News

Canadian conference trip yields research grant for Tim Wilkinson


7 November 2006

Tim Wilkinson
Tim Wilkinson

Dr Tim Wilkinson recently attended the annual meeting of CIDECT and attended the 11th International Symposium on Tubular Structures held in Quebec, Canada.

CIDECT is an international association of leading manufacturers of hollow sections and pipes whose objective is to expand knowledge, by means of research and studies, of steel hollow sections and their application in steel construction and engineering.

The Project is entitled "Connections in high strength cold-formed rectangular hollow sections". This aim of this project is to determine design rules for the static strength of RHS truss connections in high strength (450 MPa) cold-formed steel. This will be performed through laboratory experiments and finite element analysis.

The project will be carried out in collaboration with Smorgon Steel Tube Mills.

CIDECT will contribute 66000 Euros, with matching funding from Smorgon Steel ($220000 total).

Dr Wilkinson also presented 4 papers at the International Tubular Symposium held at the same time in Quebec.

  • Hollow flange channel bolted web side plate connection tests (co-authored by PhD student David Cao)
  • Finite element analysis of structural steel elliptical hollow sections in pure compression (co-authored by Masters student Frank Zhu)
  • Behaviour of hollow flange channel sections under concentrated loads (co authored by Frank Zhu and former Sydney postdoc Demao Yang)
  • Tubular steel roof for Spencer Street railway station in Melbourne, Australia (written by Peter Skene (Leightons) and Rob di Blasi (Winward) but presented by Dr Wilkinson).

This conference is the premier international conference in the field of tubular structures and featured several Australians including several Sydney Alumni such asXiao-Ling Zhao (Professor at Monash), Mark Bradford (Professor at UNSW) and Ben Young (Ass Professor in Hong Kong).

The Quebec Bridge is famous amongst Canadian engineers.  It collapsed twice during construction in 1907 and 1916.  All Canadian engineers wear an iron ring originally made from the remains of the bridge to remind them of their duties.  The ISTS11 conference on tubular structures featured a site tour of the Quebec Bridge.
The Quebec Bridge is famous amongst Canadian engineers. It collapsed twice during construction in 1907 and 1916. All Canadian engineers wear an iron ring originally made from the remains of the bridge to remind them of their duties. The ISTS11 conference on tubular structures featured a site tour of the Quebec Bridge.