News

CIMS2008 and the Gregory J Hancock Symposium


27 June 2008

The CIMS2008 logo illustrates the various buckling modes of cross-sectional shapes.
The CIMS2008 logo illustrates the various buckling modes of cross-sectional shapes.

Inspired by the professors and lectures he listened to and worked with as a student in the 1960s and 1970s, Greg Hancock has been instrumental in the identification and understanding of distortional buckling.

Now, researchers in thin-walled and metal structures across the world are tackling the problem of the interaction of different modes of buckling - local, global and distortional.



The School of Civil Engineering hosted the Fifth International Conference on Coupled Instabilities of Metal Structures (CIMS2008) this week.



Nearly 100 delegates from arounf the world met in Sydney to
(i) review recent achievements in the advancement of knowledge and understanding in this field,
(ii) share the latest trends and developments, and
(iii) exchange ideas and views on current and future research areas of need.



Associate Professor Ben Schafer from Johns Hopkins University presenting a keynote paper on Numerical Modelling of Cold-Formed Structures
Associate Professor Ben Schafer from Johns Hopkins University presenting a keynote paper on Numerical Modelling of Cold-Formed Structures

The full list of papers and participants in available on the CIMS2008 website.

Delegates came from across the globe: inlcuding Australia, United States, Canada, France, UK, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Singapore, China, Japan, Korea, Germany, Russia, Hungary, India, Brazil and Poland.

CIMS2008 included keynote presentations from Dinar Camotin (Portugal), Richard Liew (Singapore), Angelo Luongo (Italy) and Ben Schafer (USA).



The third day of the conference, Wed 25 June 2008, was set aside as the Gregory J Hancock Symposium, dedicated to him and his many achievements.



These include the developments of semi-analytical finite strip and spline finite strip methods and the use of "design by buckling analysis" which laid the foundation for the Direct Strength Method now rapidly being accepted in North America and Australia.



While the Symposium was part of the CIMS2008 Conference, speakers for the Hancock Symposium were invited from amongst Greg's collaborators, friends, colleagues and past PhD students.





Greg Hancock gave a memorable presentation on The Sixth Equation that Changed the World, based on Euler's buckling formulation.



Professor Dinar Camotin from Portugal
Professor Dinar Camotin from Portugal