of design, mapped into socio-political factors through the lens of the capabilities approach. Illustrating its application, I apply the instrument onto Sydney's desalination project as a case study for measuring citizens' capability !

to design.

About the speaker: Andy Dong is a Senior Lecturer in Design Computing in the Design Lab at the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, University of Sydney. His research area is the computational modelling of design, with a specific focus on language use in design and how to predict design outcomes based on design text and talk. This talk is based on his Australian Research Council-funded research project 'Quantifying citizens' capability to design' in collaboration with Professor Tom Kvan of the University of Melbourne.

Menander's "Dyskolos"   View Summary
17 September 2009

The University of Sydney holds a very special place in the history of the comedy of Menander. On July 4, 1959 students of the University performed this comedy in its original Greek for the very first time since antiquity.

Now, 50 years later, a combination of students, staff and members of that original 1959 cast will re-perform scenes from the play in celebration of that important event in theatre history.

Join us in celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Fisher Library.   View Summary
20 September 2009

Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir will launch the celebration at a gala afternoon tea.

Listen to guests speakers, live music, and enjoy the company of friends and colleagues!

An exhibition accompanying the event will display architectural drawings of the first Fisher Library in MacLaurin Hall; treasures from the Library's Rare Books and Special Collections; photos and memorabilia covering the last 100 years.

To attend this free event please register via the Library website.

Money and Keynesian Uncertainty   View Summary
21 September 2009

Department of Political Economy Seminar. A talk by Dr Bill Lucarelli, School of Economics and Finance, UWS.

The University Apprentice Business Challenge!   View Summary
21 September 2009

THE UNIVERSITY APPRENTICE!

Watch as teams of Business Information Systems students present novel solutions to challenging business problems.

The event will also feature talks from business industry professionals, including: -

* Mark Reid (Head of Retail Sales at BankWest): Customer Relationship Management

* Giridhar Tirumalai (Senior Project Manager, IBM): A day in the life of a project manager.

If you're a future business professional, or just want some good fun and entertainment, come along!

Please RSVP by emailing pass@econ.usyd.edu.au

Andrew Benjamin: Art Matters: Colour in Painting   View Summary
21 September 2009

This paper takes up the relationship between art history and philosophy.

Institute of Social Sciences Annual Forum   View Summary
22 September 2009

You are invited to the University's Annual Forum showcasing social science research.

The speakers are prize winners in the University's annual social science competition, together with two invited guest speakers.

This year the Forum will also include the formal launch of the Institute of Social Sciences.

Events

Tuesday 22nd September 2009

Darlington Centre

Speakers

10- 11am Bronwyn Winter

Winner Mid-Career Researcher 2008 Prize

11am- 12pm Alex Broom

Winner Early Career Researcher 2008 Prize

2- 3pm Joy Paton

Winner 2008 Social Science PhD Prize

3- 4pm

Guest Speaker: Margaret Levi

Founding Professor of US Politics, US Studies Centre, University of Sydney & Director, CHAOS, Department of Political Science, University of Washington, Seattle

4- 5pm Reception and Drinks

5pm Institute Launch

VC, Michael Spence, will launch the Institute of Social Sciences and present prizes to the annual award winners, followed by:

5pm - 7pm

Guest Speaker: Robert Wade

Professor of Political Economy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He will speak on The Global Slump: Deeper Causes and Harder Lessons

RSVPs to the Evening Forum are ESSENTIAL. Please RSVP to Nisha Brooks - n.brooks@usyd.edu.au

A Hunger to Design fundraiser for World Vision   View Summary
22 September 2009

Currently there are children and families in 33 countries around the world who are suffering from the effects of biggest Global Food Crisis seen on the face of the planet. Food can be harder to find and is more expensive to buy, so it’s the poorest families who suffer the most.

Inspired by a crisis plunging 900 million into chronic hunger around the world, William Chan, a second year architecture student, became passionate about spreading awareness on this global issue.

There are practical ways that youth can take action to improve the lives of children facing this situation. Students can develop a humanitarian view on architecture and design to be part of the creative solution to fight global poverty, says William.

This Faculty event, A Hunger to Design, will feature the Faculty of Architecture, Design & Planning's Associate Lecturer in Sustainable Architecture, Daniel Ryan, as well as the Director of World Vision's youth movement and Sydney University International Studies student, Matt Darvas. The environmental and sustainability causes to the crisis will be explored and the role architects and designers play in order to make a global difference will be discussed.

Food and drinks will be provided alongside live jazz and a designer market will showcase sweat-shop free t-shirts and ethical products. The night will conclude with the epic documentary, Garbage Warrior, which follows the story of eco architect Michael Reynolds and his fight to build off-the-grid self-sufficient communities.

All proceeds from the night will go to World Vision's Global Food Crisis fund, which will help to provide sustainable agriculture and development programs and emergency food aid. These projects will work to increase reliable access to food and water, reduce the effects of climate change, invest in agricultural education and microenterprise development.

To make a secure tax-deductible credit card donation on the World Vision 40 Hour Famine website, click here: https://famine.worldvision.com.au/famine.cgi?a=SPONSOR_&pn=29299855-6 Receipt Book Number is 29299855-6.

Uni Trek - Discover Engineering & IT - Year 12 Information Night    View Summary
23 September 2009

Information night for Year 12 students and the parents

Key Thinkers Series - John Rawls   View Summary
23 September 2009

Speaker: Professor Duncan Ivison, Professor of Political Philosophy and Head of the School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry (SOPHI)

John Rawls (1921-2002) has been hailed as one of the most important liberal political philosophers of our times. He is best known for hishugely influential book, A Theory of Justice (1971), which defended a vision of social justice in which individual rights and social equality were seemingly reconciled—something many consider to be impossible.For Rawls, justice was the "first virtue" of social and political and institutions and should structure the way fundamental rights and opportunities (as well as burdens) are distributed in a society. His conception of "justice as fairness" attempted to reconcile the often competing ideals of liberty and equality by setting out principles of justice that individuals, conceived of as rational and "free and equal", would be willing to accept. Technically innovative, often dizzyingly abstract and yet deeply informed by the history of philosophy, Rawls's work has shaped philosophical thinking about justice—for better or worse—ever since.

For full details consult the website : http://www.usyd.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/thoughts_thinkers/index.php

Research Leader's Seminar: Chronic disease and sustainability    View Summary
23 September 2009

Professor Stephen Leeder will present a conceptual framework that encapsulates three major approaches to chronic disease and sustainability: (1) Primary prevention of chronic disease through a healthy built environment; (2) Secondary prevention, through the use of drug regimes, treatment to reduce other elevated risk factors, and the provision of surgical services; and (3) Building an integrated system of care across hospital and other settings, to cater for an ageing population and the concomitant increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases. Stephen Leeder is a professor of public health and community medicine at the University of Sydney and is currently a Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Policy. He has a long history of involvement in public health research, educational development and policy. RSVP is essential

Research Leader's Seminar: Chronic disease and sustainability   View Summary
23 September 2009

Professor Stephen Leeder will present a conceptual framework that encapsulates three major approaches to chronic disease and sustainability: (1) Primary prevention of chronic disease through a healthy built environment; (2) Secondary prevention, through the use of drug regimes, treatment to reduce other elevated risk factors, and the provision of surgical services; and (3) Building an integrated system of care across hospital and other settings, to cater for an ageing population and the concomitant increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases. Stephen Leeder is a professor of public health and community medicine at the University of Sydney and is currently a Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Policy. He has a long history of involvement in public health research, educational development and policy. RSVP is essential

Disciplines of Inquiry - Methodology Colloquia 09   View Summary
24 September 2009

The Research Division, Faculty of Education and Social Work invites you to participate in the launch of a colloquia series on new approaches to research and interdisciplinarity across the education and social work domains.

The detailsfor thisweek'sproceedings are to be released shortly - please check this website for updates.

Black Caesar and Billy Blue: subversive African performance in early colonial Sydney   View Summary
24 September 2009

The Sydney University Arts Association is pleased to announce the Inaugural Lecture of Professor Cassandra Pybus, Department of History, School of Philosophical and Historical Studies, on the topic: "Black Caesar and Billy Blue: subversive African performance in early colonial Sydney".

The International Relations of Genocide   View Summary
24 September 2009

Department of Government and International Relations Seminar. A talk by Professor Martin Shaw, University of Sussex.

Monuments to the Mighty Force: Sri Lankan State religion and the social assemblage   View Summary
24 September 2009

Anthropology Seminar. A talk by Rohan Bastin, Deakin University.

Nick Murcutt and Rachel Neeson: Topographic + suburban strategies   View Summary
24 September 2009

Topographic and Suburban Strategies will trace two primary lines of thinking evident in our current work. The topographic is necessarily site specific - exploring the ambiguity between particular built and natural landscapes. Suburban strategies on the other hand, whilst developed in the first instance for a specific site and client, are interesting for their more generic application. We look to the particularities of each project - its program, budget, physical and cultural contexts - to identify the driving questions to which our architecture responds.

About the speakers: Nicholas Murcutt studied at both the University of Technology and the University of Sydney, before establishing Nicholas Murcutt Architect in 1993. His practice won a number of architectural awards and his work was published widely in both local and international journals. Rachel Neeson graduated from the University of Sydney in 1994 with first class honours and the University Medal. She established Neeson Murcutt Architects with her partner Nicholas Murcutt in 2004 after completing a Masters of Architecture in Barcelona at UPC. Together they are the recipients of significant industry awards including the AIA Wilkinson award for residential architecture in 2007 and 2009. Their work has been published broadly and was exhibited in Australian Pavilion at the 2006 and 2008 Venice Biennale. Neeson Murcutt maintains involvement with small public projects whilst operating primarily at the domestic scale.

The Great Hall 150 Year Anniversary - please see Sunday 27th September    View Summary
25 September 2009 to 27 September 2009

PLEASE SEE Sunday 27 September 2009:

The University of Sydney's Great Hall will be open to the public between 10am and 3pm on Sunday 27 September 2009 for self-guided tours of the Great Hall and Quadrangle. Between 2pm and 3pm the Carillon will be playing a special recital, with a tour of The Belfry afterwards.

"Unimaginable Bodies" Book Launch   View Summary
25 September 2009

Launch hosted by Professor Meaghan Morris (Gender & Cultural Studies, Sydney). Speakers include Professor Gerard Goggin (UNSW).

Unimaginable Bodies radically resituates academic discussions of intellectual disability. Through building relationships between philosophy, cultural studies and communities of integrated dance theatre practice, Anna Hickey-Moody argues that dance theatre devised with and performed by young people with and without intellectual disability, can reframe the ways in which bodies with intellectual disability are known. This book is essential reading for those interested in theories of embodiment, disability studies and dance.

Happiness + Wellbeing @ Work   View Summary
25 September 2009

The 3rd Happiness + Wellbeing @ Work Conference organised by the Workplace Research Centre (WRC), University of Sydney will take place on Friday, 25th September 2009 at Harbours Edge, Darling Harbour, Sydney. This conference will present strategies for generating increased productivity through the dominant value of employee wellbeing. Keynote international speaker is Michael Carroll author of the books "The Mindful Leader" and "Awake at Work".

Attendees will be able to gain insights into successful employee wellbeing programs in the private and public sector with case studies from ING Australia, TNT Australia and Sydney Water and they will be able to hear the latest research and strategies through a number of presentations and workshops on the day.

Harald Jensen Lecture: Soil Carbon: The Known Unknowns.   View Summary
25 September 2009

The Harald Jensen Lecture is an annual lecture held by the NSW Branch of the Australian Society of Soil Science (Inc.), as a forum to discuss and reflect upon contemporary and historical soil science issues. The Inaugural Lecture was delivered in 2005 by Dr Pat Walker. Since then other pillars of Soil Science in Australia, such as Neil McKenzie (Chief of CSIRO- Land & Water), Bob Gilkes (Professor Emeritus UWA) and Rob Fitzpatrick (a well known pedologist with CSIRO- Land & Water) spoke on various topics.

This year our distinguished Professor Alex McBratney will deliver the Harald Jensen Lecture focusing on the topic: Soil Carbon: The Known Unknowns. In the context of offsets in carbon pollution reduction scheme and its obvious influence on soil quality, Alex will talk about what we think we know about soil carbon, and then about what we know we don t know. Alex sees this as one of the major future challenges for soil science. This is a hot topic at the moment and I would like to extend an invitation to all in to register to attend this lecture. Usually the occasion is very relaxed, semi-formal gathering of soil scientists and allied scientists (and their partners).

Self-guided tours to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Great Hall   View Summary
27 September 2009

The University of Sydney's Great Hall will be open to the public between 10am and 3pm for self-guided tours of the Great Hall and Quadrangle. Between 2pm and 3pm the Carillon will be playing a special recital, with a tour of The Belfry afterwards.

Southern Theory and Australian Intellectual Culture   View Summary
28 September 2009

Department of Sociology and Social Policy Seminar. A talk by Raewyn Connell, Education and Social Work, University of Sydney.

The art of classic Chinese opera   View Summary
28 September 2009

The Confucius Institute is presenting a FREE Chinese opera performance by the award-winning Jingkun Theatre Group on Monday, 28 September.

Kungu is one of the most venerable and highly appreciated forms of Chinese opera, famous for its lyrical texts and its seamless co-ordination of song, dance and movement.

The ensemble comprises of seven outstanding performers from China who will perform highlights from: The Peony Pavilion, The Crossroads and Wulong Yuan.

RSVPs are essential, please email: confucius.institute@usyd.edu.au.

Sydney Ideas - Michael Wesley   View Summary
29 September 2009

Getting China Right

A Sydney Ideas lecture by Dr Michael Wesley, Director of the Lowy Institute for International Policy

Australia can no longer muddle through its relationship with China. What is required is a fundamental re-examination of this country's vital interests, and a clear prioritization of the values that underpin our foreign policy. We also need to develop a clear idea of how our international environment will evolve over the next decades, and where we can fit into this milieu.

Key Thinkers Series - Kurt Godel   View Summary
30 September 2009

Professor Mark Colyvan, Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Sydney Centre for the Foundations of Science

Kurt Godel was one of the foremost mathematicians and logicians of the 20th century. He proved a number of extremely surprising results about the limitations of mathematics. Perhaps the most significant of these is his celebrated incompleteness theorem, which tells us that there are mathematical "blind spots": parts of mathematics that traditional methods of proof cannot access. These results are thought by many to have far-reaching consequences for computing and for our understanding of the nature of the human mind.Godel'sresults have thus been the subject of a great deal of popular attention. Indeed, few other results in the history of mathematics have had such an impact outside of mathematics. For those of us who have never heard of Godel, this lecture will give an accessible outline of his work and achievements.

For full details consult the website : http://www.usyd.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/thoughts_thinkers/index.php

October
Nicholson: Man and Museum (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 December 2009

A colourful exploration of some of the unearthed tales behind the extraordinary life of Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum, and the first vice-chancellor and second chancellor of the University of Sydney. Find out about Nicholson and mummies, spiritualism, trips up the Volga, grand houses, a much younger wife, retirement to England aged 53, and the loss of his house and life's work aged 90. True melodrama.

WS Macleay and the natural history circle   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 1 December 2009

William Sharp Macleay's natural history Horae Entomologicae (1819 - 21) sought God's order in nature through a system of organisation based on the affinities and analogies between organisms. This quinarian system, as it was known, was read and considered by London's young and radical naturalists in the 1820's and the 1830's, among them the promising scholar Charles Darwin.

Speaking Volumes - the Three Decker Novel   View Summary
14 May 2009 to 30 November 2009

What did people in nineteenth century England really read? Explore the books from the Three Decker Novel Collection and be entertained by historical and sporting fiction, thrilled by adventure and romance and enlightened by novels on social issues.

Identity Crisis: Dilution of public domain & the rise of the art museum   View Summary
1 October 2009

Richard Francis-Jones will discuss the nature of the public building as a social representation and fundamental transformations of the public realm within a contemporary condition where identity is blurred with consumption. Within this blurred context he will present recent Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp investigations into the nature of the art museum and public building.

GEM Information Session - Faculty of Health Sciences   View Summary
1 October 2009

If you want to have a positive impact on the health of others and be qualified in just two years then our GEM programs could be for you. These courses are ideal for career changers as well as recent graduates who are looking to qualify as a practicing health professional.

"Akhenaten, Nefertiti and the Amarna Revolution": A talk by Ben Churcher   View Summary
4 October 2009

A free talk on the controversial period of ancient Egyptian history. Part of the Nicholson Museum's free Sunday lecture series.

Launch of Ageing, Work & Health Research Unit and Anti-Ageing Seminar   View Summary
6 October 2009

The Faculty of Health Sciences is launching the new Ageing, Work & Health Research Unit with a Welcome by the Dean, Professor Gwynnyth Llewellyn and opening remarks by Head of the Unit and National Convenor of the ARC/NHMRC Research Network in Ageing Well, Professor Hal Kendig.

To mark this occasion the Faculty of Health Sciences in collaboration with the ARC/NHMRC Research Network in Ageing Well invite you to attend:

Anti-Ageing Medicine and Science: An Area of Conflict and Profound Societal Implications

Presented by internationally renowned guest speaker

Professor Robert Binstock

Professor of Aging, Health and Society

Case Western Reserve University

Cleveland, Ohio, USA

Sancta Sophia College 2009 Fundraising Lunch   View Summary
6 October 2009

The Principal, Dr Marie Leech and the Sancta Sophia College Council invite you to the 2009 Fundraising Lunch and 2010 Scholarship and Bursary Fund Launch

Special guest speaker, the Hon Tanya Plibersek MP, Minister for Housing and the Status of Women and Federal Member for Sydney will speak on 'Women and Leadership: Opportunities and challenges'.

Join us for the launch of the 2010 Scholarship and Bursary Fund which aims to raise $1 million for 2010 scholarships. Help make the Sancta experience a reality for more students, particularly those from rural, disadvantaged and Indigenous backgrounds.

The 2009 Fundraising Lunch is Sancta's important annual fundraising event. Please join fellow Alumnae and Alumni, College friends and staff and university faculty members to hear our speaker, exchange fond memories and share news.

RSVP: Contact Kristin Romanis or visit the Sancta website to RSVP before noon, Wednesday, 30 September 2009.

Sydney Uni Monthly Markets   View Summary
7 October 2009

Have a browse, grab something to eat or snatch up a bargain at the Sydney Uni Monthly Markets.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Mariana Valverde, University of Toronto   View Summary
7 October 2009

How We Came to See Cities as Collections of Land Uses

Professor Mariana Valverde

Director, Centre of Criminology, University of Toronto

Dr. Mariana Valverde is Professor of Criminology and Director of the Centre of Criminology at the University of Toronto. Dr. Valverde is among the foremost socio-legal theorists and feminist legal scholars in Canada. Recent publications include Law and Order: Images, Meanings, Myths (Rutgers, 2006) and Law's Dream of a Common Knowledge (Princeton University Press, 2003). Her current research is looking at the historical sociology of urban regulation.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

Key Thinkers Series - Pierre Bourdieu   View Summary
7 October 2009

Speaker: Dr Kate Huppatz, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Sociology

Pierre Bourdieu was the preeminent French intellectual in the late 20th century. His social theory, particularly his cultural approach to class and unique understanding of social practice, has been highly influential in the disciplines of sociology, anthropology and philosophy. His best known work, Distinction: a social critique of the judgment of taste (1984), uses ethnographic evidence to link consumption practices to social class. This presentation outlines Bourdieu's research interests and key conceptual tools. Moreover, it looks at how Bourdieu has recently been appropriated by significant feminist scholars despite being widely critiqued for his limited engagement with women's issues and gender.

For full details consult the website : http://www.usyd.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/thoughts_thinkers/index.php

Lunchtime Art talk with Professor Colin Rhodes   View Summary
7 October 2009

Join us for a free floor talk on the exhibition Annemarie Grgich"Archaeologies of the Extraordinary Everyday", by its curator Professor Colin Rhodes, Dean of Sydney College of the Arts.

"Taylor in the Antarctic": Public lecture by Dr David Branigan   View Summary
7 October 2009

University of Sydney has long has a firm commitment to science in the Antarctic region. David Branagan will talk about some of the scientists, including Edgeworth David and Griffith Taylor, who ventured to the Antarctic to tackle questions of geology, geography and climate in one of the harshest environments on earth.

Museums School Holiday Activities: Passport to Explore   View Summary
7 October 2009

Two hours of school holiday activities; suitable for children 5-12.

Policy for enhanced prevention in US and Australia: how much bang for the buck?   View Summary
7 October 2009

Prevention makes sense! But does it make economic sense? Are the recommendations from the National Health and Hospital Reform Commission and the National Preventative Health Strategy sound investments? Or are there other approaches/recommendations worth considering? Are there lessons to be learnt from the current proposals for reform in the US?

These and other questions will be explored in the seminar, Policy for enhanced prevention in US and Australia: how much bang for the buck?, to be hosted by the Menzies Centre for Health Policy and The United States Studies Centre.

Lunchtime Art Talk: Professor Colin Rhodes (SCA)   View Summary
7 October 2009

A free floor talk on the exhibition "Annemarie Grgich - Archaeologies of the Extraordinary Everyday".

KONSORTIUM: AN AUSTRALIAN ARTISTS COLLABORATION   View Summary
7 October 2009

GOLD
KONSORTIUM: AN AUSTRALIAN ARTISTS COLLABORATION

Opening Wednesday 7 October, 5 to 7pm
Exhibition continues to Sunday 1 November

Dusseldorf's Konsortium group has run an intriguing exhibition program for over five years. This has happened alongside a rigorous schedule of collaborative work between the members at off-site locations throughout Europe and around the world. In October, Lars Breuer, Sebastian Freytag and Guido Munch will be in Australia for a series of SNO assisted east-coast exhibitions.

Sydney College of the Arts
The Visual Arts Faculty of the
University of Sydney
Balmain Road Rozelle (enter at Cecily St)
02 9351 1008 scagallery@sca.usyd.edu.au
Further information: www.usyd.edu.au/sca Gallery hours:
Wednesday to Friday, 11am to 5pm
Saturday to Sunday, 11am to 4pm

SKAMP - A telescope that looks back in time    View Summary
7 October 2009

Travel back in time with radio astronomer, Professor Anne Green. New developments with the Molonglo Telescope will show us what the Universe was like when it was half its present age. Watch the winking radio sky with the Square Kilometre Molonglo Prototype (SKAMP), a low frequency spectrometer. Learn how Australian astronomers are contributing to the vision for the powerful international radio telescope of the future, the Square Kilometre Array.

This talk will describe the project and how it builds on the previous telescope and its science achievements. Two of the key science goals to be undertaken initially will be a survey of red-shifted neutral hydrogen gas and a study of the transient radio sky. With the subsequent polarization capability, we will map the magnetic field structure of our Galaxy and explore cosmic magnetism.

"THESIS:"   View Summary
7 October 2009

"THESIS:"
SCA / VCAM Inaugural PhD Exchange Exhibition

SANDRA BRIDIE, CELESTE CHANDLER, SARAH CROWEST, SOPHIE KNEZIC, DAVID MCDOWELL, EVANGELOS SAKARIS & SIMONE SLEE.

Curated by Dr Chantal Faust

Opening Wednesday 7 October, 5 to 7pm
Exhibition continues to Sunday 1 November

Opening address by Professor Colin Rhodes Dean, Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney

Sydney College of the Arts
The Visual Arts Faculty of the
University of Sydney
Balmain Road Rozelle (enter at Cecily St)
02 9351 1008 scagallery@sca.usyd.edu.au
Further information: www.usyd.edu.au/sca Gallery hours:
Wednesday to Friday, 11am to 5pm
Saturday to Sunday, 11am to 4pm

Designing Accountability: International Economic Organisations and the World Bank's Inspection Panel   View Summary
8 October 2009

Department of Government and International Relations Seminar. A talk by Dr Susan Park, GIR, University of Sydney.

Darwin and the Ascent of Emotionally Modern Man: How humans became such hypersocial apes    View Summary
8 October 2009

Anthropology Seminar. A talk by Sarah Blaffer Hardy, University of California.

Location: Room 148, RC Mills Building A26, Camperdown

Darwin and the Ascent of Emotionally Modern Man: How humans became such hypersocial apes   View Summary
8 October 2009

Anthropology Seminar. A talk by Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, University of California.

Architecture, Design & Planning: Faculty researchers speak   View Summary
8 October 2009

Faculty researchers speak at the Faculty Research Expo.

Museums School Holiday Activities: A world of Art   View Summary
8 October 2009

Two hours of school holiday activities; suitable for children 5-12.

GEM Information Session - Faculty of Health Sciences    View Summary
8 October 2009

Our Graduate Entry Master's programs are ideal if you have only just discovered your niche during your undergraduate studies, or if you are looking for a highly employable additional qualification.

You don't need a background in health to enter the majority of our GEM programs. Graduates from areas such as Business, Science and Arts have all gone on to successfully gain professional accreditation n their chosen health field.

SUSAN TE KAHURANGI KING   View Summary
8 October 2009

SUSAN TE KAHURANGI KING

Opening Thursday 8 October, 6 to 8pm
Exhibition continues to Saturday 31 October

This will be the first exhibition of work by the New Zealand self-taught artist. The exhibition will feature a selection of works drawn over a period of more than fifty years.

Callan Park Gallery
Sydney College of the Arts
The Visual Arts Faculty of the
University of Sydney
Balmain Road Rozelle (enter at Cecily St) Further information:
www.usyd.edu.au/sca
callanparkgallery@sca.usyd.edu.au
Gallery hours: Saturday, 11am to 4pm
By appointment on other days
Free admission and parking

Book launch: A Natural Calling by Professor Tony Larkum   View Summary
9 October 2009

Come to the launch of the fascinating new book A Natural Calling: Life, Letters and Diaries of Charles Darwin and William Darwin Fox, by Professor Tony Larkum from the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Sydney.

The book provides new factual material on Charles Darwin, following many years of research into Darwin's relationship to his cousin William Darwin Fox. It is a biographical and historical account of the letters exchanged by these two men and the diaries of William Darwin Fox have never been accessed before.

The relationship between Darwin and Fox has been acknowledged as a major biographical source on Darwin. Here the life of Fox is carefully pieced together and compared and contrasted with that of Darwin. Since Darwin and Fox were undergraduates together at Christ's College, Cambridge, and corresponded with each other for the rest of their lives, dying within two years of each other, the diaries allow us a vivid insight into the unique relationship of these two naturalists and family friends.

Both were studying to be clergymen of the Church of England, when Darwin was offered a place on The Beagle. Thereafter their lives diverged, as Fox became the country parson that Darwin might have been. Never the less, Fox supplied many facts to Darwin, which were used in the Origin of Species and later books.

At the launch, hear Professor Larkum speak about his book, followed by readings of some of the letters in the book by professional actors, over drinks and nibbles. RSVP is essential for catering purposes.

Museums School Holiday Activities: Ancient Greek Myths   View Summary
9 October 2009

Two hours of school holiday activities; suitable for children 5-12.

Smarter Energy: The Promise of Cyber-Physical Energy Systems   View Summary
9 October 2009

As part of the Basser Seminar Series, Professor Shivkumar Kalyanaraman from IBM India Research Labs will review how the climate change problem is linked to the fossil-fuel energy problem, and give an overview of various options for sustainable energy and their relative contributions. He will then discuss smarter energy (including smart grids), and how sensing, networking, real-time analytics, actuation and control come together in a "cyber-physical" system.

Professor Shivkumar Kalyanaraman is the Senior Manager of the Next Gen Systems & Smarter Planet Solutions Department at IBM India Research Labs, Bangalore.

Exhibition by Cassandra Hard Lawrie    View Summary
9 October 2009

'Sublimation', continues until 31 October 09

Exhibition by Nathalie Hartog-Gautier    View Summary
9 October 2009

Exhibition: Scanning Memories:France/Australia, a botanical journey. Continues until 31 October 09.

Commodo-normativity and left-wing Australian historiography   View Summary
12 October 2009

Department of Political Economy Seminar. A talk by Dr Ben Maddison, School of History and Politics, University of Wollongong.

Commodo-normativity and left-wing Australian historiography   View Summary
12 October 2009

Department of Political Economy Seminar. A talk by Dr Ben Maddison, School of History and Politics, University of Wollongong.

Controversies in Public Health Lecture Five - Obesity: is the food industry more part of the problem   View Summary
12 October 2009

Dr Rosemary Stanton AOM, Nutritionist, Dr Derek Yach, Director - Global Health Policy, PepsiCo.

Food companies have contributed to the development of a food system that now provides adequate and safe food to billions of people worldwide. Nutrition crises related to over and under nutrition however remain common. This presentation will outline the role food companies are increasingly playing in contributing solutions to both sets of problems. Emphasis will be given to the role of science, multistakeholder approaches and government incentives as major means of accelerating progress. The importance of tackling high levels of mutual distrust between the private and public sectors will be stressed and practical ways of working together without compromising any sides autonomy proposed.

Controversies in Public Health Lecture Five - Obesity: is the food industry more part of the problem   View Summary
12 October 2009

Dr Rosemary Stanton AOM, Nutritionist, Dr Derek Yach, Director - Global Health Policy, PepsiCo.

Food companies have contributed to the development of a food system that now provides adequate and safe food to billions of people worldwide. Nutrition crises related to over and under nutrition however remain common. This presentation will outline the role food companies are increasingly playing in contributing solutions to both sets of problems. Emphasis will be given to the role of science, multistakeholder approaches and government incentives as major means of accelerating progress. The importance of tackling high levels of mutual distrust between the private and public sectors will be stressed and practical ways of working together without compromising any sides autonomy proposed.

Museums School Holiday Activities: Ancient Greek Myths   View Summary
12 October 2009

Two hours of school holiday activities; suitable for children 5-12.

Museums School Holiday Activities: Passport to Explore   View Summary
13 October 2009

Two hours of school holiday activities; suitable for children 5-12.

Key Thinkers Series - Mary Wollstonecraft   View Summary
14 October 2009

Speaker: Professor Helen Irving, Faculty of Law

Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797) was the first theorist systematically to give voice to what we now call feminism. Her Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792) was a radical account of the impact of limited education and subordination on women's lives, built on Enlightenment theories of reason and human progress. Wollstonecraft was not an armchair radical, but lived a life of extraordinary daring and independence, dying tragically young after giving birth to her daughter (the writer, Mary Shelley). In this talk, Helen Irving explores Wollstonecraft's life and her place in the English Enlightenment, and traces the enduring legacy of her ideas. Wollstonecraft, she argues, was right to insist not only that reason is vital to progress, but that progress rests on sexual equality. In this 250th anniversary year of her birth, she concludes, Wollstonecraft deserves to be better known and the Enlightenment better honoured.

For full details consult the website : http://www.usyd.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/thoughts_thinkers/index.php

Museums School Holiday Activities: A world of Art   View Summary
14 October 2009

Two hours of school holiday activities; suitable for children 5-12.

Free Lunchtime art talk: Annemarie Grgich   View Summary
14 October 2009

Join Professor Colin Rhodes (SCA) for a free floortalk on the exhibition "Annemarie Grgich - Archaeologies of the Extraordinary Everyday".

Museums School Holiday Activities: Passport to Explore   View Summary
15 October 2009

Two hours of school holiday activities; suitable for children 5-12.

Moving Cities to Low Carbon - Lessons from Hannover   View Summary
15 October 2009

Hannover has over twenty years of experience in planning to meet Climate Change, and a Low Carbon Future. Hannover has committed itself to a wholistic sustainable urban strategy, whose aims are derived from a vision of sustainable development and comprise protection of natural common goods, social justice, responsible lifestyles, urban planning and development, mobility, business development, sustainable local economy and global responsibility for local action.

Hans Monninghoff will outline the experiences of Hannover in Climate Protection, Planning for a Low Carbon Future, the Development of Model Urban Projects, Sustainable Resource Management, and Energy, amongst others. Given how long Hannover has been working in these fields, they have learnt many valuable lessons in what to do, and what not to do, as well as some of the barriers to implementation.

About the Speaker:

Hans Monninghoff has been dedicated to energy and climate protection politics for over 30 years. As Deputy Chief Executive for the City of Hannover, Monninghoff established and led Hannover's Carbon Reduction Initiatives with a target of 40% below 1990 levels by 2020, on the back of existing successful initiatives to reduce carbon. Monninghoff has played a key role in the development of Hannover as the greenest City in Germany with the most square meters of green space per capita.

Museums School Holiday Activities: Ancient Greek Myths   View Summary
16 October 2009

Two hours of school holiday activities; suitable for children 5-12.

Need for Whole Person Learning and its Use in Engineering Classroom    View Summary
16 October 2009

Need for Whole Person Learning and its Use in Engineering Classroom

Today everyone is inundated with information and internet search engines can provide you a viewpoint on any topic. Many people have mastered the art of getting their link to be on the top of the search with many advertisements and unsubstantiated claims forming its body. Wikipedia allows any person to be able to put any information on the internet from their point of view. Many bonafide and professionally respected academics do not engage in these kinds of information presentation. The contradictions contained in these offerings from that presented in the classroom can be source of great stress to keen young learners. Hence just presenting a point of view in the classroom for the students to master leaves them stressed and thereby disengaged from learning.

Discerning what information makes sense and can be trusted and what is fiction is a skill students must learn early. It requires students to become self empowered learners early and understand the material at unprecedented depths earlier and earlier. It drastically changes the role of the instructor from an information provider to a facilitator of learning and classroom interaction needs to accommodate this.

This talk will present the concepts of the whole person learning and how to engage students to become self empowered learners in the classrooms of tomorrow. Further results of its use in engineering classroom will be provided.

Dr. Manjula B. Waldron.

Dr. Waldron received her B.S. in Physics from the University of Delhi and Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore. She received her M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1968 and 1971 respectively.

Dr. Waldron retired as a full professor in the Biomedical and Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at the Ohio State University. She is currently a Consulting professor in the Design Division of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University working in the area of integrative design and complex and anticipatory adaptive systems. She is widely published in engineering design research, deafness, and application of neural networks to biomedical problems. She has over forty years of classroom experience. Her engaging whole person pedagogy has emerged over this long tenure and her training as a master facilitator of sixth generation co-creating learning organization and Covey leadership series of highly effective leaders.

The Rock Show: Tasmanian Devil Benefit Concerts   View Summary
16 October 2009 to 17 October 2009

With a set design that invites you to party in a 70s living room, the Rock Show features the music of such classic rock acts as; The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, Led Zepplin, Queen, The Kinks, Cream, Bob Dylan, The Beach Boys, Deep Purple, Pink Floyd, David Bowie, Janis Joplin, Elton John, Billy Thorpe, Mamas and The Papas, AC/DC ... plus many more.

This production is a fundraising event for the Save the Tasmanian Devil breeding program. Please join the cast who are donating their time and help Save the Tasmanian Devil through the captive breeding of a mainland insurance population and Dr Kathy Belovs research at the Faculty of Veterinary Science.

Inaugural Sydney Uni sport and fitness expo   View Summary
17 October 2009

Whether you're a couch potato or an Olympic athlete, the EXPO gives you and your family an unprecedented chance to experience the benefits of sport, fitness and exercise at one of the area's top facilities - absolutely FREE!

Plus, learn more about your health and wellbeing from our sponsors, inlcuding MBF and ACUVUE, entertain the kids with our giant pool inflatable, magic shows, face painting and an outdoor jumping castle. And, there's FREE showbags for the first 100 guests. Get in early so you don't miss out!

Free Organ Recital   View Summary
18 October 2009

John Wells, organist to the University of Auckland and Auckland City Organist, plays a one hour program of organ music by Bach, Mendelssohn and Wells. Enjoy the sublime sounds of the von Beckerath organ in the splendid surrounds of the 150 year old Great Hall. A talk by Robert Ampt on "Memories of the Great Hall" precedes the recital at 3.10pm.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Alvin Warren, Harvard Law School   View Summary
19 October 2009

The Ross Parsons Address in Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law - Tax Policy after the Financial Crisis

Professor Alvin Warren

Ropes & Gray Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Alvin C. Warren is the Ropes & Gray Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, where he has taught tax law and policy since 1979. He was the director of the HLS Fund for Tax and Fiscal Research from its inception in 1985 until 2008. Prior to coming to Harvard, Professor Warren was a member of the law faculties of the University of Pennsylvania, Duke University, and the University of Connecticut. He has also been a Visiting Professor at Stanford and Yale. Professor Warren received a B.A. in English (magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa) from Yale University in 1966 and a J.D. (with honors, Order of the Coif) from the University of Chicago Law School in 1969. He is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and of teaching awards at Harvard, Pennsylvania and Connecticut.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

Key Thinkers Series - Confucius   View Summary
21 October 2009

Speaker: Professor Jeffrey Riegel, Professor and Head of School of Languages and Cultures, Faculty of Arts

Confucius (traditional dates 551-479 BCE) lived during the waning years of the Zhou dynasty. He was deeply troubled by the disorder of his age and took it upon himself to teach others about Zhou virtues as well as to instruct them on how to cultivate such virtue in themselves. Confucius's efforts mark the beginning of the traditional Chinese emphasis on education and the crucial role of self-improvement and self-cultivation in any ethical system. Some of his followers refined his teachings on the importance of education while philosophers from competing schools of thought rejected Confucian ideas as outmoded and ineffective.

First Emperor of Qin (239-210 BCE) assumed the throne as king at a young age and was aided and tutored by a brilliant minister named Lü Buwei. The young king eventually outgrew his minister and aggressively took over the reins of government himself. He conquered his enemies and created an empire in 221 BCE. The First Emperor appointed as his chief minister an accomplished legalist thinker named Li Si. Together they created a philosophy for empire based on the primacy of law, the high (and almost god-like) status of the emperor, and a system of universal standards that embraced everything from thought to weights and measures. These features of his rule continue as hallmarks of Chinese governance to this day.

For full details consult the website : http://www.usyd.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/thoughts_thinkers/index.php

Lunchtime Art talk with Professor Colin Rhodes   View Summary
21 October 2009

Join us for a free floor talk on the exhibition Annemarie Grgich"Archaeologies of the Extraordinary Everyday", by its curator Professor Colin Rhodes, Dean of Sydney College of the Arts.

Governing the Margins: The Changing Practice of Global Economic Governance   View Summary
22 October 2009

Department of Government and International Relations Seminar.

Richard de Dear: Thermal Delight in Architecture   View Summary
22 October 2009

Thermal Delight in Architecture lecture by Associate Professor Richard De Dear, academic in the Faculty of Architecture, Design & Planning.

On Gold Diggings Ants and Crocodile Farming: Herodotus' ethnography in context"   View Summary
22 October 2009

Following in the footsteps of Herodotus, as classicist Julia Kindt takes us on a journey through Egypt exploring some of Herodotus' descriptions of the people and the customs he found.

Postgraduate Info Night, Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning   View Summary
22 October 2009

The Faculty of Architecture, Design & Planning offers an array of respected postgraduate study options from PhDs to individual units of study across the full range of built environment and design disciplines.

Our Postgraduate Information Night is an opportunity for you to discover the perfect academic program to meet your professional and personal needs. Meet with academics and students to discuss flexible learning options and gain an understanding of how our programs work.

Diana Temple Memorial Lecture   View Summary
22 October 2009

Professor Mary O'Kane, NSW Chief Scientist and Scientific Engineer, on the topic of "The advancement of the role of women in science" RSVP (02) 9845 1234 or e-mail vanitad@chw.edu.au as seats are limited.

In Blue   View Summary
23 October 2009

Description:

Sydney University Symphony Orchestra proudly presents a concert for the benefit of beyondblue (the national depression initiative), featuring renowned Australian pianist Kathryn Selby. All concert proceeds will be donated to beyondblue.

Programme:

Gershwin - Rhapsody in Blue (Soloist: Kathryn Selby)

Mendelssohn - Hebrides Overture

Dvorak - Symphony No. 8 in G Major

Conducted by George Ellis

In Blue is an associated event of Art & About 2009 presented by City of Sydney.

Date & Time:

Friday 23rd October, 7.30pm

Venue:

The Great Hall, Main Quadrangle, University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW

Bookings:

http://www.trybooking.com/BZW or at the door (entry by donation). Seating is unreserved.

Enquiries:

Sydney University Symphony Orchestra

0410711901

suso_soc@hotmail.com

www.suso.org.au

Bosch Distinguished Seminar - Professor David Cook   View Summary
23 October 2009

Title of Presentation: "Infections, cancer and ion transport by epithelia".

The post-carbon world and Australia's vulnerability   View Summary
26 October 2009

Department of Political Economy Seminar. A talk by Dr Ben McNeil, Climate Change Research Centre, UNSW.

"Sweet, unmingled, a potion divine": Greek Wine from Antiquity to Modern Times   View Summary
26 October 2009

Ancient Greek Wine Event as part of the Sydney International Food Festival

David Tsirekas of Perama Restaurant, The Sydney Friends of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens (AAIA) & the Nicholson Museum present

An evening to entice the senses!

Three experts will give short talks on the wine culture of ancient and modern Greece. Seven tasting samples especially designed for the evening by David Tsirekas from Perama Restaurant will follow, each matched with a Greek wine.

Michael Turner, Senior Curator of the Nicholson Museum, will talk about the god Dionysus and the relationship of wine and religion in the ancient world.

Dr Elizabeth Bollen will discuss the ways in which wine was consumed in ancient Greece, the cups, jugs and kraters that were used and the ceremonies that accompanied drinking.

Angie Giannakodakis, Sommelier, "The Press Club Restaurant" (Age Good Food Guide "Best New Restaurant 2008") will talk about modern Greek wine varieties and the wine culture of modern Greece.

The short talks will be followed by catered drinks to be served in the beautiful Nicholson Museum. Each of the seven tasting samples will be especially designed by David and his team at Perama for this night only and will be matched with a Greek wine.

Guests will be given a menu and can also undertake a self-guided tour (booklet provided) of artefacts in the museum's collections that relate to wine in the ancient world.

A unique night, fitting perfectly into the Sydney International Food Festival's programme for October 2009.

Remember that David Tsirekas & the Sydney Friends offer practical cooking classes which focus on Ancient Greek food. More will be held in 2010, register your interest at the event!

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Tim Edgar, University of Western Ontario   View Summary
27 October 2009

Tax Seminar Series - Is TOFA Finally Over? A View from Canada

Professor Tim Edgar

University of Western Ontario

Tim Edgar joined the Faculty of Law, The University of Western Ontario in 1989 and is the Director of the National Tax Centre there. Prior to this, he was a solicitor with Stikeman, Elliott, Barristers & Solicitors in Toronto.

He is a graduate of the University of Western Ontario, Osgood Hall Law School and Deakin University, and is the author of a book on the taxation of financial instruments, a co-editor of Materials on Canadian Income Tax (12th ed.), and is also a regular contributor to the Canadian Tax Journal and other tax publications.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

Madrigal Society 10th Anniversary Concert - Celebrating the International Year of Astronomy Event   View Summary
27 October 2009

Featuring members of the Australian Baroque Brass, Sydney Conservatorium Early Music Ensemble, Barefoot Musica Antigua, Pocket Score Company, Madrigal Alumni Choir and The Madrigal Society - we'll be presenting a plethora of music from across the ages including favourites old and new.

Composers include Verdelot, Monteverdi, Lassus, Giovanni Gabrieli, Andrea Gabrieli, Josquin, Dowland, Farmer, Morley, Palestrina, and Yardley.

Join us for celebratory drunken debauchery afterwards at The Rose.

"Beirut Ya Habibi": Public lecture by Ghada Daher   View Summary
28 October 2009

Classical archaeologist Ghada Daher takes us on a journey through recent excavations in the capital of Lebanon, and discusses the latest archaeological finds from the city.

Disciplines of Inquiry - Methodology Colloquia 09   View Summary
29 October 2009

The Research Division, Faculty of Education and Social Work invites you to participate in the launch of a colloquia series on new approaches to research and interdisciplinarity across the education and social work domains.

The detailsfor thisweek'sproceedings are to be released shortly - please check this website for updates.

Describing Rome in the Middle Ages   View Summary
29 October 2009

For the Centre for Medieval Studies, Dr Maurizio Campanelli, Ricercatore at the Sapienza University of Rome, will lecture on "Describing Rome in the Middle Ages", 5.00 (for 5.30) p.m., Thursday 29 October, the Common Room, Floor 4, John Woolley Building, Science Road.

Centre for Medieval Studies lecture by Maurizio Campanelli, Sapienza University   View Summary
29 October 2009

Dr Maurizio Campanelli, Ricercatore, Sapienza University of Rome will lecture on "Describing Rome in the Middle Ages".

Climate Change @ Work Conference Brisbane   View Summary
29 October 2009

Earlier this year Australian economist Professor Ross Garnaut stated the first strength of Australia in the context of effective sustainable development is the strength of our human resource base. The Climate Change @ Work conference focuses on this key human element of sustainable development. It promotes achieving sustainability in the workplace through sustainable leadership and management practice. From important HR Management issues, such as how sustainability practices will affect workplace relations, skill demands and jobs, to operational issues such as achieving carbon reduction in the workplace. Another key management issue presented at the conference is how to promote, communicate and engage your employees in sustainable development.

The Workplace Research Centre, University of Sydney has been running the Climate Change @ Work Conference for two years in Sydney and now looks forward to bringing it to Brisbane.

To register for this conference please go to www.wrc.org.au or contact the Workplace Research Centre on 02 93515624.

Sydney Sawyer Seminar, session 5: Varieties of Empire in the Antipodes: Taking Over and Letting Go   View Summary
30 October 2009

Settler colonialism has raised profound questions about the process of imperial expansion and the limits of decolonisation. The papers in this session bookend the period from the late eighteenth to the late twentieth centuries, dealing with such diverse commentators as public intellectuals, renegade slave traders and maverick convict escapees. They explore how northern hemisphere debates about political power, social status, national identity and ideas of freedom were worked through in southern settler colonies. Battles over the nature of citizenship were fought out on the imperial periphery in ways that would profoundly shape political rights in Europe. By the end of the twentieth century new varieties of nationalism were grappling with the problem of divesting themselves of a civic identity associated with imperial models they had helped to forge.

Emma Christopher (Sydney),
'The non-free white men and their freed African slaves: claims to British Liberty and its realities in Australia and Sierra Leone'

James Curran (Sydney)
'The "great age of confusion": Intellectuals and the "œnew nationalism" in Australia'

Mark McKenna (Sydney)
'Turning away from Britain: Manning Clark, History, Public Intellectuals and the end of Empire in Australia'

Kirsten McKenzie (Sydney),
'The Daemon Behind the Curtain: prize slaves, convict escapees and the antipodean theatres of liberty'

Discussant: Angela Woollacott (Manning Clark Professor of History, ANU)

Climate Change Through the Lens of the Geological Record: the Example of Sea Level    View Summary
30 October 2009

Changes in sea level provide one of the key records of past climate change. Professor Lambeck will describe what we can learn from the geological record, with a special focus on the last glacial cycle.

Modern sea level measurements are precise, but the challenge is to separate natural and human driving mechanisms if forecasts of future change are to be meaningful.

Professor Lambeck will raise the role of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and its findings, and how the public debate on climate change appears to be becoming increasingly confused, while the underpinning science is becoming ever more robust.

Professor Lambeck is the Distinguished Professor of Geophysics at the Australian National University and the President of the Australian Academy of Science.

His research interests include geophysics, geodesy and geology with a focus on the deformations of the Earth on intermediate and long time scales and on the interactions between surface processes and the solid earth. His recent research work has focused on aspects of sea level change and the history of the Earth's ice sheets during past glacial cycles, including field and laboratory work and numerical modelling.

Sydney Democracy Forum - Preconditions of Democracy and The Middle East: Prospects for Democracy   View Summary
30 October 2009

The Sydney Democracy Forum Presents its Democracy in Hard Time Series, commencing with Preconditions of Democracy and The Middle East: Prospects for Democracy.

Speakers:

Martin Krygier

Gordon Samuels Professor of Law and Social Theory UNSW

"The Rule of Law as a precondition of democracy: conceptions and misconceptions."

Sarah Phillips

Centre for International Security Studies University of Sydney

"The Dilemmas of Opposition in the Arab World"

Graeme Gill

Department of Government and International Relations University of Sydney

'Democracy and Development: Is economic growth good for democracy?'

Please join us in discussing this very topic debate. Refreshments will be served after the lectures have concluded.

Faculty of Health Sciences Cumberland 30th Anniversary Celebrations   View Summary
31 October 2009

Cumberland 30th Anniversary and Reunion Celebrations


Saturday 31 October 2009

For 30 years we have worked hand-in-hand with health professions and our community to lead the way in health science education and research. To celebrate we are hosting a series of public events to engage and inform all those fascinated by health.

Join us in celebrating this important milestone!

What's on? A fun-filled day that will give you the chance to explore the Health Sciences campus, learn more about healthy living and what we do here at Cumberland! Interactive health checks, sporting demonstrations, live band, barbeque, industry stalls, free face painting, study fair,children's activities and much more will make this a day for all.

Official Opening Ceremony - 12pm

A reflection on the heritage and impact of the Faculty of Health Science officiated by Faculty of Health Sciences Dean, Professor Gwynnyth Llewellyn.

Health Sciences Symposium - From 1pm

Our leading scientists provide a series of ten minute presentations that showcase their pioneering work and its impact on improving health sciences. From healthy ageing to the importance of children's play, these bite-sized insights give you a taste of the future of health care in Australia and internationally.

Networking Reunion - 3.30pm

An opening address by University of Sydney Vice-Chancellor, Dr Michael Spence leads into a relaxed afternoon tea giving you the opportunity to reconnect with your peers.

Register online now!

November
Nicholson: Man and Museum (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 December 2009

A colourful exploration of some of the unearthed tales behind the extraordinary life of Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum, and the first vice-chancellor and second chancellor of the University of Sydney. Find out about Nicholson and mummies, spiritualism, trips up the Volga, grand houses, a much younger wife, retirement to England aged 53, and the loss of his house and life's work aged 90. True melodrama.

WS Macleay and the natural history circle   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 1 December 2009

William Sharp Macleay's natural history Horae Entomologicae (1819 - 21) sought God's order in nature through a system of organisation based on the affinities and analogies between organisms. This quinarian system, as it was known, was read and considered by London's young and radical naturalists in the 1820's and the 1830's, among them the promising scholar Charles Darwin.

Speaking Volumes - the Three Decker Novel   View Summary
14 May 2009 to 30 November 2009

What did people in nineteenth century England really read? Explore the books from the Three Decker Novel Collection and be entertained by historical and sporting fiction, thrilled by adventure and romance and enlightened by novels on social issues.

"Father of History, Mummy's Boy" - A Tribute to Herodotus": Talk by Ronika Power   View Summary
1 November 2009

A free Sunday Egypt lecture.

Consuming Nationalism Offshore: the case of Australians drinking at theme bars abroad    View Summary
2 November 2009

Department of Sociology and Social Policy Seminar. A talk by Annette Falahey, Sociology and Social Policy, University of Sydney.

Consuming Nationalism Offshore: the case of Australians drinking at theme bars abroad   View Summary
2 November 2009

Department of Sociology and Social Policy Seminar. A talk by Annette Falahey, Sociology and Social Policy, University of Sydney.

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Brian J Arnold, Consultant, Goodmans LLP, Toronto   View Summary
3 November 2009

Tax Seminar Series - Interminable International Tax Reform

Brian J Arnold

Consultant, Goodmans LLP, Toronto

Brian J Arnold is a tax consultant with Goodmans LLP, Toronto. He is a graduate of Harvard Law School and taught tax law at a Canadian law school for 28 years. He teaches international tax courses at the Harvard Law School and the University of Economics and Business Administration, Vienna.

Professor Arnold has been a consultant to various Canadian government departments, the OECD, the Office of the Auditor General, the South African Revenue Service, and the Australian and New Zealand governments.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

Sydney Uni Monthly Markets   View Summary
4 November 2009

Have a browse, grab something to eat or snatch up a bargain at the Sydney Uni Monthly Markets.

Research Leader's Seminar: Indigenous Health   View Summary
4 November 2009

Associate Professor Ngiare Brown will will present an overview on the aims and research work of Bullana, the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health.

Bullana, The Poche Centre for Indigenous Health has been established to address the disparities in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and social justice outcomes. The Centre aspires to working closely with Aboriginal communities, community controlled health services, clinicians, institutions, departments and other service providers.

RSVP to this event is essential. Visit the website for more information.

The real significance of Hobbits: Hominid Biogeography in South East Asia   View Summary
4 November 2009

In 2004 Professor Mike Morwood led the team that found the skeleton of a previously undiscovered human species on the island of Flores. The ‘Hobbit’ skeleton was of a much smaller stature than present day humans, being that of an adult who was only one metre in height. Evidence suggests that these 'Hobbits' may have lived from 95,000 to 13,000 years ago and were probably descendants of the Homo erectus population that had evolved in isolation on Flores. It is believed that the 'Hobbits' may have still been in existence when the 16th century Dutch traders arrived at the island. This discovery has raised questions about the nature of human of evolution.

The discovery of an endemic species of human on Flores was unexpected, but no more so than finding evidence of Homins on the islands from 880,000 years ago. This lecture will explain why the 2004 discovery was not wholly unexpected with reference to the faunal biogeography of South East Asia. It will conclude with some of the implications for early hominin and modern human dispersal mechanisms, and for the future archaeological research in the region.

Undergraduate Research Conference (Stepping Out with Fresh Ideas)    View Summary
4 November 2009 to 7 November 2009

The Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources is holding its second annual undergraduate research conference, Stepping Out with Fresh Ideas (SOwFI), from November 4th-6th inclusive. This year, we are very pleased to announce the sponsorship of the Grains Research & Development Corporation (GRDC) for this event. The three-day program for SOwFI includes oral presentations from 58 Year IV students drawn from the BScAgr, BLWSc, BHortSc, BAgrEc and BResEc degrees. Each of these 58 students will give a 15 minute presentation on the results of their individual research projects. There will also be a poster session for the BScAgr, BLWSc and BHortSc students.

Whilst comprising an important part of the assessment regime for the research project unit of study, this conference also gives the faculty a wonderful opportunity to showcase the talents of our undergraduates as they prepare to enter the workforce. We have invited external stakeholders and friends of the Faculty to attend, as we did last year, and expect to have around 80 people in attendance for most sessions. In addition to being a great example of research-led teaching, the research project unit that these students are now in the throes of completing is one of the most important units that our undergraduates attempt over the life of their degrees.


The presentations at this conference will explore some cutting-edge research related to agricultural and natural resource science and economics. As well as presenting their findings about some topical issues, this conference provides a platform for students to display their communication and professional skills.

Thematic sessions will include:

* The science and economics of climate change and carbon
* Issues in broadacre crop production
* Plant responses to disease and insect pressures
* Impact and cost of soil utilisation and land use change
* Water resource planning and management
* Plant physiology and breeding
* Animal nutrition, behaviour and reproduction
* Production and trade
* Development economics, and
* Economics of minerals and energy

Each day of the conference commences at 8:30 am in the Wallace lecture theatre. People interested in attending this (free) conference event should RSVP to sofiagric@usyd.edu.au by Monday, 26 October 2009.

Not in my Name: representation and its discontents   View Summary
5 November 2009

The Sydney University Arts Association is pleased to announce the Inaugural Lecture of Professor Simon Tormey, Head of the School of Social and Political Sciences, on the topic: "Not in my Name: representation and its discontents".

"The Venus de Milo: A Myth in the Making": Public Lecture by Dr Alastair Blanshard    View Summary
5 November 2009

The Friends of the Nicholson Museum annual party.

TNL: New Concepts and Technologies for Energy Efficient Buildings   View Summary
5 November 2009

In this Thursday Night Lecture, visiting Professor Andreas Wagner discusses the findings from over 50 research projects running throughout Germany where innovative building materials, advanced HVAC systems and Integrated Simulation & Design Tools have been applied to new and retrofitted residential and commercial buildings.


Professor Wagner will discuss the lessons learned from retrofitting residential buildings and new office buildings, including interior and exterior insulation, glazing, hybrid ventilation concepts, passive cooling, heating and cooling with renewable energies and other thermal systems.

CONVR2009   View Summary
5 November 2009 to 6 November 2009

9th International Conference on Construction Applications of Virtual Reality 2009. Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) are exciting technologies that offer considerable potential benefits in all stages of the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) process, from initial planning and conceptual design to facility management and operations. VR and AR allow people to see and interact with a building or infrastructure design and construction process prior to it being constructed.

This year the University of Sydney is planning to jointly host this conference in Australia together with University of Newcastle and FORUM8. The aim/mission of CONVR 2009 is to bring together researchers and practitioners in all areas of the Architecture, Engineering and Construction Industry to promote the exchange of ideas for applying Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality. The objective of the conference is to report and disseminate ideas, progress, and products of innovative international research activities in this field and formulate strategies for future research directions.

Enchanting Taiwan photographic exhibition   View Summary
6 November 2009 to 28 January 2010

The Taipei Economic and Cultural Office (TECO) is proud to present the Enchanting Taiwan photographic exhibition, sponsored by the University of Sydney Library.

The exhibition comprises 80 photographs. Selections have been shown in several Australian cities, but this is the first time that all of the works will be displayed together.

The images were shot by 67 different photographers, each artist capturing a unique aspect of Taiwan. Studies range from neon-lit cityscapes to scenes of pristine natural beauty. Among the most stunning are the marble canyons of Taroko National Park and the stark salt fields of southern Taiwan. Some of the works focus on the rich traditions which have evolved from agrarian culture and folklore, evoking a world of ritual, religion and dazzling spectacle. Importantly, the collection also features images of Taiwan's indigenous cultural heritage.

Free concert by the Ensembles Studies Unit of the   View Summary
8 November 2009

As part of the 20th Annual Glebe Music Festival the Sydney Conservatorium of Music is providing a free concert at the Great Hall, University of Sydney. The program will be:

1. Romance for Wind and Brass Quintets by the Australian composer Ralph Middenway.

The work is based on images from Shakespeare's The Tempest and is scored for a dectet of wind instruments. Interspersed will be readings from the play itself and some song settings of Shakespeare by Gerald Finzi and Eric Korngold. The songs will be sung by Amy Corkery (soprano) and Morgan Pearse (baritone), accompanied by David Miller.

2. Work for wind dectet by the American composer Robert Washburn.

3. Two works for wind quintet: Ravel's Tombeau de Couperin and a Mozart quintet.

The concert will be preceded by a carillon recital by Edward Grantham in the Quadrangle at 2pm.

Cracked Media   View Summary
8 November 2009

SCA Foundation Coordinator, Dr Caleb Kelly's first book Cracked Media: The Sound of Malfunction (MIT Press, 2009), will be officially launched by Professor Ross Gibson on Sunday 8 November, 3.30pm at gleebooks.

From the mid-twentieth century into the twenty-first, artists and musicians manipulated, cracked, and broke audio media technologies to produce novel sounds and performances. In Cracked Media, Kelly explores how the deliberate utilisation of the normally undesirable (a crack, a break) has become the site of productive creation.

Dr. Kelly's research is based in the sound arts, specifically as it relates to art and music. He has written for numerous art publications and is currently editing an anthology entitled Sound for the Documents in Contemporary Art series published by Whitechapel Gallery in London and MIT Press.

RSVP: gleebooks (02) 9660 2333

Debate - Too many people go to university   View Summary
10 November 2009

A Sydney Ideas and Intelligence Squared Australia co-presentation Access to university in Australia was once for the privileged few, yet is now a presumed right for all. But has the growth in graduate numbers and diverse university degree courses actually diminished the quality of a university degree?

The University of Sydney and IQ² Australia have assembled a panel of expert speakers to debate the merits of the current system and explore the opportunity to genuinely boost Australia’s national productivity and performance as called by for the Australian Government.

The motion: TOO MANY PEOPLE GO TO UNIVERSITY

CHAIR: Dr Simon Longstaff, Executive Director of St James Ethics Centre.

FOR:

Steve Hind, Director of Debates at the University of Sydney Union.

Andrew Smith Executive Director of the Australian Council for Private Education and Training (ACPET) Stephen Matchett , columnist and leader writer for The Australian

AGAINST:

Naomi Oreb Best Individual Speaker at the 2009 World Universities Debating Championships Dr Michael Spence Vice- Chancellor and Principal of the University of Sydney.

Adam Spencer , ABC radio broadcaster

Debate - Too many people go to university   View Summary
10 November 2009

A Sydney Ideas and Intelligence Squared Australia co-presentation Access to university in Australia was once for the privileged few, yet is now a presumed right for all. But has the growth in graduate numbers and diverse university degree courses actually diminished the quality of a university degree?

The University of Sydney and IQ² Australia have assembled a panel of expert speakers to debate the merits of the current system and explore the opportunity to genuinely boost Australia’s national productivity and performance as called by for the Australian Government.

The motion: TOO MANY PEOPLE GO TO UNIVERSITY

CHAIR: Dr Simon Longstaff, Executive Director of St James Ethics Centre.

FOR:

Steve Hind, Director of Debates at the University of Sydney Union.

Andrew Smith Executive Director of the Australian Council for Private Education and Training (ACPET) Stephen Matchett , columnist and leader writer for The Australian

AGAINST:

Naomi Oreb Best Individual Speaker at the 2009 World Universities Debating Championships Dr Michael Spence Vice- Chancellor and Principal of the University of Sydney.

Adam Spencer , ABC radio broadcaster

Power Publications book launch: A Singular Voice by Joan Kerr    View Summary
11 November 2009

'A Singular Voice' is a collection of essays by the controversial and popular Australian art and architecture scholar, Joan Kerr, that have appeared over the past 30 years in a wide variety of scholarly publications, many of which enjoyed only a small distribution. The publication will be an important resource for scholars, as well as a tribute to Joan Kerr. The collection includes a foreword by Roger Benjamin, a brief biography of Joan Kerr and a list of her essential writings.

To be launched by Kate Clark, Director of the Historic Houses Trust of NSW.

RSVP essential: events@gleebooks.com.au

Distinguished Speakers Program 2009: Professor Martti Koskenniemi, University of Helsinki   View Summary
12 November 2009

Julius Stone Address: International Law and State Power: Historical Reflections

Professor Martti Koskenniemi

Academy Professor, University of Helsinki

Martti Koskenniemi is an international lawyer and a former Finnish diplomat. Currently he is Professor of International Law at the University of Helsinki and Director of the Erik Castrén Institute of International Law and Human Rights. He is well known for his critical approach to international law.

This event is part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2009. Click here for more details.

The Origin of the Universe and the Arrow of Time    View Summary
16 November 2009

Speaker: Professor Sean Carroll, Caltech

Professor Carroll will talk about the nature of time, the origin of entropy and how what happened before the Big Bang might be responsible for the arrow of time we observe today.

One of the most obvious facts about the universe is that the past is different from the future. The world around us is full of irreversible processes: we can turn an egg into an omelet, but can't turn an omelet into an egg. Physicists have codified this difference into the Second Law of Thermodynamics: the entropy of a closed system always increases with time. But why? The ultimate explanation is to be found in cosmology: special conditions in the early universe are responsible for the arrow of time.

Sean Carroll is a theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology. He received his Ph.D. in 1993 from Harvard University and has previously worked at MIT, the Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the University of Chicago. His research ranges over a number of topics in theoretical physics, focusing on cosmology, particle physics and general relativity. He is the author of _From Eternity to Here_, a popular book on cosmology and the arrow of time; _Spacetime and Geometry_, a textbook on general relativity; and has produced a set of introductory lectures for The Teaching Company entitled _Dark Matter and Dark Energy: The Dark Side of the Universe_. Carroll is a co-founder of the popular science blog _Cosmic Variance_ (cosmicvariance.com). He was recently awarded the 2009 Viktor Hamburger Outstanding Educator award. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, writer Jennifer Ouellette.

2009 Ian Beveridge Lecture   View Summary
17 November 2009

The Ian Beveridge Memorial Lecture for 2009 will be presented by Dr Paul Morley, Professor of Epidemiology & Biosecurity, Colorado State University. Dr Morley, whose lecture is titled Animal infections and risk for veterinary personnel: do we really act wisely? has a keen interest in control of infectious diseases, including those infections acquired within veterinary teaching hospitals by both patients and the veterinary professionals working in these environments.

This lecture, which will reflect the Beveridge Principal of 'One Medicine', is a timely subject for deepening our understanding of both animal and public health.

Graduate Connections Breakfast   View Summary
17 November 2009

Professor Andrea Hull AO (BA 69 SYD, DipEd 70 SYD, MBA 09 MELB) recently retired as the Director (CEO) of the Victorian College of the Arts (VCA) after 15 years of service. Through the outstanding international and national achievements of its alumni and staff it is widely regarded as Australia's pre-eminent artists training and education institution.
Professor Hull's topic is 'Unaccountable Passion - how the arts defy the hubris of managerialism'.

2009 Degree Shows   View Summary
17 November 2009

Towards the close of every year SCA holds two major celebrations: the Undergraduate and Postgraduate Degree shows.

These large-scale group exhibitions showcase the work of over 270 graduating students. And each year the amazing number of works on display creates a dynamic set of dialogues across a diverse field of artistic practices.

Exhibited throughout SCA's galleries and studios, this festival of art gives students a chance to share their ambitions and successes with friends who have travelled alongside them through the years of their degree.

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE SHOW

Opening Tuesday 17 November, 6 to 8pm

Exhibition continues to Friday 27 November

POSTGRADUATE DEGREE SHOW

Opening Wednesday 9 December, 6 to 8pm

Exhibition continues to Wednesday 16 December

Sydney College of the Arts

The Visual Arts Faculty of the

University of Sydney

Balmain Road, Rozelle, NSW Australia

(enter opposite Cecily Street)

+61 2 9351 1008 www.usyd.edu.au/sca

degreeshow@sca.usyd.edu.au

Exhibition Hours:

Monday to Friday, 11am to 5pm

Saturday to Sunday, 11am to 4pm

Dermatology Research Foundation's 21st Anniversary Celebration   View Summary
18 November 2009

A series of lectures outlining the Dermatology Research Foundation's major breakthroughs in the treatment and prevention of skin cancer as well as recent clinical advancements.

Qualitative Health Research - Evening Information Forum   View Summary
18 November 2009

Interested in Qualitative Health Research?
Sydney Medical School has some exciting new programs for 2010.

Qualitative methodologies are increasingly important in health and medical research. From 2010, the Sydney Medical School will be offering three new programs:
- Master of Qualitative Health Research (KC087)
- Graduate Diploma in Qualitative Health Research (KF056)
- Graduate Certificate in Qualitative Health Research (KG018)

They will provide hands-on training in qualitative research practice, sophisticated engagement with theory and methodology, and solid preparation in health issues. If you enrol as a Masters student, you will have access to Units of Study in social sciences and the humanities from across the University.

Looking for a Professional Development opportunity for 2010?

Our three core units of study (Introducing qualitative health research, Qualitative methodologies and study design, Qualitative research: analysis and writing) are also available as a standalone intensive short courses.

In 2010, jump-start your development as a leader in the growing field of qualitative health research at Sydney Medical School.

Want to know more?
Come to a free information seminar, Wednesday 18 November 2009, 5.45pm.

Refreshments provided.

Controversies in Public Health Lecture - Whither primary health care in Australia?   View Summary
19 November 2009

Brought to you by the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery and the School of Public Health

Speaker: Professor Mary Chiarella, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, the University of Sydney.

Free. On-line registration essential: http://www.health.usyd.edu.au

Colloquium on Internationalising Learning and Teaching in Academic Settings   View Summary
23 November 2009

Internationalisation is a dynamic and complex process that has become a popular term used to describe the ways in which universities respond to globalisation, and interpretations are varied.

The Faculty of Education and Social Work invites colleagues (staff and students) from all disciplines to share ideas with us in this one-day colloquium.

Keynote Speaker: Hans de Wit, International higher education consultant, The Netherlands

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS OPEN - submission deadline: 12 August 2009

For more information please visit the colloquium web page.

Terry Smith: Contemporary Art: Transitions & Translations   View Summary
23 November 2009

Terry Smith, Andrew Mellon Professor of Contemporary Art History & Theory at University of Pittsburg and former Director of the Power Institute, University of Sydney, will explore the defining characteristics of contemporary art from an art historical point of view.

Under the Radar Book Launch   View Summary
25 November 2009

Under the Radar is the biography written by Professor Miller Goss and Dr Richard McGee, of Ruby Payne-Scott (1912-1981), a graduate in Physics from the University of Sydney in 1936 who became the world's first female radio astronomer. Hired in 1941 by the Radiophysics Laboratory of the then Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) she was part of an Australian team that developed a means of measuring radio emissions from the sun, a breakthrough which would lead to the construction of sophisticated radio telescopes. Secretly married to a colleague her extraordinary career was cut short by pregnancy and forced retirement. Ruby Payne-Scott was not only a brilliant pioneering radio physicist but also an outspoken advocate for women's rights. Her two children, artist, Fiona Hall and mathematician, Professor Peter Hall, will be at the launch along with author Professor Miller Goss.

Charles Darwin and the Church   View Summary
25 November 2009

This symposium, to mark the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth and the sesquicentenary of his great work, The Origin of Species, will include a day and evening of discussion on the positive impact over time of evolutionary ideas on religious thought.

Disciplines of Inquiry - Methodology Colloquia 09   View Summary
26 November 2009

The Research Division, Faculty of Education and Social Work invites you to participate in the launch of a colloquia series on new approaches to research and interdisciplinarity across the education and social work domains.

The detailsfor thisweek'sproceedings are to be released shortly - please check this website for updates.

The Antikythera Mechanism: 'as above, so below: a lecture by Professor Robert Hannah   View Summary
26 November 2009

On Thursday 26th November, Robert Hannah will reveal to us the inner workings of the Antikythera Mechanism, the most significant scientific instrument to have survived from antiquity. It was recovered in 1901 from a 1st century BC shipwreck off the cost of the Greek Island of Antikythera. The corroded bronze plates of over 30 interlocking gears have been subjected to scientific analysis (including radiation scans). Many models have been constructed in attempts to unravel the workings and to help determine what this time-tracking device might have been used for.

Kids Museum: Yolgnu Song and Dance   View Summary
29 November 2009

Come and join us to dance and sing in a celebration of Yolgnu spirit and Aboriginal heritage.

December
Nicholson: Man and Museum (exhibition)   View Summary
5 January 2009 to 1 December 2009

A colourful exploration of some of the unearthed tales behind the extraordinary life of Sir Charles Nicholson, founder of the Nicholson Museum, and the first vice-chancellor and second chancellor of the University of Sydney. Find out about Nicholson and mummies, spiritualism, trips up the Volga, grand houses, a much younger wife, retirement to England aged 53, and the loss of his house and life's work aged 90. True melodrama.

WS Macleay and the natural history circle   View Summary
12 February 2009 to 1 December 2009

William Sharp Macleay's natural history Horae Entomologicae (1819 - 21) sought God's order in nature through a system of organisation based on the affinities and analogies between organisms. This quinarian system, as it was known, was read and considered by London's young and radical naturalists in the 1820's and the 1830's, among them the promising scholar Charles Darwin.

Enchanting Taiwan photographic exhibition   View Summary
6 November 2009 to 28 January 2010

The Taipei Economic and Cultural Office (TECO) is proud to present the Enchanting Taiwan photographic exhibition, sponsored by the University of Sydney Library.

The exhibition comprises 80 photographs. Selections have been shown in several Australian cities, but this is the first time that all of the works will be displayed together.

The images were shot by 67 different photographers, each artist capturing a unique aspect of Taiwan. Studies range from neon-lit cityscapes to scenes of pristine natural beauty. Among the most stunning are the marble canyons of Taroko National Park and the stark salt fields of southern Taiwan. Some of the works focus on the rich traditions which have evolved from agrarian culture and folklore, evoking a world of ritual, religion and dazzling spectacle. Importantly, the collection also features images of Taiwan's indigenous cultural heritage.

Society for Free Radical Research Australasia (SFRRA) Conference   View Summary
1 December 2009 to 4 December 2009

Please see website for more information.

CCE 25th Anniversary Lecture    View Summary
1 December 2009

Help us celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Centre for Continuing Education (CCE), at the University of Sydney.

To commemorate this special occasion, CCE is proud to host a public lecture "Barack Obama, The Man and his Presidency So Far" with special guests Prof Fred Greenstein, Professor of Politics Emeritus at Princeton University, and Hon Bob Carr

Professor Greenstein is a notable US political commentator and has published many books on political psychology, in particular, the leadership qualities of US presidents. His recent published works have included The Presidential Difference: Leadership Style from FDR to Barack Obama (2009), and Inventing the Job of President: Leadership Style from George Washington to Andrew Jackson (2009). He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and past president of the International Society for Political Psychology.

Professor Greenstein will examine the presidency of Barack Obama so far, his leadership qualities throughout his presidential campaign and his first year in office, and what his presidency means for Australia.Following the lecture, the Hon Bob Carr will host a discussion with Professor Greenstein, with opportunity for questions from the audience.

Cost: $25 per person (bookings essential)

To book tickets please call us on 02 9036 4789, or visit www.cce.usyd.edu.au.

"Makarr-Garma": A Curator's Talk and Musical Performance by Dr Joe Gumbula   View Summary
2 December 2009

Join us for a musical performance and tour of the exhibition "Makarr-garma: Aboriginal Collections from a Yolngu Perspective" by its curator Dr Joseph Gumbula.

Studentship Awards Presentation   View Summary
2 December 2009

Danielle Sulikowski: Department of Brain, Behaviour and Evolution, Macquarie University.

Spatial cognition and foraging ecology of the noisy miner

Danielle has investigated the spatial cognitive abilities of the noisy miner bird. She found that the natural distribution of rewards can be used to predict the variation seen in the birds performance and strategies they use to complete tasks. Danielle's experiments were based on the assumption that cognitive mechanisms, as the proximate determinants of behaviour, have been shaped by evolution, to allow animals to behave in functionally adaptive ways.

Isa Chan: School of Chemistry, The University of New South Wales.

Molecular Interactions and Chirality

Chirality, or "handedness", is the structural characteristic of a molecule that cannot be superimposed on its mirror image. It is essential to the proper functioning of living systems. Devising more efficient methods in the generation of chirally pure compounds has been of great interest in contemporary chemistry and beneficial to many key areas of science. Isa's current research involves systematically revealing new types of weak non-covalent interactions. An alicyclic diol example will be presented, whose structure is determined simply by the solvent chosen for crystallisation.

Tamara Keeley: Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney and Taronga Conservation Society of Australia.

Maintaining the Genetic Diversity of the Tasmanian Devil: Development of Assisted Reproductive Technologies

The steep decline in population of the Tasmanian devil has lead to research into species preservation through artificial insemination of cryopreserved spermatozoa. Tamara has developed methods to improve sperm viability and motility after cryopreservation. Tamara's research also includes the study of reproductive and stress hormones in the faeces of captive female devils.

"Medicine and Magic, Health and Healing in Ancient Egypt": Free Public Talk by Dr Katherine Eaton   View Summary
6 December 2009

The latest in the Nicholson Museum's Free Sunday Egypt series featuring a talk by Egyptologist Dr Katherine Eaton.

Makarr-garma - Explore Yolngu Country": University Museums School Holiday programs   View Summary
8 December 2009

School holiday activities for children aged 5-12. Discover Yolngu culture of the Northern Territory and explore Yolngu life. In conjunction with the exhibition "Makarr-garma". Bookings essential as places are limited!

"Walu, Ngalindi and the Yolngu Skyscape": Public Lecture by Ray Norris (CSIRO)   View Summary
9 December 2009

Ray Norris is passionate about the stars and about the tremendous scientific and cultural knowledge Australia's and probably the world's earliest astronomers Aboriginal peoples. In this talk, Ray shares his experience of his work with Yolngu people and some aspects of their knowledge and of astronomy in their world.

2009 Degree Shows   View Summary
9 December 2009

Towards the close of every year SCA holds two major celebrations: the Undergraduate and Postgraduate Degree shows.

These large-scale group exhibitions showcase the work of over 270 graduating students. And each year the amazing number of works on display creates a dynamic set of dialogues across a diverse field of artistic practices.

Exhibited throughout SCA's galleries and studios, this festival of art gives students a chance to share their ambitions and successes with friends who have travelled alongside them through the years of their degree.

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE SHOW

Opening Tuesday 17 November, 6 to 8pm

Exhibition continues to Friday 27 November

POSTGRADUATE DEGREE SHOW

Opening Wednesday 9 December, 6 to 8pm

Exhibition continues to Wednesday 16 December

Sydney College of the Arts

The Visual Arts Faculty of the

University of Sydney

Balmain Road, Rozelle, NSW Australia

(enter opposite Cecily Street)

+61 2 9351 1008 www.usyd.edu.au/sca

degreeshow@sca.usyd.edu.au

Exhibition Hours:

Monday to Friday, 11am to 5pm

Saturday to Sunday, 11am to 4pm

Bosch Young Investigators Symposium 2009   View Summary
11 December 2009

A showcase of Young Researchers within the Bosch Institute.

AstroMed09   View Summary
13 December 2009 to 16 December 2009

The inaugural Sydney international workshop on synergies in astronomical and medical imaging.

Into The Academy- Indigenous Knowledges Symposium   View Summary
14 December 2009 to 15 December 2009

The University of Sydney Indigenous Knowledges Research Group (IKRG), in conjunction with the Faculty of Arts has invited some key Indigenous scholars to join with us in a conversation about change as it applies to the role of Indigenous Australians and their culture in the academy. This is envisaged as a means of developing constructive dialogue about Indigenous Knowledges (IK) approaches to teaching, learning and research and of beginning strategies for ways forward to progress developments on this campus.

Cost: Registration for the symposium includes all refreshment, morning and afternoon teas, as well as lunches on each day of the conference. For fully waged and faculty guests, the registration amount will be $185.00. For students, casual staff and guests who are unwaged, the registration cost will be $25.00. There will be a conference dinner on the evening of 14 December that attracts a separate charge of $85.00.

Into the Academy: Indigenous Knowledges Symposium    View Summary
14 December 2009 to 15 December 2009

The University of Sydney Indigenous Knowledges Research Group (IKRG), in conjunction with the Faculty of Arts has invited some key Indigenous scholars to join with us in a conversation about change as it applies to the role of Indigenous Australians and their culture in the academy. This is envisaged as a means of developing constructive dialogue about Indigenous Knowledges (IK) approaches to teaching, learning and research and of beginning strategies for ways forward to progress developments on this campus.

The SOPHI Gender and Modernity Research Group presents: Thinking Fashion and Dress Symposium   View Summary
15 December 2009

Speakers - Fiona Allon (USYD) 'Dressing down the Nation: Sabrina and The Flannelette Series',

Prudence Black and Catherine Driscoll (UTS & USYD) - 'Strapped to the Drain Pipe: Emma Peel and the Vinyl Jumpsuit',

Stella North (USYD)- 'Flesh Made Nest: Dwelling in Dress',

Alison Gill and Abby Lopes (UWS) - 'On Wearing: A Critical Interpretive Framework on Design's Already Made

Indigenous Knowledges - Sydney Ideas lecture    View Summary
15 December 2009

As part of the Indigenous Knowledges Symposium Professor Graham Hingangaroa Smith will give an evening lecture open to all. He is a prominent Maori educationalist who has been at the forefront of the alternative Maori initiatives in the education field and beyond. In his lecture for Sydney Ideas he looks at indigenous knowledge production within a 'conventional' university institution, compared with an Indigenous-tribal institution, and highlights the sites of struggle for Indigenous Knowledges scholars working within the western academy.

So you think you can trade carbon?   View Summary
17 December 2009

As the Copenhagen negotiations proceed, and our political parties reshuffle themselves in response to the associated political pressures, you are invited to try your hand at virtual carbon . See whatit islike to participate in a simulated carbon market as you come under pressure to reduce emissions!

REEML (the Resources, Energy and Environmental Markets Laboratory), a collaboration between the Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources and CSIRO, is using specially developed experimental software to test carbon permit markets under various scenarios. If you attended the Emissions Trading for Dummies seminar in August, you would have seen some of the early research results from this project.

Now is your chance to experience what it means to trade carbon under an ETS. How well can you do against your academic colleagues?

A session specifically for university staff will be held at 10am-noon Thursday December 17.

Tea and coffee will be provided afterwards, during which a discussion and de-brief of the results will be presented. A further session will be held in the new year (28th January) subject to demand.