All future 2018 events

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July
"My friends are on WeChat and my boss as well":Social Media & Employee Privacy in Chinese Workplace   View Summary
10 July 2018

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Speaker: Dr Mimi Zou, inaugural Fangda Career Development Fellow in Chinese Commercial Law at St Hugh's College, in association with the Oxford Law Faculty and the Oxford China Centre

About the event

It is no understatement that social media has become a ubiquitous feature of our lives. In the People's Republic of China, the popularity of social media usage continues to grow, particularly in the workplace setting. The vast quantity and range of data generated and shared on social networks, including personal information, have become a valuable resource for employers to screen job applicants, monitor work performance, and investigate employee wrongdoings. Developments in workplace surveillance technologies have also made it easier for employers to track, monitor, and access employees' online activities. The legitimacy of employers' inquiry into the online lives of job applicants and employees is often justified on the basis of business concerns about reputational risks, leakage of intellectual property and trade secrets, and other legal liabilities that could arise from employees' social media activities.

In this talk, Dr Zou will probe into a number of regulatory challenges arising from employers' acquisition and use of social media in China. She will start with an analysis of the extent to which privacy and personal data protection laws in China, including relatively recent developments in the Cyber Security Law and the General Rules of Civil Law, protect employees' rights in this context. Dr Zou will then examine relevant cases brought before local courts that reveal how employers have accessed and made use of employees' social media communications in various circumstances. From this analysis, she will highlight three important issues that expose extant regulatory gaps in the protection of employee privacy in this context: unlawful discrimination arising from employers' use of employees' and job applicants' social media content; employee speech that may harm an employer's business and reputational interests; and 'off-duty' social media communications of employees. The talk will conclude with some observations about the further risks posed by the rapid development of Artificial Intelligence in workplace surveillance technology in China.

Speaker
Dr Mimi Zou is the inaugural Fangda Career Development Fellow in Chinese Commercial Law at St Hugh's College, in association with the Oxford Law Faculty and the Oxford China Centre. It is the first post in Chinese law at the University of Oxford. Dr Zou has the role of developing the subject as a new field of study and research at Oxford, exploring how best to understand Chinese law and the links between law, economy, politics, and society, both within China and as it affects transnational relations.

Dr Zou obtained her Doctor of Philosophy in Law and Bachelor of Civil Law (Distinction) degrees from St John's College and Christ Church, University of Oxford on a Commonwealth Scholarship and a James Fairfax Oxford Australia Scholarship. She also graduated with first class honours degrees in Law, Economics, and Social Sciences (University Medal) from the University of Sydney. She is currently completing an Executive MBA programme.

CPD points: 1.5


This event is co-presented with the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at Sydney Law School and the University of Sydney Business School.

JSI Seminar Series: Legal Polycentrism: A Jurisprudential Evaluation   View Summary
10 July 2018

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Legal Polycentrism: A Jurisprudential Evaluation


Speaker: David VanDrunen, Westminster Seminary California

An old question in legal theory is whether law is monocentric (that is, deriving exclusively from state sources) or polycentric (that is, deriving from a variety of state and non-state sources). Contrary to prevalent contemporary assumptions that law is monocentric, this paper presents five interconnected reasons to believe law should be interpreted as polycentric instead. The paper concludes by suggesting ways to identify what the law is when state and non-state sources conflict.


About the speaker

David VanDrunen (JD, Northwestern University School of Law; PhD, Loyola University Chicago) is the Robert B. Strimple Professor of Systematic Theology and Christian Ethics at Westminster Seminary California, where he has taught since 2001. He was a visiting fellow of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University in 2009 and was a Henry Luce III Fellow in Theology in 2016-17. He is the author or editor of eleven books, which treat a variety of legal, theological, and ethical issues.


CPD Points: 1.5

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Queer(y)ing Justice in the Global South Conference   View Summary
11 July 2018 to 13 July 2018

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Recent years have seen social, criminal, and legal justice campaigns for sexuality and gender diverse people gain increasing visibility and popular support in many jurisdictions, while repression and discrimination have increased in others. At the same time, academic LGBT and queer scholarship in fields such as criminology, criminal justice studies, sociology, and socio-legal studies, has grown significantly.

Despite reversals of enfranchisement for sexuality and gender diverse people in some countries, important changes in the interests of social and legal justice have been achieved, and there is a growing space in some legal and criminal justice contexts for the needs of sexuality and gender diverse people to be recognised. However, more can be done to respond to the intersections of inequalities in these contexts. Culturally diverse people, Indigenous people, and people seeking safety, among others, have not always benefited from these gains. A gulf remains between academia and practitioners in these areas, with greater opportunity to pay attention to the voices of those in the Global South in these debates, and to how 'Northern' frameworks guiding research and practice in this area may need to be reconsidered. These issues are central to ongoing campaigns to achieve greater social and criminal justice for sexuality and gender diverse people globally.

To further explore and respond to these issues, and strengthen the international networks of scholars and practitioners working in this area, we invite proposals to speak at an upcoming conference on 'Queer(y)ing Justice in the Global South'. We hope to question how justice can be 'queered' and queried from the perspectives of sexuality and gender diverse people.

The conference is an opportunity to bring together researchers, community members, and organisations working at the intersections of sexuality, gender diversity, and justice, broadly conceived.

View the draft program


The conference will held at The University of Sydney, Australia, from 11-13 July 2018. It will include keynote presentations by:

Dameyon Bonson, Black Rainbow, Australia

Plenary: Queer(y)ing Indigenous Health; Achieving Indigenous LGBQTI Health and Social Justices (ABSTRACT)

Dameyon Bonson, a Mangarayi and Torres Strait Islander male, is a Northern Territory based advisor and facilitator in the prevention of Indigenous, including Indigenous LGBQTI suicide. Dameyon has spent the past six years working in upstream suicide prevention; three of those years working specifically within remote Aboriginal communities across the entire north west of Western Australia.
Dameyon has self-published the country's only report in suicide prevention relating to Indigenous LGBQTI people and crowdfunded the birthing of Black Rainbow; a social enterprise specifically for Indigenous LGBQTI people in the prevention of suicide. He has also developed the country's only workforce development training that look to strengthen the capabilities of health and community services to work with Indigenous LGBQTI clients.

In 2016, Dameyon was awarded the Dr. Yunupingu Award for Human Rights for his cumulative efforts. Despite handing back that award in 2018, he continues to be recognised as the leading voice in the prevention of Indigenous LGBQTI suicide and the health space. This year Dameyon began his post graduate studies in Suicide Prevention to strengthen his frontline and live experience contribution to the prevention of Indigenous suicide.


Professor Jo Phoenix, Open University, UK

Against Queer Criminology: For A Criminology Of Sex And Sexualities (ABSTRACT)

Jo Phoenix is Professor in Criminology at the Open University, having formerly been at the Universities of Leicester, Durham, Bath and Middlesex. Her research interests relate to the fields of youth crime and punishment; sex, sexualities and regulation, and criminological knowledge production.  She has been a keen observer and remained interested in the politics of sex and sexualities since her days of feminist activitism in Bristol, England in the 1980s.

Her most recent publications are:

- two chapters in an edited collection entitled Alternative Criminologies edited by Carlen, P. and Franca Ayres, L.  (2017: Routledge),

- two chapters on discourses and policies of childhood sexual exploitation in Dewey et al (eds) Routledge Handbook of Sex Work Research (forthcoming 2018: Routledge) and Pearce, J. (ed.) Child Sexual Exploitation: Theory to Practice forthcoming 2018: Bristol Policy Press)

- and a monograph entitled Youth Justice 2.0 (forthcoming 2018: Palgrave).


Dr Jace Valcore, University of Houston Downtown, USA

Beyond Pulse: Queering Frontiers (ABSTRACT)

Jace L. Valcore, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Houston Downtown. His educational background includes degrees in Sociology, Criminal Justice, and Public Affairs. This multidisciplinary training fuels research interests in public policy, criminal law, social justice, and the criminal legal system with a specifically queer lens focused on the experiences, needs, and elevation of the LGBTQ community. He has published work on US state hate crime laws, gender in policing, and co-edited a special issue on LGBTQ families for Journal of Family Strengths. He is currently completing projects on the measurement of gender in criminological research, the experiences of LGBTQ police officers, and media analysis of the 2016 mass shooting at Pulse nightclub in Orlando, FL. He also provides queer competency workshops and seminars for students, educators, professionals, and community members, and serves on the board for New Leaders Council-Houston.

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This conference is being jointly hosted by The Sydney Institute of Criminology (The University of Sydney), the Crime and Justice Research Centre (Queensland University of Technology), the Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies (University of Tasmania), and the School of Social Sciences and Psychology (Western Sydney University). It is also part nine of the Queering Paradigms conference series.

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NAIDOC Week Public Lecture: "Because of her, we can!"   View Summary
12 July 2018

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Sydney Law School, Faculty of Health Sciences, and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at The University of Sydney invites you to the Annual University of Sydney NAIDOC Public Lecture.

Hear from a panel of exceptional Aboriginal women from The University of Sydney, and across NSW, showcasing the different ways in which Indigenous women have played - and continue to play - active and significant roles at the community, local, state and national levels.

Our panel speakers will include Kamilaroi astronomer, Karlie Noon, the social epidemiologist, Dr Vanessa Lee, award winning poet, Evelyn Araluen, and Nakari Thorpe, political reporter on NITV. The lecture will also feature a performance by the legendary blues singer, Aunty Marlene Cummins, and Donna Ingram will give the Welcome to Country.


NAIDOC Week is a time to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, culture and achievements and is an opportunity to recognise the contributions that Indigenous Australians make to our country and society.


Time

6 - 6.30pm Registration and refreshments

6.30 - 8pm Welcome to Country and presentations


The University of Sydney NAIDOC Public Lecture is hosted by Sydney Law School, Faculty of Health Sciences, and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

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Public Health Law and Health Leadership in the United States: What can Australia learn?   View Summary
19 July 2018

Registration

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About the seminar

In 2016, life expectancy at birth in the United States fell for the second year in a row.  Since his inauguration in 2017, President Trump and his administration have taken a number of actions that arguably weaken America's public health infrastructure.

At the same time, the United States remains one of the world's great innovators. With 52 States and more than 89,000 local and city governments, the United States frequently functions as a social laboratory for social policies, and public health laws and practices. While constrained in some areas by its constitutional design, the United States remains a leader in global health: its influence and innovations in public health law cannot be ignored.

What can Australia learn from recent American experience with public health law and regulation?  What are the good ideas?  What should be avoided?  How can Australian jurisdictions adapt the best American innovations and create an enabling legal and political environment for public health and wellbeing?
This seminar features presentations reviewing public health law and leadership in the United States, with particular reference to: communicable diseases and pandemic preparedness, non-communicable diseases, health care, injuries and global health leadership.

Click here for a copy of the flyer

Chair:Professor Simon Jackman, CEO, United States Studies Centre

Speakers/topics:

Keynote speaker:

  • US public health and global health leadership (or not)
    Professor Lawrence Gostin, Linda and Timothy O'Neill Professor of Global Health Law, Georgetown University Law School, Washington DC, and Faculty Director of the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law. Prof. Gostin is the Director of the WHO Collaborating Center on National and Global Health Law

CPD points = 1.5

This event is co-presented by the University of Sydney Law School and the United States Studies Centre.
August
Law & Business Downtown Seminar: The Remaking of Wall Street   View Summary
15 August 2018

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Please note: Online registrations must be paid by Mastercard or VISA. For alternative payment methods, please contact law.events@sydney.edu.au.
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The Remaking of Wall Street

Speaker: Professor Andrew Tuch, Washington University School of Law

This seminar will examine significant changes on Wall Street in the wake of the financial crisis of 2007-09. Since that time, major private equity firms have grown to resemble the former investment banks as they existed on the eve of the crisis. They have diversified their activities well beyond private equity, formed broker-dealer subsidiaries, and increasingly engaged in traditional investment banking. They have adopted the ethos of entrepreneurialism, innovation, and aggressive risk taking that was the hallmark of investment banking. Like the former investment banks, they act as "shadow banks" because of the bank-like functions they perform outside the traditional banking system. Many have gone public.

These similarities with the now-defunct investment banks might suggest that private equity firms pose financial risks similar to those of their predecessors. This seminar will argue that, as currently structured, private equity firms are more financially stable and pose less systemic risk. However it warns that ongoing changes in firms' broker-dealer activities and hedge and credit funds pose risks that require active regulatory monitoring. The seminar will consider the implications of these post-crisis changes for regulatory reform, the popular backlash against Wall Street, and the incidence of financial misconduct.

About the speaker
Andrew Tuch is a professor of law at Washington University School of Law. He writes and teaches in financial and securities regulation and corporate law. His scholarship has appeared in leading journals in the US and overseas and has been cited judicially, including by the Delaware Court of Chancery. He holds LLM and SJD degrees from Harvard Law School where he was a Fulbright Scholar and an Olin Fellow in Law and Economics. An Australian, he practiced corporate law in New York and London before entering academia.

 

Commentator: Waldo Jones, Sullivan & Cromwell

Chair: Dr Natalie Silver, The University of Sydney Law School

 

Registration (GST inclusive)
Full fee: $77
Sydney Law School alumni: $66
Sydney Law School full time student: $44
Group 3+: $55

 

CPD Points: 1


View the 2018 Law & Business Downtown Seminar Program


The Law & Business Downtown seminar series is organised by Professor Jennifer Hill, Director of the Law & Business Program, Professor of Corporate Law, The University of Sydney Law School.

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September
Law & Business Downtown Seminar: White Collars, Dirty Cuffs: The BBSW Cases and Rate-Rigging   View Summary
20 September 2018

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Please note: Online registrations must be paid by Mastercard or VISA. For alternative payment methods, please contact law.events@sydney.edu.au.
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White Collars, Dirty Cuffs: The BBSW Cases and Rate-Rigging

Speaker: Greg O'Mahoney, Barrister, New Chambers

ASIC's cases against the major banks for alleged manipulation of the Bank Bill Swap Reference Rate (BBSW) were ground-breaking - not just in Australia but internationally. They concerned conduct which went to the integrity of Australia's key interest rate benchmark and markets at the heart of our financial system. The BBSW proceedings highlighted a corporate regulator with an unprecedented willingness to undertake complex investigations and litigation aimed at exposing conduct about which the Australian public (as Justice Jagot, in approving the settlement between ASIC and the ANZ and NAB banks, put it) should be "shocked, dismayed and disgusted".

This presentation will examine the implications of these cases for the regulation of market manipulation in Australia.

About the speaker
Dr Greg O'Mahoney is a barrister in New Chambers. His principal areas of practice include corporate and commercial law. Greg appeared for ASIC in the BBSW proceedings against the ANZ Bank. He is an Adjunct Lecturer at Sydney University where he teaches a Masters course on market manipulation and insider trading. He was Associate to Chief Justice Murray Gleeson at the High Court of Australia in 2005-2006. Prior to commencing at the Bar, he studied as a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford, where he completed the BCL and DPhil in law. He is a graduate of Sydney University with First Class Honours in both Arts and Law.

 

Commentator: The Honourable Justice Michael Wigney, Federal Court of Australia

Chair: Dr Juliette Overland, The University of Sydney Business School

 

Registration (GST inclusive)
Full fee: $77
Sydney Law School alumni: $66
Sydney Law School full time student: $44
Group 3+: $55

 

CPD Points: 1


View the 2018 Law & Business Downtown Seminar Program


The Law & Business Downtown seminar series is organised by Professor Jennifer Hill, Director of the Law & Business Program, Professor of Corporate Law, The University of Sydney Law School.

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October
Law & Business Downtown Seminar: Sketching the Australian Activist Landscape   View Summary
23 October 2018

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Please note: Online registrations must be paid by Mastercard or VISA. For alternative payment methods, please contact law.events@sydney.edu.au.
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Sketching the Australian Activist Landscape: The Nature and Implications of Contemporary Australian Shareholder Activism

Speaker: Tim Bowley, The University of Sydney Law School

Shareholder activism attracts significant attention in the Australian financial press and is widely regarded as a major phenomenon in Australian corporate governance. In recent years, there have been calls for law reform to address shareholder activism - in some cases to facilitate it, in other cases to regulate it more closely. In order to understand the need for, and implications of, such reforms, it is important to have a clear understanding of the nature of shareholder activism in the Australian context.

In this seminar, Tim Bowley will present the results of his research project, which analyses publicly-disclosed activist interventions in recent years relation to companies in the S&P/ASX 500 index. What emerges from this research is a more nuanced picture of the nature of shareholder activists, their objectives and tactics, and the types of companies they target.

In this seminar, Tim will discuss the implications of his research for the regulation of shareholder activism in Australia and for corporate governance practices more generally.


About the speaker
Tim Bowley is currently a doctoral candidate at Sydney Law School, where he is engaged in research on the regulatory implications of shareholder activism. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, Tim was a partner in a national Australian law firm with a practice focused on corporate advice and mergers and acquisitions, and has also practised in London. In 2017 Tim received Sydney Law School's Walter Reid research scholarship and undertook a doctoral exchange at Harvard Law School, where he researched the potential implications of developments in US shareholder activism for Australia. Tim holds a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws from the University of Adelaide and a Master of Law from the University of Cambridge.


Commentator: Ewen Crouch AM, Allens

Chair: Dr Olivia Dixon, The University of Sydney Law School

 

Registration (GST inclusive)
Full fee: $77
Sydney Law School alumni: $66
Sydney Law School full time student: $44
Group 3+: $55

 

CPD Points: 1

 

The Law & Business Downtown seminar series is organised by Professor Jennifer Hill, Director of the Law & Business Program, Professor of Corporate Law, The University of Sydney Law School.

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