News

Oxidative Stress Bioanalytical Facility opens at University of Sydney


15 October 2010

(L-R) Professor David Burke (Director of Research, Sydney Medical School), Professor Roland Stocker (Professor of Vascular Medicine), Professor Jill Trewhella (DVC Research) and Professor Jonathan Stone (Executive Director. Bosch Institute).
(L-R) Professor David Burke (Director of Research, Sydney Medical School), Professor Roland Stocker (Professor of Vascular Medicine), Professor Jill Trewhella (DVC Research) and Professor Jonathan Stone (Executive Director. Bosch Institute).

The University of Sydney's Bosch Institute formally opened its Oxidative Stress Bioanalytical Facility (OSBF) this week, located in the Medical Foundation Building.

Oxidative stress has emerged as a major factor in human disease, both in acute infections and inflammation and in the aging process. This stress is an inevitable result of a very basic feature of humans and all vertebrates - our reliance on oxygen to generate energy needed by all our tissues. We must have oxygen to live; but oxygen generates damaging 'reactive oxygen species'.

Bosch OSBF founder, Professor Roland Stocker, said normally stress caused by oxygen is countered by mechanisms found in every cell, which have evolved to counter this stress, by mopping up the damaging forms of oxygen.

"In acute disease, and more slowly in aging, the anti-oxidative mechanisms fail, and tissue damage results," he said.

"It is a fundamental thing in so many diseases."

The Bosch OSBF will be a common research facility, available to laboratories in the Bosch Institute and throughout the University.

The Executive Director of the Bosch Institute, Professor Jonathan Stone said the facility was the culmination of Professor Stocker's years of work, defining the concept and then putting together the equipment infrastructure needed with help from many colleagues."

"The concept - to be able to study oxidative stress in living tissue and track the fast-acting, transient molecules which cause the tissue damage - is brilliant," he said.

"The Bosch OSBF is unique in the world, as far as I know and it provides our researchers with a powerful platform to advance understanding of the many diseases we study."

A Research Officer will be appointed to run the facility, provide training and help to researchers, and to develop its infrastructure. Equipment and capabilities will include:

  • The Agilent 6460AA triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer
  • The ESA CoulArray multi-channel electrochemical detector
  • PC2-ready facilities for tissue/cell culture studies

The Bosch OSBF was formally opened by Professor Jill Trewhella, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) at the University of Sydney.

Major support from the University of Sydney has come via the Sydney Medical School's Major Infrastructure Support Scheme, and from the Bosch Institute. External grant support for the OSBF has been provided by the Australian Research Council, under its LIEF grant scheme, partner universities including the University of New South Wales, Monash University and the University of Western Australia, the major commercial partner being Agilent Technologies.


Media enquiries: Rachel Gleeson, 0403 067 342, 9351 4312, rachel.gleeson@sydney.edu.au