All future 2013 events

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February
Right to Silence (FULLY BOOKED)   View Summary
11 February 2013

This seminar is fully booked, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au to be placed on a wait list.

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The NSW Government has foreshadowed legislation that will change the standard caution given to suspects held in police custody. This panel session will examine the impact of the proposed amendments on one of the fundamental tenets of our legal system - the right to silence - and the implications for accused, legal practitioners and the criminal justice system as a whole.

Panel Members

Phillip Boulten SC (NSW Bar Association) - Phillip Boulten SC practises from Forbes Chambers. He specialises in criminal trials and appeals. He is currently the President of the New South Wales Bar Association and is a member of the Law Council of Australia's Criminal Law Committee.

Associate Professor David Hamer (Sydney Law School) - David Hamer's primary research interest is in the law of evidence. He takes an interdisciplinary approach, interrogating the law - and the proof process more broadly - using tools drawn from probability theory, narrative theory and psychology. His interest in evidence law often flows over into areas of substantive law and broader issues, in particular law's continuing struggle with the notion of causation, criminal justice, and the causes of and solutions to wrongful convictions.

This is a joint event of the NSW Bar Association and the Sydney Institute of Criminology (Sydney Law School)

George Winterton Memorial Lecture 2013: Professor Geoffrey Lindell (FULLY BOOKED)   View Summary
14 February 2013

This event is now FULLY BOOKED, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au to be placed on the waitlist.

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Topic: Judicial review and the dismissal of an elected government in 1975: Then and Now?

When the Whitlam Labor Government was dismissed in 1975 it was widely assumed that judicial review was not available to challenge the validity of that dismissal. Since that time developments have occurred both in Australia and elsewhere which may involve in the future the courts resolving 'conflicts over the reins of power'. It has been questioned whether such conflicts would be resolved by a pronouncement of a court. In Australia developments in administrative law have undermined the assumption that the normal rules which govern the exercise of discretions vested in ordinary government officials and bodies do not apply to those vested in a Vice-regal representative. In addition there have also been developments which may have the effect of converting the core aspects of the conventions of responsible government - and their accompanying qualifications based on the reserve powers of the Crown - into judicially enforceable rules of law. This lecture addresses whether in the light of such developments the High Court would, and should, intervene to review the legal validity of the dismissal of an elected Government as a result of the Senate blocking Supply if this were to occur again.

About the Speaker

The 4th Annual George Winterton Memorial Lecture will be delivered by Professor Geoffrey Lindell. Geoffrey Lindell, is an Adjunct Professor of Law at the Adelaide and Australian National Universities and a Professorial Fellow at the Melbourne University.

Before his recent retirement as a full time academic, he held senior academic positions at the Australian National University and later the University of Melbourne. He has taught and published widely in the field of Australian constitutional law. He has assisted in some major reviews of the Australian Constitution, as well as having provided (and continuing to provide) legal and constitutional advice to governments and parliaments. He was until 2002, the inaugural Secretary of the Australian Association of Constitutional Law, a body he helped to form.

About the Lecture

The late George Winterton, Professor of Constitutional Law in the University of Sydney, was one of Australia's foremost experts on the Constitution and constitutional law, with an international reputation. He is remembered as an outstanding scholar and teacher to generations of colleagues, students and the legal profession. His influence on Australian constitutional law and policy has been profound. He was an Emeritus Professor at the University of New South Wales; a member of the Constitutional Commission 1985-87 and of the Republic Advisory Committee 1993; an Appointed Delegate to the Constitutional Convention 1998; and foundation member of the Council and Trustees of The Constitution Education Fund Australia. He was the founding editor of Constitutional Law and Policy Review and author of the seminal book on executive power, Parliament, the Executive and the Governor-General. He was the lead author of the influential textbook Australian Federal Constitutional Law, currently being carried into its third edition by Professor Winterton's academic colleagues. This lecture series was inaugurated in 2010 to commemorate this outstanding contribution and to maintain this legacy of high and uncompromising standards in constitutional law, of considered and dispassionate reflection on constitutional issues, and of dedicated service to the Academy, the Commonwealth and the Constitution.

SCIL International Law Year in Review Conference   View Summary
22 February 2013

To register click here
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ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

The Sydney Centre for International Law at Sydney Law School is delighted to present the inaugural International Law Year in Review Conference.
The conference will give participants insight into the latest developments in international law over the preceding year, especially those most salient for Australia.

Speakers at the conference will include leading academics, practitioners and government lawyers, and will provide an in-depth and critical analysis of contemporary developments in international law on topical themes, including Australia's participation in international cases in the International Court of Justice and the World Trade Organization. Participation will enable lawyers and non-lawyers alike to remain abreast of important trends in international affairs.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

REGISTRATIONS: 8.15am-8.45am

SESSION 1: 8.45am-9.30am

Developments in International Economic Law in 2012

Speakers: Professor August Reinisch, University of Vienna; Professor Luke Nottage, Sydney Law School;Dr Brett Williams; Sydney Law School
Chair: Professor Chester Brown, Sydney Law School

SESSION 2: 9.30am-10.30am

Australia's Treaty Making in 2012
Speakers: Simona Timmins; Office of International Law (Attorney-General's Department), Mitali Tyagi; Office of International Law (Attorney-General's Department).

Chair: Dr James Renwick SC, NSW Bar

MORNING TEA: 10.30am-11.00am

SESSION 3: 11.00am-12.00pm

Developments in Private International Law in 2012
Speakers:
Dr James Renwick SC, NSW Bar; Thomas John, Commonwealth Attorney-General's Department

Chair: Professor Chester Brown, Sydney Law School

SESSION 4: 12.00pm-1.00pm

Major International Law Cases of 2012
Speakers: Fiona Roughley, NSW Bar; Associate Professor Tim Stephens, Sydney Law School
Chair: Professor Ben Saul, Sydney Law School

INTERNATIONAL LAW LITERARY LUNCH WITH DAVID DAY: 1.00pm-2.30pm (see below)

SESSION 5: 2.30pm-3.30pm
Developments in Human Rights and Refugee Law in 2012

Speakers: Professor David Kinley, Sydney Law School; Professor Mary Crock, Sydney Law School; Catherine Renshaw, Sydney Law School
Chair: Associate Professor Fleur Johns, Sydney Law School

AFTERNOON TEA: 3.30pm-4.00pm

SESSION 6: 4.00pm-5.00pm

Developments in International Law and Security in 2012
Speakers:
Dr Alison Pert, Sydney Law School; Professor Ben Saul, Sydney Law School; Dr Emily Crawford, Sydney Law School
Chair: Associate Professor Tim Stephens, Sydney Law School


THE INTERNATIONAL LAW LITERARY LUNCH

Guest Speaker: David Day 1-2.30pm in the Law Lounge (Level 1)

As a part of the days proceedings, historian and author David Day will discuss his books Conquest - How societies overwhelm others (Oxford University Press 2008) and Antarctica: a Biography (Random House 2012) over lunch.

David Day has written widely on Australian history and the history of World War II. His biography of John Curtin won the 2000 Queensland Premier's Literary Awards Prize for History and was shortlisted for the 2000 New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards Douglas Stewart Prize for Non-Fiction, while his biography of Ben Chifley was shortlisted for the New South Wales Premier's Award for History in 2002. David Day is currently an Honorary Associate with the History Program at La Trobe University.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 6 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is presented by the Sydney Centre for International Law.

PRICE (GST Inclusive)
Full day: $200

Students (full day): $99
Morning sessions: $100 (includes 4 sessions plus morning tea and lunch)
Afternoon sessions: $100 (includes 3 sessions plus afternoon tea and cocktail reception)

Public health law in the European Union   View Summary
25 February 2013

To register and make your secure online payment, please CLICK HERE

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About the seminar:


In the EU, national governments have a specific responsibility to strive to create the conditions in which people can be as healthy as possible. Part I of this session will discuss how this responsibility for health has been interpreted and the challenges that exist in terms of discharging this responsibility. We will also discuss the interplay between policy and law, examining the functions of the Parliament and Council in this context and asking why is public health law important.

In Part II we will look at a brief overview of national public health systems in some EU jurisdictions and we will also discuss whether there should be a single public health act in Europe. The session will conclude with a look at the current program of EU action in health, for example in relation to communicable disease and health promotion.

About the speaker:

Dr Deirdre Madden is a Senior Lecturer in Law with research interests and publications primarily in the area of medical law and ethics. She has a Master's degree on surrogate motherhood and a PhD on the law relating to assisted reproduction. She was called to the Bar in 1989. Her books include Medicine, Ethics and the Law (Bloomsbury 2nd ed. 2011) and Medical Law (Kluwer 2010). Dr Madden was author of the Report on Post-Mortem Practice and Procedure (2005) and Chairperson of the Commission on Patient Safety and Quality Assurance which published its Report, entitled Building a Culture of Patient Safety, in July 2008.

Dr Madden has been a member of the Medical Council since 2004 and is a current member of the Fitness to Practise Committee and Chairperson of the Ethics Working Group of the Council. She is currently a member of a number of national expert groups related to medical law, ethics and patient safety, including the National Patient Safety Advisory Group, the National Advisory Committee on Bioethics, HIQA's Research Advisory Group and Expert Groups on the Implementation of the ABC v Ireland judgement and the Implementation of HIQA's Tallaght Report. Dr Madden also currently chairs the National Consent Advisory Group for the HSE.

In addition to participation in a number of European research projects, Dr Madden is also an expert evaluator for the European Commission; a member of the Research Ethics Committee for the National Longitudinal Study of Children in Ireland; legal expert for UNESCO's Global Ethics Observatory Project; ethics consultant for HIQA on Health Technology Assessment; consultant for the National Healthcare Regulatory Authority in Bahrain; member of the National Council of the Forum on End-of-Life; Visiting Professor at the University of Leicester; and an elected Fellow of the Hastings Center in the United States.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 2.5 MCLE/CPD units.

This seminar is presented by the Centre for Health, Governance, Law and Ethics as a part of the Postgraduate Unit of Study LAWS6312 European Health Law and Policy (Semester 1 intensive running 21, 22, 25 and 26 February 2013). For more information on this unit of study,and to enrol (as a degree or non-degree participant), please follow the above link.

March
2013 Ross Parsons Commercial Law Seminar Series   View Summary
1 March 2013

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Throughout March, members from the Commercial Law Group of the Ross Parson's Centre of Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law at the University of Sydney will present a series of lunchtime and early evening seminars on a wide range of current issues

Seminars will be held in the Minter Ellison Room (Level 13) at the Old Law School on Phillip St in the city (unless otherwise stated) and are each equal to either 1 or 1.5 MCLE/CPD units.

PRICE (GST Inclusive)

Full Fee (per seminar): $60
Alumni (per seminar): $50
Student (per seminar): $40
Full series : $315 (7 seminars at $45 per seminar)

NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please emaillaw.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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THE IMPACT OF ANDREWS V ANZ [2012] HCA 30: LIQUIDATED DAMAGES, LEASES AND MORTGAGES

SPEAKERS: Professor Elisabeth Peden (Sydney Law School) and Patricia Lane (Sydney Law School)

Thursday 7 March, 2013
5.30pm-7pm (registration and refreshments from 5pm)
Minter Ellison Room, Old Law School, 173 Phillip St Sydney
MCLE/CPD Units: 1.5

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

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KEY POINTS ON CONTRACTUAL INTERPRETATION

SPEAKERS: Professor John Carter (Sydney Law School)

Monday 11March, 2013
1pm-2pm (registration and lunch from 12.45pm)
Minter Ellison Room, Old Law School, 173 Phillip St Sydney
MCLE/CPD Units: 1

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

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HIGHLIGHTS AND LOWLIGHTS FROM THE AUSTRALIAN CONSUMER LAW: PRODUCT SAFETY REGULATIONS AND UNFAIR CONSUMER CONTRACT TERMS
SPEAKER: Professor Luke Nottage (Sydney Law School)
CHAIR: Adjunct Professor Dr Jocelyn Kellam (Clayton Utz)
Wednesday 13 March, 2013
1pm-2pm (registration and lunch from 12.45pm)

Minter Ellison Room, Old Law School, 173 Phillip St Sydney
MCLE/CPD Units: 1

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

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KEY TOPICAL ISSUES ARISING UNDER THE PERSONAL PROPERTY SECURITIES
SPEAKERS:
Professor Sheelagh McCracken (Sydney Law School) and Professor John Stumbles (Sydney Law School)
Thursday 14 March, 2013
5.30pm-7pm (registration and refreshments from 5pm)
Minter Ellison Room, Old Law School, 173 Phillip St Sydney
MCLE/CPD Units: 1.5

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

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ENFORCEMENT OF FOREIGN JUDGMENTS ON INSOLVENCY: IMPLICATIONS OF EUROFINANCE V RUBIN [2012] UKSC 46; [2012] |3 WLR 1019
SPEAKER:The Hon KR Handley AO QC and Associate Professor Lee Aitken (Sydney Law School)
Thursday 21 March, 2013
1pm-2pm (registration and lunch from 12.45pm)
Minter Ellison Room, Old Law School, 173 Phillip St Sydney
MCLE/CPD Units: 1

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

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THE INS AND OUTS OF INDEMNITIES
SPEAKER:
Dr Wayne Courtney (Sydney Law School)
Monday 25 March, 2013
6pm-7pm (registration and refreshments from 5.30pm)
Minter Ellison Room, Old Law School, 173 Phillip St Sydney
MCLE/CPD Units: 1

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

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THE LEGAL FRAMEWORK OF CLAIMS AGAINST RATINGS AGENCIES
SPEAKERS:
Professor Barbara McDonald (Sydney Law School)
CHAIR: Professor David Partlett (Emory Law School)
Wednesday 27 March, 2013
6pm-7pm (registration and refreshments from 5.30pm)
Minter Ellison Room, Old Law School, 173 Phillip St Sydney
MCLE/CPD Units: 1

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

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To register for the FULL SERIES of 7 seminars, CLICK HERE

Distinguished Speakers Program: Judge Yvonne Murphy (FULL)   View Summary
4 March 2013

This lecture is fully booked, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au to be placed on the waitlist

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Child abuse and child sexual abuse: The Irish experience

The tsunami of clerical child abuse disclosed since the mid-1990s has had a particularly dramatic effect in Ireland, historically a Catholic country with an observance rate of 95%.


Though there is still a considerable cohort of loyal Catholics, such as former President Mary McAleese, the scandals have broken the Church's grip on the population generally, with precipitous falls in observance and the recruitment of priests.


By the Commission of Investigation Act 2004, the Irish State set up two Tribunals or Commission of Inquiry, one into Abuse in Residential Institutions, and one into sexual abuse by clerics in the Dublin and, later, the Cloyne (Co Cork) dioceses. Judge Yvonne Murphy headed up both of these Commissions.


In the 2009 Report on the Commission's investigations, the so-called Murphy Report, the Institutional Catholic Church was found to have been highly evasive, obsessed with the protection of its assets and reputation, prone more to offenders rather than to addressing their propensities. The Church's defence, that the Institution was "on a learning curve was comprehensively rejected. The Murphy Report was described by Professor Ronan Fanning, a highly respected Professor of History at University College, Dublin, as "a truly historic landmark". A number of prelates, including John Magee, Bishop of Cloyne, resigned following the publication of the Report.

More optimistically, there was a high level of co-operation by Church Authorities with the Commission and rigid codes of practice on the treatment of children have been implemented. However a steady stream of criminal cases continues to afflict the Church, whose future remains uncertain.


Judge Murphy will discuss the techniques of the investigations and the legal and other difficulties encountered during them.

About the speaker

Yvonne Murphy served as a judge of the Circuit Court in Ireland between 1998 and 2012. This is an intermediate Trial Court in Civil, Criminal, Family and Tax cases. She is best known in Ireland as the Chair of the Government appointed Commission of Inquiry into Child Abuse in two Roman Catholic dioceses in Ireland, Dublin and Cloyne, Co. Cork (2006 - 2009). The Commissions' two Reports were widely credited in Ireland and abroad as having had an impact of historic dimensions.


Yvonne is a former Vice-Chair of the Employment Equality Agency and the Employment Appeals Tribunal in Ireland.


Yvonne Murphy was born in rural Ireland and educated at boarding school in Co. Mayo, University College Dublin, and the Honorable Society of the Kings Inns where she qualified as a barrister. She is also a member of the Bars of England and Wales (Middle Temple) and of Northern Ireland (Inn of Court of Northern Ireland).

While in practice at the Bar she was Editor of the Irish Times Law Reports and authored two books, one on Insider Dealing, and the other on Defamation. The latter went into a third edition last year.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Full Fee $25; SLS Alumni $20; USyd Student $10

Beyond Punishment: Restorative Justice and Adult Offending   View Summary
6 March 2013

This event is booked out, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au to be placed on the waitlist.

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The introduction of restorative justice for adult offenders represents a compelling new direction in the criminal justice system. It offers a real and persuasive alternative to the adversarial system. This seminar will explore the value and challenges of restorative justice for adult offenders, victims and communities at different stages of the criminal justice system. John McDonald will give the key note address on 'Restorative Justice: Some Big Ideas'. The seminar will bring together a panel of experts to offer critical analysis of the emergence and impact of program developments for restorative justice practitioners and professionals.

The Honourable Greg Smith, NSW Attorney General and Minister for Justice, will launch the new book Restorative Justice: Adults and Emerging Practice published by the Sydney Institute of Criminology, at this seminar, providing a timely opportunity to reflect on key issues and developments in restorative justice for adult offending.


PROGRAM

Book Launch: The Honourable Greg Smith, NSW Attorney General and Minister for Justice

Keynote Address:'Restorative Justice: Some Big Ideas', John McDonald, Managing Director, ProActive Resolutions

Panel members:
Kate Milner, Manager, Restorative Justice, Corrective Services NSW
Dean Hart, State Manager, Forum Sentencing, NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice
Professor Elena Marchetti, University of Wollongong

Chair: Dr Jasmine Bruce, University of New South Wales

The seminar will be of interest to restorative justice professionals - lawyers, police, magistrates, program managers, convenors and facilitators - policy-makers, academics and students.

This seminar is part of the Beyond Punishment series sponsored by NSW Corrective Services and hosted by the Sydney Institute of Criminology.

This seminar attracts 1.5 MCLE/CPD points.

The impact of Andrews v ANZ [2012] HCA 30: Liquidated damages, leases and mortgages   View Summary
7 March 2013

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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In this seminar, our two experts in contract law and property law will consider:

  • How the High Court's decision in Andrews v ANZ Banking Group Ltd affects the existing law of liquidated damages and penalties
  • The impact of the decision in areas other than banking where the law on penalties is relevant, particularly leases and mortgages.
  • Points to remember when drafting and negotiating incentives and liquidated damages clauses.

SPEAKERS:
Professor Elisabeth Peden (Sydney Law School)
Patricia Lane (Sydney Law School)

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to1.5 MCLE/CPD units.

Key points on contractual interpretation   View Summary
11 March 2013

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please email law.events@sydney.edu.aufor an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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The eminent author of Contract Law in Australia and a new book Construction of Commercial Contracts will explain fundamental aspects of contractual interpretation and valuable analysis of recent developments in commercial contract law. Some of the questions Professor Carter will deal with are:

  • What are the main construction rules?
  • Are construction rules predictive?
  • What construction presumptions are used?
  • Is there more to construction than 'meaning'?
  • What is the impact of 'commercial construction'?
  • What is the role of context under Australian law?

SPEAKER:
Professor John Carter (Sydney Law School)

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Employment Relations and the Law Seminar Series 2013 - Week 1   View Summary
13 March 2013

Register Online
To register and make your secure online payment, please click here.


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The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law. The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law.

This course provides an introduction to the regulation of employment and labour relations in Australia today. Topics covered include employers' and employees' rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act and the common law of employment, anti-discrimination law, and the regulation of collective bargaining and industrial action.

Program Schedule (Subject to change)

March 13- Overview of the system of workplace regulation in Australia
March 20 - Employment as a contractual relationship
March 27 - The modern contract of employment
April 3- The Fair Work System - setting terms and conditions of work for employees April 10 - Enterprise bargaining
April 17 - Industrial action
April 24 - Gender and equality at work
May 1 - Diversity at work - age and ability inclusion
May 8 - Contemporary issues - Social Media
May 15 - The Role and Regulation of Trade Unions

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

University of Sydney staff receive a 50% discount on the series fees. For details on how to register, please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au.


Information for lawyers and barristers: Attendance at this seminar series is equal to 20 MCLE/CPD units, based on 2 points per seminar attended.

Highlights and lowlights from the Australian consumer law   View Summary
13 March 2013

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.
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Highlights and lowlights from the Australian consumer law: Product safety regulations

This seminar surveys key features and the impact after 2 years of several innovations in the Australian Consumer Law, especially the obligation on suppliers to notify regulators about serious product-related accidents, and the generic controls over unfair contract terms. The seminar briefly contrasts these regimes with their precursors in the European Union and compares them with counterparts in other major trading partners, including proposals now pending in the Consumer Law Reform Bill (NZ). It also highlights legislative history and some policy issues that should inform interpretation of key provisions in the Australian Consumer Law. The seminar will draw on the 15-chapter book forthcoming in late February: Justin Malbon and Luke Nottage (eds) Consumer Law and Policy in Australia and New Zealand (Federation Press, 2013).

SPEAKERS
Professor Luke Nottage (Sydney Law School)

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Key topical issues arising under the Personal Property Securities Act    View Summary
14 March 2013

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.
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This seminar focuses on two areas of current concern. The first part explores the impact of insolvency on PPSA security interests, examining in particular the position of priority creditors and the new concepts of circulating assets and circulating security interests. The second part, drawing on recent New Zealand case law, analyses the operation of the default priority rules.

SPEAKERS

Professor Sheelagh McCracken (Sydney Law School)

Professor John Stumbles (Sydney Law School)

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Religious Freedoms Conference: The scope and limits of religious freedom in Australia   View Summary
15 March 2013

This conference is now fully subscribed. If you would like to join the waiting list, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au

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About the conference:

Until recently, religious freedom was taken for granted in Australia as being not only a fundamental human right, but also an essential component of a successful multicultural society. The role of government in Australia has been understood to be neutral between religions and as between faith-based and secular moral codes or values. However, times are changing, and governments are being urged by some to reduce the freedom that faith-based organisations have previously enjoyed where there is a clash with other rights or interests.

This one-day conference will explore the way in which issues of freedom of religion are now emerging as contested matters in western democracies, in particular the United States, Britain and Australia. Speakers will present ideas on these issues from a variety of perspectives.

Special guest speaker:

Professor Robin Fretwell Wilson is a Professor of Law at Washington & Lee University School of Law. A specialist in Family Law and Health Law, her research and teaching interests also include Insurance and Biomedical Ethics. Professor Wilson is the editor of four volumes: Health Law and Bioethics: Cases in Context (with Sandra Johnson, Joan Krause and Richard Savor, 2009); Same-Sex Marriage and Religious Liberty: Emerging Conflicts (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2008) (with Douglas Laycock and Anthony A. Picarello); Reconceiving the Family: Critique on the American Law Institute's Principles of the Law of Family Dissolution (Cambridge University Press, 2006); and the Handbook of Children, Culture & Violence (Sage Publications, 2006) (with Nancy Dowd & Dorothy G. Singer).

Professor Wilson's work has been featured in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio's All Things Considered, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, U.S. News and World Report, ABA Journal, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Chicago Tribune, CNN Headline News, Good Morning America, ABC News, CBS News, the Philadelphia Inquirer, and Essence Magazine among others. Professor Wilson is the past Chair of the Section on Family and Juvenile Law of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) and of the AALS' Section on Law, Medicine & Healthcare. Professor Wilson has presented her research in China, Israel, Qatar, the Netherlands, Italy, England, Wales, Poland, Serbia, Japan, Canada, Norway, Denmark, Australia, New Zealand, and France, as well as throughout the United States.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

9.00am -9.30am
Registration and welcome

9.30am-10.15am
The accommodation of religious liberty in the USA
Robin Fretwell Wilson, Washington & Lee University School of Law

10.15am-11.00am
Religious freedom and the privatisation of religion
Dr Ryan Messmore, Campion College Sydney

11.00am-11.30am
Morning tea

11.30am-12.15pm
Issues concerning religious liberty in Britain
Andrea Williams, Christian Concern UK

12.15pm-1.00pm
Religious Freedom in Multicultural States - The experience of Muslim communities
Dr Ghena Krayem, Sydney Law School

1.00pm-1.45pm
Lunch

1.45pm-2.30pm
The scope and limits of religious freedom under the Australian Constitution

Professor Nick Aroney, University of Queensland

2.30pm - 3.15pm
Anti-Discrimination and Freedom of Religious: does the 2012 Human Rights and Anti-discrimination Bill achieve the right balance?
Professor Gillian Triggs, Australian Human Rights Commission

3.15pm-3.35pm
Afternoon tea

3.35pm - 4.20pm
Exceptional religious freedom
Professor Patrick Parkinson, Sydney Law School

4.20pm - 4.45pm
Discussion and close

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to6 MCLE/CPD units.

This conference is being presented in partnership with Freedom 4 Faith.

JSI Seminar Series: Assistant Professor David Plunkett   View Summary
18 March 2013

Click here to register

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Dworkin's Interpretivism, Metalinguistic Negotiations,and the Pragmatics of Legal Disputes

by David Plunkett Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Dartmouth College and Timothy Sundell Assistant Professor of Philosophy, University of Kentucky

In work ranging from Law's Empire to Justice For Hedgehogs, Ronald Dworkin argues that the concept LAW differs from ordinary concepts like CHAIR or BOOK. In particular, he argues that law is an instance of a special type of concept—an "interpretive concept"— whose meaning consists not in the type of extension-determining criteria that he thinks the meaning of ordinary concepts consists in, but rather depends on the normative facts that best justify the set of practices in which the concept is used. This result in turn plays a crucial role in Dworkin's more general arguments for legal antipositivism. Dworkin argues for his interpretivism about LAWby observing the seeming conceptual coherence of a distinctive type of legal dispute, what Plunkett and Sundell call "bedrock legal disputes", in which, roughly, parties persist in their disagreement even as it becomes clear that they have divergent views about the criteria for something's being counted as "a law" in the first place. If the relevant concepts were understood as ordinary non-interpretive concepts, Dworkin claims, then we would be forced to conclude that parties to such disputes in fact employed distinct concepts, and thus failed to disagree genuinely with one another. Plunkett and Sundell argue that this line of reasoning relies on a mistaken premise about the nature of disagreement, and they propose an alternative form of analysis of theoretical disagreements. They observe that genuine disagreements can be expressed via a range of linguistic mechanisms, many of which do not require that speakers literally assert and deny one and the same proposition. Plunkett and Sundell focus in particular on what they call "metalinguistic negotiations," disputes in which speakers do not mean the same things by their words and do not employ the same concepts, but rather negotiate how words should be used and which among a set of competing concepts is best suited to the circumstances. Metalinguistic negotiations reflect disagreements that are "genuine" in any plausible sense of the word, and Plunkett and Sundell argue that they provide the basis for a plausible alternative to Dworkin's interpretivist analysis of bedrock legal disputes. In particular, they claim that certain important bedrock legal disputes - including many of those that provide trouble for standard accounts of LAW as an ordinary, non-interpretative concept - can be thought of as metalinguistic negotiations. They claim that, in such cases, the speakers are best seen as advocating different ordinary (non-interpretive) concepts. They claim that this view has quite general theoretical advantages over Dworkin's interpretivism, including, importantly, that their view, in contrast to Dworkin's, does not entail either positivism or antipositivism, and does not require positing a controversial new type of concept.

About the Speaker:

David Plunkett is an Assistant Professor in the Philosophy Department atDartmouth College. Before joining Dartmouth, he was a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Law and Philosophy program atUCLA. He received his PhD (in Philosophy) from the University of Michigan in 2010, and his AB (in Social Studies) from Harvard in 2004.His main areas of current research are in Metaethics, Ethics,Philosophy of Law, and the Philosophy of Mind andLanguage.

Employment Relations and the Law Seminar Series 2013 - Week 2   View Summary
20 March 2013

Register Online
To register and make your secure online payment, please click here.


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The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law. The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law.

This course provides an introduction to the regulation of employment and labour relations in Australia today. Topics covered include employers' and employees' rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act and the common law of employment, anti-discrimination law, and the regulation of collective bargaining and industrial action.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

University of Sydney staff receive a 50% discount on the series fees. For details on how to register, please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au.


Information for lawyers and barristers: Attendance at this seminar series is equal to 20 MCLE/CPD units, based on 2 points per seminar attended.

Enforcement of foreign judgments on insolvency: implications of Eurofinance v Rubin [2012] UKSC 46;    View Summary
21 March 2013

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.
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Both speakers will build on their recent in-depth analyses in the latest Law Quarterly Review which discuss this important decision of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom from two perspectives: first, the enforcement of a foreign judgment generally and secondly, the particular insolvency issues which arise in a transnational context. The topic will be of especial relevance and interest to all litigators and insolvency practitioners.

SPEAKERS
The Hon KR Handley AO QC
Associate Professor Lee Aitken (Sydney Law School)

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to1 MCLE/CPD unit.

How binding are the EU's 'binding' renewables targets?   View Summary
21 March 2013

To register for this seminarCLICK HERE

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About the lecture

The development of the European Union's law and policy on renewable energy has been slow and cautious. One big step forward was claimed with the Second Renewables Directive in 2009: Member States had agreed to accept 'binding' targets for renewable energy, rather than the 'indicative' targets which had applied under the First Renewables Directive in 2001. While the 2009 Directive has received much attention on various other topics (biofuels, guarantees of origin and trading/transfer mechanisms), comparatively little attention has been paid to what it means to have 'binding targets'. This paper will examine: how those targets have been developed, how they are defined; what enforcement mechanisms are available in EU law and their likely effectiveness; and some possible future approaches to this issue. Given the European Commission's intention to review the operation of the EU legal framework on renewables, with a view to making new proposals, it is hoped that some of the matters raised here will contribute to that review and future proposals.

About the speaker

Angus Johnston is a CUF Lecturer and a Fellow in Law at University College, where he arrived in September 2010.

He read for the B.A. (Law with Law Studies in Europe) and the B.C.L. at Brasenose College and was elected to the Vinerian Scholarship in 1999. He read for the LL.M. in European Union Law and was also Lecturer at the Institute for Anglo-American Law at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands in 1997-8.

He was a Fellow and Director of Studies in Law at Trinity Hall, Cambridge (from 1999) and University Lecturer (from 2004) and then Senior Lecturer at Cambridge University (from 2008) until his appointment to Oxford. He has been a visitor to Harvard Law School and the Max Planck Institute for Comparative and International Private Law in Hamburg; he is also an affiliated lecturer at Cambridge University and at the Jacobs University, Bremen.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

The Ins and Outs of Indemnities   View Summary
25 March 2013

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.
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In this seminar, Dr Courtney will examine key issues to consider when drafting or negotiating indemnities. Particular focus will be given to recent decisions concerning the use of indemnities in conjunction with guarantees in banking or financial transactions; and to the use of indemnities to supplement common law rights for breach of contract.

SPEAKER:

Dr Wayne Courtney (Sydney Law School)

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Corporate Law Discussion: Lessons from the Sovereign Debt Crises: PIGS, FISH and beyond*   View Summary
26 March 2013

*PIGS: Portugal, Ireland, Greece, Spain. FISH: France, Italy, Spain, Holland.

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***Please note change of venue/time. This seminar will now take place at New Law School Building, Seminar room 403, level 4 from 5.15****

About the discussion

Over the past year, news on sovereign debt crises were hard to avoid. Greece, Spain, Argentina, even Belize. What lessons can lawyers draw from these crises? Do creditors still send the Fifth Fleet to defaulting sovereigns? Collective action clauses, the role of hedge funds, the meaning of pari passu and credit derivatives, all feature in this bird's eye view of the sovereign world.

About the Speaker

Jan Job de Vries Robbé, JJ for short, is Manager Legal Affairs at the Netherlands Development Bank FMO. JJ specialises in international finance. He gained legal experience in Australia and The Netherlands, working both in private practice and in-house. In his current role he covers a broad range of financial products, from derivatives to debt capital markets and project finance. JJ has a keen interest in regulatory reform as well as in microfinance. He has published extensively on financial law (his most recent book is Structured Finance: The Road to Recovery). JJ lectures annually at the University of Sydney.

Chair:Professor Jennifer Hill, Sydney Law School

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Employment Relations and the Law Seminar Series 2013 - Week 3   View Summary
27 March 2013

Register Online
To register and make your secure online payment, please click here.


______________________________
The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law. The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law.

This course provides an introduction to the regulation of employment and labour relations in Australia today. Topics covered include employers' and employees' rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act and the common law of employment, anti-discrimination law, and the regulation of collective bargaining and industrial action.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

University of Sydney staff receive a 50% discount on the series fees. For details on how to register, please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au.


Information for lawyers and barristers: Attendance at this seminar series is equal to 20 MCLE/CPD units, based on 2 points per seminar attended.

The Legal Framework of claims against Ratings Agencies   View Summary
27 March 2013

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE

NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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As part of the fallout from the global financial crisis, investors are seeking to recover their losses by pursuing the liability of advisors, investment bankers and also international ratings agencies that had endowed various investments products with their ratings. First instance judgments have recently been given in Wingecarribee Shire Council v Lehman Brothers Australia Ltd (in liq) [2012] FCA 1028 and Bathurst Regional Council v Local Government Financial Services Pty Ltd (No 5) [2012] FCA 1200. Professor McDonald will consider the various legal bases of the claims and the key elements that must be made out to establish liability, and make some comparison with the legal position in the United Kingdom. Professor Partlett will give a US perspective on liability, back in the news with an action launched on 4 February against Standard & Poor by the Department of Justice.

SPEAKER:Professor Barbara McDonald (Sydney Law School)
CHAIR:Professor David Partlett (Emory Law School)

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to1 MCLE/CPD unit.

April
Ross Parsons 2013 Corporate Law Seminar Series   View Summary
1 April 2013
Throughout 2013, members and guestsfrom the Corporate Law Group of the Ross Parson's Centre of Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law at the University of Sydney will present a series evening seminars on a wide range of current issues

Seminars will be held in the Minter Ellison Room (Level 13) at the Old Law School on Phillip St in the city between 6pm - 7.15pm and are each equal to1 MCLE/CPD units.


PRICE (GST Inclusive)

Full Fee (per seminar): $77

Alumni (per seminar): $66

Group 3+ from same organisation (per seminar):$55

Student (per seminar): $44


NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, pleaseemail law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.
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Lessons from the Sovereign Debt Crises: PIGS, FISH and Beyond*

(NB PIGS: Portugal, Ireland, Greece, Spain. FISH: France, Italy, Spain, Holland).
Speaker: Jan Job de Vries Robbé, Netherlands Development Bank FMO
Commentator:Jo Dodd, Senior Associate, King & Wood Mallesons
Tuesday 26 March 2013

For more information and to register, please click here
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Schemes of Arrangement - Recent Developments
Speakers: Tony Damian and Andrew Rich, Partners, Herbert Smith Freehills
Monday 6 May 2013

For more information and to register, please click here
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Recent Developments in U.S. Buyouts
Speaker: Ron Barusch, Visiting Lecturer, Sydney Law School
Commentator: David Friedlander, Partner, King & Wood Mallesons
Thursday 20 June 2013

For more information and to register, please click here________________________________________
Directors' Duties to Creditors after Bell
Speakers: Associate Professor Anil Hargovan, Australian School of Business & Jason Harris, Senior Lecturer, UTS
Monday 22 July 2013

For more information and to register, please click here________________________________________
Taking Corporate Social Responsibility Seriously in Business Regulation and Practice
Speakers: Professor Bryan Horrigan, Dean, Monash University Law School & Associate Professor Ian Lee, University of Toronto
Monday 12 August 2013

For more information and to register, please click here ________________________________________

The Notional Legislator: ASIC's Role as Lawmaker
Speakers: Professor Stephen Bottomley, Dean, ANU Law School
Monday 14 October 2013

For more information and to register, please click here
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Why did Australia Fare So Well in the Global Financial Crisis?
Speakers: Professor Jennifer Hill, Sydney Law School
Commentator: John Trowbridge, Former Consultant, Executive and Regulator in Financial Services
Monday 11 November 2013

For more information and to register, please click here

Employment Relations and the Law Seminar Series 2013 - Week 4   View Summary
3 April 2013

Register Online
To register and make your secure online payment, please click here.


______________________________
The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law. The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law.

This course provides an introduction to the regulation of employment and labour relations in Australia today. Topics covered include employers' and employees' rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act and the common law of employment, anti-discrimination law, and the regulation of collective bargaining and industrial action.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

University of Sydney staff receive a 50% discount on the series fees. For details on how to register, please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au.


Information for lawyers and barristers: Attendance at this seminar series is equal to 20 MCLE/CPD units, based on 2 points per seminar attended.

Employment Relations and the Law Seminar Series 2013 - Week 5   View Summary
10 April 2013

Register Online
To register and make your secure online payment, please click here.


______________________________
The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law. The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law.

This course provides an introduction to the regulation of employment and labour relations in Australia today. Topics covered include employers' and employees' rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act and the common law of employment, anti-discrimination law, and the regulation of collective bargaining and industrial action.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

University of Sydney staff receive a 50% discount on the series fees. For details on how to register, please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au.


Information for lawyers and barristers: Attendance at this seminar series is equal to 20 MCLE/CPD units, based on 2 points per seminar attended.

Facing Outwards: Australian private international law in the 21st century   View Summary
10 April 2013

To register and make your secure online payment, please CLICK HERE

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ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

The nation's prosperity depends not only on the willingness of its businesses to export goods and services, and of its citizens and residents to travel to take advantage of opportunities overseas, but also on the willingness of the businesses and citizens of other nations (in particular in the Asia-Pacific region) to come to Australia to do business.

Economic expansion, and parallel increases in tourism and immigration, have brought Australians into more frequent contact with the laws and legal systems of other nations. At the same time, the legal systems of Australia are faced with a growing number of disputes involving foreign facts and parties. Against this background, the Attorney-General's current review of Australian private international law is timely and calls for debate as to the best way forward in terms of policy and substantive rulemaking.

This conference, jointly organised by Sydney and Griffith Law Schools, brings together experts from Australia, New Zealand, Asia and Europe to consider the recent and future development of the law in this area.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM*

WELCOME AND OPENING ADDRESS: 9.15am-10.00am
Roger Wilkins AO, Attorney General's Department

PANEL 1: 10.00am-11.15am
The advancement of private international law in the Asia-Pacific region
Adeline Chong, Singapore Management University
Yujun Guo, Wuhan University
Elsabe Schoeman, University of Auckland

MORNING TEA: 11.15am-11.30am

PANEL 2: 11.30pm-12.45pm
International co-operation and advancement in private international law
Andrew Dickinson, Sydney Law School
Michael J Hartmann, Asia-Pacific Regional Office of The Hague and formery Justice of the Court of Appeal of Hong Kong
Mary Keyes, Griffith Law School

LUNCH: 12.45pm-2.00pm

PANEL 3: 2.00pm-3.15pm
The SCLJ Harmonisation Project: The story so far, and next steps
Thomas John, Attorney General's Department

Richard Garnett, Melbourne Law School
Andrew S Bell SC, Eleven Wentworth Chambers

AFTERNOON TEA: 3.15pm-3.30pm

PANEL 4: 3.30pm-4.45pm
The Trans-Tasman Treaty: State of play, and future impact
Reid Mortensen, University of Sthn Queensland
David Goddard QC, Thorndon Chambers (Wellington)

KEYNOTE ADDRESS 5.00pm-5.30pm
The Honourable James Allsop AO, Chief Justice, Federal Court of Australia; formerly President, NSW Court of Appeal

COCKTAIL RECEPTION from 5.30pm
Join us for drinks and canapés to celebrate the end of the conference.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at thisconference is 6 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is presented by the Sydney Centre for International Law, Griffith Law Schooland .


PRICE(GST Inclusive)
Early Bird Full Day: $132 (extended until March 29!)
Full day: $150 (after March 29)
Alumni/USYD staff: $110
Full time student: $50
Group: $110 per person (5 or more from the same organisation)

*Program is subject to change

Improving child protection extending or limiting the role of the court?   View Summary
10 April 2013

This seminar is now FULL, to join a waiting list please email law.events@sydney.edu.au.

If you have missed out on this event, have a look at our upcoming conference Responding to Historical Child Sexual Abuse: A multi-disciplinary forum on May 31, 2013.

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About the lecture:

Australia and England and Wales face many similar problems in relation to their court systems for child protection, and systems in both countries have been the subjects of recent reviews (Wood Report NSW 2008; Victoria's vulnerable children 2012, Family Justice Review 2011 in England and Wales).

Although the responsibilities of judicial officers in this area is widely accepted- providing a welfare response to children and holding child protection agencies to account - there is far less agreement about what is done, the way it is done and concern about the time it takes. In addition, in England and Wales the continually increasing cost of legal services and court resources for this work in an age of austerity adds its own pressures.

The paper will explore responses to these challenges - the modernisation of family justice- to restrict the use of additional experts, to increase judicial control, to improve judicial understanding of child welfare and to change judicial culture. It will draw on my empirical work on care proceedings and families on the edge of care in England and Wales, and experience derived from my work on the Family Justice Council and the Judicial Studies Board.

About the speaker:

Judith Masson M.A., PhD is Professor of Socio-legal Studies at the Bristol University, specialising in Child Law. She has undertaken numerous studies on law in social work including: step-parent adoption; representation of children: Out of Hearing (1999); partnership with parents of looked after children Lost and Found (1999); and emergency intervention: Protecting Powers (2007). In 2007-8, Judith directed a project examining 400 child protection cases which resulted in court proceedings - Care Profiling Study (Ministry of Justice, 2008). This was followed by an ESRC-funded qualitative study on the representation of parents in such proceedings, Pearce et al, Justfollowing Instructions? (2011). She is currently completing another ESRC-funded study on legal advice for, and agency decision-making about, families on the edge of care proceedings. Judith has been a specialist adviser for Parliamentary Committees and a member of the Judicial Studies Board. From 2004-2011she was the academic member of the Family Justice Council.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1MCLE/CPD units.

NOTE:The venue has changed for this seminar. It is now being held in Seminar Room 440 on Level 4 ofthe New Law Building ANNEX. The easiest entry to this building is through the Taste Cafe on Eastern Avenue.

Distinguished Speaker: Professor Harold Bruff   View Summary
15 April 2013

To register and secure online payment please CLICK HERE

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The President and Congress: Separation of Powers in the United States of America

Although the framers of Australia's Constitution adopted many features of the United States Constitution, they rejected the separation of legislative and executive power in favour of responsible government in a parliamentary system like that of Great Britain. This lecture will review the main consequences for the United States of its choice to separate these two branches. Many current controversies in America reveal the effects of separation, including the appointment of executive and judicial officers, the funding of the federal government, and the conduct of foreign relations and war.

About the speaker:

Harold Bruff is the Rosenbaum Professor of Law at the University of Colorado School of Law, where he was dean from 1996-2003. He received his B.A. in American history from Williams College (Phi Beta Kappa) and his J.D. from Harvard Law School (magna cum laude). He has served in the Office of Legal Counsel in the U.S. Department of Justice, where he advised the DOJ, the White House, and executive agencies on issues of constitutional and administrative law. He has testified before Congress many times, and has written several books and many articles on administrative law and separation of powers.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Employment Relations and the Law Seminar Series 2013 - Week 6   View Summary
17 April 2013

Register Online
To register and make your secure online payment, please click here.


______________________________
The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law. The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law.

This course provides an introduction to the regulation of employment and labour relations in Australia today. Topics covered include employers' and employees' rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act and the common law of employment, anti-discrimination law, and the regulation of collective bargaining and industrial action.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

University of Sydney staff receive a 50% discount on the series fees. For details on how to register, please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au.


Information for lawyers and barristers: Attendance at this seminar series is equal to 20 MCLE/CPD units, based on 2 points per seminar attended.

JSI Seminar Series: Professor Andrei Marmor    View Summary
18 April 2013

Click here to register

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Varieties of Vagueness in the Law

The main purpose of this paper is to articulate the different types of vagueness, and related linguistic indeterminacies, that we find in statutory language and to explain their different rationales. Professor Marmor argues that the various normative considerations involved in employing vague terms in legislation depend on the kind of vagueness in question. He shows that while some cases of vagueness in law are concerned with fairly standard problems of borderline cases, other are not. He also argues that semantic vagueness can be distinguished from conversational vagueness, which we also find in law, and that vagueness in law should be clearly distinguished from cases of ambiguity and polysemy.

About the speaker:

AndreiMarmor is Professor of Philosophy and Maurice Jones Jr. Professor of Law at the University of Southern California. He is director of theUSCCenter for Law & Philosophy and editor-in-chief of theJournal of Ethics & Social Philosophy, an on-line peer-reviewed journal in moral, political and legal philosophy. A prolific author on issues concerning the relations between law morality and politics, Professor Marmor has writtenInterpretation and Legal Theory(Oxford University Press, 1992;Hart Publishing, 2005);Positive Law & Objective Values(Oxford University Press 2001);Law in the Age of Pluralism(Oxford University Press, 2007);Social Conventions(Princeton University Press, 2009),Philosophy of Law(Princeton, 2011); and numerous journal articles. Professor Marmor earned his B.A. and M.A. in philosophy, as well as his LL.B., fromTelAvivUniversity and earned his DPhil fromOxfordUniversity. He was a professor atTel Aviv University, Israel, and taught as a visiting professor at several universities before joining theUSC Law and Philosophy faculties in 2002.

Employment Relations and the Law Seminar Series 2013 - Week 7   View Summary
24 April 2013

Register Online
To register and make your secure online payment, please click here.


______________________________
The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law. The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law.

This course provides an introduction to the regulation of employment and labour relations in Australia today. Topics covered include employers' and employees' rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act and the common law of employment, anti-discrimination law, and the regulation of collective bargaining and industrial action.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

University of Sydney staff receive a 50% discount on the series fees. For details on how to register, please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au.


Information for lawyers and barristers: Attendance at this seminar series is equal to 20 MCLE/CPD units, based on 2 points per seminar attended.

The Inbetweeners: Getting Youth Back on Track   View Summary
24 April 2013

This event is now fully subscribed. To join a waiting list, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au

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About the seminar:

Enhancing outcomes for children and adolescents is an important goal of early intervention programs, where critical aspects of risk and need, rather than simply crime, are addressed. A holistic approach to the lives of young people also has significantly broader effects, including community safety, risk reduction and crime prevention. This important seminar will focus on the role of early intervention for juveniles as young as 10 years of age following the NSW Government's recent announcement of its Youth on Track program. The program aims to respond to the needs of those young people who come into repeated contact with police, and who have previously fallen through the cracks of service provision. The program will provide adequate services to prevent the further entrenchment of young people in the criminal justice system. This second seminar in the 2012 - 2013 Juvenile Justice seminar series explores the role of early intervention for these young people - the inbetweeners - and its effectiveness in getting them back on track.

About the speakers:

Brendan Thomas BA was appointed to his current role, Assistant Director General for Crime Prevention and Community Programs in September 2007. Brendan is responsible for Criminal Diversion and Crime Prevention activity for the NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice, including oversight of the Crime Prevention Division, Anti-Discrimination Board, the Aboriginal Programs Division, the Diversity Services and the Victims Services Division. Brendan has worked in crime prevention and criminal justice for more than 18 years and has written widely on crime prevention and Aboriginal justice issues.

Rebecca Magoffinis a Principal Policy Officer, Communities Prevention and Early Intervention Team within the Policy, Programs and Strategy Directorate of Community Services, NSW Department of Family and Community Services (FACS). As Principal Project Officer, Rebecca is responsible for coordinating the implementation of the FACS review - Better Outcomes for Vulnerable Teenagers. The review aims to identify potential reforms that can be implemented by FACS and its partners to assist vulnerable teenagers to have improved outcomes and live full lives. FACS is about to commence the implementation of the recommendations of the review. Rebecca's role in overseeing the implementation of this review within Community Services draws on her professional experience in working with a range of government departments and in policy and project management.

Professor Ilan Katz joined the Social Policy Research Centre at UNSW in January 2005, becoming Director in July 2007-December 2011. He started his career as a social worker and manager in several local authorities and NGOs in the UK. He was Head of Practice Development and Research at the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. After spending some time as a civil servant in the Department for Education and Skills, he returned to research. His research interests include parenting, child protection, disability, youth justice, youth mental health prevention and family support, children and communities, social inclusion, comparative child welfare systems, adoption, migration, race and ethnicity and Indigenous social policy.

This event is sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW and hosted by the Sydney Institute of Criminology.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD units.

May
Employment Relations and the Law Seminar Series 2013 - Week 8   View Summary
1 May 2013

Register Online
To register and make your secure online payment, please click here.


______________________________
The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law. The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law.

This course provides an introduction to the regulation of employment and labour relations in Australia today. Topics covered include employers' and employees' rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act and the common law of employment, anti-discrimination law, and the regulation of collective bargaining and industrial action.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

University of Sydney staff receive a 50% discount on the series fees. For details on how to register, please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au.


Information for lawyers and barristers: Attendance at this seminar series is equal to 20 MCLE/CPD units, based on 2 points per seminar attended.

JSI Conference - Rationality + Consciousness = Free Will: Legal and Philosophical Reflections   View Summary
4 May 2013

To register and make your secure online payment, please CLICK HERE

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ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

David Hodgson's final book,Rationality + Consciousness = Free Will (Oxford University Press 2012), published in the year of his death, focuses on two of his most significant philosophical interests, consciousness and free will, but it also considers the significance of these topics for the law. On Saturday 4 May 2013, a conference will be held at Sydney Law School at the University of Sydney, which sadly must mark his passing, but on a more positive note will critically analyse legal and philosophical themes in the book.

Often the topics of consciousness and free will have been treated in separate literatures and one of the interesting features of this book (and this conference) is the bringing together of these two areas of philosophy. However, the book and David Hodgson's work more generally is unusual in that it benefits from his work as a philosopher and his career as a legal scholar, legal practitioner and ultimately a Judge of Appeal of the New South Wales Supreme Court.

The conference will be of interest not just to philosophers and legal scholars, but to solicitors, barristers and judges, as the sections of book that consider the implications of Hodgson's view for law will be a significant part of the conference. Other presentations will focus on the themes of consciousness and free will.

Speakers include:

Christopher Birch, SC (University of Sydney, NSW Bar)

Glenn Carruthers (Macquarie University)

David Chalmers (Australian National University and New York University)

Neil Levy (University of Melbourne and University of Oxford)

Allan McCay (University of Sydney)

Michael Sevel (University of Sydney)

Nicole Vincent (Macquarie University and Delft University of Technology)

will present a paper co-authored with FilippoSantoni de Sio (Delft University of Technology)

The Hon. Dennis Mahoney AO QC will open the conference and offer introductory remarks.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 6 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is presented by The Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence.

Click here for a flyer about the book. You can purchase a copy of the bookdirectly from Oxford University Press.

Ross Parsons Corporate Law Series: Schemes of Arrangement - Recent Developments   View Summary
6 May 2013

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE


NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please emaillaw.events@sydney.edu.aufor an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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Seminar Description

This seminar will cover a number of recent developments in relation to schemes of arrangement, including:
- the approach of the courts in relation to classes and interests;
- the use of contingent consideration and stub equity in schemes;
- creditor schemes of arrangement; and
- joint bid structures in schemes.

About the Speakers

Tony DamianandAndrew Rich, who are both graduatesof Sydney Law School,are partners specialising in mergers and acquisitions at Herbert Smith Freehills. They are the co-authors of Schemes, Takeovers and Himalayan Peaks, now in its third edition, which is published in conjunction with the Ross Parsons Centre, Sydney Law School.

Tony and Andrew have acted on some of Australia's most significant M&A deals, including Peabody Energy's A$5 billion joint hostile takeover of Macarthur Coal, which was Australia's largest ever hostile joint bid, Commonwealth Bank's A$2.1 billion acquisition of BankWest and Eldorado Gold Corporation's A$2.4 billion acquisition of Sino Gold Mining Limited.

Chair: Professor Jennifer Hill, Sydney Law School

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Employment Relations and the Law Seminar Series 2013 - Week 9   View Summary
8 May 2013

Register Online
To register and make your secure online payment, please click here.


______________________________
The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law. The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law.

This course provides an introduction to the regulation of employment and labour relations in Australia today. Topics covered include employers' and employees' rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act and the common law of employment, anti-discrimination law, and the regulation of collective bargaining and industrial action.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

University of Sydney staff receive a 50% discount on the series fees. For details on how to register, please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au.


Information for lawyers and barristers: Attendance at this seminar series is equal to 20 MCLE/CPD units, based on 2 points per seminar attended.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Zaki Tun Azmi   View Summary
9 May 2013

To register and secure online payment please CLICK HERE

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Rule of Law and the Independence of the Judiciary in Malaysia: New Government, Old Government, does it really matter?

On 5 May 2013, the Malaysian people will elect another government. According to opinion polls and the rumour mill, Malaysia could be about to have its own 'spring' and usher in to power a new coalition. But whatever the result, a new political landscape is forming, old loyalties are shifting and a younger generation is expecting more of those who govern them.

The Malaysian judiciary has often been in the firing line. In the 1980s, during the tenure of former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamed, the torch of judicial independence appeared to shine brightly with the judges expanding grounds for judicial review and acting with the temerity to declare UMNO, the dominant member of the ruling 'National Front', an 'illegal organisation'. In the eyes of overseas commentators at least, that spirit of independence was short-lived with the Malaysian Supreme Court (then, its apex court) effectively 'sacked' in 1988, then 'stacked' with known party stalwarts and subsequently 'stripped' of its inherent jurisdiction by constitutional amendment. A decade later, political machinations reached their zenith in the prosecution and subsequent conviction, by judges not by jury, of then Deputy Prime Minister, Anwar Ibrahim. In the 'noughties', following the revelation of the 'Lingam Tapes', matters went from bad to worse with the 'rigging' of judicial appointments and the coming to light of a 'corrupt' judiciary.

There are, of course, two sides to every story, but the above impression of the Malaysian judiciary has endured at home and lingered overseas notwithstanding a series of recent reforms and measures designed to restore the judiciary's reputation and the credibility of the Malaysian legal system.


This talk, given by an insider, ZakiTun Azmi, a recently retired and 'reformist' Chief Justice of Malaysia, will explore these issues and discuss, through questions and answers, his opinions of where the future might lie regarding the independence of the judiciary in his country, and ultimately the 'rule of law'.

About the speaker

Zaki Tun Azmi was the 12th Chief Justice of Malaysia. He was elevated directly to the apex court as a Judge of the Federal Court in September 2007. Shortly thereafter, Zaki Azmi was appointed President of the Court of Appeal. Prior to his elevation to the Federal Court, Zaki Azmi had served for 15 years in the Judicial and Legal Service and was in private practice for another 22 years. He read law at Lincoln's Inn and was called as a Barrister in 1969.

Zaki Azmi is nationally and internationally recognised and acknowledged as instrumental in introducing reforms to the Malaysian judiciary. The sweeping reforms that were implemented by the Zaki Court resulted in the clearing of backlog of cases, the introduction of the use of up-to-date technology in the courts and the putting in place of an efficient system for the disposal of cases, from the time of filing of an action to the disposal of the final appeal. As a result of these successes, Zaki Azmi was invited by distinguished bodies such as the Singapore Academy of Law to speak on and share his experiences with the international legal community on the subject of reform of the judiciary.

His service to his nation extends beyond the legal sphere. After his retirement as Chief Justice, Zaki Azmi was appointed the Chairman of the Civil Service Transformation Commission by the Government of Malaysia. His contributions and services in the field of education are evident from his appointments as Chancellor of two private universities and Adjunct Professor in three other public universities in Malaysia.

Zaki Azmi's pre-eminence in the field of law has been recognized with accolades by both domestic and international bodies. He was made Honorary Bencher of Lincoln's Inn and conferred with the Honorary Doctor of Laws degree by two local universities.

Employment Relations and the Law Seminar Series 2013 - Week 10   View Summary
15 May 2013

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The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law. The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law.

This course provides an introduction to the regulation of employment and labour relations in Australia today. Topics covered include employers' and employees' rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act and the common law of employment, anti-discrimination law, and the regulation of collective bargaining and industrial action.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

University of Sydney sta

ff receive a 50% discount on the series fees. For details on how to register, please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au.


Information for lawyers and barristers: Attendance at this seminar series is equal to 20 MCLE/CPD units, based on 2 points per seminar attended.

JSI Seminar Series: Dr Honni van Rijswijk    View Summary
16 May 2013

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The Childhood of Jesus and the child's role in the juridical-political imaginary

In J.M. Coetzee's The Childhood of Jesus (2013), a five-year-old boy arrives by boat in a new country, without parents and without papers. After being processed in a desert camp, he travels with a middle-aged man to the city of Novilla, a city with no past, where new arrivals' histories are also "washed clean". The child reveals himself to be extraordinary, and as the Novilla republic becomes interested in him, his protectors try to keep him out of the state's reach. Coetzee's novel offers an allegory and critique of contemporary Australia, located in the particularity of the child's position, but drawing also on the role of the child figure in Western philosophical and literary canons. The novel suggests that the child figure is redemptive and might ground a special justice, a special truth.

Children arriving in boats without papers; children stolen; and children abused—the child has been the occasion and scene for a long list of commissions and inquiries, legislative responses and interventions. This paper examines the child as a figure central to the Australian juridical-political imaginary. It asks how the child figure might also function as the location and voice of critique. Dr van Rijswijk considers whether the figure provides a subject position from which to resist and re-create juridical and political spaces, and the ways in which the child figure offers a fraught challenge—as a site of biopolitical control, and instrumentalised vulnerability—to critical projects.

About the speaker:

Dr Honni van Rijswijk is a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Law at the University of Technology Sydney, and Co-convenor of the Faculty's Law and Culture Group. Her current research focuses on representations of harm and responsibility in legal and literary texts.

2013 Sydney Law School Alumni Graduation Party   View Summary
23 May 2013

Sydney LLB and Sydney JD graduands are invited to celebrate at the 2013 Sydney Law School Alumni Graduation Party.

To register
Responding to Historical Child Sexual Abuse: A multi-disciplinary forum   View Summary
31 May 2013

Registration closed

This event has reached maximum capacity. To be placed on a wait list, please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au.

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ABOUT THE FORUM:

Child sexual abuse is a serious concern for the community and only a small proportion of perpetrators are ever 'brought to justice'. The criminal justice approach provides only one avenue of redress and one that many victims are not keen to use or do not see as an adequate means of resolution. The aim of this forum is to generate discussion about how best to address the legal and societal "justice gaps" in and outside the criminal justice system and how to minimise the trauma and meet the needs of those who have been sexually abused.

The betrayal of trust inherent in child sexual abuse is a key element of the abuse and contributes to the often very long-lasting impact on the victims. Many victims suffer in silence.

There is little reliable information to guide those involved, including professionals, about the ways in which historical and institutional abuse is dealt with, and the likely benefits, pathways and outcomes of any prosecution. There is also little information about other ways of reaching an appropriate resolution. This forum is particularly timely given the recent establishment of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

This forum will provide an opportunity to discuss alternative and systemic approaches in the light of the impact of the abuse and the process on victim complainants as well as the investigative and evidentiary issues.

SPEAKERS INCLUDE:

  • Assoc Professor Judy Cashmore AO, Sydney Law School, Unviersity of Sydney
  • Professor Kathleen Daly, Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Griffith University
  • Dr Jodi Death, Crime and Justice Research Centre QUT
  • Nicola and John Ellis, Clinch Long Letherbarrow
  • Dr Gary Foster, Living Well
  • Dr Cathy Kezelman, President, Adults Surviving Child Abuse
  • Megan Mitchell, National Children's Commissioner
  • Detective Michael Newbury, South Australia Police
  • Professor Patrick O'Leary, Griffith University
  • Kara Shead, NSW Crown Prosecutor

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at thisforum is equal to6 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is part of Sydney Social Justice Research Network (SSJN) Workshop Program for 2013.

June
Retooling: Techniques for an uncertain world   View Summary
11 June 2013

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Professor Annelise Riles, Jack G. Clarke Professor of Far East Legal Studies and Professor of Anthropology, Cornell University

Co-presented with the Centre for Asian-Pacific Law and the Sydney Centre for International Law within the Faculty of Law

From financial markets, to environmental policy and disaster preparedness, to academic thought, one of the defining features of the moment is our ambivalence about experts and expertise. To the public, as to experts themselves, the world seems highly uncertain, unknowable, uncontrollable, which is to say, expert tools for predicting and regulating the world do not seem to work as they should. Many of the experts I have studied over the last ten years seem to be losing hope in their own techniques, and their sense of their powerlessness to solve problems can lead to cynicism and disengagement.

Yet in my ten years of ethnographic research among one particular group of experts-lawyers working the financial markets-I have observed many subtle but formidable ways of thinking and acting under conditions of profound uncertainty that offer an enticing view of an alternative approach to the role of experts in contemporary political life. In this lecture, I discuss how these subtle techniques can be "retooled" into ways of responding professionally, politically and ethically to the demands of our political moment. I focus in particular on how to build a more transformative dialogue between experts and the broader public.

Annelise Riles is the Jack G. Clarke Professor of Law in Far East Legal Studies and Professor of Anthropology at Cornell, and she serves as Director of the Clarke Program in East Asian Law and Culture. Her work focuses on the transnational dimensions of laws, markets and culture across the fields of comparative law, conflict of laws, the anthropology of law, public international law and international financial regulation. Her most recent book, Collateral Knowledge: Legal Reasoning in the Global Financial Markets (Chicago Press 2011) is based on ten years of fieldwork among regulators and lawyers in the global derivatives markets. Her recently co-authored article From Multiculturalism to Technique: Feminism, Culture, and the Conflict of Laws Style (with Karen Knop & Ralf Michaels), 64(3) Stanford Law Review, 589-656 (Mar 2012) concerns what conflict of laws can contribute to theoretical debates about the clash between feminist and multiculturalist norms.

Matt Laffan memorial address on social justice   View Summary
19 June 2013

Registration

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Guest speakers

  • Stella Young,editor of ABC's Ramp Up, disability advocate and comedian
  • Dr Peggy Dwyer, Barrister

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On Sunday 1 March 2009, Sydney Law School alumnus Matt Laffan passed away after he fought and lost the biggest battle of his colourful and active life. In memoriam of the significant impact Matt has had in his short life, Sydney Law School has established an annual social justice address in his honour.


This year's address will be held on Wednesday 19 June, commencing with a recollection of Matt Laffan by barrister Dr Peggy Dwyer, followed by an address by Stella Young, disability advocate and editor of ABC's Ramp Up.

Matt Laffan had severe disabilities, but he will be remembered most for his impressive abilities. With enormous enthusiasm for life, Matt grabbed opportunities and made the most of them.

About the speakers

Stella Young

Stella Young is Editor of ABC's Ramp Up website, the online space for news, discussion and opinion about disability in Australia, a disability advocate and comedian.

Stella has been active in the disability community in a variety of roles, including membership of the Victorian Disability Advisory Council, Ministerial Advisory Council for the Department of Victorian communities and Women With Disabilities Victoria. She was a two-time state finalist in the Melbourne International Comedy Festival's Raw Comedy competition; and has hosted eight seasons of Australia's first disability culture program No Limits.

With a strong interest in issues facing women and young people with disabilities, Stella has worked with the Youth Disability Advocacy Service to establish the LiveAccess project, advocating for better access to live music venues. Prior to joining the ABC, Stella worked in Public Programs at Melbourne Museum.

Dr Peggy Dwyer

As a barrister, Peggy appears in a wide range of criminal matters, including jury trials, contested hearings, appeals, Children's Court matters and Parole Board hearings. Peggy has appeared as counsel in jury trials in NSW, the Northern Territory and Western Australia.

She has a busy practice in coronial proceedings, appearing as Counsel Assisting the Coroner (in the NT and NSW) and counsel for interested parties. She also has a significant interest in medical law and appears in disciplinary tribunals including the Medical Tribunal and Medical Council, for both prosecution and defence.

Accessibility

Sydney Law School is wheelchair accessible. Lecture Theatre 101 is a tiered venue, however positions are available for wheelchairs.This lecture will have Auslan Interpreter provision.

Please notify us of any accessibility requirements you may have so that we can assist you appropriately by calling 9351 0248.

Ross Parsons Corporate Law Series: Recent Developments in U.S. Buyouts   View Summary
20 June 2013

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NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, pleaseemail law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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About the lecture

Over the last couple of years the Delaware courts have been highly critical of the players in the U.S. buyout game, particularly where there have been conflicts of interests. Investment bankers have borne a large portion of the criticisms as a result of the Del Monte and El Paso buyouts. But management, directors, and in some cases, buyers, have also come under fire.

In recent U.S. transactions, dealmakers have noted these lessons, and 2013 appears headed towards being the year of the buyout. However, even as old criticisms are addressed new, or reformulated, ones have surfaced in deals like Dell's fight with its shareholders to gain approval for a massive management-led LBO; Sprint's attempt to squeeze out the minority holders of Clearwire in the face of a competing bid; the sale of Sprint itself to Softbank in a complex deal; and even the sale of NYSE to upstart and former adversary Intercontinental Exchange (ICE). It seems like this year's deals are too good not to do as even LBO critic (and master investor) Warren Buffett has prominently changed course and teamed up with private equity to buy H.J. Heinz.

Ron Barusch's well known 'Dealpolitik' columns at The Wall Street Journal address many of these criticisms. Come join us to hear how the recent U.S. cases have influenced the terms of buyouts and the areas in which this year's deals remain controversial.

About the Speaker

Ronald C. Barusch was a mergers and acquisitions lawyer with Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP for over 30 years. Ron retired in 2010 after 25 years as a partner at the firm, including three years as office leader of Skadden's Sydney office. He is currently a visiting lecturer at Sydney Law School teaching 'Cross Border Deals.'

Ron also writes 'Dealpolitik' for The Wall Street Journal's Deal Journal providing a strategic look at deals currently making the headlines as well as the major forces at work in the deal-making world

Commentator: David Friedlander, Partner, King & Wood Mallesons

Chair: Professor Jennifer Hill, Sydney Law School


Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

July
National Forum on Children and Young People from Refugee Backgrounds   View Summary
15 July 2013 to 16 July 2013

Please visit the forum website for more details and to register; http://sydney.edu.au/law/forum/

Distinguished Speakers Program: The Hon Kevin Lindgren AM QC   View Summary
18 July 2013

The Rule of Law: some practical issues relevant to Australia

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The Hon Kevin Lindgren AM QC, former Justice of the Federal Court of Australia, will discuss practical issues with the Rule of Law in Australia.

Current tensions between governments and the courts over attempts to enlist the courts as co-fighters against crime, how access to the courts, and the accessibility of legislation highlight the relevance and importance of the Rule of Law. A topic of interest for lawyers and judges, and the community as a whole.

The Hon Kevin Lindgren AM QC is an Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Sydney, amongst his appointments at other universities. Dr Lindgren worked as a solicitor and academic before practising at the Bar in Sydney and was made Queen's Counsel in 1991. He was appointed as a Judge of the Federal Court in 1994 and decided cases across the full range of the Court's jurisdiction. Since his retirement from the Bench in 2010 he continues to write extensively on the law and is engaged in mediation and arbitration work.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Ross Parsons Corporate Law Series: Directors Duties to Creditors after Bell   View Summary
22 July 2013

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NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please emaillaw.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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Speakers

Associate Professor Anil Hargovan, Australian School of Business

Jason Harris, Senior Lecturer, UTS

Chair: Professor Jennifer Hill, Sydney Law School

It is well established, following judicial authority by the High Court of Australia in Spies, that directors owe a duty to consider creditors' interests upon corporate insolvency and that such a duty is one of imperfect obligation that is incapable of direct enforcement by the creditors. Notwithstanding such orthodox authority, the precise nature and scope of directors' duties to creditors upon corporate insolvency remains a vexed issue which continues to plague the judiciary as a consequence of the absence of any detailed consideration of such issues by the High Court.

The recent appellate court decision in the Westpac Banking Corporation v The Bell Group Ltd (in liq) (No 3) exemplifies the legal uncertainties on this topic which arose upon the directors' exploration of corporate rescue plans in the context of looming insolvency.

It is now unclear as to whether directors must go beyond consideration of creditors' interests and ensure that creditors are protected in conformity with the pari passu principle. Furthermore, the extent to which the judiciary can intervene to adjudicate on the directors' beliefs and business judgements in this context is also clouded by uncertainty. The seminar, in light of the Bell appeal to the High Court of Australia, will consider such issues.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

21st Annual Labour Law Conference 2013   View Summary
22 July 2013

Beyond 'Groundhog Day': Can productivity and fairness be improved without further 'labour law reform'?


Over the last two decades labour law reform has had a high profile in Australian policy debates, higher in fact than nearly all other advanced industrial societies. The seemingly endless calls for 'reform' and changes to labour law now mean Australia has a highly volatile industrial landscape, a volatility not arising from industrial disputation but which is policy induced.

At this year's labour law conference we will explore ways to improve productivity within the existing system and consider how labour relations policy-making can be improved. Attention will be devoted to reflecting on what works well, how perceived problems in the law can in fact be managed in ways that prevent the need for yet more 'system reform' and how the statutory framework could be made more stable in the long term. Perspectives will be provided by legal strategists who advise pace setting employers and unions, key union and employer leaders who define strategies in light of what is (as opposed to those who lament what 'ought to be') and seasoned researchers knowledgeable of the operation of the law and how, more often than not, factors other than it are crucial for determining efficiency and equity outcomes.


This year's speakers include:

  • Professor Joellen Riley, Dean, Sydney Law School, University of Sydney
  • The Hon Professor Geoffrey Giudice AO, University of Melbourne
  • Richard Bunting, Partner, Ashurst
  • Josh Bornstein, Principal, Maurice Blackburn Lawyers
  • Stephen Smith - Director National Industrial Relations, AiG
  • Tim Lyons, Assistant Secretary, ACTU
  • Anthony Forsyth, Associate Professor & Director, Juris Doctor Programs, RMIT
  • Geoff McGill, Visiting Industry Scholar, WRC, University of Sydney Business School
  • Professor Emeritus Ron McCallum, Sydney Law School, University of Sydney
  • Barbara Pocock, Director, Centre for Work + Life, University of South Australia
  • Chair: Professor John Buchanan, Director, Workplace Research Centre, University of Sydney Business School

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Registration

Cost: Early Bird - $795 until 22nd May
General Conference rate - $895
USYD Staff and Student rates are available - Contact WRC

Professor Bryan S. Turner Lecture: The End of Public Religion in America   View Summary
30 July 2013

This event is now fully subscribed. To join a waiting list, please email your details to law.events@sydney.edu.au

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The End of Public Religions in America: Occupy Wall Street, Tea Party politics, Same-sex marriage, homosexuality, abortion, Shari'a and the growth of no religion

American exceptionalism has typically included the notion that secularization might apply to northern Europe but was not a valid description of religion in the United States. Most accounts of religion in America start with Alex de Tocqueville in the 1840s and conclude with Robert Bell on civil religion. Furthermore, in 1994 Jose Casanova published his influential book on Public Religions in the Modern World to argue against a naïve view of secularization, and to draw attention to the Moral Majority, Solidarity, the Iranian Revolution and Latin American liberal theology. In the last decade the sociology of religion has celebrated the presence of religion in the public domain. The secularization thesis is dead and buried - or at least almost. This lecture looks at what is arguably the failure of the Moral Majority agenda to capture American politics, which is a thesis illustrated by looking at the slow and complex, but significant, acceptance in mainstream politics of homosexuality in the military, in the Body Scouts, and public life. We can also point to the spread of legislation in support of same-sex marriage, and the modest success of creationism. After Obama's second electoral victory, it appears the Republican party is abandoning the Tea Party and embracing Democratic strategies. The lecture reports on some research undertaken in New York on Occupy Wall Street, which had only limited religious support. People who declare 'no religion' has grown to around 20%; 'spirituality' rather than 'religion' has also grown. Is America becoming like northern European societies in terms of secularization? Possibly - but this lecture concludes, because it is timely, with a retrospective reflection on Reagan and Thatcher to consider the different location of political conservatism and conservative politics in the two societies.


About the speaker
Professor Bryan S. Turner is the Presidential Professor of Sociology and the Director of the Committee on Religion at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and concurrently the Director of the Centre on Religion and Society at the University of Western Sydney. He was the Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge (1998-2005) and was awarded a doctor of letters from the University in 2009. More recently the Alona Evans Distinguished Visiting Professor of Sociology at Wellesley College (2009-2010). His publications in the sociology of religion include Weber and Islam (1974), Religion and Social Theory (1983) (with Kamaludeen and Pereira), Muslims in Singapore (2010), Religion and Modern Society (2011), and The Religious and the Political (2013). He is the founding editor of three sociology journals: Citizenship Studies, Journal of Classical Sociology (with John O'Neill), and Body & Society (with Mike Featherstone). He serves on various editorial boards: Journal of Sociology, The Sociological Review, British Journal of Sociology, Society, Ethnicities, and Contemporary Islam. He is currently editing the Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Social Theory. His current research projects are on Shari'a in the USA and Australia, Occupy Wall Street, assimilation of Muslims in the West, and the same-sex marriage debate in New Zealand and Australia.

This public lecture is co-hosted by the Law & Society Research Network (Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Sydney) and the Institute of Criminology,Sydney Law School.

August
RP Meagher Lecture in Law, Arts and Letters: The Hon. Justice Arthur Emmett   View Summary
1 August 2013

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The Sydney Law School andEight Selborne Chambers presents the second R P Meagher Lecture in Law, Arts and Letters whereThe Honourable Justice Arthur Emmett with discuss Roman Law and Equity.

The late Roddy Meagher AO QC, Justice of the New South Wales Court of Appeal, renowned scholar and collector of art and antiquities, and longstanding member of Eighth Floor Selborne Chambers, was Challis Lecturer in both Roman Law and Equity at the University of Sydney.While Roman Law is no longer a compulsory subject in the curriculum of any Australian law school, an understanding of Roman Law informs much of the common law, and particularly the law of Equity.

There is an interesting parallel, although not necessarily a close analogy, between the contribution to law making by the Roman Praetor and the development of equitable doctrines by the Chancellor and Court of Chancery. Just as the Chancery Court was the source of equitable doctrines that have been inherited in New South Wales and elsewhere in Australia, so the Praetor was a chief source of equity at Rome.

Roddy Meagher was a great advocate of the study of Roman law as a means whereby one can learn a great deal by the comparison of our own institutions with those that developed independently in Rome. A comparison of equitable remedies developed by the Praetor and notions of equity recognised by Roman jurists with similar remedies and notions that developed in the common law demonstrates that the ways of legal thinking are very much alike, however different may be the legal systems concerned. Papinian, the greatest of the classical Roman jurists and a modern leader of the Equity bar are of a similar breed. Such a comparison serves to assist in an understanding of both the deficiencies and the genius of the common law.

The lecture will be followed bya cocktail receptionserved in the Judges' Dining Room on Level 13, Supreme Court of New South Wales.

Places will be limited so early registration is advised.

About the speaker:

Justice Arthur Emmett was a judge of the Federal Court of Australia with from 3 February 1997 until 6 March 2013. During that time he was a member of the Competition, Corporations, Patents, Admiralty and Taxation Panels of the Federal Court. He was a presidential member of the Copyright Tribunal of Australia from April 2001, and President from October 2007 until March 2013. He has also served as a part time Commissioner of the Australian Law Reform Commission and as convenor of the Rules Harmonisation Committee of the Council of Chief Justices. He was appointed as a judge of the Court of Appeal of New South Wales with effect from 7 March 2013. For several years Justice Emmett taught Real Property for the Law Extension Committee of the University of Sydney and was also examiner in that subject. He has been teaching Roman Law at the University of Sydney since 1978 and is presently Challis Lecturer in Roman Law. He also teaches Roman law at the University of New South Wales.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Corporate Law Judicial Decision-Making   View Summary
8 August 2013

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Panel:

The Hon. T F Bathurst, Chief Justice of NSW
Justice Randy J. Holland, Delaware Supreme Court, USA
The Hon. Justice R.S. McColl, AO, Supreme Court of NSW, Court of Appeal

Chairs:

Professor Jennifer Hill, Professor of Corporate Law, Sydney Law School
Professor Matthew Conaglen, Professor of Equity and Trusts, Sydney Law School

The goal of this Panel discussion is to examine how the judiciary in the United States and Australia decide corporate law cases.

In the United States, Delaware occupies a unique position in this regard. More than half of all U.S. firms trading on the NYSE and NASDAQ are incorporated in Delaware, and the Delaware Supreme Court is the pre-eminent U.S. corporate law decision-making forum.

The Panel will analyse how similar facts would be dealt with by U.S. judges compared to Australian judges. As a basis for this analysis, the Panel will compare and contrast key decisions on directors' duties from each jurisdiction. These are (i) Stone v Ritter, 911 A 2d 362 (Del. Supr., 2006), a Delaware Supreme Court decision, involving directors' duty of oversight and (ii) the Centro litigation (ASIC v Healey (2011) 196 FCR 291; ASIC v Healey [No 2] (2011) 196 FCR 430), involving directors' duty of care in Australia.

The Panel will comprise three leading judges - in the US context, Justice Randy J. Holland of the Delaware Supreme Court, and, in the Australian context, The Hon. Justice Tom Bathurst, Chief Justice of NSW, and The Hon. Justice Ruth S. McColl, AO, Supreme Court of NSW, Court of Appeal.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Corp Law Series:Taking Corporate Social Responsibility Seriously   View Summary
12 August 2013

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NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please emaillaw.events@sydney.edu.aufor an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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Taking CSR Seriously in Business Regulation and Practice


In his presentation, Professor Horrigan will address what is needed for corporate social responsibility (CSR) to become part of the mainstream of business regulation and practice, both here and abroad. In particular, his presentation will cover:
- various governmental roles that provide regulatory stimulus for business uptake of CSR;
- mapping contemporary intersections between CSR and business law and regulation;
- frameworks that integrate CSR, corporate governance, and human rights
- steps towards developing a 'whole of organisation' CSR approach
- implications for the legal profession's own CSR

The Problematics of Corporate Social Responsibility
Professor Lee, in turn, will discuss the "problematics of corporate social responsibility." Although few commentators will say outright that they are opposed to corporate social responsibility, there are basic disagreements within the legal academy concerning the roles that each of corporate law, external regulation and other mechanisms should play in promoting the greater alignment of corporate behavior with that which would be considered "responsible." Professor Lee will identify and explore some of the main fault lines in the legal discourse about CSR, examining both the assumptions underlying the contrasting positions and their implications for law reform and the interpretation of existing law.

Speakers

Professor Bryan Horrigan,Dean, Monash University Law School

Associate Professor Ian Lee, University of Toronto

Chair: Professor Jennifer Hill, Sydney Law School

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

2013 Julius Stone Address: Professor Brian Leiter    View Summary
14 August 2013

Online registration
This event is now fully registered. To join a waiting list, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au
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Sydney Law School is please to announce the 2013 Julius Stone Address guest speaker, American philosopher and legal academic, Professor Brian Leiter (University of Chicago).

"The Case against Free Speech"

Western liberal democracies are rife with institutions that view massive restrictions on speech as essential to realizing the ends of liberal democracies. In universities and schools, for example, no one thinks the classroom should be turned over to unregulated expression of opinion, without regard to cognitive value, civility, or pedagogical purpose.Professor Leiter's focus shall be on the courts. In courts, the idea that the unbridled freedom of speech - the "unfettered exchange of ideas" to quote a typical formulation of the United States Supreme Court - has any value is rejected from the start. We recognize a plethora of epistemic reasons - reasons pertaining to the discovery of the truth - for restricting speech. There are obvious disanaologies between the courtroom and the polity at large, but the aim of this Lecture is to explore those in some detail.Professor Leiter willargue that to the extent there are reasons to have less regulation of speech in society at large, these pertain only to the epistemic reliability of our institutional mechanisms for restricting speech.

About the speaker

Brian Leiter is Karl N. Llewellyn Professor of Jurisprudence and Director of the Center for Law, Philosophy & Human Values at the University of Chicago, where he has taught since 2008. He taught previously at the University of Texas at Austin (1995-2008), the University of San Diego School of Law (1993-1995) and, as a visiting professor, at University College London (Philosophy), Oxford University (Philosophy), Yale University (Law), University of Paris X-Nanterre (Law), and University of California, San Diego (Philosophy).

Professor Leiterteaches and writes primarily in the areas of moral, political, and legal philosophy, in both Anglophone and Continental traditions. He is the author of Nietzsche on Morality(Routledge, 2002),Naturalizing Jurisprudence(Oxford, 2007), andWhy Tolerate Religion?(Princeton, 2013), as well as many articles in such journals asEthics, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Philosopher's Imprint, Social Philosophy & Policy, Journal of the History of Philosophy, Yale Law Journal, Columbia Law Review, Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Law & Philosophy,and elsewhere.

He has edited a number of volumes, includingThe Oxford Handbook of Continental Philosophy(2007) (with Michael Rosen),Nietzsche and Morality(Oxford, 2007) (with Neil Sinhababu),The Future for Philosophy(Oxford, 2004),Nietzsche(Oxford Reading in Philosophy, 2001) (with John Richardson), and Objectivity in Law and Morals(Cambridge, 2001). He is the founding editor of the Routledge Philosophersbook series and (with Leslie Green) ofOxford Studies in the Philosophy of Law. He was previously co-editor for eight years ofLegal Theory, and also currently serves on the editorial boards ofNotre Dame Philosophical Reviews, Journal of Nietzsche Studies, Journal of Moral Philosophy, The Philosopher's Annual, Oxford Bibliographies Online: Philosophy, Theoria(Sweden), Anilisi e Diritto(Italy),Problema: Anuario de Filosofia y Teoría(Mexico),Nietzsche Online(Germany), andRevista de Teoría Jurídica(Argentina).

Professor Leiter has given or is scheduled to give a number of named lectures at universities around the world, including the Taylor Lecture in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Otago in New Zealand, the Fresco Lectures in the Department of Jurisprudence at the University of Genoa in Italy, the Bernd Magnus Lecture in the Department of Philosophy at the University of California at Riverside, and the 'Or 'Emet Lecture at Osgoode Hall School of Law at York University, Toronto.

This event is generously sponsored by the Educational Heritage Foundation

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD unit.

Australian Society of Legal Philosophy Conference 2013   View Summary
16 August 2013 to 18 August 2013

To register and make your secure online payment, please CLICK HERE
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The Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence, Sydney Law School is pleased to host the upcoming Australian Society of Legal Philosophy Conference. The conference, held at the University of Sydney from Friday 16 - Sunday 18 August, will feature papers from various fields of legal theory.

Conference Speakers
Professor Brian Leiter, Karl N. Llewellyn Professor of Jurisprudence and Director, Center for Law, Philosophy, and Human Values, University of Chicago

Professor Emilios Christodoulidis, Professor of Legal Theory, University of Glasgow

Professor Wojciech Sadurski, Challis Professor in Jurisprudence, Sydney Law School, University of Sydney

Book Symposium:
The book symposium will feature two titles;

Forms Liberate: reclaiming the jurisprudence of Lon L Fuller
(Hart Publishing, 2012) by Kristen Rundle, Lecturer in Law, The London School of Economics and Political Science;

Philip Selznick: Ideals in the World
(Stanford University Press, 2012) by Martin Krygier, Gordon Samuels Professor of Law and Social Theory at the University of New South Wales

Conference Program
To download a copy of the draft program, please click here

Cost:
Full Fee $250
Alumni $200
Student $125

Conference Dinner: $75 per person

Federal Election Feature Event: Senator The Hon. Bob Carr   View Summary
16 August 2013

Online registration

This event is now FULL, to join a waiting list, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au

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Foreign Minister Senator The Hon. Bob Carr speaks on Australia's Foreign Policy

On August 16, Senator Carr will address an audience of scholars, students, members of the public and the media at the University of Sydney. The Foreign Minister will discuss the Government's foreign policy priorities and achievements so far, and set out his foreign policy vision for the Government's next term, should it win the election.

What would you like to see changed in the world? On what issues would you like to see Australia take a different stand, regionally or globally? What is on the mind of the next generation of foreign policy thinkers?

Distinguished Speakers Program: Professor Alec Stone Sweet   View Summary
29 August 2013

CLICK HERE to register

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A Cosmopolitan Legal Order: Constitutional Pluralism and Rights Adjudication in Europe

The European Convention on Human Rights is rapidly evolving into a cosmopolitan legal order: a transnational legal system in which all public officials bear the obligation to fulfil the fundamental rights of every person within their jurisdiction. The emergence of the system depended on certain deep, structural transformations of law and politics in Europe, including the consolidation of a zone of peace and economic interdependence, of constitutional pluralism at the national level, and of rights cosmopolitanism at the transnational level. Framed by Kantian ideas, Professor Stone Sweet will develop a theoretical account of a cosmopolitan legal system, provide an overview of how the ECHR system operates, and establish criteria for its normative assessment.

About the speaker

Professor Alec Stone Sweet works in the fields of comparative and international politics, comparative and international law, and European integration. His most recent book is A Europe of Rights: The Impact of the ECHR on National Legal Systems (2008). Other books include The Birth of Judicial Politics in France (1992), European Integration and Supranational Governance (1998), Governing with Judges (2000), The Institutionalization of Europe (2001), The Politics of Delegation (2002), On Law, Politics, and Judicialization (2003), and The Judicial Construction of Europe (2004). Prior to coming to Yale, he was Official Fellow, Nuffield College, Oxford, and has held visiting professorships in universities in Aix-en-Provence, Florence, Madrid, Paris, Stockholm, and Vienna. He is presently engaged in a long-term project on the development of (private, a-national) systems of governance for transnational business.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

JSI Roundtable: The Migration of Proportionality across the World   View Summary
30 August 2013

To register for this event CLICK HERE _______________________________________________________

This discussion explores the migration of proportionality across practices of adjudication of human and constitutional rights with the aim of illuminating an answer to the question whether that migration is justified. It will begin with a presentation by Dr Bernal-Pulido, which proceeds in an introduction and two parts. The introduction explains the main concerns arising from the migration of proportionality. The first part accounts for the spread of proportionality across the world. On the basis of an analysis of the particular reasons behind those migrations, the second part argues for a justification common to them, namely, that proportionality is normatively necessary for the adjudication of constitutional rights. Professor Alec Stone Sweet will then respond. The session will conclude with an open discussion.

About the speakers

Dr Carlos Bernal-Pulido is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie Law School. He has research interests in the fields of jurisprudence, comparative constitutional law and constitutional theory. He has published widely in all these fields in seven different languages. His qualifications include a LLB from the Universidad Externado of Colombia (Bogota) (1996), a SJD from the University of Salamanca (Spain) (2001) and a MA (2008) and a PhD in Philosophy (2011) from the University of Florida (U.S.A). He is currently writing a book on proportionality and socio-economic constitutional rights.

Professor Alec Stone-Sweet works in the fields of comparative and international politics, comparative and international law, and European integration. His most recent book is A Europe of Rights: The Impact of the ECHR on National Legal Systems (2008). Other books include The Birth of Judicial Politics in France (1992), European Integration and Supranational Governance (1998), Governing with Judges (2000), The Institutionalization of Europe (2001), The Politics of Delegation (2002), On Law, Politics, and Judicialization (2003), and The Judicial Construction of Europe (2004). Prior to coming to Yale, he was Official Fellow, Nuffield College, Oxford, and has held visiting professorships in universities in Aix-en-Provence, Florence, Madrid, Paris, Stockholm, and Vienna. He is presently engaged in a long-term project on the development of (private, a-national) systems of governance for transnational business.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to2 MCLE/CPD units.


September
2013 Kevin McCann Lecture on Energy and Resources Law: Grant King, Managing Director, Origin Energy   View Summary
5 September 2013

To register for this event click here
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Mr Grant King, the Managing Director of Origin Energy will present the 2013 Kevin McCann Lecture on Energy and Resources Law on the topic "The Legal and Policy Impacts of Reducing Carbon Emissions in the Electricity Sector".


ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Grant King was appointed Managing Director of Origin Energy at the time of its demerger from Boral Ltd, in February 2000, and was Managing Director of Boral Energy from 1994. Grant is a member of the Company's Risk and Health, Safety and Environment committees.

Prior to joining Boral, he was General Manager, AGL Gas Companies. Grant is Chairman of Contact Energy Ltd, a councillor of the Australian Petroleum Production and Exploration Association, a Director of the Business Council of Australia and Chairman of the Business Council of Australia Infrastructure & Sustainability Growth Committee. He is a former director of Envestra Ltd and former chairman of the Energy Supply Association of Australia Ltd.

Grant has a Civil Engineering degree from the University of New South Wales and a Master of Management from the University of Wollongong.

JSI Seminar Series 2013: Allan McCay   View Summary
5 September 2013

CLICK HERE to register for this seminar

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The Fernando Principles and genetic vulnerabilities to the crimogenic effects of social environments

Justice Wood in R v Stanley Edward Fernando enunciated principles concerning the mitigating effect of certain social circumstances in respect of the sentencing of Aboriginal offenders. These principles have gone on to exert influence in New South Wales and other states. They are currently being considered by the High Court in the Bugmy and Munda cases,

Although the cases before the High Court do not focus on genetics, this paper will consider the possibility that some who encounter Fernando environments have a genetic vulnerability to the crimogenic effects of such environments and, as a result, may deserve more mitigation than is currently granted.

Allan McCay teaches at the University of Sydney Foundation Program and is a PhD candidate at the Sydney Law School. He is also engaged in the construction of a Neurolaw database at Macquarie University's Centre for Agency Value and Ethics.

In the past he has been an associate solicitor with Baker and McKenzie in Hong Kong, and a visiting researcher in the philosophy departments of the University of California, Riverside and the University of Stirling.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Prof Edward Rock, University of Pennsylvania    View Summary
12 September 2013

Embattled CEOs

To register and secure online payment please CLICK HERE

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CEOs of publicly held corporations in the United States have lost power to their boards of directors and to their shareholders. This loss of power is recent and gradual, but nevertheless represents a significant move away from the imperial CEO who was surrounded by a hand-picked board and lethargic shareholders. In this talk,Professor Rockwill discuss the causes and symptoms of the decline in CEO power and the implications of this decline for corporate law and corporate governance.

Professor Rock, the Saul A. Fox Distinguished Professor of Business Law and the University of Pennsylvania Law School, studied at Yale and Oxford and received his J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1983. Since joining the Penn faculty in 1989, he has written widely in corporate law on topics including: proxy access, corporate voting, government ownership, hedge funds, and comparative corporate law. He has taught as a visiting professor at Columbia, NYU, Hebrew University, Israel, and the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

JSI Seminar Series 2013: Yarran Hominh   View Summary
12 September 2013

CLICK HERE to register for this seminar

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Derrida's remainder: a perlocutionary reading of the Declaration of Independence

One of the most promising encounters between 'Continental' and 'analytic' philosophy was Jacques Derrida's appropriation of J.L. Austin's work on 'performative utterance'. In this paper, Yarran Hominh proposes to come at this connection obliquely, through Derrida's work on law. In his short piece 'Declarations of Independence', Derrida argues that the constitutional (constitutive) force of the American Declaration of Independence lies in the fact that it cannot be simply understood as either 'performative' or 'constative', in Austin's terminology. According to Derrida, 'the people' do not pre-exist the Declaration, but are constituted in the act of declaration itself. Hominh argues that while Derrida's insight regarding the constitution of 'the people' is sound, he has missed three key aspects of the Declaration in his analysis. These three lacunae in Derrida's account point the way to an understanding of the constitutive force of the Declaration in terms of a particular Austinian speech act: the 'perlocutionary' speech act. In turn, applying the concept of the perlocutionary to the Declaration provides an explanation for the initial ambiguity between the 'performative' and the 'constative' that Derrida correctly identified. Hominh suggests in passing that the concept of the perlocutionary has particular importance that both Derrida and Austin miss.

Yarran Hominh has just handed in his LLM by Research at the Sydney Law School in constitutional theory. Heteaches casually in the University of Sydney Philosophy Department and at Macquarie Law School.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Corporate Governance Roundtable: The Role of the Board of Directors in the 21st Century   View Summary
13 September 2013

Click here to register and for secure online payment (VISA OR MASTERCARD payment required)

If you require an alternative payment method, please contact us at law.events@sydney.edu.au or 02 9351 0429

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This Roundtable will cover a range of topical corporate governance issues regarding the contemporary role of the board of directors. Leading international and Australian speakers will discuss issues including the extent to which directors can, and should, be involved in managerial strategy; the relationship between the board and board committees; the extent to which the board can delegate, and can rely on the advice of others; information management by boards; how boards manage hostile M&A transactions; boards and stakeholders;executive pay; board diversity; and regulatory issues.

International speakers include;
-Professor Edward Rock, University of Pennsylvania Law School
-Professor Sarah Worthington, University of Cambridge
- Ron Barusch, Visiting Lecturer, Sydney Law School
- Richard Nolan, Professor, University of York / 2013 McWilliam Visiting Professor of Commercial Law

Draft Program*

9.00 - 9.05am

WELCOME TO THE ROUNDTABLE

Professor Joellen Riley, Dean, Sydney Law School

9.05 - 9.15am

INTRODUCTION: RE-EVALUATING THE ROLE OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Jennifer Hill, Professor of Corporate Law, Sydney Law School

9.15 - 10.15am

BOARDS AND STAKEHOLDERS

ADAPTING TO THE NEW SHAREHOLDER-CENTRIC REALITY: IMPLICATIONS FOR DIRECTORS
Edward B. Rock, Saul A. Fox Distinguished Professor of Business Law, University of Pennsylvania,
Commentator: John Stumbles, Professor of Finance Law, Sydney Law School

Chair: Dr Olivia Dixon,Sydney Law School

10.15 - 10.45am

Morning Tea

10.45 - 12.00noon

PANEL DISCUSSION: THE IMPACT OF MODERN CORPORATE GOVERNANCE ON THE ROLE AND STRUCTURE OF THE BOARD

(Topics include: independent directors; committees; delegation to management; role of the chairman)

The panel will comprise of:

Robert Austin, Senior Legal Consultant, Minter Ellison; Challis Lecturer in Corporate Law, Sydney Law School.

Alan Cameron AO, Company Director and Consultant, Ashurst Australia.

Richard Warburton AO LVO, Chairman of Westfield Retail Trust, Magellan Flagship Fund and Citigroup Pty Ltd.

Richard Nolan, Professor, University of York / 2013 McWilliam Visiting Professor of Commercial Law

Chair: Jennifer Hill, Professor of Corporate Law, Sydney Law School

12.00 - 1.00pm

HOW DO BOARDS OF TARGET COMPANIES MANAGE HOSTILE M&A TRANSACTIONS - AN AUSTRALIAN/US COMPARISON
Ron Barusch, Visiting Lecturer, Sydney Law School; Wall Street Journal columnist; former partner, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom.
David Friedlander, Partner, King & Wood Mallesons

Chair:Penelope Crossley, Sydney Law School

1.00 - 2.00pm

Lunch

2.00 - 3.15pm

HOT CORPORATE GOVERNANCE ISSUES FOR BOARDS

(a)Executive Pay - "The Impact of the Two Strikes Rule"
Alan Cameron AO, Company Director and Consultant, Ashurst Australia
Commentator:Jennifer Hill, Professor of Corporate Law, Sydney Law School

(b)Board Diversity - "The Impact of Women in the Boardroom"
Renée Adams, Professor of Finance, Commonwealth Bank Chair, Australian School of Business, UNSW

Commentator: Helen Conway, Director of the Workplace Gender Equality Agency

Chair: Fady Aoun, Sydney Law School

3.15 - 3.45pm

Afternoon Tea

3.45pm - 4.50 pm

REGULATION AND THE BOARD: PREVENTION AND ENFORCEMENT
ENFORCING THE BOARD'S RESPONSIBILITIES TO THE COMPANY

Sarah Worthington, Downing Professor of the Laws of England, University of Cambridge
Commentators:
Michael Kingston, Chief Legal Officer, Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC)
Charles Littrell, Executive General Manager, Policy, Research and Statistics, Australian Prudential Regulatory Authority (APRA).

Chair:Matthew Conaglen, Professor of Equity and Trusts, Sydney Law School.

4.50 - 5.00pm

CLOSING REMARKS

Jennifer Hill, Professor of Corporate Law, Sydney Law School

5.00pm

Drinks (featuring jazz by Jackson Harrison)

* Program subject to change

Cost

Full registration $350 inc GST

Alumni registration $280 inc GST

SLS student registration $245 inc

Special Offer: All registrations include a ticket to the 2013 Distinguished Speakers Program lecture by Professor Edward Rock at 6pm on Thursday 12 September.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to5 MCLE/CPD unit.

2013 Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) Information Session   View Summary
19 September 2013

Register now for the 2013 Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) Information Session, which takes place from 6pm on Thursday, 19th September.

The 2013 Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) Information Session will give you an insight into the exclusive features of the Sydney JD as well as information on admission requirements and application procedure.

Speakers include:

The Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) ushers in a new era for the Sydney Law School and its teaching of law at graduate level.
A comprehensive three year degree, it has an unrivalled international focus, where you receive a comprehensive overview of the practice and profession of the law in Australia and how it relates globally, transnationally and internationally.

Exclusive international features of the Sydney JD include:

  • The opportunity for you to study two core units in International Law - Public International Law and Private International Law
  • You have access to approximately 120 elective units of study across all areas of specialisation taught at the Sydney Law School, including comparative and international law
  • Exchange opportunities available for you in North America, Europe and the Asia Pacific at institutions including NYU, Humboldt and the National University of Singapore
  • You can undertake off-shore study in China, Japan, the United Kingdom and Nepal

Classes commence 19 February 2014.

Applications open on 5 September 2013

The UAC offer dates for the 2014 Sydney JD are as follows:

Early Offers

Thursday, 28 November 2013

Main Offers

Thursday, 16 January 2014

Late Offers

Thursday, 30 January 2014

Wigram Allen Scholarships

There are four categories to apply for, including those for international applicants.

2013 Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) Information Session

6-7pm

Lecture Theatre 101, Level 1 New Law Building (F10)

Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney NSW 2006

Register now for the 2013 Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) Information Session

For video testimonials of the Sydney Juris Doctor (JD), subscribe to Sydney Law School's YouTube Channel.

Register your interest and order the 2014 Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) Guide

Download the 2014 Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) Guide

Global Health and The Law: Incorporating Theory into Practice   View Summary
30 September 2013 to 1 October 2013

To register and for secure online payment CLICK HERE

(Note: The University of Sydney only accepts Visa or MasterCard)_______________________________________________________________

This conference is being presented by Sydney Law School's Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics in cooperation with the Sydney Medical School's Centre for Values, Ethics & Law in Medicine.

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

The most pressing challenges for health are not confined within national borders. The global spread of infectious diseases, the rising burden of non-communicable diseases, and the growing trend in health tourism all present important and novel challenges for the global community.

With papers addressing health and human rights, gene patenting, communicable and non-communicable diseases, health tourism, surrogacy and cross border reproduction, and the global regulation of therapeutics, this interdisciplinary conference will explore the role for law in supporting and promoting global health. A particular focus of the conference will be the consideration of practical opportunities and challenges in responding to issues in global health

This conference will be relevant to all those with an interest in global health, health law, public health, and human rights including students, lawyers, health professionals, academics, and the public.

For the final conference program, CLICK HERE.

For the final conference program including abstracts,CLICK HERE.

Conference Fees (2 days):

Full fee: $150 gst inclusive
Alumni/USYD staff: $120 gst inclusive
Concession/Students: $99 gst inclusive
Conference Dinner (optional): $99 gst inclusive
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Additional information for conference delegates:

Accomodation guide.pdf

Conference dinner sample menu.pdf

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The conference is sponsored by The Australasian Association of Bioethics and Health Law (AABHL), Australia and New Zealand's leading organisation concerned with issues of bioethics and health law. For further information or to become a member CLICK HERE.

October
Global Health and The Law: Incorporating Theory into Practice   View Summary
30 September 2013 to 1 October 2013

To register and for secure online payment CLICK HERE

(Note: The University of Sydney only accepts Visa or MasterCard)_______________________________________________________________

This conference is being presented by Sydney Law School's Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics in cooperation with the Sydney Medical School's Centre for Values, Ethics & Law in Medicine.

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

The most pressing challenges for health are not confined within national borders. The global spread of infectious diseases, the rising burden of non-communicable diseases, and the growing trend in health tourism all present important and novel challenges for the global community.

With papers addressing health and human rights, gene patenting, communicable and non-communicable diseases, health tourism, surrogacy and cross border reproduction, and the global regulation of therapeutics, this interdisciplinary conference will explore the role for law in supporting and promoting global health. A particular focus of the conference will be the consideration of practical opportunities and challenges in responding to issues in global health

This conference will be relevant to all those with an interest in global health, health law, public health, and human rights including students, lawyers, health professionals, academics, and the public.

For the final conference program, CLICK HERE.

For the final conference program including abstracts,CLICK HERE.

Conference Fees (2 days):

Full fee: $150 gst inclusive
Alumni/USYD staff: $120 gst inclusive
Concession/Students: $99 gst inclusive
Conference Dinner (optional): $99 gst inclusive
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Additional information for conference delegates:

Accomodation guide.pdf

Conference dinner sample menu.pdf

_________________________________________________________________

The conference is sponsored by The Australasian Association of Bioethics and Health Law (AABHL), Australia and New Zealand's leading organisation concerned with issues of bioethics and health law. For further information or to become a member CLICK HERE.

JSI Seminar Series 2013: Piero Moraro   View Summary
3 October 2013

CLICK HERE to register for this seminar

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A moral argument for restricted suffrage

Whether or not voting is a citizen'sduty, it is certainly a citizen'sright: no one can be prevented from voting. Against this view, Piero Moraro claims that a citizen who is not interested in politics should not vote and, furthermore, could justifiably be prevented from voting. First, he describes cases where voting is morally wrong, that is, when a citizen has a moral dutynotto vote. Second, he considers the view of "epistocrats", who argue that incompetent citizens should not be allowed to vote. Third, he offers one main objection to epistocracy, and argues that rather than on "competence", we should focus on the subject's interest in politics, or "commitment". Fourth, he claims that "uncommitted" voters cause an unjust harm to voters who are "committed". In such cases, it might be morally permissible to prevent uncommitted voters from voting, in order to avert the unjust harm. His conclusion, thus, is that it is in principle morally permissible to deny some citizens the right to vote.

About the speaker:

Piero Moraro is a lecturer in Justice Studies at Charles Sturt University, and a fellow of the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics (CAPPE). He holds a PhD from the University of Stirling, UK, and a MSc in Philosophy and Public Policy from the London School of Economics. His research interests focus on political obligation and democratic theory.

Ross Parsons Corporate Law Series: The Notional Legislator: ASIC's role as Lawmaker   View Summary
14 October 2013

To register for this seminarCLICK HERE
NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please emaillaw.events@sydney.edu.aufor an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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Along with its power to exercise 'on the ground' discretion to alter the way in which legislative rules are applied (for example, by granting exemptions in particular cases), the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) has the power to re-write aspects of that legislation. It can, in effect, do the work of Parliament. This paper examines ASIC's discretionary power to change the operation of the Corporations Act 2001 by issuing Class Orders that omit, modify or insert provisions into the Act. The existence and operation of ASIC's power has attracted little critical attention in the legal literature, be it academic, judicial, or professional. The paper examines the scope of this power, its operation and history. This inquiry is prompted by a concern that the system of statutory modification via Class Order, while beneficial to the flexible regulation of the corporate and finance sector, has developed into a substantial and complex body of 'notional legislation'.

Stephen Bottomley is Dean of the ANU College of Law, and Professor of Commercial Law, at the Australian National University. He came to the university in 1988, having previously taught corporate and commercial law for a number of years in Sydney while completing his postgraduate thesis on law and psychiatry.

Prior to commencing the Deanship in January 2013, he has served in the College in a number of capacities, including as Sub-Dean (1993-1995); Director, Graduate Program in Law (2000-2002); Chair, Undergraduate Studies Committee (2002-2004); Associate Dean and Head of School (2005-2009); and Head of School (since 2011).

He was the inaugural Director of the College's Centre for Commercial Law (1998-2005).

Commentator: David O'Reilly, General Counsel, Fiducian Portfolio Services.

Chair: Professor Jennifer Hill, Sydney Law School

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

2013 Paul Byrne SC Memorial Lecture: The Hon. Murray Gleeson AC QC    View Summary
16 October 2013

Online registration

To register for this event CLICK HERE

To donate to The Paul Byrne SC Memorial Fund CLICK HERE

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Guest Speaker: The Honourable Murray Gleeson AC QC

Topic: Presuming Innocence

Chair: His Honour Judge Stephen Norrish QC

Murray Gleeson took silk in 1974 achieving an extensive constitutional, commercial and tax practice. President of the New South Wales Bar Association 1984 to 1986, he received the Order of Australia for service to the law in 1986 and then received the Companion Order of Australia in 1992. He was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of NSW 1988. During his term of office in the Supreme Court he implemented major reforms to the administration of the Court, resulting in increased efficiency. In 1998, Chief Justice Murray Gleeson resigned his commission as Chief Justice of NSW to take up the appointment of Chief Justice of the High Court of Australia in Canberra until 2008.

About Paul Byrne SC

Paul Byrne SC graduated in Arts and Law from the University of Sydney, and worked with the Public Solicitor's Office as a solicitor. He became a barrister in 1979, and was appointed a public defender. In 1983 he was awarded a Master of Laws degree with First Class Honours, and was awarded a University Medal. He was appointed Director of the Criminal Law Review Division and a Commissioner of the New South Wales Law Reform Commission. In 1995 he took silk and continued an outstanding career as an advocate, taking on the toughest cases, in courts at all levels, with a deep sense of responsibility and the utmost commitment to justice and fair process.

This is the second Paul Byrne SC Memorial Lecture honouring Paul Byrne SC, who had a life long interest in criminal law and the criminal justice system, as well being an active participant and generous supporter of the Institute of Criminology at the Sydney Law School.

The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund

The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund has been set up to honour and continue Paul's interest in the criminal justice system by supporting the ongoing activities of the Institute of Criminology, such as lectures, seminars, publications, and awards.

Attendees of the Paul Byrne SC Memorial Lecture are warmly invited to make a donation to The Paul Byrne SCMemorial Fund. Gifts to The Paul Byrne SC Memorial Fund support the activities of the Institute of Criminology and other activities in the field of criminal law at Sydney Law School, in memory of the late Paul Byrne SC.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD unit.

2013 JSI Seminar Series: Dr Anthony Connolly   View Summary
24 October 2013

CLICK HERE to register for this seminar.

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Naturalised Jurisprudence as an Experimental Philosophy of Law

In a number of his recent forays into the methodology debate in legal philosophy, Brian Leiter has claimed that themethods of the emerging field of experimental philosophy may have a significant role to play in any futurenaturalised jurisprudence. In this paper, Anthony Connolly sets out to explore this claim. It turns out that doing so implicates a series ofbroader questions about the nature and goals of a naturalised philosophy of law, the place within such aphilosophy of a concept of law, and the role of philosophy itself within the naturalistic scheme of things.

About the speaker:

Dr Anthony J. Connolly is an Associate Professor at the Law School of the Australian National University, specialising in legal philosophy, indigenous rights law, and public law. He completed his BA.LLB (Hons) at the University of Western Australia, after which he practiced law for a number of years, predominantly as a human rights lawyer working with indigenous people. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy, supervised by Professors Philip Pettit (Princeton) and Robert Goodin (ANU), and a Masters degree in education. He is the author of Cultural Difference on Trial: The Nature and Limits of Judicial Understanding (Ashgate Publishing (UK): 2010) and the editor of Indigenous Rights (Ashgate Publishing (UK): 2009). He has also published a number of book chapters and journal articles on legal philosophy and indigenous rights.

Lawyers/Barristers:2 MCLE/CPD points

Sydney Law School Postgraduate Conference: Stability and Transformation   View Summary
31 October 2013 to 1 November 2013

To register for this eventCLICK HERE

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STABILITY AND TRANFORMATION

"Change is the only constant" (Heraclitus, Greek philosopher, 535-475 BC)

Legal principles, practices, institutions and scholarship are characterised by stability and transformation, and by the interplay between them. Law both responds to and shapes social, economic and political transformations, while the rule of law connotes stability and continuity. As legal scholars, are we rule-bound, rational or radical? Are our lenses microscopic, telescopic or panoramic? And what is the role of law in the context of shifting alliances and emerging priorities?

The Committee invites research students in law and related disciplines (including sociology, cultural studies, philosophy, political economy, history, economics and business) to submit paper proposals that engage with the conference theme.

We encourage you to interpret the theme widely and creatively: to apply it to your experience of scholarship, to your particular research area, or to current national and global events.

The conference will take place at the New Law School Building, University of Sydney. Day One will include the keynote address and concurrent presentation sessions. Day Two will run as a half day and will include discussion sessions on aspects of the PhD experience facilitated by leading academics. Research students are welcome to attend without presenting.

2013 Keynote Speaker:

Professor Rosalind Croucher President, Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC)

Professor Rosalind Croucher was first appointed to the ALRC as a full-time Comissioner on 5 February 2007, joining the Commission after a distinguished period of 25 years in University teaching and management, most recently as Dean of Law at Macquarie University (from 1999). Prior to this she was a member of the Law Faculties of the University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales. Professor Croucher served as Chair of the Council of Australian Law Deans (2002), Vice President (Western Pacific), International Academy of Estate and Trust Law (1998-2005), Chair of the Scientific Committee for the World Congress of Medical Law 2004 and on the Program Committee for the 8th biennial conference of the International Association of Women Judges, 2006, for which she was also 'Rapporteur'.

2013 JSI Seminar Series: Dr Mark Bennett    View Summary
31 October 2013

CLICK HERE to register for this seminar.

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Fuller's Challenge and the Self-Understanding of Contemporary Legal Positivism

In this seminar, Mark Bennett will argue that Fuller's challenge to legal positivism - to make sense of the connection between law and the rule of law - has played a similar role in the development of legal positivism as Dworkin's did in the last quarter of the 20th century. It forced Hartian legal positivists to reflect on the core tenets of their tradition's understanding of law, and to choose whether, where, and how, to make concessions to Fuller's account of the rule of law. In particular, most prominent positivists accept that conformity to Fuller's principles is generally of moral value, and that there is some necessary connection between such conformity and the existence of law. Yet despite these concessions, positivists have not accepted his anti-positivist account of legal validity and legal obligation. This does not mean that they reject Fuller's analysis of the moral obligations of fidelity to law - in fact, legal positivists seem to be amenable to much of the Fullerian view, so long as it is understood as disclosing judges' moral obligations, rather than their legal obligations. If this is so, the traditional debates between positivists and anti-positivists lose much of their importance. This seminar draws on the analysis set out in Bennett's recent thesis, "Legal positivism and the Rule of Law: the Hartian Response to Fuller's Challenge", available at http://hdl.handle.net/1807/35776- especially the final chapter.

About the speaker:

Dr Mark Bennett has been a lecturer at Victoria University of Wellington Faculty of Law since 2010. He had previously undertaken his undergraduate education in law, classics and sociology there, subsequently being appointed as an Assistant Lecturer, while also completing an LLM with Distinction. He was then awarded the Frank Knox Memorial Fellowship to study for an LLM at Harvard Law School, after which he completed doctoral studies at the University of Toronto, supported by a Connaught Fellowship. His thesis 'Legal positivism and the Rule of Law: the Hartian Response to Fuller's Challenge' - available at http://hdl.handle.net/1807/35776 - examines the competing understandings of the idea of 'the rule of law' in contemporary legal philosophy. His recent publications include contributions to two books concerning regulatory reform in New Zealand, and articles on legal philosophy inLaw and Philosophy, the Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy, the Canadian Bar Review, and the Victoria University of Wellington Law Review (forthcoming). Some of these are available on his SSRN page - http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/cf_dev/AbsByAuth.cfm?per_id=682942.

His current research includes work towards book manuscript based on his doctoral thesis, and a project examining whether equity law should be understood, in many of its manifestations, as subverting justice and the rule of law.

November
Sydney Law School Postgraduate Conference: Stability and Transformation   View Summary
31 October 2013 to 1 November 2013

To register for this eventCLICK HERE

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STABILITY AND TRANFORMATION

"Change is the only constant" (Heraclitus, Greek philosopher, 535-475 BC)

Legal principles, practices, institutions and scholarship are characterised by stability and transformation, and by the interplay between them. Law both responds to and shapes social, economic and political transformations, while the rule of law connotes stability and continuity. As legal scholars, are we rule-bound, rational or radical? Are our lenses microscopic, telescopic or panoramic? And what is the role of law in the context of shifting alliances and emerging priorities?

The Committee invites research students in law and related disciplines (including sociology, cultural studies, philosophy, political economy, history, economics and business) to submit paper proposals that engage with the conference theme.

We encourage you to interpret the theme widely and creatively: to apply it to your experience of scholarship, to your particular research area, or to current national and global events.

The conference will take place at the New Law School Building, University of Sydney. Day One will include the keynote address and concurrent presentation sessions. Day Two will run as a half day and will include discussion sessions on aspects of the PhD experience facilitated by leading academics. Research students are welcome to attend without presenting.

2013 Keynote Speaker:

Professor Rosalind Croucher President, Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC)

Professor Rosalind Croucher was first appointed to the ALRC as a full-time Comissioner on 5 February 2007, joining the Commission after a distinguished period of 25 years in University teaching and management, most recently as Dean of Law at Macquarie University (from 1999). Prior to this she was a member of the Law Faculties of the University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales. Professor Croucher served as Chair of the Council of Australian Law Deans (2002), Vice President (Western Pacific), International Academy of Estate and Trust Law (1998-2005), Chair of the Scientific Committee for the World Congress of Medical Law 2004 and on the Program Committee for the 8th biennial conference of the International Association of Women Judges, 2006, for which she was also 'Rapporteur'.

The University Beyond Walls: Transformative Prison Education from the Inside Out   View Summary
4 November 2013

To register and for this event CLICK HERE

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About the panel discussion:

The Institute of Criminology and the Sydney Social Justice Network are excited to announce an innovative panel discussion exploring alternative educational frameworks within the prison setting. The panel will feature Lori Pompa, Founder and Director of The Inside-Out Center at Temple University, USA. Inside-Out brings university students and incarcerated individuals together as peers in a classroom setting that emphasises dialogue, critical thinking, collaboration, and the creation of new ideas. The program aims to deepen the conversation and transform ways of thinking about social issues. The panel discussion will explore a range of topics relevant to launching Inside-Out in the Australian context, including cultural and institutional issues, education, and methodology. Lori Pompa's first visit to Australia will enliven this discussion around Australia's potential to promote social change through transformative prison education and identify potential challenges. This panel discussion asks: how is a program such as Inside-Out distinct from other courses taught in correctional facilities? What do inside and outside students gain from the experience? What are some of the local issues facing prison educators and students? How might the experiential learning method promote genuine interaction and exchange of ideas between inside and outside students in the Australian context? Join us for this stimulating evening of discussion with prison educators, stakeholders and academics to ask 'How might an Inside-Out program work in Australia?'.

About the panel:

Keynote speaker Lori Pompa is Founder and Director of The Inside-Out Center at Temple University, USA, the International Headquarters of The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program. Beginning in 1997, Inside-Out has been creating opportunities for social change through transformative education, involving individuals inside and outside of correctional facilities working together through dialogue and collaborative problem solving in classrooms behind prison walls. As a 2003 Soros Justice Senior Fellow, she collaborated with others on both sides of the prison wall to develop Inside-Out into a national (now international) model of transformative pedagogy with over 500 Inside-Out classes offered so far in disciplines spanning the social sciences, the arts, and the humanities. Employing experiential and service learning pedagogies in her Criminal Justice classes, she has taken more than 7,000 students to area correctional facilities in the past 11 years, and has worked with men and women inside prison since 1985. Her areas of expertise are correctional issues, race and racism, hands-on experiential learning, and community education. In 2011 she received the Justice Studies Association (JSA) Social Activist Award for her work with the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program.

Jo McAlpin is Performance and Compliance Manager in Corrective Services NSW. She has a background in English Literature and the History and Philosophy of Science. Her diverse experience in education includes prison teaching and being responsible for state wide management of basic adult education for Corrective Services NSW. Jo is currently working in the area of strategic policy and planning for Corrective Services.

Juanita Sherwood is Professor of Indigenous Education, FASS UTS. Juanita has worked actively inside and outside of the academy, in rural and in urban settings in Aboriginal health and education for over 25 years. She is a registered nurse and a qualified teacher with extensive experience in Aboriginal health policy planning, community consultation, advocacy, community development and management. Her areas of expertise include Aboriginal health and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research monitoring, Indigenous research methodologies, capacity building in primary health care and health service planning. Experiences working with Community have shaped Juanita's passionate commitment to ensuring that Aboriginal voices are listened two respected and heard, a commitment which finds expression in her own Indigenous research and in mentoring and growing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander post graduate students within an Indigenous research agenda. Juanita is lead researcher on the Social and Cultural Resilience and Emotional Wellbeing of Aboriginal Mothers in Prison (SCREAM) project.

Dr Nicky McWilliam is Visiting Research Fellow, Faculty of Law, UTS. She is a Co-Principal and practices as a mediator at Sydney Mediation Partners, a small dispute resolution practice based in Sydney. Nicky has experience in community, commercial, business, workplace, construction, family, court appointed and general mediation. Nicky is also currently involved with government, commercial and community organizations in relation to dispute management programs in workplace, commercial and corrections communities. In association with UTS Faculty of Law, Corrective Services NSW and Psychiatrist Dr Olav Nielssen, Nicky has implemented a pilot peer mediation program at a medium security corrections facility in NSW. She is accredited with the National Accreditation Mediation System (NMAS) and is registered with the Commonwealth Attorney Generals Department as an accredited Family Dispute Resolution Practitioner (FDRP). Nicky received a LEADR award this year 2013 for significant contribution to Alternative Dispute Resolution.


This event is sponsored by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School, and theSydney Social Justice Network, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

Book Launch: Consumer Law and Policy in Australia and New Zealand   View Summary
6 November 2013

To RSVP for this event, please email Susie Jovanovski SJovanovski@mauriceblackburn.com.au

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Consumer Law and Policy in Australia and New Zealand (Federation Press 2013)

Edited by Justin Malbon and Luke Nottage.

Consumer Law and Policy in Australia and New Zealand examines the 'Australian
Consumer Law' reform package in a broad context and compares it to recent reform initiatives especially in New Zealand. It considers consumer law developments in other economies including the European Union, Japan, Canada and the United States, as well as parallel re-regulation of consumer credit and other financial markets impacting on consumers. The book also examines policy considerations and market transformations, as well as the often complex legislative history associated with recent consumer law reform proposals in Australia and New Zealand.

Specific areas covered include: definitions of 'consumers', comparativeconsumer law reform, statutory guarantees and controls over unfair terms in consumer contracts, regulation of unconscionable conduct, a possible general prohibition of 'unfair practices', product liability and safety regulation, responsible lending and 'hardship' provisions for consumer credit, consumer banking and financial advice, protections for vulnerable consumers, interest rate caps, dispute resolution, regulatory powers and e-commerce.

Authored by 14 consumer law experts, the book will appeal to policy-makers, researchers, law students, and legal practitioners interested in an advanced and wide-ranging analysis of current consumer law issues.

The book will be launched by The Hon. Michael Kirby AC CMG

To purchase the book, visit Federation Press.

Young People, Alternative Education and Diversion Seminar   View Summary
7 November 2013

To register and for this event CLICK HERE

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Various programs seek to maintain young people in education, provide recreational opportunities and divert them from criminal activity and the criminal justice system. Despite the widespread adoption of recreational, sporting, educational and other forms of diversionary program, there has been limited research testing the efficacy of these programs. This free seminar will bring together practitioners involved in developing and delivering innovative alternative education and diversionary programs, and Sydney University research staff to discuss evaluation and research issues. In particular, this seminar will explore how research and practice can better inform each other.

SPEAKERS INCLUDE:

Dr Gareth Jenkins

Dr Jenkins is the Youth Engagement Coordinator for Save the Child Australia. In this role, Gareth is responsible for designing and implementing youth engagement projects in urban and remote locations. Gareth has a background in education, psychology and digital media projects in the youth and community sector. He will be discussing the Glebe Pathways Project.

Shane Phillips

Shane is an outstanding community leader and respected spokesperson for Aboriginal Australians. Shane is passionate about the importance of empowering Aboriginal people and is a dedicated contributor to a range of community organisations. He has cultural connections to the Bunjalung, Wonnarua, and Eora peoples. Shane is Chief Executive Officer of the Tribal Warrior Association. Prior to this, Shane's career included roles working with young people in child protection, juvenile justice and the law, including working with the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody as a community liaison officer under the Honourable Justice Hal Wooten.

Superintendent Luke Freudenstein

Superintendent Freudenstein is the Commander of the Redfern Local Area Command. He recently received the prestigious Australian Police Medal announced in the Australia Day Honours. The award is called the Superintendent's Medal for Excellence. Superintendent Freudenstein joined the NSW Police Force in 1980 when the NSW Police Academy was located in Redfern, and has been the Commander at the Redfern Local Area Command since June 2008.

Dr Kate Russell

Dr Russell is a Senior Lecturer, Human Movement and Health Education at the University of Sydney. Current research interests include the negotiation of gender in a range of sporting contexts such as swimming, snowboarding, men's netball, female boxing, motor cross and BMX. Kate is also currently involved in a research project looking at the impact of the Young Endeavour Youth Scheme on social inclusion and will discuss current Faculty of Education and Social Work projects.

This seminar is being hosted by the Sydney Institute of Criminology and the Faculty of Education and Social Work.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to2 MCLE/CPD units.

RP Corp Law: Why Did Australia Fare So Well in the Global Financial Crisis? by Prof Jennifer Hill   View Summary
18 November 2013

To register for this seminar CLICK HERE,


NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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Seminar Description

Some jurisdictions weathered the global financial crisis far better than others. Australia has attracted much international attention as a result of its post-crisis economic performance.

This seminar will be based on her recent, co-authored book on The Regulatory Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis (Cambridge University Press, 2012). The seminar will explore why Australia fared so well in the crisis, compared to other common law jurisdictions, such as the U.S. and U.K. For many commentators, the answer to this question has been that Australia was "lucky", in that its economy was buoyed by China's demand for resources. Jennifer will argue, however, there are a number of other significant, but often under-appreciated, factors which contributed to Australia's resilience during the crisis. These include legal structures and reform; financial market regulation; banking history; and corporate governance.

About the speaker:

Jennifer Hill is Professor of Corporate Law at Sydney Law School and a Director of the Ross Parsons Centre. She writes widely in the field of corporate law and governance, and has taught at several US law schools, including Vanderbilt, University of Virginia, University of Texas and Cornell.

Jennifer is a Research Associate of the European Corporate Governance Institute and a member of the corporations law editorial board for Cambridge University Press. She is also a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Law (AAL)Advisory Council of theCentre for International Finance and Regulation.Jennifer is also an International Commentator on Columbia Law School's Blue Sky Blog on Corporations and the Capital Markets and in 2013, held the Foreign Chair at the University of Ghent, Belgium.

Jennifer's recent publications include:- (i) R. S. Thomas and J.G. Hill (eds), Research Handbook on Executive Pay (2012, Edward Elgar); and (ii) and E. Ferran, N. Moloney, J.G. Hill and J.C. Coffee, Jr.), The Regulatory Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis (Cambridge University Press, 2012). Jennifer is currently working with Professor Randall Thomas on a new edited book on Shareholder Power, which will be published in 2014.

Commentator: John Trowbridge, Former Consultant, Executive and Regulator in Financial Services

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

December
Distinguished Speakers Program: Christopher Field   View Summary
5 December 2013

Climate Change: Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters


To register and for secure online payment CLICK HERE

(Note: The University of Sydney only accepts Visa or MasterCard)

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To coincide with the release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fifth Assessment Report, climate scientist Professor Chris Field from Stanford University will be delivering a Sydney Law School 2013 Distinguished Speaker address. This event is co-presented by Sydney Ideas.

ABOUT THE ADDRESS

Historically, risks from climate-related events are concentrated in extreme events. In its 2012 Special Report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded that "A changing climate leads to changes in the frequency, intensity, spatial extent, duration, and timing of extreme weather and climate events, and can result in unprecedented extreme weather and climate events." Existing data indicate increases over the last 50 years in several kinds of climate extremes. Climate models project continuing changes in these extremes. There is a wide range of opportunities for reducing disaster risk and improving disaster response. The most effective options tend to produce both immediate benefits in sustainable development and long-term benefits in reduced vulnerability. Some options may require transformation, including questioning assumptions and paradigms, and stimulating innovation. For the future, the recognition that climate change adaptation, disaster risk reduction, and sustainable development are all aspects of the same grand challenge can open a wide range of important opportunities.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Professor Chris Fieldis the founding director of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology. Professor Field's research emphasises impacts of climate change, from the molecular to the global scale. He is deeply involved with national and international scale efforts to advance science and assessment related to global ecology and climate change, especially the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, where he is co-chairs the working group responsible for assessments of climate-change Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Professor Field's recognitions include the Heinz Award, the Max Plank Research Award, and election to the US National Academy of Sciences.

WELCOME

Professor Joellen Riley, Dean, Sydney Law School

CHAIR

Professor Rosemary Lyster, Professor of Climate and Environmental Law and Director, Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law

COMMENTATOR

Professor Lesley Hughes,Macquarie University, member of the Climate Counciland an IPCC Working Group II (Australasia) Lead Author

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

"Contract Law Reform in Asia" Symposium   View Summary
6 December 2013

To register for this eventCLICK HERE


NB: The University of Sydney no longer accepts AMEX, to pay by cheque, please emaillaw.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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The Symposium (9.30am - 4pm) compares the comprehensive reforms recently proposed for Japan's Civil Code, likely to be enacted in 2014, with contract law reform initiatives and possibilities in Korea, China, Indonesia and Australia - involving leading speakers and moderators from all these jurisdictions as well as New Zealand and the USA.

The Symposium is supported by the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney and the Australian Network for Japanese Law, and is dedicated to the memory of the lateProfessor Zentaro Kitagawa.

PROGRAM

9.15-9.30

Registration

9.30-10am

Contract Law Reform in Japan - Process and Prospects

Professor Luke NOTTAGE, Sydney Law School

Chair: Dr Petra BUTLER, VUW

10-10.45am

Japan - Specific Topics

Professor Andrew PARDIECK, Southern Illinois University School of Law

Chair: Stacey STEELE, Melbourne Law School/ Standard and Poors

10.45-11am

Morning Tea

11-11.45am

Japan - Specific Topics (cont'd)

Professor Kenji SAIGUSA, Waseda University Law Faculty

Chair: Professor Greg TOLHURST

11.45-12.15pm

Q&A chaired by Dr Trevor RYAN

12.15-1pm

Lunch

1-1.45pm

Contract Law Reform in Korea (including Q&A)

Professor JEONG Jonghyu, Chonnam National University Faculty of Law

Chair: Professor Bing LING

1.45-2.45pm

Contract Law Reform in China (including Q&A)

Professor YAO Hui (deputy director), Renmin University Law School

Professor YANG Lixin (director), Renmin University Law School

Professor LIU Baoyu, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics School of Law

Chair: Professor Bing LING

2.45-3.00pm

Afternoon Tea

3.00-3.45pm

Contract Law Reform in Indonesia (including Q&A)

Dean Paripurna SUGARNA, Gadjah Mada University Law Faculty

Chair: A/Professor Simon BUTT

3.45-4.00pm

General Q&A chaired by Veronica TAYLOR, ANU

"Asia Pacific International Arbitration: What's Next?" Seminar   View Summary
6 December 2013

The event is BOOKED OUT

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This complimentary seminar with theAsia-Pacific Forum for International Arbitration (4pm- 6pm) focuses on regional developments in cross-border commercial dispute resolution.

PROGRAM(Click hereto download the event flyer)

4.00-4.15pm

Coffee and registration for AFIA arbitration symposium

4.15-4.45pm

First panel discussion

Lucy REED, Freshfields, Hong Kong & Singapore

Ben HUGHES, Independent Arbitrator and Mediator, Seoul & Hong Kong

Peter ANAGNOSTOU, Norton Rose Fulbright, Sydney

Moderator: Professor Luke NOTTAGE

4.45-5.15pm

Guest speaker

David RIVKIN, Debevoise & Plimpton, New York & London

5.15-6.00pm

Second panel discussion

David RIVKIN, Debevoise & Plimpton, New York & London

Yoshimi OHARA, Nagashima Ohno, Tokyo

Elodie DULAC, King & Spalding, Singapore

Moderator: Professor Chester BROWN

6.00-6.30

Cocktail refreshments

Attendees may also choose to attend the "Contract Law Reform in Asia" Symposium. The Symposium (9.30am - 4pm) compares the comprehensive reforms recently proposed for Japan's Civil Code, likely to be enacted in 2014, with contract law reform initiatives and possibilities in Korea, China, Indonesia and Australia - involving leading speakers and moderators from all these jurisdictions as well as New Zealand and the USA.Click herefor more information and the program.