All future 2013 events

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February
Seminar - Modafinil in untreated mild to moderate sleep apnea    View Summary
12 February 2013

Full title: Modafinil in untreated mild to moderate sleep apnea - results from a randomised, placebo controlled, double-blind crossover trial

Presenter:Ms Julia Chapman, CIRUS

Summary

Julia will present the results of the modafinil in mild to moderate sleep apnea trial (MOSA) that was completed at the Woolcock Institute between October 2009 and November 2012.
Modafinil is a wakefulness promoter which has been approved for use in patients with treated sleep apnea and residual daytime sleepiness. This study provides novel data on the effect of modafinil on daytime sleepiness in untreated sleep apnea patients, offering a potential clinical option for these patients.
Julia hopes to present this research at the APSS conference in Baltimore in June. The talk will be in a format of 10 min presentation + 5 minute questions/discussion.
For the rest of the time, Julia would also like to introduce/discuss her current PhD work looking at the use of modafinil and armodafinil in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (DEAR).

About the speaker

Julia has worked at the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research as a Clinical Trials Coordinator since 2008. She started her PhD at the University of Sydney in 2012 under the supervision of Dr Nat Marshall and Prof Ron Grunstein working on the DEAR trial.

Hosted by Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Seminar - Function-based screening for therapeutic targets in cancer   View Summary
12 February 2013

Presenter:Professor Daniel Peeper, Head, Division of Molecular Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - PET radiotracers for imaging the biochemistry of cancer   View Summary
14 February 2013

Presenter:Associate Professor Andrew Katsifis, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Sleep restriction therapy for insomnia disorder: experimental studies   View Summary
19 February 2013

Presenter:Mr Christopher Miller, CIRUS, Universities of Sydney and Glasgow

About the speaker

Christopher Miller is a Cotutelle Doctoral Researcher based at the Universities of Glasgow and Sydney. He graduated from the University of Glasgow (2009) with a BSc Hons (First Class) in Psychology. Post-graduation he worked as a Research Assistant on a large scale public engagement study with the University of Glasgow Sleep Centre investigating biomarkers for sleepiness. He is interested in the biological basis of behaviour and his current research is focused on sleep and in particular, the assessment of effective behavioural treatment for Insomnia Disorder. Currently, he is examining the response to Sleep Restriction Therapy through subjective and objective measurements of sleep and daytime functioning as part of his PhD.

Hosted by Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Lecture - Sexual identity disorder   View Summary
20 February 2013

Presenter:Dr Vinciane Corman, Belgian Endocrinologist and Board member of the Belgian Endocrine Society.

The talk will be given in French with slides in English.

Seminar - Real-time tracking of cell cycle progression in melanoma   View Summary
21 February 2013

Full title: Real-time tracking of cell cycle progression in melanoma and its implications for the 'real world'

Bonus: On a larger scale - real-time tracking of albatross

Presenter:Dr Nikolas Haass, Associate Faculty, Immune Imaging, Centenary Institute

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - The active cortex at cell-cell junctions: diversity and principles of self-organisation   View Summary
22 February 2013

Speaker:Professor Alpha Yap, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland

Research interest
Professor Yap's group studies the role of cadherin cell adhesion molecules in morphogenesis and tumour development. E-cadherin is a key mediator of cell-cell recognition. It participates in tissue patterning and its dysfunction contributes to tumor progression and invasion.

Bio
Professor Yap is a Medicine and PhD graduate of the University of Queensland. He completed clinical training at the Royal Brisbane Hospital with the Hospital's Head of Endocrinology and Clinical Professor with UQ's School of Medicine, Professor Robin Mortimer. Between completing his PhD in the laboratory of Associate Professor Simon Manley in 1994 and returning to the University of Queensland in 1997,Professor Yap worked as a CJ Martin Research Fellow at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre in New York. Professor Yap returned to UQ as a Wellcome Trust Senior International Medical Research Fellow and has a joint appointment with the School of Biomedical Sciences and the University's Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) and is now a Professorial Research Fellow.

Hosted by the Children's Medical Research Institute

Forum for young people living with rare disease   View Summary
23 February 2013

We are looking forward to a successful Forum where young people and parents have an opportunity to discuss transition to adult health services and the many other transitions facing young people. We aim to use the forum to develop advocacy tools which can be used to improve Transition Services.

Hosted by the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit

Seminar - Identifying sleep apnoea patients who may benefit from non-PAP therapies   View Summary
26 February 2013

Presenter:Associate Professor Andrew Wellman, Harvard Medical School

About the speaker

Andrew Wellman, MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. The goal of his research is to understand the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). In doing so, the aim is to contribute to the development of newer, more tolerable therapies for patients. Dr Wellman has pioneered new measurement techniques to quantify respiratory control stability (loop gain) during sleep. He continues to work on developing novel tools to define the pathophysiological traits that cause sleep apnoea. He is a world leader in this line of investigation and has expertise in respiratory/upper airway physiology and engineering.

Hosted by Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Seminar - Human stromal (skeletal) stem cells: from basic biology to clinical applications   View Summary
26 February 2013

Presenter:ProfessorMoustapha Kassem, KMEB, Molecular Endocrinology, University of Southern Denmark

Hosted byCentenary Institute

Seminar - Intrahepatic T cell responses after liver transplantation   View Summary
28 February 2013

Full title: Intrahepatic T cell responses after liver transplantation and
adeno-associated virus mediated antigen delivery

Presenter:Dr Szun Tay, Research Officer, Immune Imaging, Centenary Institute

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

March
Seminar - Lipids in the land of plenty: metabolic studies in obesity and diabetes   View Summary
4 March 2013

Speaker: Professor Hugh Barrett from the University of Western Australia

Further details

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Seminar - Systems analysis of insulin action   View Summary
4 March 2013

Speaker: ProfessorDavid James from the University of New South Wales

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Seminar - A multidisciplinary approach to obesity research   View Summary
5 March 2013

Speaker: Professor Gary Wittert, Head, Discipline of Medicine, and Director Freemasons Foundation Centre for Men's Health, University of Adelaide

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Seminar - Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields and Brain Physiology   View Summary
5 March 2013

Full title: Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields and brain physiology: effects on sleep and the electroencephalogram

Presenter:Dr Sarah Loughran, University of Wollongong and Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Zürich, Switzerland

Presentation summary

The steady increase of mobile phone usage has led to increased concern about potential adverse health effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMF), such as those emitted by mobile phones, at intensities below the existing safety limits. Due to this widespread use and concern, numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the possible effects of mobile phone-related emissions on human health, with a particular focus on potential effects on brain activity. Indeed, accumulating evidence suggests that pulse-modulated RF EMF may alter brain physiology. Exposure-related increases in alpha power during waking and the spindle frequency range during sleep have now been consistently shown. Additionally, a number of studies have indicated that pulse modulation of the RF EMF signal may be crucial to induce these changes in brain activity, that the effects may be dose-dependent, and particularly in regards to sleep, that the effects on the EEG outlast exposure.

Despite the established effect of RF EMF exposure on the EEG, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of this effect remain unknown. Therefore, to further understand the potential causal association between RF EMF exposure and brain function and to help draw conclusions about possible health consequences of RF EMF, research addressing the mechanisms and functional significance of these observed effects is a priority. Based on the state of knowledge from previous research, this talk will discuss current and future research aimed at further understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying this exposure-induced effect on brain activity, while also exploring the potential sensitivity of children, whose brains are still undergoing maturation, to such exposures.

About the speaker

Dr Loughran completed a PhD in cognitive neuroscience/psychophysiology at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne under the guidance of Professor Rodney Croft, investigating the effects of electromagnetic fields on sleep, the EEG, and melatonin. Sarah subsequently spent 5 years as a postdoctoral fellow continuing this research at one of the leading international sleep laboratories (Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Zurich, Switzerland) under the guidance of Professor Peter Achermann. While there she also expanded her expertise and began research in other sleep-related areas, particularly looking at sleep-wake behavior and the EEG in vegetative state and minimal conscious patients. She is now about to begin a senior research position focusing on electromagnetic health research at the University of Wollongong. She is a recognised leader in Bioelectromagnetics research, evidenced by her role as an invited member of the current World Health Organisation's RF Environmental Health Criterion evaluation committee as well as her recent appointment as an invited member of the scientific expert group at the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection.

She has won several awards for her work and presentations, including the Young Scientist Award from the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) General Assembly in 2008 and elected as an experienced research fellow in the Marie Curie training in Sleep Research and Sleep Medicine program. Her contribution to the field has also been recognised by numerous invitations to present her work, including presentations at Oxford University, the German Aerospace Center, the Electric Power Research Institute in Palo Alto, California, and a plenary seminar at the Bioelectromagnetics annual conference in Seoul, South Korea.

Hosted by Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Lecture - Sleep and pain: understanding a deleterious interaction   View Summary
7 March 2013

Speaker: Professor Gilles Lavigne, Dean, Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Montreal

About the speaker

Professor Lavigne completed Post Doctoral training in the neurobiology of pain at NIZH, Bethesda, and a Doctor Honorus Causa from the faculty of Medicine Zurich 2009. He currently holds a Research Chair in Pain, Sleep and Trauma, is the Past President of the Canadian Sleep Society and the President Elect of the Canadian Pain Society. He is the co-founder and past director of the 3 research networks in Oral Health, Pain and Placebo Mechanisms of the Fonds de la Recherche en Sante du Quebec and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). He was the co-director of the training grant Pain MC2 of the CIRH. Gilles Lavigne is internationally recognised for his experimental and clinical research on bruxism, and is currently conducting studies of the role of sleep in placebo analgesia, the influence of sleep on airway on sleep in teenagers
with craniofacial malformation , and sleep and pain in patients with brain injury.

Hosted by the Discipline of Sleep Medicine

Seminar - Serving the community: training generalists and extending specialists   View Summary
8 March 2013

The Royal Australasian College of Physicians, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada have been working together on issues of joint interest for some time.

The seminar is designed to attract senior health educators, policy makers and advisors, regulators and others working in the area of specialist education and training. Among the anticipated 250 participants will be delegates from the

three Colleges, other medical colleges, associations and councils.

The move over previous decades towards increased specialisation and sub-specialisation has produced a decline in the number of specialists who have retained the general component of practice or general orientation. This trend is impacting on the capacity to provide health care to communities and is an issue for Governments, policy makers and educators of generalists and specialists in

Australia, New Zealand and Canada. It is also closely associated with other key issues in health such as access, safety and quality, costs and outcomes for individuals and the community. These issues will be the focus of the conference program.

International Women's Day Forum   View Summary
11 March 2013

Theme: Integrating care in the perinatal period: crucial to mother and child survival in resource-poor settings

This is a joint event with Médecins Sans Frontières and features an AusAID scholarship recipient studying at the University of Sydney.

Registration closes 12.30pm on Monday 11 March

Seminar - Dendritic cells and CD8+ T cells in immunity to peripheral HSV-1 infection   View Summary
12 March 2013

Presenter:Dr Sammy Bedoui, NHMRC Career Development Fellow, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, The University of Melbourne

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - e-health expose   View Summary
12 March 2013

Presenter:Dr Andrew Campbell, Bachelor of Health Sciences Co-Director, Senior Lecturer in Psychology, Faculty of Health Sciences

Presentation summary

This presentation will give a broad overview of the current research and applications in e-Health, with a general review of e-health records, tele-health, online counselling, mobile technologies, virtual reality and serious games. Dr Campbell will also give specific examples of his work to date involving biofeedback serious games to treat ADHD and Virtual Client Interview Training Software developed in 2012.

About the speaker

Dr Andrew Campbell has been researching and teaching in the area of e-Mental Health and Child, Adolescent and Family Mental Health for more than a decade. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Health Sciences, and the Co-Director of the Bachelor of Health Sciences. He obtained his PhD in psychology in 2003 and was the first psychologist in Australia to research and publish about the use of the Internet for social fearfulness self-help. He is often approached to speak in the media on the topics of popular leisure and communication technology (e.g. video game addiction, mobile phone use and youth culture and technology) and its impact on healthy behaviour across the lifespan. He has conducted research notably in the area of online therapies for depression and anxiety, as well as in AD/HD treatment using bio-feedback videogames.


In 2006 he established a research team called, Prometheus - Technology and Well Being (TWB), which is one of 63 partner organisations under the CRC Young and Well, which was awarded $27million in funding by the DIISR for 5 years. He is a passionate teacher who has secured Learning and Teaching Grants in excess of $200K since 2005 to improve Health Science Education at The University of Sydney.

Hosted by Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Think arthritis and osteoporosis: a clinical update day   View Summary
16 March 2013

A seminar for health care professionals on the latest research and management guidelines in arthritis and osteoporosis.

Seminar - Molecular regulation of angiogenic blood vessel growth   View Summary
18 March 2013

Presenter:Professor Ralf Adams, Director, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Department of Tissue Morphogenesis, University of Muenster, Germany

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Instability of respiratory motor output and OSA: implications for treatment   View Summary
19 March 2013

Presenter:Professor Jerome Dempsey, University of Wisconsin, Madison

About the speaker

Professor Jerome Dempsey is a world leader in Respiratory Physiology, and the immediate Post Editor of Journal of Applied Physiology. He is John Robert Sutton Professor of Population Health Sciences, and the Director of John Rankin Laboratory of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison. He has his primary appointment in the Department of Population Health Sciences and affiliate appointments in Physiology and Kinesiology. His research interests are concerned with the regulation of breathing in various physiologic states in un-anesthetized humans and animals. One group of projects seeks to determine the limits of the healthy human pulmonary system for gas transport, respiratory muscle function and ventilatory output during exercise. The effects of aging, gender, fitness and airway reactivity on these processes are emphasized. A second major aim is the influence of respiration on autonomic control of cardiovascular function. A third series of studies is concerned with regulation of breathing in waking and sleeping humans and animals, with specific emphasis on sleep apnea and the effects of novel treatments.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Seminar - Diabetes in the Pacific Islands: reasons and remedies   View Summary
21 March 2013

Speaker: Dr Si Thu Win Tin from the Health and Sustainability Unit at the Boden Institute

About the speaker

Dr Si Thu Win Tin is a physician and specialises in public health. He has worked as a Public Health Physician in the humanitarian aid organisations such as World Vision International and Aide Medicale Internationale in South East Asia. He was the Director of Public Health for the Ministry of Health Government of Nauru and then worked as Non Communicable Diseases Adviser for the Secretariat of the Pacific Community, providing technical assistance to Pacific Islands Countries and Territories.

Si has experience in international public health, especially in non-communicable diseases program management, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. He is also involved in the clinical care, training and research work in a wide range of public health programs. Since joining the Health and Sustainability Unit of the Boden Institute as a Research Fellow, he has been involved in projects on preventing diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in Pacific Island Countries.


RSVP via online registration or email to crystal.lee@sydney.edu.au

Hosted by the Boden Institute

Seminar - Insights into the molecular mechanism of early T cell signal regulation   View Summary
26 March 2013

Presenter:Professor Katharina Gaus, Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Vascular Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Obstructive sleep apnoea and day time driver sleepiness   View Summary
26 March 2013

Presenter:Dr Ashleigh Filtness, Senior Research Officer at CARRS-Q, Queensland University of Technology

Summary

Once treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients are fit to drive, with post-treatment incidence of road traffic collisions substantially reduced. However, little is known about the implications of increased sleep pressure on driving performance in successfully treated long term OSA patients. Results from two studies where additional sleep pressure has been placed on OSA patients will be presented: (1) reduced sleep opportunity to 5h with CPAP treatment (2) withdrawal of CPAP treatment for one night. Comparison will be made with performance following treatment as usual and performance of a control group. Vulnerability of treated OSA patients to sleep restriction and treatment withdrawal will be discussed within the context of driving performance, subjective sleepiness and EEG measures of objective sleepiness whist completing a simulated, monotonous drive.

About the speaker

Dr Ashleigh Filtness is a Senior Research Officer at CARRS-Q, Queensland University of Technology, prior to this she worked for two years at Monash University Accident Research. In her role at MUARC and now CARRS-Q, Ashleigh undertakes road safety research specialises in driving impairment. Her main interest is driver sleepiness however, she is also investigates impaired driving due to alcohol. Ashleigh is experienced at using driving simulators, which form the basis of the majority of her publications.


She completed her Ph.D at Loughborough University Sleep Research Centre, UK (2011) with Dr Louise Reyner and Prof Jim Horne. Her thesis focused on impaired driving performance of long term CPAP treated obstructive sleep apnoea patients. Using a driving simulator protocol driving performance was assessed while participants received treatment as usual, treatment as usual with restricted sleep opportunity and treatment withdrawal. During her research career Ashleigh has achieved Chartered Biologist status from the Society of Biology, UK, was recognised as Young Sleep Researcher of the year 2009 by the British Sleep Society and was selected as a student for specialist sleep research training on the EU Marie Curie ESRS - PENS Project 2007 - 2010.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

April
Seminar - Mechanisms of zebrafish heart regeneration   View Summary
2 April 2013

Presenter:Dr Kazu Kikuchi, Lab Head, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Allergen exposure in bed - what is its role in nocturnal symptoms?   View Summary
2 April 2013

Presenter:Dr Euan Tovey, Allergen Research Group, Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Summary

I will talk about our recent study of the time course of house dust mite allergen exposures during the day and night, which has produced data which is at variance from the 40 year paradigm that has dominated this area. Part of this concerns the fine-structure of nocturnal allergen exposure and the role disturbed sleep might play in modulating this exposure. This has implications for the way that asthma and persistent rhinitis is prevented and symptoms are managed. I will also talk about traditional methods of reducing allergen exposure, why they seldom work and new and more exciting approaches to this.

About the speaker

Euan Tovey's graduated with a PhD from University of Sydney in 1984 and has core expertise is in personal exposure to allergens. He has had sojourns into cloning, biochemistry, epidemiology, virology (particularly exhaled viruses) the role of viruses in asthma, and novel methods for the immunodetection of allergens. He has invented several of the methods used in measuring personal allergen exposure.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Seminar - Associations between modifiable lifestyle behaviours with obesity   View Summary
4 April 2013

Full title: Associations between modifiable lifestyle behaviours with obesity, blood pressure and retinal vessels

Speaker: Dr Bamini Gopinath, Centre for Vision Research, Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research

About the speaker

Dr Bamini Gopinath is a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Vision Research, Westmead Millennium Institute. She completed an honours degree in Biomedical Science at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, and then went on to complete a PhD at the University of Sydney. She currently works in the area of public health and epidemiology. One of her key research interests has been assessing the lifestyle determinants (physical activity, diet and screen time) of obesity, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, and associated adverse changes to the retinal microvasculature, particularly in children and adolescents.

The Sydney Childhood Eye Study is a large community-based sample of children aged 6 and 12 at baseline who were followed over a period of 5 years. Prospective associations between poor diet, physical inactivity and excessive screen time with obesity, elevated blood pressure, and changes to the retinal vessels were examined. The retina offers a unique 'window' to study vascular changes associated with hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Changes to the retinal vessels is a good indication of the health of blood vessels in the rest of the body. The adverse effects of soft drink consumption, high-glycemic index of foods consumed, reduced time spent in physical activity and excessive TV viewing on various health outcomes were shown in this cohort of schoolchildren.


RSVP via online registrationor email to crystal.lee@sydney.edu.au

Hosted by the Boden Institute

Seminar - Genetics of complex traits in human populations   View Summary
9 April 2013

Presenter:Professor Peter Visscher, Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, & Translational Research Institute (TRI)

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Objective measurement of sleep disorders in Parkinson's Disease   View Summary
9 April 2013

Presenter:Dr Samuel Bolitho, Brain and Mind Research Institute

About the speaker

Dr Samuel Bolitho is currently in the final year of a PhD at the Brain and Mind Institute, University of Sydney. He is also working towards a fellowship in Neurology. His current research utilises experience in computational and biomedical engineering to improve the measurement of sleep disorders in Parkinson's Disease.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Sydney Medical School Early Career Researcher (ECR) Showcase   View Summary
11 April 2013

The inaugural Sydney Medical School Early Career Researcher (ECR) Showcase will be a free, fun afternoon of short talks, aimed at a general audience, by ECRs from all schools within the Sydney Medical School. This is a chance to discover the exciting research taking place in the faculty, and to meet and talk to other researchers in the Sydney Medical School.

RSVP:Registrationcloses Friday 5 April.


All early career researchers (up to 10 years post-PhD) are invited to submit a biosketch of 100 words by Friday 22 February.

Sydney Medical School Early Career Researcher (ECR) Showcase   View Summary
11 April 2013

The inaugural Sydney Medical School Early Career Researcher (ECR) Showcase will be a free, fun afternoon of short talks, aimed at a general audience, by ECRs from all schools within the Sydney Medical School. This is a chance to discover the exciting research taking place in the faculty, and to meet and talk to other researchers in the Sydney Medical School.

RSVP: Registration closes Friday 5 April.


All early career researchers (up to 10 years post-PhD) are invited to submit a biosketch of 100 words by Friday 22 February.

Concept development workshop for trials and translational research studies   View Summary
12 April 2013

This one day workshop will help clinical and scientific investigators refine their concept into a proposal for a clinical trial and/or translational research study.

Hosted by the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre

Seminar - Selective GABA-A receptor ligands for treating stroke and anxiety   View Summary
12 April 2013

Presenter:Professor Mary Collins from the Faculty of Pharmacy

NHMRC Early Career Fellowships session   View Summary
15 April 2013

So you are well advanced with your application and have an RGMS number?

To help you polish off your fellowship or to know what happens to it once it is submitted we have arranged a short session with a panel member to give you advice about how your application will be treated, as well as advice from other panel members about how to approach some of the questions.


Former Panel Member: Professor Alaina Ammit (extra advice from Professor Peter Lui)

Come in the front door, take the lift to level 5, take the stairs to level 6.

How to get there:
- By bus to the Woolcock Institute , take number 431 bus down Glebe Pt Rd - last bus stop.
- or walk to end of Glebe Pt Rd
- or drive (plenty of 2 hour parking outside).


Professors Judy Black and Carol Armour

Seminar - Gene regulation and the discovery of RNAmerica   View Summary
16 April 2013

Presenter:Professor Thomas Preiss, Leader RNA Biology Group, Genome Biology Department, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Why our understanding of lung development limits us all   View Summary
16 April 2013

Presenters:Edwin Jesudason and Andreas Fouras

Edwin is a paediatric surgeon who specialises in the lung, and has a particular interest in lung development, and is perhaps best know to us for his work with Prof David Warburton at CHLA.

Edwin is currently on sabbatical in Melbourne in the Lab of Andreas Fouras, an engineer who has a particular interest in lung imaging. Andreas will also present some of his work during Edwin's seminar. Andreas's videos alone will be of great interest to anyone in a lung field as his imaging techniques allow an unparalleled examination of how the lung actually works - rather than how we like to model it!

Hosted by theWoolcock Institute

Seminar - Mechanisms of compensatory neural drive in Obstructive Sleep Apnoea   View Summary
16 April 2013

Presenter:DrJulian Saboisky, Neuroscience Research Australia

Summary
The patency of the human upper airway is influenced by neural activity to airway dilator muscles. Reduced neural drive to these muscles could contribute to the development of obstructive sleep apnoea, a disorder in which the upper airway collapses repetitively during sleep. Multiunit electromyographic activity of the genioglossus is greater in obstructive sleep apnoea patients than in healthy Control subjects during wakefulness. It is believed this reflects increased drive to airway dilator muscles and that this increased "compensatory" drive is needed to overcome the increased upper airway resistance and compliance. The Obstructive Sleep Apnoea compensatory neural drive hypothesis is supported by evidence that the amplitude of the multiunit EMG is increased in patients with OSA. However, the multiunit electromyogram is dependent on the underling number and complexity of motor unit potentials it is often used as an estimate of the neural drive to the muscle. The results of this presentation indicate that structural neurogenic changes occur in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea that are reflected through changes in the motor unit potentials.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Seminar - Development of a Staging System for patients with infection based on the PICO concept   View Summary
18 April 2013

Presenter:Dr Armando Teixeira-Pinto, School of Public Health, TheUniversity of Sydney

Abstract
Context: PIRO concept (Predisposition, Insult, Response, Organ) has been applied to intensive care patients with sepsis in an attempt to develop a staging system to estimate individual prognosis and to tailor treatment. However, most research has focused on the development of another prognostic score rather than a staging system.
Objective: In this seminar, I will present the methodology and results of a staging system based on the PIRO concept for patients hospitalized with infection. I will also discuss the possibility of inclusion of longitudinal markers in this approach.
Design: One-year prospective cohort study of hospitalized patients with infection, who were followed up until hospital discharge. Variables associated with hospital mortality within each of the 4 components of PIRO were selected using logistic regressions. Based on the regression coefficients, a score for each component was developed and a classification tree was used to stratify patients into 4 stages associated with different risks of hospital mortality. The final clinical staging system was then validated using an independent cohort (n=186).
Results: Regarding Predisposition factors, hospital mortality was significantly associated with age, sex, previous antibiotic therapy, chronic hepatic disease, chronic hematologic disease, cancer, atherosclerosis and a Karnofsky index<70; whereas Insult/Infection was associated to type of infection; host Response with abnormal temperature, tachypnea, hyperglycemia and severity of infection; and Organ dysfunction with hypotension and SOFA score>0. The area under the ROC curve (95%CI) for the combined PIRO model as a predictor of mortality was 0.85 (0.82-0.88). Based on the scores for each of the PIRO components and on the cut-offs estimated from the classification tree, patients were stratified into 4 stages with increasing mortality rates: stage I <5%, II 6-20%, III 21-35% and IV>35%. Finally, this new PIRO clinical staging system was studied in the validation cohort providing similar results (3%, 19%, 30% and 40%, respectively).
Conclusions: Based on PIRO concept, a new clinical staging system was developed for hospitalized patients with infection. The proposed system is not only likely to help defining inclusion criteria and analysis of results in clinical studies of infection and sepsis but also to allow the tailoring of individual management plans.


About the speaker

Armando Teixeira-Pinto recently joined the Screening and Test Evaluation Program (School of Public Health, University of Sydney) as a Senior Research Fellow. Before this appointment he worked as an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Medicine. University of Porto, Portugal. He holds an AM (2004) and PhD (2007) in Biostatistics from Harvard University.

Hosted by The George Institute for International Health

Seminar - Social and spatial patterns of obesity and inactivity   View Summary
18 April 2013

Full title: Social and spatial patterns of obesity and inactivity: Can theories of diffusion of innovations explain the trends we have seen over three decades in a Norwegian county? - The HUNT Study

Presenter:Associate ProfessorSteinar Krokstad, Head of the HUNT Research Centre, Norway

Further information

Hosted by theBoden Institute

Seminar - Engineered and targeted immune therapy of leukaemia with chimeric antigen receptor T cells   View Summary
18 April 2013

Presenter:Associate Professor Bruce L Levine, Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, USA

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Anatomy of colour pathways in primate retina   View Summary
19 April 2013

Presenter:Associate Professor Ulrike Grünert, Save Sight Institute

TEDMED Sydney   View Summary
20 April 2013

TEDMED is a multi-disciplinary community of innovators and leaders who share a common determination to create a better future in health and medicine. It is different to a TEDx event, in that the entire day is devoted to presentation about health and medicine. So many of our great challenges in health and medicine are rooted in social and commercial causes as much as medical. We need everybody at the table for an inclusive conversation about how to get the future in health and medicine we all want.

Once a year at The Kennedy Center in Washington DC, TEDMED curates an unusual and provocative program. The 3½ day program features brilliant short talks and stunning artistic performances that celebrate the power of unexpected connections to create important new possibilities.

We will stream the "best of the best" of these talks as well as have an impressive line-up of local speakers including:

Professor Martin Tattersall AO (University of Sydney)
Professor Ian Hickey (Brain and Mind Institute, University of Sydney)
Professor Reginald Lord (Surgeon)

Associate Professor Eugen Molodysky (University of Sydney)
Associate Professor Amanda Sainsbury-Salis (Boden Institute, University of Sydney)
Dr Ross Walker (Channel 9 and 2UE)
Dr Paul Bladock (Garvan Institute)

This event is being run by Sydney medical students, with the support of Sydney Medical School and MEDSOC, and promises to be a day of inspiration and ideation.

The event is free, to register go to:
http://www.tedmedsydney.com/

Seminar - Immune regulation in mouse and man CANCELLED   View Summary
23 April 2013

Presenter:Professor Barbara Fazekas de St Groth, NHMRC Principal Research Fellow, Head, T Cell Biology Research Group, Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine and Cell Biology

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Loss of NF-kappaB1 causes intestinal-type gastric cancer   View Summary
23 April 2013

Full title: Loss of NF-kappaB1 causes intestinal-type gastric cancer via dysregulated cytokine-mediated chronic inflammation

Presenter:Dr Lorraine O'Reilly, Molecular Genetics of Cancer Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Sleep simulation for research and clinical applications   View Summary
23 April 2013

Presenter:Mr Romesh Abeysuriya, PhD student at the Complex Systems group in the School of Physics and CIRUS.

Summary
This presentation will demonstrate the use of SleepSim, our sleep simulation program that models sleep based on physiology. The latest generation of sleep simulation software allows users unfamiliar with programming or modelling to simulate realistic and detailed experimental protocols, shift work schedules and other sleep paradigms to predict sleep times, sleep duration, fatigue, and other experimentally important measures. SleepSim is uniquely based on verified biological findings, and has been tested on published experimental data.

About the speaker

Romesh Abeysuriya is a PhD student at the Complex Systems group in the School of Physics working with Prof. Peter Robinson, and a part-time CIRUS PhD student. Romesh's research is highly interdisciplinary combining analysis of experimental EEG data and mathematical modelling with particular focus on large-scale brain dynamics during various arousal states and the sleep-wake transition.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Seminar - Ghrelin, ghrelin mimetics and autonomic function   View Summary
26 April 2013

Presenter:Professor John Furness, University of Melbourne

Seminar - A molecular handshake: the first structural view of insulin engaging its receptor   View Summary
30 April 2013

Presenter:Associate Professor Mike Lawrence, Division of Structural Biology, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - The course and impact of Insomnia after Stroke - the POISE study   View Summary
30 April 2013

Presenter:Professor Nick Glozier, BMRI & Discipline of Psychiatry, Sydney Medical School

About the speaker

Nick Glozier is the Professor of Psychological Medicine at the Brain and Mind Research Institute, Sydney Medical School and a consultant Psychiatrist. He has interests in psychiatric and physical comorbidity, and cross-cultural health, behaviours, stigma and disability. He has worked in Europe, South Asia and Africa, in areas of mental illness and its comorbidity with sleep disorders, stroke, cardiovascular disease and epilepsy. He is a Chief Investigator in CIRUS the NHMRC funded Centre for Research and Understanding of Sleep and undertakes a number of observational and interventional studies in sleep and psychiatric disorder. In the past five years he has published over 60 peer reviewed papers, several textbook chapters, given up counting conference abstracts, and been part of technical assessments and reviews for the DSM-V revision, the Commonwealth Health Ministers Meeting, the National Mental Health Commission and the National Heart Foundation.
Previously he worked at the Institute of Psychiatry in London and at the World Health Organisation, primarily in the area of disability. He was part of the team who developed the WHODAS 2.0 cross cultural disability assessment and the International Classification of Health, Disability and Functioning, the ICF.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

May
Seminar: Stem cell promises - science, ethics, impact   View Summary
3 May 2013

Presenter:Professor John Hearn, School of Medical Scienes

Seminar - Cross-talk between cytokines and pathogen recognition receptors in cancer and inflammation   View Summary
7 May 2013

Presenter:Brendan Jenkins, Viertel Senior Medical Research Fellow, Head, Cytokine Signalling Laboratory,Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Diseases, Monash Institute of Medical Research

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Viruses in May   View Summary
9 May 2013 to 11 May 2013

Scientific Convenors A/Prof Monica Lahra and Prof Bill Rawlinson are delighted to announce that 2013 will be the 10th anniversary of Viruses in May. This meeting has been getting bigger and bigger every year and 2013 promises to be the best Viruses in May yet. Celebratory events include a special 10th anniversary Conference Dinner and complimentary tour of the highlights of Katoomba and Leura. As always there will be an exceptional scientific program and excellent speakers. In 2013 the meeting will highlight Principles and Practice of Clinical Virology, Infections of pregnancy and perinatal period, Diagnostic virology and Paediatric viral infections.

Seminar - Introduction to the CRC for alertness, safety and productivity   View Summary
9 May 2013

Presenter:Anthony Williams, Interim CEO

Summary
The CRC for Alertness, Safety and Productivity will reduce the burden of impaired alertness on the safety, productivity and health of all Australians. It will build on Australia's strengths in sleep and alertness research by bringing together expert knowledge, state of the art technologies, and key industry partners. The CRC will develop and deploy the next generation of shift scheduling and workplace design techniques; alertness assessment devices; individualised programs for better sleep health; and, a range of innovative strategies to reduce fatigue. These new products and services will improve alertness and performance, resulting in fewer injuries, enhanced workplace efficiency and improved quality of life in our 24-hour society.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Seminar: Treating sleep disorders - from physiology to practice   View Summary
10 May 2013

Presenter:Professor Ron Grunstein, Woolcock Institute and Sleep Disorders Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital

Activity based funding conference   View Summary
13 May 2013 to 16 May 2013

The Independent Hospital Pricing Authority's (IHPA) Activity Based Funding Conference will bring together local and international experts to discuss health reform and the best approaches to implementing Activity Based Funding in Australian public hospitals.

This year's conference will focus specifically on the following topics:
•Implementing Activity Based Funding locally
•Future directions for classification development
•Costing issues at the hospital level
•Pricing and funding model development

There will be two days of pre-conference workshops (13 and 14 May 2013) followed by the two day conference (15 and 16 May 2013).

Seminar - Drugging the undruggable: Targeting RNA Polymerase I to treat cancer   View Summary
14 May 2013

Presenter:Associate Professor Ross Hannan, Group Leader, Growth Regulation Laboratory Program Head, Oncogenic Signaling and Growth Control Program, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Lowy Cancer Symposium - Discovering cancer therapeutics   View Summary
15 May 2013 to 17 May 2013

The symposium is designed for basic research scientists, oncologists and other health care professionals andwill highlight Australasia's research strengths, including recent developments in personalised pancreatic cancer therapy and hypoxia-activated cancer drugs. Several of Australia's leading researchers and seven international speakers will focus on the three key phases of cancer therapeutics development: Discovery; Pre-Clinical and Clinical, with various aspects of basic and applied research in the field.


Themes for the 2013 conference will include:
Drug Delivery Strategies * New Small Molecules * Preclinical and Clinical Trial Systems * Stratified Cancer Therapy * Target Identification using Systems Biology * Emerging Targets

Rotary fundraising event for Fundu Isin-Di'ak   View Summary
16 May 2013

Funds raised will support Rotary Club of Sydney in partnership with The University of Sydney to improve health outcomes in Timor-Leste. Fundu Isin-Di'ak Timor-Leste (Good Health Fund Timor-Leste) aims to eradicate two nasty parasitic diseases caused by lymphatic filariasis and intestinal worms affecting the population of Timor-Leste. Lymphatic filariasis affects up to 20% of the Timorese population and causes extensive swelling of limbs and other parts of the body, is very debilitating, but can be effectively treated. Intestinal worms affect up to 50% of Timorese children, causing anaemia and malnutrition, and are also treatable. A five-year program of annual mass dosing with two anti-parasitic drugs can eliminate both diseases from the country. The success of this project will make a substantial difference to the wellbeing and quality of life for many Timorese people.

Invitation
Seminar - Novel driver oncogenes in melanocytic neoplasia   View Summary
16 May 2013

Full title: Novel driver oncogenes in melanocytic neoplasia: implication for disease classification and clinical management

Presenter:Professor Boris C Bastian, Gerson and Barbara Bakar Distinguished Professor of Cancer Biology, University of California and UCSF Cardiovascular Research Institute

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Analgesic conotoxins: Mechanisms of inhibition of neuronal calcium channels   View Summary
17 May 2013

Full title: Analgesic conotoxins: Mechanisms of inhibition of neuronal calcium channels in pain pathways

Presenter:Professor David J Adams, RMIT University

Seminar - Blinding in randomised trials   View Summary
17 May 2013

Presenter:Professor Rob Herbert, The George Institute for Global Health / Neuroscience Research Australia

Abstract
Blinding is a feature of many randomized clinical trials. The aim of blinding is to reduce potential for bias associated with beliefs about allocation. Here we show that even when blinding establishes identical patterns of beliefs about the allocations of treated and control group participants it cannot eliminate the potential for bias associated with beliefs about allocation. It is difficult or impossible to empirically determine the magnitude of such biases in a particular clinical trial. Theoretically, bias associated with beliefs about allocation could be minimized by implementing blinding in a way that induces uncertainty about the allocation of every trial participant, but this objective may be difficult to achieve in practice and may reduce the generalizability of the trial's findings.


About the speaker

Rob Herbert is an Honorary Professorial Fellow at The George Institute for Global Health, Senior Principal Research Fellow at Neuroscience Australia and NHMRC Principal Research Fellow. Rob's research examines the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions. He also conducts complementary research into the mechanical properties of human muscles.

Hosted by The George Institute for International Health

Seminar - Non-mulberry silk as biomedical materials for regenerative medicine   View Summary
17 May 2013

Presenter:Professor Subhas C Kundu, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kharagpur, India

Abstract

Present approaches of regenerative medicine are focused on the re-establishment of altered tissue architectures caused due to congenital abnormalities, injury, disease, or ageing by transplantation of cells in combination with supportive scaffolds and biomolecules. Biologically active scaffolds are attracting considerable interest that induces synthesis of tissues and organs based on similar analogs of the extracellular matrix. Scaffolds can be fabricated from synthetic or natural materials intended to augment, direct, replace, repair or regenerate organs, tissues, or cells. Since natural materials offer several advantages over synthetic materials, because the surrounding biological environment can recognize and metabolically process the substance through established pathways. While synthetic polymers are concerned with toxicity, chronic inflammation, and clearance issues that are of less significance with natural materials. Silk proteins, sericin and fibroin are established bio-compatible materials. Silk fibroin, the core protein, is hydrophobic in nature while sericin is hydrophilic glue like protein. Isolation of fibroin from the silkworm cocoon requires the complete removal of glue protein sericin, a waste by-product of Textile Industry. The characteristics of silks, including biodegradability, biocompatibility, controllable degradation rates, and versatility to generate different material formats attract interest in the field of biomaterials. With the help of various technologies, thin films, porous 3D scaffolds, nanoparticles, macro patterned surface coating, micro-beads, hydrogels are developed from the mulberry and diverse nonmulberry silk proteins for biomedical and tissue engineering purposes. The cell culture and tissue formation on silk-based biomaterials show appropriate cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation that support the regeneration of tissues. Furthermore, due to the presence of RGD motifs on non-mulberry silk fibroin based biomaterials display enhance cellular adhesion and subsequent proliferation on different matrices, hence resulting in improved cytocompatibility and bio-functionality. The use of non-mulberry tasar cocoon silk sericin as surface coating on titanium facilitates osteoblast cell adherence and proliferation. We could also use silk fibroin matrices as 3D model for cancer investigation. Similarly sericin/polyacrylamide semi-interpenetrating network proves suitable as a reconstructive dermal sealant. The successful delivery of gene and or drug is observed through sericin or fibroin based nanoparticles. Other non-mulberry silk proteins from eri, semi-domesticated Samia ricini and muga Antheraea assamensis are tested for their cytocompatibility and biomaterial potential. The results of the work will be presented.

About the speaker

Subhas C Kundu, Ph. D. is Professor of the Department of Biotechnology of Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) - Kharagpur. He teaches genetics, cell and molecular biology and recombinant DNA technology to under-graduates, post-graduates and pre-doctoral students at IIT. Dr. Kundu received his Post doctoral training at Institute of Molecular Biology, Moscow; Department of Biology, York University, Canada; Medical University, Lubeck, Germany; Department of Biology & Biochemistry, Brunel University, UK. His chief area of interest is molecular genetics and silk biomaterials. He has published 100 research articles as author or coauthor in journals such as Chromosoma, Experimental Cell Research, Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics, Euro J Cell Biology, Methods in Enzymology, J Biological Chemistry, Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Acta Biomaterialia, Biomedical Microdevices, Biomaterials, Macromolecular Bioscience, Progress in Polymer Science, Biotech Advances, Soft Matter, Tissue Engineering, Advanced Functional Materials, etc. He is associated with several national and international research projects.

Hosted by the Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology

Webinar - Neurochemistry of mood disorders   View Summary
20 May 2013

Presenter: Clinical Associate Professor Seetal Dodd from Deakin University

Mood disorders have been associated with dysfunction of nueurotransmitter systems. Best described is the monoamine deficiency model of depression. This model forms the theorectical basis for antidepressant pharmacotherapy. In this presentation neurochemical models of mood disorders will be explained and discussed.

Register now to secure your spot

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry at Westmead Clinical School

18th NSW Stem Cell Network Workshop - Expanding the use of cord blood   View Summary
21 May 2013

This workshop aims to understand the value of how cord blood might help in the treatment of diseases aside of the more traditional bone marrow transplants.

Seminar - Mechanisms of bone metastasis: key role of immune suppression   View Summary
21 May 2013

Presenter:Dr Belinda Parker, Senior Research Fellow, Faculty of Science, Technology and Engineering, School of Molecular Sciences, Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - The role of attention biases in the development,maintenance and management of chronic pain   View Summary
21 May 2013

Presenter:Professor Louise Sharp, Clinical Research Director, School of Psychology

Summary
Chronic pain patients demonstrate attentional biases towards pain-related stimuli. However, their clinical importance has yet to be established. The aim of this presentation is to determine (1) whether patients with chronic pain demonstrate attentional biases; (2) whether attentional biases predict subsequent function; and (3) whether interventions that change attentional biases result in clinical improvements. There is now clear evidence that attentional biases exist in chronic pain patients that are not evident in healthy people. However, these biases do not appear to be associated with function. However, biases away from affective pain information or towards positive stimuli consistently predicted subsequent pain reports, when stimuli were presented for 500ms, indicating strategic avoidance of negative stimuli. In the only study to investigate vigilance (100ms presentation of stimuli with a mask), speeded response to painful stimuli predicted subsequent pain. Further, there was evidence that interventions targeting attentional biases resulted in changes in pain in both analogue and clinical samples. These results suggest that attentional biases in pain are more complex than initially thought, but appear to be important, at least in the development and management of pain.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Research and Careers Fair   View Summary
22 May 2013

Register now


Sydney Medical School's Research and Careers Fair is an opportunity for students considering undertaking Honours, Masters or PhDs, or a project which can be done as part of a medical degree, to discuss options with some of the faculty's leading medical and health researchers. Students will be able to talk about specific projects or interests with a wide cross section of researchers and current students, working in areas including cancer, neuroscience, immunology, child and maternal health, cardiac disease, obesity, nutrition and exercise, clinical trials, ageing, smoking, public health, sleep medicine, ophthalmology, genetics, medical imaging - and more! Scientists, clinicians and researchers will be happy to talk about and advise on projects suitable for Honours, Masters or PhDs, or which can be done as part of a medical degree.

Sydney Medical School is one of the largest research organisations in Australia. This Fair brings together representatives from all its major research Institutes, Centres and Schools, those based on campus as well as those linked to the School's teaching hospitals at Westmead, Nepean, Concord, RPA and North Shore.

Careers in medicine and health

Attending the Research and Careers Fair will be a range of public and private sector employers of medical and health graduates, including NSW Health and the Local Health Districts. A number of the key Royal Colleges (Physicians, General Practitioners, Psychiatrists, Ophthalmologists, Intensive Care Medicine) and alumni from a range of disciplines (including cardiology and emergency medicine), will be present to meet students and discuss career options.


Participating organisations
Antipodeans Abroad
Australia Orthopaedic Association
Australian Society for HIV Medicine
Cancer Council NSW
Contact Singapore
Defence Force Recruiting
HealthStrong
NSW Health
Public Health Training and Workforce
Public Health Association of Australia
PwC
Western NSW Local Health District

Colleges
Royal College of General Practitioners
Royal Australian College of Surgeons
Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists
Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia

Research institutes
Brain and Mind Research Institute
Save Sight Institute
Kids Research Institute at The Children's Hospital at Westmead
Faculty of Pharmacy
Children's Medical Research Institute
Heart Research Institute
Nepean Clinical School
ANZAC Research Institute
Save Sight Institute
CIRUS
Bosch Institute
Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research
Charles Perkins Centre
Brain Dynamics Centre
Centre for Values, Ethics & the Law in Medicine

Specialists attending
Cardiologist
Research Academic
Careers in Medicine
Primary Care GP
Emergency Medicine


Register now

Medicine and Dentistry information evening   View Summary
22 May 2013


Register now


Thinking of applying to study graduate medicine or dentistry at Sydney Medical School or Faculty of Dentistry?

The evening will provide an overview of thegraduate entrymedicine (MBBS) and dentistry (DMD) programs, as well as up to date information on the application process and advice on preparing for the (much feared) Multiple Mini Interviews.


Program

Martin, Stage 3 medical student (MC)
Professor Bruce Robinson, Dean, Sydney Medical School
Professor Chris Peck, Dean, Faculty of Dentistry
Harriet, Stage 2 medical student
Simon, Stage 3 medical student and MedSoc president
David, Year 4 dentistry student
Professor Stewart Dunn, Associate Dean, Sydney Medical Program Admissions
Q&A


Students attending should also visit Sydney Medical School's Research and Careers Fair, held in MacLaurin Hall immediately prior to the Medicine and Dentistry information evening. Encouraging students to undertake research is an important component of studying medicine at Sydney, and the Research and Careers Fair is an introduction to the extensive research opportunities available to students.

Research scholarships in Medicine and Health (lecture and webinar) CANCELLED   View Summary
22 May 2013

Information for students seeking scholarships for research degrees

Associate Professor Brett Hambly will provide a comprehensive outline of scholarships available and the application process for postgraduate research within Sydney Medical School, Sydney Nursing School, and the Faculties of Dentistry and Pharmacy. Join in person or via webinar, details for webinar participants will be emailed prior to the event.

Register now

Seminar - Nutritional preconditioning of the myocardium: the basis of omega-3 cardioprotection   View Summary
24 May 2013

Presenter:Professor Peter L McLennan, University of Wollongong

Webinar - Epidemiology of mood disorders & symptoms of bipolar disorder   View Summary
24 May 2013

Presenter:Professor Philip Mitchell from the University of New South Wales

This one hour webinar will firstly focus on epidemiology of mood disorders with details of the prevalence of mood disorders in the community, the common ages of onset of the anxiety disorders, the common comorbidities that you would screen for in a patient with an anxiety disorder, and the population level risk factors for the development of a mood disorder.


After a brief Q&A session, the webinar will continue to discuss the symptoms of bipolar disorder. The presentation will highlight the symptoms of bipolar disorder. You will learn how to distinguish between major depression and bipolar depression. The webinar will end with a discussion on cyclothymia and other forms of bipolar disorder followed by a brief Q&A session again.

Register now to secure your spot.

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry at Westmead Clinical School

Webinar - Internet-based treatment approach for major depressive disorder   View Summary
27 May 2013

Presenter:Professor Gavin Andrewsfrom the University of New South Wales

Major depressive disorder accounts for 30% of the Burden of Mental Disorders and is the principal cause of disability in the world. Standard treatment has been with medication but recent reviews show that they are weak treatments with number needed to treat ranging from 4-14. Cognitive behaviour therapy, especially that delivered over the internet is a stronger treatment and is to be preferred especially as there is concurrent reduction in suicidal ideation and work loss days.

Register now to secure your spot.

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry at Westmead Clinical School

Seminar: Gene and drug delivery systems for treatment and prevention of brain disorders and diabetes   View Summary
30 May 2013

Presenter:ProfessorJagdish Singh, Professor and Chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at North Dakota State University, USA

Targeted nano-particulate systems hold extraordinary potential for delivery
of therapeutics across blood brain barrier (BBB). An innovative approach of
combining transferrin receptor targeting with enhanced cell penetration to
design liposomal vectors for improving the transport of molecules into brain
will be presented and discussed. Diabetes afflicts roughly 250 million worldwide.
The ability of the thermosensitve polymeric solution to provide basal level of
insulin for three months after a single subcutaneous injection will be discussed.
Further, a novel nanobiotechnology based non-viral DNA carrier for delivery of
pDNA encoding IL-4 and IL-10 genes for prevention of type 1diabetes will be
presented.


Research theme: Cardiovascular / Diabetes


About the speaker

Jagdish Singh is Professor and Chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical
Sciences at North Dakota State University. Singh's research efforts focus on
the mechanistic studies for developing and testing novel delivery technologies
to deliver biotechnologically derived molecules (eg. peptide, protein, and gene).
He has published over 160 peer-reviewed papers and 280 abstracts. Singh
received his PhD from Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, and completed postdoctoral fellowships at the University of Otago and University of California San Francisco. He is a Fellow of American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) and Fellow of Association of Biotechnology and Pharmacy.

Hosted by the Faculty of Pharmacy

Seminar - The plastic ear: Perceptual relearning and spatial perception   View Summary
31 May 2013

Presenter:Associate Professor Simon Carlile, Disicpline of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences

Webinar - Mood disorder in the primary care sector   View Summary
31 May 2013

Presenter:Professor Tim Usherwood from the Discipline of General Practice


At the end of this presentation, participants will:

1. Appreciate the ways in which mood disorders may present in primary care and be aware of appropriate responses by the clinician,
2. Be able to describe a safe and focused approach to assessment, suitable for the primary care context, and
3. Be able to outline a structured approach to management, based on an assessment of the patient, their illness and its context

Register now to secure your spot

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry at Westmead Clinical School

Emerging Infectious Diseases: Understanding the Threat and Developing Solutions   View Summary
31 May 2013 to 7 June 2013
The emergence and re-emergence of infectious diseases including HIV, avian influenza, drug resistant tuberculosis, dengue fever and many others, is evidence that new diseases will continue to develop and others will reappear. Both the Asia-Pacific and Latin America are key incubators of emerging infectious diseases, and both regions are in a unique position to lead research and increase capacity to detect and respond to the threats.

Sydney Medical School has great depth of expertise in infectious diseases and immunity, with major programs in hospital acquired infections, tuberculosis, malaria, influenza, HIV and more. A multidisciplinary approach brings together expertise in animal heath, biosecurity, clinical infectious diseases and epidemiology. A delegation of its research experts will be in Latin America from May 31 to June 7, discussing potential collaborations with research colleagues in Chile, Brazil and Argentina, with a view to reduce the global impact of emerging infectious diseases.

The delegation would be delighted to meet prospective health and medical students, including research students.
June
Emerging Infectious Diseases: Understanding the Threat and Developing Solutions   View Summary
31 May 2013 to 7 June 2013
The emergence and re-emergence of infectious diseases including HIV, avian influenza, drug resistant tuberculosis, dengue fever and many others, is evidence that new diseases will continue to develop and others will reappear. Both the Asia-Pacific and Latin America are key incubators of emerging infectious diseases, and both regions are in a unique position to lead research and increase capacity to detect and respond to the threats.

Sydney Medical School has great depth of expertise in infectious diseases and immunity, with major programs in hospital acquired infections, tuberculosis, malaria, influenza, HIV and more. A multidisciplinary approach brings together expertise in animal heath, biosecurity, clinical infectious diseases and epidemiology. A delegation of its research experts will be in Latin America from May 31 to June 7, discussing potential collaborations with research colleagues in Chile, Brazil and Argentina, with a view to reduce the global impact of emerging infectious diseases.

The delegation would be delighted to meet prospective health and medical students, including research students.
Seminar - Moving genomics from bench to bedside   View Summary
4 June 2013

Presenter:Dr Ryan Taft, Laboratory Head and Senior Research Fellow, Genomics and Computational Biology Division, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Webinar - Comorbidity: depression and anxiety   View Summary
6 June 2013

Presenter: Professor David Castle from the University of Melbourne


Depression and anxiety often occur together in clinical practice and their co-occurrence carries negative prognostic implications. There has been ongoing debate about how these disorders should be classified, with some proposals suggesting generalised and anxiety disorder (GAD) in particular should be subsumed under the mood disorders grouping. This presentation takes GAD as a case example, traces its genesis over time and points out ways of differentiating its features from those of depression. The aetiological underpinnings of GAD are then contrasted with those of depression, and various parameters (psychological, genetic, neurotransmitter, neuroendocrine) considered in trying to dissect the disorders, Finally, an attempt is made at a pharmacological dissection.

Register now to secure your spot

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry at Westmead Clinical School

Webinar - Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and other newer antidepressant agents   View Summary
7 June 2013

Presenter:Professor Malcolm Hopwood from the University of Melbourne & Albert Road Clinic


Treatment of depression has proved challenging with all effective agents associated with an approximately 60 to 70% response rate, and a 40% remission rate. The earliest available antidepressant agents such as the tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors were also associated with significant side effects and toxicity in overdose. The introduction of the Serotonin Specific Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) in the late 1980s has thus had a dramatic influence on the treatment of Depression in the community. These agents are associated with probably equivalent efficacy, considerably lower side effect burden and relatively low toxicity in overdose.

Register now to secure your spot

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry at Westmead Clinical School

Webinar - Gender issues and mood disorders   View Summary
7 June 2013

Presenter:Professor Jayashri Kulkarni from Monash University & Alfred Hopsital


This webinar will introduce you to the differences between men and women in the epidemiology of mood disorders, the differences in the presentation of mood disorders between men and women, the biological and sociological reasons for the differences in the presentation and frequency of mood disorders between men and women, and the treatment implications for these differences.

Register now to secure your spot

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry at Westmead Clinical School

Webinar - Medical causes of mood disorders    View Summary
7 June 2013
Webinar - Medical causes of mood disorders


7 June 2013

Presenter:Professor Pete Ellis fromUniversity of Otago


Mood disorders are common among those with physical illness. This is due to the psychological impact of not only the illness, but also its treatment and its consequences, added to any direct effect the illness process may have through specific effects on brain functioning. Such mechanisms include structural changes in the brain; functional alterations in neurotransmitters; genetic vulnerabilities exposed by the given illness; endocrine effects on the hypothalamopituitary (HPA) axis; and certain inflammatory mechanisms modulated by interleukins and cytokines. A range of illnesses, particularly neurological and endocrine conditions, may trigger these mechanisms.

The differences in presentation between organic mood disorders and functional mood disorders are often subtle. Their development coinciding with that of a particular physical condition associated with organic mood disorder, in a person experiencing few other psychosocial stresses and without a part history of mood disorder, at an atypical age, strongly suggests the diagnosis. Detailed assessment may uncover subtle changes in cognitive abilities and personality traits. Always consider an underlying organic cause for mood disorder, especially when response to treatment is slow.

Treatment must include effective intervention for the underlying physical condition. The response to antidepressants may depend on the extent to which neurochemical systems remain intact. For instance, recent systematic reviews suggest that SSRIs may be ineffective in depression associated with Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease, where there is significant neuronal loss. In post-stroke depression, nortriptyline and desipramine are effective. Systematic evidence is weaker for other neurological conditions. In practice, the usual range of treatments is used. Mood disorders associated with endocrine disturbances are best treated by correcting the underlying condition, although symptomatic treatment of mania may be required concurrently.

Thorough assessment for organic mood disorders is important to guide treatment and to address the significantly increased risk of suicide compared to other presentations of depressive illness. Some recent studies in Alzheimer's Disease have re-emphasized the importance of interpersonal aspects of quality mental health care in achieving recovery.

Register nowto secure your spot

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry at Westmead Clinical School

Time: 10am - 10.30am

Location: Webinar

Contact: Richard He

Email:richard.he@sydney.edu.au

Seminar - Therapeutic potential of heat shock protein induction for muscular dystrophy   View Summary
11 June 2013

Full title: Therapeutic potential of heat shock protein induction for muscular dystrophy and other muscle wasting disorders

Presenter:Professor Gordon Lynch, Head of Physiology, Basic and Clinical Myology, The University of Melbourne

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Webinar - Mood disorders in childhood and adolescence   View Summary
12 June 2013

Presenter:Professor Philip Hazell, Head of the Discipline of Psychiatry, Sydney Medical School


A survey of Australian children found 3.7% of boys and 2.1% of girls aged 6-12 years had experienced a depressive episode in the previous 12 months. The rate among teenagers aged 13-17 years was 4.8% for boys and 4.9% for girls. This webinar will describe the causes and clinical manifestations of depression in young people, and the typical course of the disorder. In addition the webinar will examine the indications for the treatment of depression in children and adolescents, how to prioritize treatment, the evidence supporting various treatment options, and how to explain treatment to young people and their parents.

Register now to secure your spot

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry at Westmead Clinical School

Seminar - Who, what, when and how? Development and implementation of a set of risk assessment tools   View Summary
13 June 2013

Full title: Who, what, when and how? The development and implementation of a set of risk assessment tools for detecting undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in a multi-ethnic UK population

Speaker: DrLaura Gray, University of Leicester

About the speaker

Dr Laura Gray is a Lecturer of Population and Public Health Sciences at the University of Leicester, UK. Laura has led the development and implementation of the Leicester risk assessment tools for detecting undiagnosed type 2 diabetes.

Laura's background is medical statistics with a particular interest in the design and analysis of clinical trials (especially cluster randomised trials, and trials with ordinal outcomes) and evidence synthesis.


RSVP via online registrationor email to crystal.lee@sydney.edu.au

Hosted by the Boden Institute

Seminar - Inserting a red light into the brain   View Summary
14 June 2013

Full title: Inserting a red light into the brain; development of a new treatment for Parkinson's disease

Presenter:Professor John Mitrofanis, Disicpline of Anatomy and Histology, School of Medical Sciences

Seminar - Plasmodium infection of red blood cells: a kinomics perspective   View Summary
18 June 2013

Presenter:Professor Christian Doerig, Head, Department of Microbiology, Monash University

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Webinar - Innovations in TMS and tDCS in the treatment of mood disorders   View Summary
21 June 2013

Presenter:Professor Colleen Loo from the University of New South Wales


The development of novel physical treatments is an exciting recent development in psychiatry. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation uses strong magnetic pulses to focally stimulate the surface of the brain and has been shown in clinical trials to have antidepressant effects. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation uses very small electrical currents (approximately 1/400 of those used in electroconvulsive therapy) and is able to stimulate the brain at depth. Recent clinical trials suggest it also has meaningful antidepressant efficacy. Both of these novel treatments do not require any anesthesia and do not induce seizures. Further, clinical studies have shown that they do not cause memory and cognitive impairment, and may in fact, improve cognition. Other novel physical treatments will also be discussed in this webinar - magnetic seizure therapy, deep brain stimulation.

Register now to secure your spot

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry at Westmead Clinical School

Seminar - Sleep study for expectant first time mothers   View Summary
25 June 2013

Presenter:Ms Liora Kemper, Psychologist and CIRUS PhD Candidate, University of Sydney

Summary
Background: There is a high association between disturbed (poor quality) sleep and depression, which has lead to a consensus that there is a bidirectional relationship between sleep and mood. One time in a woman's life when
sleep is commonly disturbed is during pregnancy and following childbirth. It has been suggested that sleep disturbance is another factor that may contribute to the propensity for women to become depressed in the postpartum period compared to other periods in their life. Post Natal Depression (PND) is common (15.5%) and associated with sleep disturbance, however, no studies have attempted to provide a sleep-focused intervention to pregnant women and assess whether this can improve sleep, and consequently maternal mood post-partum. The primary aim of this research is to determine the efficacy of a brief psychoeducational sleep intervention compared with a control group to improve sleep management, with a view to reduce depressive symptoms in first time mothers.


Method: This randomised controlled trial will recruit 214 first time mothers during the last trimester of their pregnancy. Participants will be randomised to receive either a set of booklets (control group) or a 3hour psychoeducational intervention that focuses on sleep. The primary outcomes of this study are sleep-related, that is sleep quality and sleepiness for ten months following the birth of the baby. The secondary outcome is depressive symptoms. It is hypothesised that participants in the intervention group will have better sleep quality and sleepiness in the postpartum period than women in the control condition. Further, we predict that women who receive the sleep intervention will have lower depression scores postpartum compared with the control group.


Discussion: This study aims to provide an intervention that will improve maternal sleep in the postpartum period. If sleep can be effectively improved through a brief psychoeducational program, then it may have a protective role in reducing maternal postpartum depressive symptoms.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

2013 Bosch ASM - Visual neuroscience: Modern challenges and Australian pioneers   View Summary
27 June 2013 to 28 June 2013

The scientific sessions will be in five themes, all pioneered by Bishop and his colleagues:

* Thalamic processing of retinal input
* Parallel processing of visual information
* Physiological optics
* Cortical processing of visual information
* Neural basis of Stereopsis

Hosted by the Bosch Institute

Short course - Fieldwork skills for epidemiological research   View Summary
27 June 2013

This course is designed to address the most common issues that occur when establishing and running epidemiological research projects. The collective research experience of the Respiratory & Environmental Epidemiology (REE) team at the Woolcock combines to provide hands-on and practical ways for new researchers to transfer theoretical knowledge into practice.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute

1st Chemical Proteomics Symposium   View Summary
27 June 2013

Registration and call for abstracts now open. Key speakers from the University of Sydney, Monash University, Griffith University, UNSW and more. Learn about the latest proteomics technology and how mass spectrometry can answer your research questions at the pre-symposium workshop on 19 June.

Hosted by theChildren's Medical ResearchInstitute

July
4th International NanoMedicine Conference   View Summary
1 July 2013 to 3 July 2013

All researchers be they from medicine, chemistry or science that work in the nanomedicine field are acutely aware of the great need to prevent and cure diseases which have emotional, social and economic ramifications. We, either working at the bench or at the bedside, acknowledge that the application of nanotechnology into healthcare offers possibilities in the key areas of

- Target Delivery

-Sensing

- Diagnostics

- Regenerative Medicine

- Imaging

- Translational Medicine

- NanoSafety

Seminar - Sleep health in quadriplegia   View Summary
2 July 2013

Presenters:Professor Peter Cistulli and Dr Peter Singh, Royal North Shore Hospital and Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney

Summary
The Sleep Health In Quadriplegia (SHiQ) Program is a multicentre research program at enhancing our understanding of sleep problems in patients with quadriplegia with a view to developing interventions that enhance quality of life. The presentation will address the rationale and methodology of some of the projects.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Seminar - Protection of the mucosal firewall   View Summary
2 July 2013

Presenter:Dr Gabrielle Belz, Division of Molecular Immunology, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar: Neuroinflammation - A tale of two pathologies   View Summary
5 July 2013

Presenter: Professor Alan Nimmo, Professor Medicine, School of Medicine and Dentistry at James Cook University.

Hosted by the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre

Seminar - Progress towards personalised cancer therapy in chronic myeloid leukaemia   View Summary
9 July 2013

Presenter:Professor Tim Hughes, Head, Department of Haematology, SA Pathology (RAH campus)

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Discrete choice experiment for health services research   View Summary
12 July 2013

Presenter:Dr Marcel Bilger, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School - Singapore

Abstract
The lecture will start by giving an overview of health services research with a greater focus on the contributions made by health economics. This will be followed by a more detailed presentation of a discrete choice experiment (DCE) applied to the preferences for end of life (EOL) cancer care among Singaporeans aged 50 or over. Based on focus group discussions, seven policy-relevant attributes for inclusion in the DCE were selected: severity of pain, amount of care required from family-members or friends, expected length of survival, quality of health care experience, expected cost of treatment from diagnosis to death, source of payment, and place of death. Latent class models were used to estimate the relative intensity of the preference for each attribute and compute the willingness to pay for various improvements in EOL cancer care. Special attention is given on how the cognitive burden of various designs for the DCE influences the preferences stated by the respondents.


About the speaker

Marcel is Assistant Professor & Assistant Director for Education at the Signature Program in Health Services & Systems Research at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School. He previously was a consultant for the Development Research Group at the World Bank and a Research Fellow at the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago. His academic work includes publications in leading journals in health economics, health services research, and medicine as well as a book on health equity and financial protection. Marcel holds a Ph.D. in econometrics from the University of Geneva with a specialization in health economics and policy having completed the international doctoral program from the Swiss School of Public Health.

Hosted by The George Institute for International Health

RSU Continuing Education Program - Clinical trials   View Summary
15 July 2013

This workshop is appropriate for masters and PhD students doing clinical research and for clinicians interested in evidence‐based practice. The workshop requires an understanding of basic statistical concepts (undergraduate level).

Hosted by the Rehabilitation Studies Unit

Faculty leadership and governance forum 2013   View Summary
16 July 2013 to 17 July 2013

Effective faculty leadership and governance are essential to Higher Education sustainability. Realigning goals and objectives is essential to achieve success in these demanding roles. The constant challenges of change and increasing support to key academic and research functions has increased the demand for a professional forum for leaders in Higher Education to engage and enhance their skills to be more effective and dynamic in their roles.

Further information
Seminar - Stem cells and the bad seeds   View Summary
16 July 2013

Presenter:Dr Ingrid Winkler, Head, Stem Cells and Cancer Team, Blood and Bone Diseases Program, Mater Medical Research Institute, QLD

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Symposium - Freezing behaviour in Parkinson's disease: A phenomenon beyond gait?   View Summary
19 July 2013

Freezing of gait is a major cause of disease burden, yet the disorder is poorly understood. New insights into the condition have arisen from novel tests using neuroimaging and other tasks.

Freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease

Freezing behaviour in PD is not restricted to gait and a number of studies have shown that it affects other functional domains including hand movements, operating foot pedals and speech. These findings suggest that the freezing phenomenon reflects a more generalised neural impairment and is not simply the product of motor dysfunction.


A phenomenon beyond gait?

We will be joined by Alice Nieuwboer and members of her laboratory who will speak about their recent, exciting work exploring the mechanisms underlying upper limb freezing and its relationships to functional neuroanatomy.


Sensorimotor impairment

We will also be joined by Quincy Almeida, who will introduce results that question the role of sensorimotor impariment in the pathophysiology of freezing of gait.


Network dysfunction

We will discuss some of our recent experimental findings that have examined the relationship between cognitive deficits and freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease. In addition, we will highlight some new neuroimaging results and determine the extent to which they advance our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease.

Hosted by the Brain & Mind Research Institute

Direct Support Professional Conference 2013   View Summary
22 July 2013 to 23 July 2013

Confirmed keynotes include

•Johnand Connie O'Brien, known internationally for thier ground-breaking work on person-centred approaches
•Associate Professor Vivienne Riches, who will be talking on 'Who Supports the Support Workers'
•Phil Tuckerman, CEO of JobSupport and recognised in the Disability Employment Australia Hall of Fame

Hosted by the Centre for Disability Studies

New minds, fresh discoveries - our public health research   View Summary
23 July 2013

Join us at our bi-annual Research Presentation Day and hear about the impressive research work in public health being undertaken by our early career researchers and research students.

Hosted by the School of Public Health

Seminar - Gestational hypoxia impacts on developmental processes    View Summary
23 July 2013

Full title: Gestational hypoxia impacts on developmental processes and may contribute to the sporadic nature of birth defects

Presenter:Professor Sally Dunwoodie, Head, Embryology Laboratory,Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Electroencephalogram (EEG) biomarkers of neurobehavioural dysfunction   View Summary
23 July 2013

Full title: Electroencephalogram (EEG) biomarkers of neurobehavioural dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea

Presenter:Ms Angela D'Rozario, PhD candidate and CIRUS manager

Bio

After attaining a BSc (Hons) in Applied Biological Sciences, Angela D'Rozario trained as a sleep technologist at St Thomas' Hospital in London before moving to warmer shores. She has worked within the Sleep and Circadian Research Group at the Woolcock Institute since 2004 and is currently in the final year of her PhD. Her research interests include the neurophysiological aspects of sleep and her work is focussed on the analysis of EEG activity and cerebral metabolism during sleep and wake and correlates of neurobehavioural performance in sleep apnea. She also manages the Centre for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep (CIRUS), a NHMRC of Clinical Research Excellence in Interdisciplinary Sleep Health.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Course - Concept Development Workshop for Trials and Translational Research Studies   View Summary
26 July 2013

This one day workshop will help clinical and scientific investigators refine their concept into a proposal for a clinical trial and/or translational research study. It will provide information, advice and guidance on how to develop a concept outline from an initial idea or clinical/scientific question by specifying a suitable aim, objectives, population, interventions, study design, outcome measures, sample size, analysis plan and funding strategy, as well as further tips and hints on developing your proposal into a funding application, letter of intent (LOI) or a full study protocol.

Hosted by the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre

Seminar: The United Nations in Timor-Leste   View Summary
29 July 2013

This session will discuss the role of the United Nations (UN) in the peace building process in Timor-Leste, looking at the differentiated presences of the UN and how it has contributed (or not) to the consolidation of the state. Adopting a critical
approach regarding the UN interventionist model, it is argued that predefined models of intervention are limited in face of challenging contexts. The integration of the local dimension in peacebuilding processes, and the definition of ways of
articulation between formal and informal policies and practices are fundamental. The case of Timor-Leste will serve as an illustration of the challenges faced, lessons learned and possible ways ahead.

Maria Raquel Freire is a researcher at the Centre for Social Studies and tenured professor of International Relations at the School of Economics of the University of Coimbra. Her research interests focus on peace studies, particularly peacekeeping and peacebuilding; foreign policy, international security, Russia and the post-Soviet space.

Hosted by the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies

Seminar - Regulation of Inflammation by the Endothelium   View Summary
30 July 2013

Presenter:Professor Jenny Gamble, Faculty, Vascular Biology Group /Wenkart Chair of Endothelium, Centre for the Endothelium, Centenary Institute

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Effects of sleep deprivation on pain: qEEG biomarkers   View Summary
30 July 2013

Presenter:by Dr Jong-Won Kim, School of Physics, University of Sydney and CIRUS, Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Bio

PhD 2002, Physics in nonlinear dynamics and chaos, Univ. Maryland, USA
2002-2003 research fellow at Max-Plank Institute, Dresden, Germany
2004 research fellow at Arizona state Univ. Arizona, USA
2005-current research fellow at The Univ. of Sydney, Australia
2010-current research fellow at CIRUS Since 2005,
Dr Kim's primary research interest are mathematical modelling of electro-physiological activities of the brain and quantitative analysis of clinical data. In particular, he has been working on identification of qEEG biomarkers in sleep, via close collaborations with CIRUS researchers.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

August
RSU Continuing Education Program - Systematic reviews   View Summary
1 August 2013

The objectives of this workshop are to enable clinicians to: identify and find good quality systemaic reviews, interpret the results of systematic reviews, understand the process involved incompleting a systematic review and start the process of learning how to do their own systematic review.

Hosted by the Rehabilitation Studies Unit

Working together for South Sudan   View Summary
8 August 2013

South Sudan is the world's newest country (2 years old). It has the world's highest maternal mortality ratio (2050 per 100,000 births). The two keynote speakers are coming from South Sudan: the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Juba and the country's Director of Community and Public Health.

6th Sino-Australia Symposium   View Summary
12 August 2013

Translational Research Centres with a focus on heart disease and diabetes, breast/ovarian and gastro-intestinal cancer, and liver disease, looking in particular at organisational issues, bioinformatics, clinical trials and tissue banking.

Inner space: visualising the earth, mind and body   View Summary
15 August 2013

Sydney Ideas and Inspiring Australia presentInner space: visualising the earth, mind and body, adiscussion around how techniques for visualisation continue to revolutionise science and medicine when used in anatomy and pathology and applied to data and complex systems. Join Professor Ian Hickie and Professor John Crawford from the University of Sydney and Dr Kate Patterson from the Garvan Institute at this National Science Week event

2014 Medicine at Sydney: MD explained    View Summary
21 August 2013

Over the past months, we have been working towards the changeover from awarding graduates of our medical program as MBBS to awarding an MD, and are now in the final stages of that process.

 

The dean, Professor Bruce Robinson, and key faculty staff will be available to discuss the Sydney Medical Program and answer questions on the MD or other matters.

 

You can join us in person or online via a webinar below.

 

Medicine at Sydney: MD explained (Session 1)

WHEN: August 21, 4.30-5.30pm (Sydney time)

Where: Norman Gregg Lecture Theatre, Edward Ford Building, Camperdown

OR Online: Webinar link http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/sydney-medical-school-md-explained/


Medicine at Sydney: MD explained (Session 2)

WHEN: August 22, 8-9am (Sydney time)

Where: Norman Gregg Lecture Theatre, Edward Ford Building, Camperdown

OR Online: Webinar link http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/md-program-sms/

 

 

Please note the webinar will also be recorded on made available online shortly afterwards.

Medicine at Sydney: MD explained    View Summary
22 August 2013

Over the past months, we have been working towards the changeover from awarding graduates of our medical program as MBBS to awarding an MD, and are now in the final stages of that process.

The dean, Professor Bruce Robinson, and key faculty staff will be available to discuss the Sydney Medical Program and answer questions on the MD or other matters.

You can join us in person or online via a session below.

Medicine at Sydney: MD explained - Session 1

WHEN:August 21, 4.30-5.30pm (Sydney time)

Where: Norman Gregg Lecture Theatre, Edward Ford Building, Camperdown

OR Online: Webinar link http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/sydney-medical-school-md-explained/

Medicine at Sydney: MD explained - Session 2

WHEN: August 22, 8-9am (Sydney time)

Where: Norman Gregg Lecture Theatre, Edward Ford Building, Camperdown

OR Online: Webinar link http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/md-program-sms/

Please note the webinar will also be recorded on made available online shortly afterwards. Both sessions are the same.

Children's Medical Research Institute student open day   View Summary
23 August 2013

The Children's Medical Research Institute is hosting its first student open day.

Workshop on preclinical molecular imaging   View Summary
26 August 2013

A day of presentations, discussion and exploration, including a round table discussion led by experts in each of four key areas of health and medical research: cardiovascular disease; cancer; mental health and neuroscience; and infectious diseases. Discussions will focus on how these imaging modalities are able to support research in these areas, and what challenges need to be overcome

Workshop - Medical essentials for the non-specialist clinician working with eating disorders   View Summary
27 August 2013
Dr Jennifer Gaudiani,Assistant Medical Director, ACUTE Centre for Eating Disorders, Denver Colorado will present this workshopto bring allied health practitioners, GPs and other medical professionals who are non-specialist in eating disorders up to date with their essential medical knowledge for the management of eating disorder behaviours, like purging and restricting
Webinar - Nosology - what are the mood disorders?    View Summary
29 August 2013

Thu 29 Aug 2013 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Presented by Prof Gin Malhi from Discipline of Psychiatry

This webinar will describe the current descriptions of mood disorders in DSM-5 and how these have been developed. It will critically discuss the benefits and drawbacks of some of the changes that have been made in mood disorders nosology.

September
Seminar - Pre-pregnancy risk factors, complications of pregnancy, and future cardiometabolic risk   View Summary
2 September 2013

Presenter:Dr Erica Gunderson from the Kaiser Permanente Northern California

Further information

Hosted by the Boden Institute

Seminar - The signal recognition particle RNA and its multi-function   View Summary
3 September 2013

Presenter:Dr Sandro F Ataide, Lecturer in Structural Biology, School of Molecular Biosciences

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar: The ARCHER Study   View Summary
3 September 2013

Full title: The ARCHER Study - Adolescent Rural Cohort Study of Hormones, Health, Education, Environment and Relationships

Presenters:Associate Professor Catherine Hawke and Dr Karen Paxton, School of Rural Health

Presentation Summary
The presentation will describe the development of the ARCHER study. ARCHER is an NHMRC funded, multidisciplinary, prospective, longitudinal cohort study of 342 adolescents the Central West of NSW. The overall aim is to determine how changes over time in puberty hormones independently affect the study endpoints that describe universal and risk behaviours, mental health and physical status in adolescents. Data collection involves participant and parent questionnaires, which include questions to document sleep/wake patterns, and sleep disorders in the adolescent' natural sleeping environment as well as anthropometry, blood, urine collection and geocoding. Young people, 10-12 years old, began to be recruited to the study in 2011. The full cohort was established by May 2013 and the study is ongoing.
The presentation will also include results and practical experience from one of the ARCHER pilot studies - the Sleep, Puberty and Depression study - which tested the feasibility of longitudinal collection of biological samples in 13-15 year olds, the use of a sleep diary and actiwatch.

About the speakers

Catherine Hawke is a public health physician and A/Prof in rural health at the University of Sydney, School of Rural Health, in Orange. She is particularly interested in rural adolescent health and is a chief investigator on the ARCHER study. Her other work interests include teaching, building rural research and population health capacity, health services research and tackling inequalities in health.

Karen Paxton joined the School of Rural Health in October 2007 to develop and coordinate the ARCHER Study. 
Karen has a background in rural nursing and midwifery in the public and private sectors. She has also coordinated a number of other research projects with the School of Rural Health and Division's of General Practice. She has keen interest in rural health, adolescent health and qualitative research.

Hosted bythe NHMRC Centre for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep (CIRUS)

Anxiety disorders workshop series   View Summary
5 September 2013

The latest research in the field of Anxiety Disorders has been translated into a workshop series at University of Sydney by 21 leading experts from 12 universities and hospitals across Australia and New Zealand under the CCRE Scheme of National Health and Medical Research Council.

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health disorders, affecting 14.4% of the Australian population. Too much worry and anxiety makes it hard for people to concentrate on their tasks at work and home. People with anxiety disorders need your help, and we can make your help more effective and professional. To help people with anxiety disorders, you must be equipped with the specialised knowledge about effective pharmacological and non-pharmacological evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders. The theoretical basis and the application of these treatments are required knowledge for a broad range of health professionals.

If you see patients or clients with anxiety disorders and want to keep up-to-date, or if you are looking to become specialised in this area, this workshop series is right for you.

Presenters: Dr Juliette Drobny, Professor Philip Boyce and Associate Professor Anthony Harris, Discipline of Psychiatry

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry

ANZAC Research Institute 13th annual symposium - Frontiers in bone biology and osteoporosis research   View Summary
6 September 2013

Keynote speakers: Professor Roland Baron from Harvard Medical School and Professor Clifford Rosen from Maine Medical Centre.

Contemporary treatment approaches for anxiety disorders course   View Summary
6 September 2013 to 7 September 2013

This anxiety treatment training course is designed for health professionals who wish to learn how to treat anxiety disorders using evidence-based approaches. This course will cover behaviour therapy, cognitive therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy and pharmacotherapy, and will be delivered in a classroom setting using peer-reviewed and evidence-based course materials. Course contributors include A/Prof. Rocco Crino, Dr. Juliette Drobny, A/Prof. Ross Menzies, A/Prof. Michelle Moulds, Prof. Helen Christensen, A/Prof. Vladan Starcevic, Prof. Philip Boyce and A/Prof. Anthony Harris. Professionally designed PowerPoint slides and case study video clips will be used in the training. Active input from the participants is expected. Course outline, PowerPoint slides and examination paper (for self-evaluation) will be provided to participants in printed format.

Presenters: Dr Juliette Drobny, Professor Philip Boyce and Associate Professor Anthony Harris, Discipline of Psychiatry

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry

Seminar - Towards antibacterials without resistance   View Summary
10 September 2013

Presenter:Professor Jennifer Martin, ARC Australian Laureate Fellow, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Obstructive sleep apnea & erectile dysfunction: The results of the CPAPED2 study   View Summary
10 September 2013

Presenters:Ms Kerri Melehan PhD Scholar/Senior Sleep Scientist, Woolcock Institute and RPA

Presentation Summary
The CPAPED2 study is a multi-centre NHMRC funded double blind double placebo randomised control trial which I have been doing as the major component of my PhD. Data presented will be the results of this study regarding efficacy of both CPAP and Vardenafil (a PDE-5 inhibitor used for ED) on sexual function, as well as relationship satisfaction & quality of life, in men with OSA and ED. Some data will also be presented on endothelial function in a subset in this population.

About the speaker

After undergrad degrees in Accounting and Occupational Health and Safety, fell into a job as a sleep technician in 1997, became Registered Polysomnographic Technologist 1998, working at several private and public sleep labs in Sydney, and at Middlesex Hospital, London. Have been working with the Woolcock Institute since 2001, and graduated with Masters of Respiratory Science in 2005, with research on sleep disordered breathing across the menstrual cycle. Currently the senior sleep scientist at Royal Prince Alfred hospital and in final year of PhD. Also one of the co-ordinators of the annual Sleep Medicine course at University of Sydney, and involved with ensuring continuing educational opportunities for sleep scientists.

Hosted bythe NHMRC Centre for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep (CIRUS)

Seminar - Endothelial junctions in vascular permeability control and leukocyte extravasation   View Summary
10 September 2013

Presenter:Dietmar Vestweber, Professor for Cell Biology, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Biomedicine, Munich, Germany

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Lecture - The science, business and future of antibody pharmaceuticals   View Summary
11 September 2013

Speaker: Sir Greg Winter

Sir Greg Winter pioneered techniques that have led to antibody therapies for cancer, and diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. He has established hugely successful spin out companies, including Cambridge Antibody Technology and Domantis, and continues to develop new types of drugs. His technologies are involved in around 65 per cent of marketed antibody drugs today, including Humira and Herceptin.


While his science has gone on to be applied on an extraordinary scale, Greg sees himself foremost as an academic.He remains deeply committed to basic science, as a long-term investment in medical progress. He has argued extensively of the importance of scientists and clinicians interacting with each other and with business, free from bureaucratic fetters.


In 2012 Sir Gregory was installed as Master of Trinity College, Cambridge.

RSVP:Registration essential

CHERI conference - Achieving effective outcomes: language, learning and literacy   View Summary
12 September 2013 to 13 September 2013

'L' plates for language? We don't receive a drivers licence for communication, yet there is no doubt that we develop new skills as we develop language and literacy skills, and that educators and families play a major role in society as 'communication' driving instructors.

Seminar - Positive and negative selection in the germinal centre   View Summary
17 September 2013

Presenter:Associate Professor Rob Brink, Head, Immunological Diseases Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Symposium - Centre for Air quality and health Research and evaluation (CAR)    View Summary
19 September 2013 to 25 September 2013

CAR is excited to announce that there will be three international guest speakers;

Professor C. Arden Pope, III of Brigham University U.S.A

Professor Ross Anderson University of London & Kings College London

Professor Bert Brunekreef of Utrecht University, The Netherlands


These speakers were engaged by the World Health Organisation for the 2013 Review of Evidence on Health Aspects of Air Pollution Report, REVIHAAP

19 - 20 September: Air quality workshops & public forum

23 - 24 September:Community and scientific engagement forum & public forum

25 September:Air pollution and health research: policy & planning


Program
Short course in critical infection    View Summary
20 September 2013 to 21 September 2013

This 2‐day course provides a first‐principles understanding of the major infections that precipitate or complicate critical illness, as well as a focus on the practical management of scenarios that are unique to it.

Topics include:
- Bacterial, fungal and viral physiology and ecology
- Antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals - how to use and when to stop
- New Antimicrobials and new takes on old drugs
- Septic shock; severe pneumonia; meningitis/ Encephalitis
- Approach to the infected transplant patient; neutropaenic sepsis
- Case-based topics with expert panel reviews
- How a micro lab really works
- Exotic infections, biothreats and the returned traveller

Hosted by the Centre for Research Excellence in Critical Infection

Seminar - Determinants of breast cancer phenotype   View Summary
24 September 2013

Presenter:Associate Professor Chris Ormandy, Laboratory Head, Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - The future of treating cancer   View Summary
27 September 2013

Presenter: Professor Ian Olver, CEO, Cancer Council Australia

Summary

Personalised medicine is the tailoring of treatment to individual patients by use of genetic or other information. The paradigm shift in new treatments for cancer is the advent of antibodies or small molecules targeted at gene mutations and their products, which drive the growth of cancer cells. Radiotherapy and surgery are also being better targeted. Conventional cytotoxic therapy kills both cancer and normal tissue cells leading to a range of side effects. The targets for new therapies are not found on normal cells. The first of the targeted therapies was tamoxifen which targeted the oestrogen receptor, discovered in 1967. There was some good fortune in the targeted therapies first brought to clinic, in that they did target driving mutations. Glivec proved effective in GIST tumours and CML. Herceptin revolutionised the treatment of breast cancer. Now there are scores of these new agents in development.
There are, however, challenges ahead. The new drugs are expensive as is testing for the genetic target. The side effects are different but cannot be ignored and after initially success the problem of resistance is emerging. The heterogeneity of solid tumours will require mean blocking multiple and changing targets.

About the presenter

Professor Ian Olver is a medical oncologist and researcher who has been CEO of Cancer Council Australia for seven years after serving at Royal Adelaide Hospital for 15 years, where he was Clinical Director of RAH Cancer Centre. Professor Olver has published 220 papers in the medical literature and written several books. He currently chairs the Australian Health Ethics Committee of NHMRC and serves on NHMRC Council and on the Advisory Council of Cancer Australia. In 2008 he was awarded the Cancer Achievement Award by the Medical Oncology Group of Australia, and was awarded Membership of the Order of Australia (AM) in 2011 for service to medical oncology.

Hosted by the Faculty of Pharmacy

Conference - Global Health and The Law: Incorporating Theory into Practice   View Summary
30 September 2013 to 1 October 2013

With papers addressing health and human rights, gene patenting, communicable and non-communicable diseases, health tourism, surrogacy and cross border reproduction, and the global regulation of therapeutics, this interdisciplinary conference will explore the role for law in supporting and promoting global health.

The conference is being presented by Sydney Law School's Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics in cooperation with the Sydney Medical School's Centre for Values, Ethics & Law in Medicine.

October
Conference - Global Health and The Law: Incorporating Theory into Practice   View Summary
30 September 2013 to 1 October 2013

With papers addressing health and human rights, gene patenting, communicable and non-communicable diseases, health tourism, surrogacy and cross border reproduction, and the global regulation of therapeutics, this interdisciplinary conference will explore the role for law in supporting and promoting global health.

The conference is being presented by Sydney Law School's Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics in cooperation with the Sydney Medical School's Centre for Values, Ethics & Law in Medicine.

Seminar - Fine print of the human genome   View Summary
1 October 2013

Presenter:Dr Tim Mercer, Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Health Professionals' Health Conference (HPHC) 2013: caring for you; caring for others   View Summary
3 October 2013 to 5 October 2013

Recognising the role of medical education in the establishment of positive health behaviours for medical students, this conference will provide a forum for open discussion between educators and experts in doctors' health.

Seminar - Resident evil or friendly passenger? Lessons from human herpes viruses   View Summary
8 October 2013

Presenter:Dr Mainthan Palendira, Group Leader, Immunology Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Sleep apnea and kidney function   View Summary
8 October 2013

Presenters:Professor Patrick Hanly, Medical Director, Sleep Centre, Foothills Medical Centre, Professor of Medicine, University of Calgary

Hosted bythe NHMRC Centre for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep (CIRUS)

Seminar - Persuading grant reviewers to fund your study   View Summary
11 October 2013

Presented by Professor Martin Stockler, co-director of cancer trials at the CTC, director of cancer trials NSW at the Cancer Council of NSW, and professor in the Department of Medicine and School of Public Health, University of Sydney.

Martin Stockler is a clinical epidemiologist and educator with special interests in: the design, execution, analysis and synthesis of cancer clinical trials; quality of life and preference as outcome measures in cancer clinical trials; evidence-based medicine in clinical practice and medical education and patient-doctor communication; and genitourinary and breast cancer. He is a consultant medical oncologist at the Sydney Cancer Centre, RPA and Concord hospitals.

Take control of your worry workshop   View Summary
14 October 2013 to 28 October 2013

This psychoeducation course is a 3-week structured program designed for those who wish to apply proven effective strategies to gain control of their excessive worry and anxiety.

Presenter: Dr Lisa Lampe, Disicpline of Psychiatry

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry

Emerging Health Policy Research Conference   View Summary
14 October 2013

The Menzies Centre for Health Policy is delighted to invite you to register for the 8th annual Emerging Health Policy Research Conference. The conference will showcase the work in progress of current masters, doctoral and early career research workers, as well as those new to the field of health policy research.

55th Lambie Dew Oration   View Summary
15 October 2013

The Lambie Dew Oration is the premier event on the Sydney University Medical Society calendar. Held annually in honour of Professor Charles Lambie and Professor Harold Dew, the first permanent Chairs of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Sydney, the Oration draws current students and staff, alumni and community members to hear a speaker who has made a significant contribution to health through his or her career.

In 2013, the Oration will be delivered by Helen Clark, Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme and former Prime Minister of New Zealand.

For more information and to register, please visit lambiedew.com or contact the convenors at lambiedew@sydneymedsoc.org.au

Hosted by the Sydney University Medical Society

Seminar: Hepatitis C virus - lipid interaction: why does it matter?   View Summary
15 October 2013

Presenter:Professor Maggie Bassendine, Professor of Hepatology, Newcastle University, UK

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

8th Conference on Global Health and Vaccination Research   View Summary
16 October 2013 to 17 October 2013

In conjunction with the 25th Anniversary of the Centre for International Health at The University of Bergen.

The conference will present Norwegian and international implementation andhealth systems research. The key question at the conference is how we can improve health service delivery in low and middle-income countries?

Conference website
Seminar - The dual burden of disease: Issues of sustainability   View Summary
17 October 2013

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Workshop - Disability employment case management: The client side   View Summary
17 October 2013

Case management in disability employment is often focused on compliance, however it ignores the basic fact that unless you manage the client relationship, there is no outcome. This program focuses on the client side and will assist staff to develop sound client case management skills. Like all aspects of human services, it's about understanding the real person and developing a trusting respectful relationship.

Hosted by the Centre for Disability Studies

Workshop: Person centred employment practices   View Summary
18 October 2013

Hosted by the Centre for Disability Studies

Seminar:The impact of early stopping rules in clinical trials on the estimation of treatment benefit   View Summary
18 October 2013

Presenter:Professor Stephen Walter, Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Canada

Abstract
Stopping rules for clinical trials control Type I error rates when interim analyses are planned, but little attention has been paid to the associated bias in the estimated treatment effect. This presentation will discuss an analytic approach to issues such as over-estimation of the treatment effect in studies stopped for apparent benefit and the overall bias in a single study with a stopping rule, and implications for meta-analyses. We will also compare the theoretical results with some empirical literature on this question. We conclude that investigators should definitely be concerned about the potential for bias in single studies, but we find that an essentially unbiased estimate of treatment effect can be obtained in meta-analysis, if multiple studies are available.


About the speaker

Professor Stephen Walter received his Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh. After faculty appointments at the University of Ottawa and Yale University, he joined the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at McMaster University, where he is now a Professor Emeritus. Prof. Walter has collaborated with clinicians in internal medicine, evidence-based medicine and developmental pediatrics, and with epidemiologists working in environmental health, cancer etiology and screening. He is interested in several areas of biostatistical methodology, including: design and analysis of medical research studies; risk assessment; evaluation of diagnostic and screening data; and regional and temporal variation in health. He has published widely on these topics (with over 400 refereed papers) in the biomedical and statistical literature.
Professor Walter is a past Editor of the American Journal of Epidemiology, and Section Editor for the Wiley Encyclopedia of Biostatistics. He served as Chair of Biostatistics in the International Clinical Epidemiology Network (INCLEN), and has been extensively involved with research capacity development in Asia, Latin America and Africa. He is a past coordinator of the Health Research Methods program at McMaster, and has worked with about 100 Masters and Ph.D.
students.

Hosted by The George Institute for International Health

Dr J Joan Sheppard 2013 Sydney Workshops   View Summary
22 October 2013 to 24 October 2013

Hosted by the Centre for Disability Studies

Seminar: Eph RTK: potential targets in cancer and other diseases   View Summary
22 October 2013

Presenter:Professor Andrew Boyd, Senior Professorial Research Fellow, Queensland Institute of Medical Research

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Introduction to principles and applications of mass cytometry   View Summary
23 October 2013

Presenter:Tad George Phd, Senior Director, Scientific Applications, DVS Sciences Inc

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

6th COGNO Annual Scientific Meeting   View Summary
25 October 2013 to 26 October 2013

Theme: 'Neuro-oncology in the young adult'

Autism in DSM 5: Implications for assessment practices   View Summary
25 October 2013

Learn about changes to autism spectrum disorder classification in DSM 5, recent research into the possible implications of the changes on diagnostic practices and decision-making, and social communication disorder.

Presented by Vicki Gibbs, Clinical Psychologist at the Specialist Diagnostic Assessment Service Unit, Aspect.

Places are strictly limited, RSVP is essential: http://sydney.edu.au/bmri/register

Workshop: Easy English: an introduction   View Summary
25 October 2013

Hosted by the Centre for Disability Studies

Seminar - Radiotracers for neuro research   View Summary
25 October 2013

Gain a better understanding of molecular imaging for neuroscience, psychiatry and pharmacology, and learn more about radiotracer availabilities.

More information

Hosted by the Brain & Mind Research Institute

Info session - Advanced imaging and visualisation in research   View Summary
28 October 2013

The Multi-modal Australian ScienceS Imaging and Visualisation Environment (MASSIVE) is Australia's specialised high performance computing facility for imaging and visualisation. The facility provides the hardware, software and expertise to drive research in biomedical science, materials research, engineering and geoscience.

More information

Hosted by the Brain & Mind Research Institute

2013 Association of Pacific Rim Universities Global Health Workshop   View Summary
29 October 2013 to 1 November 2013

This year's workshop will explore a range of global health issues that tie us together in our shared Pacific Rim region. Discussion topics will cover the global burden of disease, cardiovascular disease mortality, aging, obesity epidemic, climate change, global health education, research ethics education and trade in the Pacific Rim.

Seminar: Synergism between influenza virus and streptococcus pneumoniae   View Summary
29 October 2013

Full title: Synergism between influenza virus and treptococcus pneumoniae: Virus induced inflammation drives pneumococcal disease and transmission

Presenter:Dr Odilia Wijburg, Senior Lecturer, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

World Summit on Rural Generalist Medicine   View Summary
30 October 2013 to 31 October 2013

There is growing recognition of Rural Generalist Medicine as a distinctive form of expansive generalist practice upon which rural communities rely. People in rural and remote areas have always depended on doctors who provide comprehensive primary care in their communities along with hospital, emergency and population health care and extended specialised service.

Seminar - Heat shock protein 72: a panacea for disease prevention?    View Summary
31 October 2013

Hosted by the Bosch Institute

November
2013 Association of Pacific Rim Universities Global Health Workshop   View Summary
29 October 2013 to 1 November 2013

This year's workshop will explore a range of global health issues that tie us together in our shared Pacific Rim region. Discussion topics will cover the global burden of disease, cardiovascular disease mortality, aging, obesity epidemic, climate change, global health education, research ethics education and trade in the Pacific Rim.

Contemporary treatment approaches for anxiety disorders course   View Summary
1 November 2013 to 2 November 2013

This anxiety treatment training course is designed for health professionals who wish to learn how to treat anxiety disorders using evidence-based approaches. This course will cover behaviour therapy, cognitive therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy and pharmacotherapy, and will be delivered in a classroom setting using peer-reviewed and evidence-based course materials. Course contributors include A/Prof. Rocco Crino, Dr. Juliette Drobny, A/Prof. Ross Menzies, A/Prof. Michelle Moulds, Prof. Helen Christensen, A/Prof. Vladan Starcevic, Prof. Philip Boyce and A/Prof. Anthony Harris. Professionally designed PowerPoint slides and case study video clips will be used in the training. Active input from the participants is expected. Course outline, PowerPoint slides and examination paper (for self-evaluation) will be provided to participants in printed format.

Presenters: Dr Juliette Drobny, Professor Philip Boyce and Associate Professor Anthony Harris, Discipline of Psychiatry

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry

PC4 Symposium 2013   View Summary
1 November 2013

The Symposium will provide a forum for those interested in cancer research and primary care to showcase their work, to share ideas and expertise, and to network with people with similar interests.

Registration closes 25 October 2013.

Workshop - Thinking of applying for project grant funding from Cancer Council NSW?   View Summary
4 November 2013

The workshop will explain our grant assessment process and the integral role of consumers in it, and discuss how you can effectively make the best use of consumers in your research. We will also describe the application process in detail, including how to complete the Consumer Review Form to increase your chances of success. The workshop will finish with a substantial question-and-answer session, so we welcome you to come prepared with questions.

Seminar: Transcriptional control of erythropoiesis   View Summary
5 November 2013

Presenter:Professor Andrew Perkins, Head of Blood and Bone Disease, Mater Research, University of Queensland

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Australian Smoking Cessation Conference 2013   View Summary
6 November 2013 to 8 November 2013

"Translating the science into clinical practice"

Worldwide Universities Network colloquium   View Summary
6 November 2013

"Understanding the overlap between infectious and non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries"

South Africa is undergoing epidemiological and demographic transition with rapidly changing disease patterns over a relatively short period of time. Adapting to these changes challenges the health care system with respect to optimizing healthcare delivery and prioritization of allocation of limited resources.

It is well understood that South Africa has extremely high levels of HIV and TB. Additionally, mortality and morbidity from non-communicable diseases, such as diabetes, is high and increasing. The changing pattern of population health has resulted in the co-existence of multiple infectious and non-communicable disease morbidities within an individual becoming the norm and occurring in younger age groups compared to developed countries. Furthermore, with the rollout of antiretroviral therapy, survival and ageing among HIV-infected persons is increasingly common. Data is emerging that co-existence of infectious and non-communicable disease morbidities attenuates and can exacerbates clinical manifestation and disease pathology.

This scenario represents an unprecedented public health challenge and calls for a new understanding of epidemiological changes including temporal trends in disease patterns and a re-thinking of models of healthcare delivery. We propose a paradigm shift that takes into account disease interactions, health provider and patient perspectives informing health system priorities for healthcare delivery.

Facilitated by Worldwide Universities Network seed funding, we are hosting a colloquium that presents this framework and explores the different perspectives. Through discussion sessions in the colloquium, we aim to explore views on pertinent issues in NCD/infectious disease co-morbidity in addition to identifying research priorities, neglected areas, and gaps in knowledge.

For further information, or if you wish to attend, contact Tolullah Oni tolullah.oni@uct.ac.za

Seminar - Myth or magic: the Singapore healthcare system    View Summary
6 November 2013

Presenter: Dr Jeremy Lim, Principal Consultant, Health Associates

Abstract

There is tremendous interest in the Singapore healthcare system, largely because of Singapore's impressive health statistics (healthiest country in the world [Bloomberg], 6th highest ranked health system [WHO], 4th highest life expectancy [WHO] etc.) despite spending less than a quarter as a percentage of GDP of what the United States of America spends. Singapore also boasts the world's only functioning national health savings account model and the Medisave scheme has attracted widespread policy and academic interest in Singapore's healthcare system. This interest has surged in recent years as countries around the world struggle to provide healthcare to its citizens in this age of austerity. At the same time, critics of the Singapore model decry that "it is better to die than to fall sick in Singapore" and bitterly criticize the co-payment and explicit rationing that are central pillars of the ideology of the Singapore system. Where does the truth lie? The presentation will explore the political philosophy of the Singapore health system, demonstrate how this shapes financing and delivery and examine the lessons, positive and negative for other health systems grappling with healthcare reform.

Biography

Dr Jeremy Lim is Principal Consultant Insights Health Associates, a specialist healthcare advisory firm. He has held senior level executive roles in the Singapore public and private sectors. He is also active in academia, holding appointments in a number of universities and writes regularly for both the scientific and popular media. Dr. Lim is a sought-after advisor and speaker for his insights into health systems reform in Singapore and the region. He is the author of 'Myth or Magic: The Singapore Healthcare System' a book on the Singapore health system and the lessons for health reform efforts in other countries. Dr. Lim is chair of the steering committee for NIHA (NUS Initiative to Improve Health in Asia), an initiative to strengthen health policy research and education in Asia, Member, International Advisory Board, Health Authority Abu Dhabi and Board Member, Advisory Council Behavioral Sciences Institute, Singapore Management University. He also contributes as Secretary of the College of Public Health and Occupational Physicians, Academy of Medicine Singapore, President of the Fulbright Association (Singapore) and lead for the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Singapore alumni.

RSVP: to Stacey Young on (02) 9351 5622 or Stacey.young@sydney.edu.au or Henry Ko on henry.ko@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Annual Nepean Scientific Day 2013   View Summary
8 November 2013

The Clinician Investigator: How to do good research despite time constraints

Seminar - What's the T in T3 and how can it get me research dollars?   View Summary
8 November 2013
This seminar explores the nature of dissemination studies, from an introduction to translational research right up to applying it in implementation science studies and grant applications.
Seminar - The Emotiv EPOC EEG system for research   View Summary
12 November 2013

Presenters:Dr Nicholas Badcock, ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Macquarie University

Nic Badcock completed a BSc and an M/PsychPhD in Applied Developmental Psychology at the University of Western Australia. His PhD examined the application of the 'attentional blink' paradigm to developmental populations as well as in developmental disorders. Following this, Nic worked as a lecturer at Curtin University of Technology before completing a postdoc at Oxford University. In Oxford, Nic used transcranial Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the lateralisation of language processing in specific language impairment. In 2011, Nic moved to Sydney to take up a postdoctoral research fellowship in the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, exploring temporal attention in reading disorders.

Hosted bythe NHMRC Centre for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep (CIRUS)

Lecture - Obesity epidemic: the influence of the parents   View Summary
13 November 2013

Presented by Doctor Virginie Lecomte, the talk will be given in French with slides in English.

20th Hong Kong International Cancer Conference   View Summary
14 November 2013 to 15 November 2013

Theme: New Horizons in Cancer Care

DSM-5 workshop   View Summary
16 November 2013

This DSM-5 training course is designed for psychiatrists, clinical psychologists and other mental health professionals who are interested in psychopathology and diagnostic issues and wish to learn how the new edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) may affect their clinical practice.

Presenter: Associate Professor Vladan Starcevic, Disicpline of Psychiatry

Hosted by the Discipline of Psychiatry

2013 New horizons: Research and education for optimal health conference   View Summary
18 November 2013 to 20 November 2013

The program is focused on ensuring that our research has impact on health, broadening the partnerships beyond basic laboratory research to include the full spectrum from bench to bedside to the community at large and the health service itself.

Seminar: Novel mechanisms of lymphatic vascular development from zebrafish genetics   View Summary
19 November 2013

Presenter:Dr Ben Hogan, Group Leader, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Associations between infants' sleep EEG and their development   View Summary
19 November 2013

Presenter:Dr Mangalam Sankupellay, University of Queensland

Hosted bythe NHMRC Centre for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep (CIRUS)

The Second Annual Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre Symposium   View Summary
22 November 2013

A multi-disciplinary meeting for clinicians & researchers aimed at improving cancer outcomes through evidence and collaboration.

Conference - Big change: Sustainable healthcare for the 21st century   View Summary
22 November 2013 to 23 November 2013

The challenge of providing affordable healthcare to all who need it is the focus of this major international event being hosted by The George Institute for Global Health and the Entrepreneurship Centre at the University of Oxford.

Seminar: Clinical trials for spinal cord injury; time to move   View Summary
22 November 2013

Presenter:Professor Sarah Dunlop, Head of School, Animal Biology, Head of Experimental & Regenerative Neurosciences, The University of Western Australia.

Hosted by theChildren's Medical ResearchInstitute

Conference: Australian Society of Performing Arts Healthcare   View Summary
23 November 2013 to 24 November 2013

Theme: Fit to Perform: Healthy Careers for Performing Artists

Seminar - The role of Sphingosine 1-phosphate in cancer: gaining a sense of translation   View Summary
25 November 2013

Presenter:Professor Nigel Pyne, Molecular Pharmacology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Craniofacial development and disease   View Summary
29 November 2013

Presenter:Professor Paul Trainor, Investigator, Stowers Institute for Medical Research; Professor, Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology, The University of Kansas School of Medicine

Hosted by the Children'sMedical ResearchInstitute

December
8th Asian Aerosol Conference   View Summary
2 December 2013 to 3 December 2013

The conference will explore a range of topics encompassing the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols and their impact on the environment and society in diverse areas such as climate, air quality, health, energy, and materials.

Seminar - Novel matricellular proteins involved in tumor angiogenesis and tissue regeneration   View Summary
3 December 2013

Presenter:Professor Beat A Imhof, Department of Pathology and Immunology, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Workshop - Medication management in supported living settings   View Summary
6 December 2013

Session 1 9am - 12: 30pm (registration from 8.30am)
Session 2 1:30pm - 5pm(registration from 1pm)

Hosted by the Centre for Disability Studies

Seminar - Muscle mass maintenance in the elderly   View Summary
12 December 2013

Presenter: Professor Luc van Loon from Maastricht University

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre