News

University building wins world architecture award


5 November 2010

Photo by John Gollings. The BMRI's Youth Mental Health Building in Camperdown was designed by BVN  Architecture. It provides a human-scaled environment for mental health patients while addressing an inner-city streetscape.
Photo by John Gollings. The BMRI's Youth Mental Health Building in Camperdown was designed by BVN Architecture. It provides a human-scaled environment for mental health patients while addressing an inner-city streetscape.

The new Youth Mental Health Building at the University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Research Institute has won a prestigious architecture award at the World Architecture Festival in Barcelona, Spain.

The jury recognised the design of BVN Architecture by giving the building the Health award. The building competed with other entrants from around the world, including a hospital in the UK by Norman Foster and Partners.

Professor Ian Hickie, the Executive Director of the BMRI, said the building is an inspiring physical environment in which to work. "Not only does the staff mix actively with each other and stop on the stairways to talk, but they also share the spaces with the patients and families who come for care," he said.

"The combination of people, space and light make the place vibrant and engaging. The contrast with more traditional medical research centres could not be more stark."

James Grose, BVN National Director said the building was designed to take into account many diverse requirements and constraints. "It had to provide a human-scaled and tactile environment for mental health patients on one hand, and address an inner-city streetscape that combines residences and the remnants of the industrial character of Camperdown on the other."

The BMRI is part of Sydney Medical School in the University of Sydney focussed on research into mental health and clinical issues relating to the brain.

The Youth Mental Health Building consists of two floors of consulting and patient interaction and two floors of research laboratories.


Media enquiries: Jacqueline Chowns, 0434 605 018, jacqueline.chowns@sydney.edu.au