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April
The Trump Muslim Ban: Litigating International Human Rights Before U.S. Courts   View Summary
24 April 2018

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The Trump Muslim Ban: Litigating International Human Rights Before U.S. Courts

Speaker: Professor Aaron Fellmeth, Arizona State University

Immediately after assuming office, Donald Trump, the 45th U.S. President, moved to fulfill his campaign pledge to implement "a total and complete shutdown of" Muslims entering the United States. In a hastily written executive order, Trump issued blanket suspensions on immigration from 7 Muslim countries, including refugees, valid visa holders, and lawful permanent residents. A series of legal challenges ensued, resulting in restraining orders against the bans and prompting Trump to revise the bans twice. The U.S. Supreme Court has partially upheld the bans pending full consideration of the case, which is now before it anew. What is remarkable about the judicial decisions staying the government measures is that not a single court has relied on U.S. obligations under international human rights law, or even mentioned human rights, despite the fact that the measures plainly violate several fundamental human rights, despite the issue being repeatedly raised by amici curiae. In his lecture, Prof. Fellmeth will explain the Trump Muslim Ban, the litigation surrounding it, and how these fit into the larger problem of U.S. legislative, executive, and judicial marginalization of international human rights law.


About the speaker
Aaron Fellmeth is a professor of law and a Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar in the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law. He is also a faculty fellow with the Center for Law, Science and Innovation, and the Center for Law and Global Affairs at Arizona State University.

Professor Fellmeth is a leading expert in public international law and international business transactions. He has published extensively on international legal theory, the history of international law, the international law of armed conflict, international trade law, human rights, and intellectual property law. He teaches Public International Law, International Business Transactions, International Law of Armed Conflict, International Human Rights Law, and Intellectual Property Law.

Professor Fellmeth's work has been cited several times by federal courts and in testimony before Congress. He has served as an Executive Advisory Committee member of International Legal Materials and is currently on the Board of Directors of the International Law Association (American Branch) and the chair of its International Human Rights Committee.

Before coming to ASU, Professor Fellmeth clerked for the Office of the General Counsel of the U.S. International Trade Commission and at the United Nations Office of Legal Affairs. He then spent seven years at international law firms practicing international business transactions, public international law, and intellectual property law.


CPD Points: 1

 

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May
Criminology Seminar Series: Challenges of Effecting Change in Policing Through Research   View Summary
3 May 2018

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Challenges of Effecting Change in Policing Through Research: Evidence from Programmes of Research Co-production and Participatory Action Research in the UK


Speaker: Professor Adam Crawford, University of Leeds

This presentation will assess and explore some of the challenges in fostering organisational change in policing through research knowledge and evidence. In so doing it will engage with debates about Evidence-Based Policing, its claims and implications. To illustrate the arguments, it will draw on two programmes of research and knowledge exchange in the UK. The first is the N8 Policing Research Partnership, a long-term collaboration of the eight research intensive universities in the North of England and 11 police forces and Police and Crime Commissioners as well as other policing partners that Professor Crawford has been leading. The second is a recently completed participatory action research project for the Police Knowledge Fund (College of Policing) that explored and developed the use of restorative justice in policing.

The presentation will examine and analyse the attributes and challenges of knowledge co-production in the context of policing. In so doing, it argues for a transformation in both the way academic researchers engage with policing partners and the place and value of knowledge, data and evidence within policing.


About the speaker

Adam Crawford is Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice in the Centre for Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Leeds where he is the Director of the Leeds Social Sciences Institute. For nearly 30 years, his research has focused on policing, urban security, community safety partnerships, the regulation of public space, restorative justice and victims of crime. He is Director of the N8 Policing Research Partnership; a collaboration between universities and policing partners in the north of England. The N8 PRP is seeking to transform the ways in which research knowledge is produced and evidence is utilised and mobilised by policing practitioners. Together with Professor Joanna Shapland (University of Sheffield), he has just completed a project exploring the use of restorative justice in policing in three English forces (funded by the College of Policing's Police Knowledge Fund). He is also working with colleagues on a recently completed AHRC project entitled: 'The future prospects of urban parks' and was the principal investigator on an ESRC research seminar series exploring the subject of 'Markets in Policing' (2015-17).


The event will be chaired by Dr Garner Clancey of the Sydney Institute of Criminology.


The Sydney Institute of Criminology presents the first lecture in our 2018 seminar series. Join us as Professor Adam Crawford reflects on the social impacts of research on policing.


CPD Points: 1.5

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Alumni-Student Discussion Forum: An Unusual Business Law Path: From Practice to Professor   View Summary
10 May 2018

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An Unusual Business Law Path: From Practice to Professor

Speaker: Associate Professor Hilary Allen, Suffolk University Law School (Boston)

Sydney University Alumna Hilary Allen will discuss her career path since graduating from Sydney University Law School in 2002, which has taken her from Sydney to the UK and the United States, and from corporate practice in international law firms to academia. In this discussion, she will reflect upon how her career in practice and her experience working in different jurisdictions has shaped her as a teacher and a scholar.

About the speaker
Associate Professor Hilary J. Allen will join the faculty of American University Washington College of Law in August 2018. She is currently an associate professor at Suffolk University Law School in Boston, where she teaches financial regulation and business law courses. Professor Allen's research concentrates on domestic and international financial stability regulation, exploring the financial products, institutions and regulators that can impact financial stability. Recently, she has focused on the rise of fintech, and its potential impact on financial stability.

Professor Allen received her Bachelors of Arts and Laws from the University of Sydney, and her Master of Laws in Securities and Financial Regulation Law from Georgetown University Law Center (for which she received the Thomas Bradbury Chetwood, S.J. Plaque for graduating first in her class). Prior to becoming a professor, Professor Allen spent seven years working in the financial services groups of prominent global firms Blake Dawson Waldron (Sydney), Clifford Chance (London) and Shearman & Sterling (New York). In 2010, she worked with the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission in Washington DC, which was appointed by Congress to study the causes of the financial crisis of 2007-2008.


The Law & Business Alumni-Student Discussion Forum is presented by Sydney Law School in partnership with The Sydney University Law Society (SULS).

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July
SAVE THE DATE & CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Queer(y)ing Justice in the Global South   View Summary
11 July 2018 to 13 July 2018

Call for abstracts extended - due by Friday 6 April 2018

Registrations - please email law.events@sydney.edu.au to be notified when conference registration opens (opening end of April 2018).

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Recent years have seen social, criminal, and legal justice campaigns for sexuality and gender diverse people gain increasing visibility and popular support in many jurisdictions, while repression and discrimination have increased in others. At the same time, academic LGBT and queer scholarship in fields such as criminology, criminal justice studies, sociology, and socio-legal studies, has grown significantly.

Despite reversals of enfranchisement for sexuality and gender diverse people in some countries, important changes in the interests of social and legal justice have been achieved, and there is a growing space in some legal and criminal justice contexts for the needs of sexuality and gender diverse people to be recognised. However, more can be done to respond to the intersections of inequalities in these contexts. Culturally diverse people, Indigenous people, and people seeking safety, among others, have not always benefited from these gains. A gulf remains between academia and practitioners in these areas, with greater opportunity to pay attention to the voices of those in the Global South in these debates, and to how 'Northern' frameworks guiding research and practice in this area may need to be reconsidered. These issues are central to ongoing campaigns to achieve greater social and criminal justice for sexuality and gender diverse people globally.

To further explore and respond to these issues, and strengthen the international networks of scholars and practitioners working in this area, we invite proposals to speak at an upcoming conference on 'Queer(y)ing Justice in the Global South'. We hope to question how justice can be 'queered' and queried from the perspectives of sexuality and gender diverse people.

We welcome proposals from academics as well as practitioners working in the field. We particularly welcome proposals from those in the Global South. The conference is an opportunity to bring together researchers, community members, and organisations working at the intersections of sexuality, gender diversity, and justice, broadly conceived.

 

Conference:

11-13 July 2018 (registrations will open at the end of April)

The conference will held at The University of Sydney, Australia, from 11-13 July 2018. It will include keynote presentations by:

  • Dameyon Bonson, Black Rainbow, Australia

Plenary: Queer(y)ing Indigenous Health; Achieving Indigenous LGBQTI Health and Social Justices (abstract)

Dameyon Bonson, a Mangarayi and Torres Strait Islander male, is a Northern Territory based advisor and facilitator in the prevention of Indigenous, including Indigenous LGBQTI suicide. Dameyon has spent the past six years working in upstream suicide prevention; three of those years working specifically within remote Aboriginal communities across the entire north west of Western Australia.
Dameyon has self-published the country's only report in suicide prevention relating to Indigenous LGBQTI people and crowdfunded the birthing of Black Rainbow; a social enterprise specifically for Indigenous LGBQTI people in the prevention of suicide. He has also developed the country's only workforce development training that look to strengthen the capabilities of health and community services to work with Indigenous LGBQTI clients.

In 2016, Dameyon was awarded the Dr. Yunupingu Award for Human Rights for his cumulative efforts. Despite handing back that award in 2018, he continues to be recognised as the leading voice in the prevention of Indigenous LGBQTI suicide and the health space. This year Dameyon began his post graduate studies in Suicide Prevention to strengthen his frontline and live experience contribution to the prevention of Indigenous suicide.

  • Professor Jo Phoenix, Open University, UK
  • Dr Jace Valcore, University of Houston Downtown, USA.

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Abstract submissions:

Due by Friday 6 April 2018

We invite abstract submissions for oral presentations, panels, or roundtables at this conference that respond to the above considerations. Abstract submissions should include information about the author(s), their institutional affiliations, their contact details, and a 300 word (maximum) abstract. Abstracts must be submitted by email (queeringjustice@gmail.com) no later than Friday 6 April 2018. Acceptance of an abstract will be advised by late April 2018. Selected presentations will also be considered for publication in an edited volume after the symposium.

Bursaries
There are a limited number of $500 (AUD) bursaries available to support First Nations scholars, or those travelling internationally from the Global South, to attend and present at the conference. If you would like to be considered for one of these, please indicate this on your abstract submission along with a succinct case (up to 500 words) supporting your application. In addition, please include a letter of support from your institution/employer/support organisation as to why your application for a bursary to the conference should be supported, including evidence of your track record in your area of expertise. This can include publishing, speaking and community engagement experience. Applicants who have already submitted an abstract are eligible to apply. Abstracts and supporting documentation should be submitted through the conference email queeringjustice@gmail.com by 6 April 2018.

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This conference is being jointly hosted by The Sydney Institute of Criminology (The University of Sydney), the Crime and Justice Research Centre (Queensland University of Technology), the Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies (University of Tasmania), and the School of Social Sciences and Psychology (Western Sydney University). It is also part nine of the Queering Paradigms conference series.

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August
Law & Business Downtown Seminar: The Remaking of Wall Street   View Summary
15 August 2018

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Please note: Online registrations must be paid by Mastercard or VISA. For alternative payment methods, please contact law.events@sydney.edu.au.
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The Remaking of Wall Street

Speaker: Professor Andrew Tuch, Washington University School of Law

This seminar will examine significant changes on Wall Street in the wake of the financial crisis of 2007-09. Since that time, major private equity firms have grown to resemble the former investment banks as they existed on the eve of the crisis. They have diversified their activities well beyond private equity, formed broker-dealer subsidiaries, and increasingly engaged in traditional investment banking. They have adopted the ethos of entrepreneurialism, innovation, and aggressive risk taking that was the hallmark of investment banking. Like the former investment banks, they act as "shadow banks" because of the bank-like functions they perform outside the traditional banking system. Many have gone public.
These similarities with the now-defunct investment banks might suggest that private equity firms pose financial risks similar to those of their predecessors. This seminar will argue that, as currently structured, private equity firms are more financially

stable and pose less systemic risk. However it warns that ongoing changes in firms' broker-dealer activities and hedge and credit funds pose risks that require active regulatory monitoring. The seminar will consider the implications of these post-crisis changes for regulatory reform, the popular backlash against Wall Street, and the incidence of financial misconduct.

 

About the speaker
Andrew Tuch is a professor of law at Washington University School of Law. He writes and teaches in financial and securities regulation and corporate law. His scholarship has appeared in leading journals in the US and overseas and has been cited judicially, including by the Delaware Court of Chancery. He holds LLM and SJD degrees from Harvard Law School where he was a Fulbright Scholar and an Olin Fellow in Law and Economics. An Australian, he practiced corporate law in New York and London before entering academia.

 

Commentator: Waldo Jones, Sullivan & Cromwell

Chair: Dr Natalie Silver, The University of Sydney Law School

 

Registration (GST inclusive)
Full fee: $77
Sydney Law School alumni: $66
Sydney Law School full time student: $44
Group 3+: $55

 

CPD Points: 1

 

The Law & Business Downtown seminar series is organised by Professor Jennifer Hill, Director of the Law & Business Program, Professor of Corporate Law, The University of Sydney Law School.

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September
Law & Business Downtown Seminar: White Collars, Dirty Cuffs: The BBSW Cases and Rate-Rigging   View Summary
20 September 2018

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Please note: Online registrations must be paid by Mastercard or VISA. For alternative payment methods, please contact law.events@sydney.edu.au.
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White Collars, Dirty Cuffs: The BBSW Cases and Rate-Rigging

Speaker: Greg O'Mahoney, Barrister, New Chambers

ASIC's cases against the major banks for alleged manipulation of the Bank Bill Swap Reference Rate (BBSW) were ground-breaking - not just in Australia but internationally. They concerned conduct which went to the integrity of Australia's key interest rate benchmark and markets at the heart of our financial system. The BBSW proceedings highlighted a corporate regulator with an unprecedented willingness to undertake complex investigations and litigation aimed at exposing conduct about which the Australian public (as Justice Jagot, in approving the settlement between ASIC and the ANZ and NAB banks, put it) should be "shocked, dismayed and disgusted".

This presentation will examine the implications of these cases for the regulation of market manipulation in Australia.

About the speaker
Dr Greg O'Mahoney is a barrister in New Chambers. His principal areas of practice include corporate and commercial law. Greg appeared for ASIC in the BBSW proceedings against the ANZ Bank. He is an Adjunct Lecturer at Sydney University where he teaches a Masters course on market manipulation and insider trading. He was Associate to Chief Justice Murray Gleeson at the High Court of Australia in 2005-2006. Prior to commencing at the Bar, he studied as a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford, where he completed the BCL and DPhil in law. He is a graduate of Sydney University with First Class Honours in both Arts and Law.

 

Commentator: The Honourable Justice Michael Wigney, Federal Court of Australia

Chair: Dr Juliette Overland, The University of Sydney Business School

 

Registration (GST inclusive)
Full fee: $77
Sydney Law School alumni: $66
Sydney Law School full time student: $44
Group 3+: $55

 

CPD Points: 1

 

The Law & Business Downtown seminar series is organised by Professor Jennifer Hill, Director of the Law & Business Program, Professor of Corporate Law, The University of Sydney Law School.

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October
Law & Business Downtown Seminar: Sketching the Australian Activist Landscape   View Summary
23 October 2018

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Please note: Online registrations must be paid by Mastercard or VISA. For alternative payment methods, please contact law.events@sydney.edu.au.
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Sketching the Australian Activist Landscape: The Nature and Implications of Contemporary Australian Shareholder Activism

Speaker: Tim Bowley, The University of Sydney Law School

Shareholder activism attracts significant attention in the Australian financial press and is widely regarded as a major phenomenon in Australian corporate governance. In recent years, there have been calls for law reform to address shareholder activism - in some cases to facilitate it, in other cases to regulate it more closely. In order to understand the need for, and implications of, such reforms, it is important to have a clear understanding of the nature of shareholder activism in the Australian context.

In this seminar, Tim Bowley will present the results of his research project, which analyses publicly-disclosed activist interventions in recent years relation to companies in the S&P/ASX 500 index. What emerges from this research is a more nuanced picture of the nature of shareholder activists, their objectives and tactics, and the types of companies they target.

In this seminar, Tim will discuss the implications of his research for the regulation of shareholder activism in Australia and for corporate governance practices more generally.


About the speaker
Tim Bowley is currently a doctoral candidate at Sydney Law School, where he is engaged in research on the regulatory implications of shareholder activism. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, Tim was a partner in a national Australian law firm with a practice focused on corporate advice and mergers and acquisitions, and has also practised in London. In 2017 Tim received Sydney Law School's Walter Reid research scholarship and undertook a doctoral exchange at Harvard Law School, where he researched the potential implications of developments in US shareholder activism for Australia. Tim holds a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws from the University of Adelaide and a Master of Law from the University of Cambridge.


Commentator: Ewen Crouch AM, Allens

Chair: Dr Olivia Dixon, The University of Sydney Law School

 

Registration (GST inclusive)
Full fee: $77
Sydney Law School alumni: $66
Sydney Law School full time student: $44
Group 3+: $55

 

CPD Points: 1

 

The Law & Business Downtown seminar series is organised by Professor Jennifer Hill, Director of the Law & Business Program, Professor of Corporate Law, The University of Sydney Law School.

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