All future 2012 events

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January
Multi-mediators Models of Learning - Prof James A Levin    View Summary
25 January 2012

Join us on January 25th when Professor James (Jim) A Levin will present a seminar titled "Multi-mediators Models of Learning".

At this talk, Jim will present a multi-mediator distributed simulation framework for modeling learning at different scales of analysis, ranging from individual to organizational learning. He will show the use of this framework to model an educational reform at the district and school level in a way that gives some insight into the differences between successful reform efforts and unsuccessful ones.

Jim Levin is a Professor in the Department of Education Studies at the University of California, San Diego. His current research focuses on a distributed learning perspective as expressed in multi-mediator models of learning at a variety of scales of analysis, ranging from individual to organizational learning.

 
March
Learning, teaching and epistemic fluency    View Summary
14 March 2012

Learning, teaching and epistemic fluency: Frames, conceptual blending and experiential resources in teacher pedagogical choices

Lina Markauskaite, The University of Sydney

This presentation aims to share some ideas about the nature of teacher knowledge and thinking. Building on the notions of "epistemic fluency" and "conceptual blending" it will illustrate how teachers work simultaneously, switch between, and integrate different kinds of knowledge and different ways of knowing. It will show that teacher decisions about task designs inextricably link different epistemological, social and material frames and structures - to include among other structures, the structure of subject matter, pedagogy, material and digital. Teachers' resourcefulness for blending different frames and forms of knowledge is grounded in diverse range of mental resources; some of these resources are inherently experiential. This presentation will illustrate some emerging ideas using results from studies with university teachers in which we studied ICT integration and assessment task designs in higher education.

Lina Markauskaite is a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Education and Social Work and a member of the Research Centre for Computer Supported Learning and Cognition at the University of Sydney, Australia. Lina's research has been investigating pre-service teachers' ICT literacy and personal epistemology, epistemic fluency, and ICT-enhanced research methods for education and social sciences. Lina is a Chief Investigator on two Australian Research Council's projects: "Professional learning for knowledgeable action and innovation: The development of epistemic fluency in higher education" (with Peter Goodyear) and "Learning the Complexity of Scientific Knowledge about Climate Change with Computer Modelling and Visualization Technologies" (with Michael Jacobson and Chun Hu). Currently she holds The University's of Sydney Thompson Fellowship.

This seminar will be accessible online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room

 
Education Heresies colloquia 2011-2012 - Colloquium Five   View Summary
15 March 2012
Colloquium Five – are markets good for education

The Education Heresies series features leading education scholars and practitioners, speaking out on how educational research, policy and practice need to be challenged and transformed. Contemporary education is a contested field, influenced by agenda that go beyond quality teaching and learning, community building and equality of access and outcomes. The place of education in the national and international marketplace; the standardisation of education materials and standards in the face of increasing cultural and linguistic diversity; 'choice' in public and private schooling; the institutional taming or liberation of the transformative potential of digital; and online technologies are among the issues traversing and disrupting Australian education. Historically, challenges to the deep grammar of prevailing orthodoxies have been branded 'heretical'. This colloquium series invites leading educators to release their inner heretic. It presents opportunities to debate and challenge the prevailing orthodoxies as they are realised every day in policy, curriculum, pedagogy and research in and out of educational institutions. It is a forum in which we acknowledge that recognising deep disagreement on big issues is a necessary accompaniment to developing productive ways forward.

Presenter
Professor Raewyn Connell
holds a University Chair within the University of Sydney. She has previously held posts at the University of California at Santa Cruz, Macquarie University in Sydney, and Flinders University in Adelaide. She has held visiting posts at the University of Toronto, Harvard University, and Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum. In the past decade, Professor Connell has been invited by United Nations agencies to lead international discussions about masculinities, violence and peacemaking, and the role of men and boys in achieving gender equality. Her work is widely cited in social science and humanities publications internationally. Four of her books were listed among the 10 most influential books in Australian sociology. She is often invited to give keynote addresses at conferences and seminars, including events in Canada, Switzerland, Germany, Senegal and Britain.

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Education Heresies colloquia 2011-2012 - Colloquium Six   View Summary
29 March 2012
Colloquium Six – does the new doxa of integrationism make multicultural education a contemporary heresy?

The Education Heresies series features leading education scholars and practitioners, speaking out on how educational research, policy and practice need to be challenged and transformed. Contemporary education is a contested field, influenced by agenda that go beyond quality teaching and learning, community building and equality of access and outcomes. The place of education in the national and international marketplace; the standardisation of education materials and standards in the face of increasing cultural and linguistic diversity; 'choice' in public and private schooling; the institutional taming or liberation of the transformative potential of digital; and online technologies are among the issues traversing and disrupting Australian education. Historically, challenges to the deep grammar of prevailing orthodoxies have been branded 'heretical'. This colloquium series invites leading educators to release their inner heretic. It presents opportunities to debate and challenge the prevailing orthodoxies as they are realised every day in policy, curriculum, pedagogy and research in and out of educational institutions. It is a forum in which we acknowledge that recognising deep disagreement on big issues is a necessary accompaniment to developing productive ways forward.

Presenter
Professor Georgina Tsolidis
is program coordinator of Master of Education studies at the University of Ballarat. Her areas of expertise are international education; gender and schooling; multicultural education; and culture- and gender-inclusive pedagogies. Her books include Youthful imagination - schooling, subcultures and social justice. She has extensive experience supervising students at honours, master and doctoral level, in particular, theses related to gender studies, multicultural and international education.

Discussant
Dr Megan Watkins
is a senior lecturer in the University of Western Sydney's School of Education and researcher with the Institute for Culture and Research at that university. Her research interests lie in the cultural analysis of education and the formation of human subjectivities. These interests mesh with her exploration of the impact of cultural diversity on education and the ways in which different cultural practices can engender divergent habits and dispositions to learning. She is a recipient of two Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkages grants: "Rethinking Multiculturalism/ Reassessing Multicultural Education and Discipline" and "Diversity: Cultural Practices and Dispositions of Learning".

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April
Education Heresies colloquia 2011-2012 - Colloquium Seven   View Summary
26 April 2012
Colloquium Seven – knowledge-blindness: how educational research neglects the basis of education

The Education Heresies series features leading education scholars and practitioners, speaking out on how educational research, policy and practice need to be challenged and transformed. Contemporary education is a contested field, influenced by agenda that go beyond quality teaching and learning, community building and equality of access and outcomes. The place of education in the national and international marketplace; the standardisation of education materials and standards in the face of increasing cultural and linguistic diversity; 'choice' in public and private schooling; the institutional taming or liberation of the transformative potential of digital; and online technologies are among the issues traversing and disrupting Australian education. Historically, challenges to the deep grammar of prevailing orthodoxies have been branded 'heretical'. This colloquium series invites leading educators to release their inner heretic. It presents opportunities to debate and challenge the prevailing orthodoxies as they are realised every day in policy, curriculum, pedagogy and research in and out of educational institutions. It is a forum in which we acknowledge that recognising deep disagreement on big issues is a necessary accompaniment to developing productive ways forward.

Presenter
Dr Karl Maton
specialises in the sociologies of education, knowledge and culture. His interests are focused on questions of knowledge and society, including epistemology, the knowledge society, higher education, schooling, and cultural studies. Karl is the principal author of Legitimation Code Theory ('LCT'), a sociological framework for the study of social fields of practice. Dr Maton completed his PhD on The Field of Higher Education at the University of Cambridge. He has published in sociology, education, linguistics, philosophy and cultural studies, and previously worked at the University of Cambridge, The Open University, Keele University and the University of Wollongong.

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July
International Conference of the Learning Sciences   View Summary
2 July 2012 to 6 July 2012

The International Conference of the Learning Sciences is a biennial conference sponsored by the International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS). The conference brings together researchers in the sciences of learning, instruction, and design in order to address questions of how we can better understand and improve learning.

The conference hosts workshops, panels, symposia, paper and poster sessions, and keynotes by leaders in the field. It's an opportunity to share and gain insight into critical debate and new research findings across the various disciplines of the learning sciences.

This year is the first time this prestigious conference has been held in the Southern Hemisphere. It will be hosted by the Faculty of Education and Social Work's Centre for Research on Computer Supported Learning and Cognition (CoCo).

CoCo's mission it to contribute to theory and research in the field in order to discover how innovative learning technologies and pedagogical approaches can enhance formal and informal learning.

 
October
Successful Learning Conference 2012   View Summary
8 October 2012 to 9 October 2012

This annual conference focuses on issues and developments in the provision of quality education for students K-12 who experience difficulties learning in a mainstream classroom setting. Areas addressed will include literacy and numeracy, accountability and assessment, behaviour management and social skills instruction. Participants may attend this conference as a stand-alone event, or as part of the Certificate in Educational Studies (Learning Support). More information about the certificate program for 2012 will be available early in the new year.