News

Architecture and design students light up Sydney


27 May 2011

Three spectacular light installations created by students from the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning will feature in Vivid Sydney, the festival of 'light, music and ideas', which opens tonight and runs until 13 June.

The three students are student Kate Fife (Bachelor of Design Architecture), graduate Andrew Daly (Master of Architecture) and student Ben Baxter (Master of Design Science, Illumination Design). Their installations form part of the Vivid Light Walk in The Rocks and Circular Quay, which comprises work by local and international artists.

It is the second time the work of Andrew Daly and Ben Baxter has appeared in the festival after both had installations included at the 2009 Vivid Festival.


'Carnivlux', by Kate Fife and Andrew Daly.
'Carnivlux', by Kate Fife and Andrew Daly.

Kate Fife and Andrew Daly have this year collaborated to produce two separate installations. Carnivlux takes the Vivid 2011 theme 'Let there be light' to bring visitors back to the dreamlike worlds of their childhood as the viewer walks underneath a field of 100 hanging lights with two circular structures supporting suspended lights that use multicoloured and eclectic lights to create a space of sanctuary.


'Crystallized', by Kate Fife and Andrew Daly.
'Crystallized', by Kate Fife and Andrew Daly.

Fife and Daly's second piece Crystallized abstracts the starry night sky creating a spatial installation for people to walk through and reflect on the impacts of poorly considered lighting on how we live. The installation creates a space 'hollowed out' from three thousand edge-lit acrylic rods - a glowing internal landscape like a cave with a ceiling of glittering stalactites. The rods act as a canopy, using programmed LED's to create an ever fluctuating, colourful abstraction of the night sky.


'Web of Light', by Ben Baxter.
'Web of Light', by Ben Baxter.

Ben Baxter collaborates with Sydney-based designer and artist Ruth McDermott to create Web of Light in which a large scale spider's web is made of linked cut-glass beads that will refract both the natural light during the day and artificial light at night. It is designed to mimic the effect of light on water droplets on a spider's web.



Media enquiries: Jacqueline Chowns, 0434 605 018, 9036 5404 jacqueline.chowns@sydney.edu.au