News

Removing the Cancer Emperor's Clothes: the successful campaign to get cigarettes in plain packs


8 June 2010

The historic announcement by the Rudd government that all tobacco products would be sold in plain packaging from 2012 was the culmination of an intense campaign of public health advocacy. The decision represents the first time any consumer good's packaging has been completely prescribed by a government. It is a decision that will domino around the world.

In a presentation today, Professor Simon Chapman and researcher Becky Freeman from the Sydney School of Public Health rehearse the arguments for plain packaging and describe the efforts by Australian and international advocates to advance this strategy onto the political agenda.

Simon Chapman is Professor in Public Health at the University of Sydney and a staff elected Fellow of Senate. He has published nearly 400 articles in peer reviewed journals and 14 books and major reports. His current research involves examining policy for the future of tobacco control; how health and medical issues are covered in the news media; the implications for tobacco control of web 2.0 technology; and characteristics of public health research (and its dissemination) which impact on public health policy.

Becky Freeman has been working in the field of tobacco control since 2000. She is an early career researcher and PhD candidate at the School of Public Health, University of Sydney. Her research interests include tobacco advertising and promotion and the influence of Web 2.0 technology in both promoting and reducing tobacco use.


Event details

When: 1pm, Tuesday 8 June

Where: New Law School Lecture Theatre 106, New Law Building (F10), Eastern Avenue, Camperdown Campus

Registration: Seating will be limited so please register.


Media inquiries: Sarah Stock, 9114 0748, 0419 278 715, sarah.stock@sydney.edu.au